Glossary of People
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M. de LangezMacarMacariusMacrinusMadeleine de ValoisMaeldub (Maildulf, Medulphus)Magnus Maximus (Maximian)Malcolm FlemingMalgoManius Acilius AureolusMappalicusMarc' Antonio Sabellico (Coccio)MarcellaMarcellinus (St Marcellinus)MarcellusMarcellus Cresentius (i.e. Marcello Crescenzio)Marcellus I (St Marcellus)MarciaMarcianMarcion of PontusMarcusMarcus Æmilius ÆmilianusMarcus (St Marcus)Marcus Annaeus LucanMarcus ArethusiusMarcus AureliusMarcus Aurelius ProbusMarcus Furius CamillusMarcus Marulus (Marko Marulić)Marcus Salvius OthoMarcus Tullius CiceroMargaret AmbsworthMargaret BakerMargaret BiddelMargaret BowgasMargaret BrayMargaret CarelessMargaret ChooteMargaret CootesfoteMargaret EllisMargaret FieldMargaret Grey (née Fynche, formerly Curteys)Margaret Grey (née Wotton; Medley)Margaret HideMargaret NixonMargaret SmithMargaret SmithMargaret SnowballMargaret TaylorMargaret ThurstonMargaret TracyMargaret von EmmersonMargaret WilyMargaret [Bradford]Margery AustooMargery CookeMargery GoytMargery KirryMargery MearingMargery MoriceMargery MorrisMargery PolleyMargery SuttonMarguerite de ValoisMarianus ScotusMarinusMarinus and ArchemiusMarinus I (Martinus II)Marinus of ArlesMarion Matthew (or Westden)MariusMark BurgesMarkesMarraunt HaynesMarshallMarsilius of PaduaMartial de Loménie (Lomenius)MartialisMartin AlgateMartin BalburMartin BalfourMartin BradbridgeMartin BucerMartin BucerMartin DonamMartin HuntMartin JohnsonMartin LutherMartin LutherMartin NewmanMartin PugsonMartin V (Oddone Colonna)Martina (St Martina)Mary Fitzroy (née Howard)Mary GloverMary HoneywoodMary MarloweMary of GuiseMary of HungaryMary Queen of ScotsMary TaylorMasseyMassyMaster BestonMaster BinghamMaster BoyerMaster BrookeMaster BurleyMaster Butler the ElderMaster CambridgeMaster ChidleyMaster DavidMaster FillesMaster GoodwinMaster HamptonMaster KemptonMaster LyonsMaster MaynardMaster MongerMaster MosleyMaster PerryMaster RiderMaster S.Master SparkeMaster TamageMaster TurnerMaster UchiltrieMaster WickesMaternusMatilda (Edith, Mold, Matilda of Scotland)Matteo BandelloMatthew BirdMatthew ButlerMatthew GraftonMatthew HarbottleMatthew Hound (de Hound)Matthew Mackerell (Makkarell)Matthew ParisMatthew ParkerMatthew ParkerMatthew ParkerMatthew PlaiseMatthew RicarbyMatthew StewartMatthew WardMatthew WhiteMatthew WythersMatthias Flacius IllyricusMatthieu CauchesMaturusMaud (Matilda) Lane (nèe Parr)MauriceMaurice (Flavius Mauricius Tiberius Augustus)Maurice (Mauritius) (St Maurice)Maurice GriffithMaurice GriffithMaurus Magnentius RabanusMaxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius)Maxima, Donatilla and SecundaMaximianus, Malchus, Martianus, Dionysius, Ioannes, Serapion and ConstantinusMaximinusMaximinusMaximinus DaiaMaximinus ThraxMaximinusOfficerMaximus and UrbanusMaximus of AlexandriaMaximus, Diostorus, Demetrius and LuciusMazabanesMelanciaMeletiusMelgaMelito of SardisMellitus (St Mellitus)Menas (St Menas)Menas and EugraphusMeniatusMercuriaMeredith ap ThomasMerewalhMerifieldMerlin (Myddin)MetrasMetrodorusMichael AnsteyMichael Drome (Drumme)Michael DunningMichael HawkesMichael LobleyMichael RenigerMichael TrunchfieldMichelMichele Antonio of SaluzzoMildburg (St Milburga)Mildrith (St Mildred)Miles CoverdaleMiles CoverdaleMiles GarnetMiles Huggarde (or Hoggarde)Miles SpencerMilguidaMillerMillesMiltiadesMiltiades (or Melchiades)MingsMinucius FundanusMistress BarberMistress BirdMistress CheekMistress HarrisMistress IrishMistress MondayMistress NevellMistress PonderMistress ShakerleyMistress WalterMonsieur VincentMontanusMorgan PhilippsMorgan Phillips (Philipps)MortonJamesMosesMother BenetMother BeriffMother BirlinghamMother FenkelMother HalleMother PalmerMother PikeMother SemonMoyseMr ArmstrongMr BaconMr BakerMr BrookMr ChapmanMr DoncasterMr DownesMr EdgarMr EdneyMr EveredMr FrankMr FrostMr GibsonMr GreenMr GreenwayMr HorneMr HunterMr HuntingtonMr JohnsonMr JohnsonMr MachelMr MalteMr MartinMr PagetMr ParkerMr PopeMr SelyardMr SmithMr StaffortonMr TracyMr WaghanMr WallerMr WarrenMrs Alexander AndrewMrs AlgateMrs ArgentineMrs AshdonMrs BakerMrs BarkerMrs BeckesMrs BenetMrs BennettMrs BirdMrs BlomfieldMrs BlomfieldMrs BosomeMrs BrageMrs BridgesMrs BrightMrs BrisleyMrs BrokeMrs BurlinghamMrs BushMrs BustreMrs ByshopMrs CallawayMrs CarltonMrs CastleMrs CatchpoolMrs ChamberlainMrs ChambersMrs ClarkeMrs ClervisMrs ColeMrs ColemanMrs CookeMrs CooperMrs CrossmanMrs DisselMrs EttisMrs FettyMrs FilmerMrs FinnMrs FisherMrs FrebarneMrs FreeseMrs FreeseMrs GlavesMrs GreeneMrs GreenwichMrs GreenwichMrs GroveMrs HammonMrs HarlstoneMrs HearstMrs HenrisonMrs HollonMrs HubbardMrs HurstMrs IngforbyMrs JordaneMrs LatimerMrs LaurenceMrs LedleyMrs ManMrs MantellMrs MarbeckMrs MarshMrs MatthewMrs MaulingMrs MayMrs MilesMrs MungeyMrs OguleMrs PalmerMrs PierrpointMrs PinchbeckeMrs PlatteMrs PotkinMrs RamseyMrs RawlinsMrs RichmanMrs RichmondMrs RobertsMrs RoughtMrs SavageMrs ShalcrossMrs SheterdenMrs Sheterden, SeniorMrs SimpsonMrs SmithMrs SmithMrs SwaineMrs SwallowMrs TankerfieldMrs Thomas HawkesMrs ThorpeMrs TollyMrs TrevisamMrs TyeMrs TymsMrs WatsMrs WhiteMrs WhoodlesMrs WilestoneMrs WilsonMrs WimshurstMrs WolseyMrs WrightMrs. BabingtonMrs. PersonsMrs. Richard BradshawMrs. Thomas RichardsonMrs.BradfordMulleinMussius AemilianusMyllesMyrrell
Glossary of People in the 1583 Edition | M
M. de Langez

Councillor to François I

The ambassador to France, Edward Fox, was given instructions by Henry VIII to distribute books declaring the justness of Henry's cause to bishops M. de Langez and other members of François I's council. 1570, p. 1220; 1576, p. 1044; 1583, p. 1071.

1583 Edition, page 1095
Macar

b. Libya; C3 martyr under Decius at Alexandria

Macar refused to deny his faith and was burnt. 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 62.

1583 Edition, page 85
Macarius

Leading Arian proponent C4 [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Julius I]

Head of Arian representatives to Julius I

Macarius sought the judgement of Julius I. 1570, p. 23; 1576, p. 18; 1583, p. 18.

1583 Edition, page 41
Macrinus

(c. 165 - 218) [M. L. Meckler www.roman-emperors.org]

Bureaucrat; praetorian prefect under Caracalla

Roman emperor (217 - 218); captured and executed, as was his son Diadumenianus

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 39, 83; 1576, pp. 31, 57; 1583, pp. 31, 57.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 80[Back to Top]
Madeleine de Valois

(1520 - 1537) [ODNB]

Queen of Scots, consort of James V; 2nd daughter, 4th child of François I of France

François I married his daughter to James V of Scotland, breaking an agreement with Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

1583 Edition, page 1112
Maeldub (Maildulf, Medulphus)

(supp. fl. mid-C7) [ODNB]

Abbot; may have been eponymous founder and 1st abbot of the monastery of Malmesbury

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 1349; 1576, p. 1151; 1583, p. 1180.

1583 Edition, page 1204
Magnus Maximus (Maximian)

(d. 388) [ODNB; W. E. Roberts www.roman-emperors.org]

Spaniard; general of the field army in Britain in 380; acclaimed emperor by the troops in 383

Defeated Gratian; recognised as augustus in 384; ruled Britain, Gaul, Spain and Africa; executed after he invaded Italy

He took troops out of Britain to fight in other countries. 1570, p. 153; 1576, p. 115; 1583, p. 114.

1583 Edition, page 131 | 1583 Edition, page 137
Malcolm Fleming

(c. 1494 - 1547) [ODNB sub James Fleming, 4th Lord Fleming]

3rd Lord Fleming; chamberlain to James V by 1528; captured at Solway Moss and imprisoned in the Tower; pledged to support policies of Henry VIII; killed at Pinkie

Malcolm Fleming sat on the assize that condemned Sir John Borthwick for heresy. 1563, p. 575; 1583, p. 1259.

1583 Edition, page 1283[Back to Top]
Malgo

Legendary king of the Britons C6 [ODNB sub John Dee]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 152; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135
Manius Acilius Aureolus

(d. 268) [R. D. Weigel www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman military commander of elite cavalry; rebelled against Emperor Gallienus and supported Postumus; killed by his own soldiers

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 39; 1576, p. 31; 1583, p. 31.

1583 Edition, page 54
Mappalicus

Martyr mid-C3

Mappalicus was martyred around the time of Decius. 1570, p. 94; 1576, p. 66; 1583, p. 65.

1583 Edition, page 88
Marc' Antonio Sabellico (Coccio)

(1436 - 1506) [Eric Cochrane, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance (Chicago, 1981) pp. 83-6]

Venetian scholar and historian; curator of San Marco library 1487 Wrote a history of Venice 1485; wrote a history of the world 1504: Rapsodie historiarum enneadum

Sabellico and Platina recorded that Constantine IV decreed that bishops of Rome were to be chosen by the clergy and people, not by the emperor. 1570, p. 5, 1576, p. 4, 1583, p. 4.

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 62, 86, 105, 112, 133; 1576, p. 38, 60, 75, 80, 97; 1583, p. 38, 59, 74, 80, 96.

1583 Edition, page 27 | 1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 82 | 1583 Edition, page 83 | 1583 Edition, page 88 | 1583 Edition, page 97 | 1583 Edition, page 103 | 1583 Edition, page 119
Marcella

Mother of Potamiaena; martyred at Alexandria C2-3

Marcella was burnt in the same fire as her daughter. 1570, p. 80; 1576, p. 54; 1583, p. 54.

1583 Edition, page 77
Marcellinus (St Marcellinus)

(d. 304) [Kelly]]

Pope (296 - ?304) Rumoured to have sacrificed to the Roman gods in compliance with Diocletian's edict

Having sacrificed to idols, Marcellinus was excommunicated by the Christians. He repented, confessed his fault, proclaimed himself a Christian and died a martyr. 1563, p. 8; 1570, pp. 113, 133; 1576, pp. 81, 96; 1583, pp. 80, 95.

The pseudo-council of Sinuessa was said to have condemned Pope Marcellinus. 1570, p. 133; 1576, p. 97; 1583, p. 96.

1583 Edition, page 103 | 1583 Edition, page 118
Marcellus

Legate from the Council of Carthage in 419 to the patriarchs of Constantinople and Alexandria

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. 9; 1570, p. 13; 1576, p. 10; 1583, p. 10.

1583 Edition, page 33[Back to Top]
Marcellus Cresentius (i.e. Marcello Crescenzio)

Cardinal-legate and president of the Council of Trent for the second set of sessions from 1551 - 1552.

Foxe refers uniquely to the circumstances of Crsentius' death, drawing on Sleidan's Commentaries. Sleidan had explained that he spent 25 March 1552 writing letters to the pope. As he completed his missives, a great black dog appeared before him. When it disappeared, he sent his servants in search of it and, when the dog could not be found, the cardinal-legate feared that it had been a bad omen and, becoming deranged, he died in Verona. 1570, p. 2306, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, pp. 2106-07. The second set of sessions of the council were suspended following his death on 28 April 1552.

1583 Edition, page 2130
Marcellus I (St Marcellus)

(d. 308) [Kelly]

Leading presbyter; pope (306 - 308)

Exiled by Maxentius and died in exile.

Marcellus confirmed Maurice, Roman soldier and martyr, and his troops in their Christian faith in Rome. 1570, p. 113; 1576, p. 81; 1583, p. 80.

Marcellus refused to sacrifice to the gods and was exiled. He gathered the Christians in the house of the widow Lucina. Maxentius turned the house into a stable and placed Marcellus in charge of the beasts, whereupon he died of the stench and rough handling. 1570, p. 133; 1576, p. 96; 1583, p. 96.

According to Platina, Marcellus died at Rome during the reign of Maximinus Daia. 1570, p. 117; 1576, p. 84; 1583, p. 83.

1583 Edition, page 41 | 1583 Edition, page 103 | 1583 Edition, page 106 | 1583 Edition, page 118[Back to Top]
Marcia

Concubine of Roman Emperor Commodus, probably his favourite [D. Quinn www.roman-emperors.org sub Commodus]

Traditionally credited with the relaxing of persecutions of the Christians under Commodus; not clear if she herself was a Christian

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 76; 1576, p. 52; 1583, p. 51.

1583 Edition, page 74
Marcian

(392 - 457) [G. S. Nathan www.roman-emperors.org]

Soldier; captured by Vandals

Eastern Roman emperor (450 - 57); called the fourth ecumenical council at Chalcedon in 451

He was one of the emperors to whom the pope and the people of Rome submitted. 1570, p. 7, 1576, p. 6, 1583, p. 6.

Marcian called the Council of Chalcedon and commanded Pope Leo to attend. Leo would have preferred the council to be held at Rome, but sent his agents to appear on his behalf. 1563, p. 619, 1570, p. 1216, 1576, p. 1041, 1583, p. 1068.

1583 Edition, page 29 | 1583 Edition, page 1092
Marcion of Pontus

(b. c. 110, fl. 144 - 54) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Heretic; rejected the Old Testament and believed the gospels had been tampered with; sought to restore the purity of Christianity

Marcion met Polycarp of Smyrna, who called him the first begotten of Satan. 1570, p. 61; 1576, p. 43; 1583, p. 43.

1583 Edition, page 66
Marcus

Co-recipient, with Pope Miltiades, of a letter from Constantine I

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 141, 1576, p. 104, 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 126[Back to Top]
Marcus Æmilius Æmilianus

(d. 253) [T. Banchich www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (c. July - c. September 253); killed by his troops

Aemilianus killed Gallus and his son through an uprising and three months later was himself killed. 1570, pp. 39, 85; 1576, pp. 31, 68; 1583, pp. 31, 67.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 90
Marcus (St Marcus)

(d. 336) [Kelly]

Pope (January-October 336)

In a letter from Athanasius and his fellow bishops, Marcus was addressed as head of the church. 1570, p. 22; 1576, p. 18; 1583, p. 17.

1583 Edition, page 40
Marcus Annaeus Lucan

(39 - 65 CE) Roman poet

Accused of involvement in the Pisonian conspiracy; ordered to commit suicide

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 38; 1576, p. 31; 1583, p. 31.

1583 Edition, page 54
Marcus Arethusius

C4 bishop of the Arethusians

Marcus Arethusius pulled down a temple and replaced it with a church. He was strung up in a basket and was covered in honey so that wasps and flies would sting him. He was eventually released. 1570, p. 138, 1576, p. 100, 1583, pp. 99-100.

1583 Edition, page 122[Back to Top]
Marcus Aurelius

(121 - 180) [H. W. Benario www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (161 - 80), with adopted brother Lucius Verus to 169; philosopher. (born M. Annius Verus)

[Foxe refers to him as M. Antoninus Verus and Marcus Antoninus]

Marcus Aurelius was an able philosopher and civil governor, but he encouraged the persecution of Christians. 1570, p. 59, 67; 1576, p. 42; 1583, p. 42.

The prayers of the Christians brought rain, and Marcus Aurelius became gentler towards the sect. 1570, p. 75; 1576, p. 51; 1583, p. 51.

In a letter to Henry VIII, Philip Melancthon referred to Lucius Verus and Marcus Aurelius as emperors who received the apologies and defences of the Christians kindly. 1570, p. 1340; 1576, p. 1144; 1583, p. 1172.

1583 Edition, page 65 | 1583 Edition, page 73 | 1583 Edition, page 74 | 1583 Edition, page 1196
Marcus Aurelius Probus

(c. 232 - 282) [R. McMahon www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (276 - 82); he suffered a series of revolts; killed by his own troops

The reign of Probus was peaceful in general, and particularly for the Christians. 1570, p. 107; 1576, p. 76; 1583, p. 76.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 98
Marcus Furius Camillus

(d. 365 BCE)

Roman general and statesman

Camillus and Cicero defeated the conspiracy of Catiline. 1563, p. 599.

Marcus Marulus (Marko Marulić)

(1450 - 1524)

Humanist writer and religious poet of Split, Dalmatia; wrote in Latin and Croatian

Marcus Marulus was cited as an authority by Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in their examination for heresy. 1563, p. 465; 1570, p. 1137; 1576, p. 975; 1583, p. 1000.

1583 Edition, page 1024
Marcus Salvius Otho

(32 - 69) [J. Donahue www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman Emperor (Jauary - April 69) Governor of Lusitania (58 - 68)

Committed suicide

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 38; 1576, p. 31; 1583, p. 31.

1583 Edition, page 54
Marcus Tullius Cicero

(c. 106 - 43 BCE)

Orator, statesman, Latin prose stylist; opposed Mark Antony after Caesar's death

Camillus and Cicero defeated the conspiracy of Catiline. 1563, p. 599.

1583 Edition, page 41[Back to Top]
Margaret Ambsworth

of St Botolph's without Aldgate; presented in 1541 as an instructor of maids and 'a great doctress' [Fines]

Margaret Ambsworth was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229
Margaret Baker

of Cranbrook, Kent; wife of William; abjured 1511; given penance [N. P. Tanner in Lollardy and the Gentry in the Later Middle Ages, M. Aston and C. Richmond (eds.) (New York, 1997)]

Margaret Baker abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Margaret Biddel

Of unknown status and origin. Of Coventry.

Margaret Biddel was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom in 1557. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

1583 Edition, page 2047
Margaret Bowgas

of Colchester; charged in 1528; further charged in 1532 [Fines]

Margaret Bowgas was charged in London in 1532 with holding heretical opinions. She disputed with Richard Sharples and finally submitted to Foxford. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1018; 1583, p. 1046.

1583 Edition, page 1070
Margaret Bray

Midwife. Of Ipswich.

Margaret Bray was described as a maintainer in a complaint against several parishioners in Ipswich made by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Possibly a relation of Robert Bray.]

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Margaret Careless

Wife of John Careless, the martyr.

Margaret Careless received a letter from her husband. 1570, p. 2104, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 1923.

1583 Edition, page 1946
Margaret Choote

of Birbrook, Essex. She, her mother and 4 brothers were troubled c. 1533 [Fines]

Margaret Choote, her mother and brothers, along with others of Birbrook, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Margaret Cootesfote

Of Coventry.

Margaret Cootesfote was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

1583 Edition, page 2047
Margaret Ellis

(d. 1556)

Maid. Of Billericay.

Margaret Ellis was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrell, by means of a letter written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

She died in Newgate late in April or in early May 1556, before she could be sent to the stake. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

1583 Edition, page 1934 | 1583 Edition, page 2086[Back to Top]
Margaret Field

Spinster. Of Ramsey, Essex.

Field was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Margaret Field was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

She wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

1583 Edition, page 1996
Margaret Grey (née Fynche, formerly Curteys)

(d. 1540-41) [ODNB sub Richard Grey]

Widow of London alderman Dawes; married Richard Grey, earl of Kent; countess of Kent (1521 - 40/41)

The duchess of Kent carried Princess Elizabeth's train at her christening. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

1583 Edition, page 1078
Margaret Grey (née Wotton; Medley)

(d. in or after 1535) [ODNB sub Thomas Grey]

Marchioness of Dorset; married Thomas Grey in 1509; widowed 1530

The widowed marchioness of Dorset was godmother to Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

1583 Edition, page 1078
Margaret Hide

Martyr. Of London.

Margaret Hide was accused of heresy either by Lord Rich or by other justices of the peace and constables. She was apprehended for not attending church. 1563, p. 1567, 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

She was examined by Darbyshire, the chancellor. Articles were brought against her and she answered. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

She was burned at Smithfield on 12 April 1557. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

1583 Edition, page 1998
Margaret Nixon

Married Robert Topley, an Augustinian canon of Clare, who abjured in 1532

Robert Topley was charged in London in 1532 because he had left off his habit and married Margaret Nixon in 1522; they had had a child. He had been caught, abjured and returned to his monastery, but escaped. 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1018; 1583, p. 1046.

1583 Edition, page 1070[Back to Top]
Margaret Smith

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged in 1541 with dressing meat in Lent

Margaret Smith was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Margaret Smith

of Steeple Bumpstead, Essex; she, her sister, mother and 2 brothers were accused in 1525 [Fines sub Agnes Smith]

Margaret Smith, her mother, brothers and sister, with many from Steeple Bumpstead, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Margaret Snowball

Wife of William; frequenter of Pearson's sermons 1540 - 43; pardoned in 1543 [Fines]

Margaret Snowball was persecuted with Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

She was one of those reported to Stephen Gardiner by William Symonds and John London as a chief helper and supporter of Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1214.

She and her husband were among those indicted under the Six Articles but pardoned by the king. 1570, p. 1399; 1576, p. 1193; 1583, p. 1221.

1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1238 | 1583 Edition, page 1245[Back to Top]
Margaret Taylor

Wife of Rowland Taylor [DNB]

Margaret Taylor is described by Foxe as 'an honest, discrete and sober matron'. 1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1446; 1583, p. 1519.

When Rowland Taylor was ejected by catholics from his church in Hadleigh, Margaret Taylor prayed out loud that God would avenge her husband. 1563, p. 1066; 1570, p. 1694; 1576, p. 1446; 1583, p. 1519.

She informed her husband, while he was in prison, of popish sermons being preached in Hadleigh. Taylor wrote her a letter (intended for public distribution) attacking these sermons. 1570, pp. 1703-5; 1576, pp. 1454-56; 1583, pp. 1527-29.

On the night of 5 February 1555, Margaret Taylor had a final dinner with her husband, their son Thomas and John Hull, in prison. Rowland Taylor urged his wife to remarry after his death, but only to an honest man who feared God. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, pp. 1699-1700; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, p. 1524.

Early on the morning of 6 February 1555, with two daughters, she kept watch by Aldgate for her husband being taken from London for execution. She recognised him, and she and her daughters were able to say farewell to Rowland Taylor. She tried to visit her husband again, but Sir William Chester would not allow this, although he provided her with an escort to her mother. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, p. 1700; 1576, p. 1452; 1583, pp. 1525.

Margaret was ejected, with her children, from her home after Rowland Taylor's death. 1570, p. 1603; 1576, p. 1454; 1583, p. 1527.

[By 1564, Margaret Taylor had married a minister named Wright, a graduate of St John's, Cambridge, who held a small benefice; they lived in Hadleigh [John Bruce and Thomas Perowne (eds.), The Correspondence of Matthew Parker (Parker Society, Cambridge, 1853), p. 221]. Her second husband was very probably Charles Wright, MA from St John's (1557) and vicar of Chesterton, Cambs [Venn].

[Foxe never gives Margaret Taylor's name; he simply refers to her as Rowland Taylor's wife.]

1583 Edition, page 1543
Margaret Thurston

Wife of John Thurston. Of Great Bentley, Essex.

Edmund Tyrrel found Margaret and John Thurston at William Mount's house and so sent them to prison at Colchester castle, along with the Mounts and their daughter. 1563, p. 1631, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

On the morning Margaret Thurston was due to be burned, her case was deferred. As she was preparing to be burned, she began to shiver and tremble, and felt as though she were being lifted up. She turned to get her psalter, just as the jailor took away her fellow prisoners. She was later taken to the town-prison where she remained for around another week. Shortly before her death she was taken back to the castle and told Joan Cook, later the wife of John Spark, what had happened. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

Foxe describes her behaviour at her death on 17 August 1557. 1561, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

1583 Edition, page 2031 | 1583 Edition, page 2044
Margaret Tracy

Wife of William Tracy

In his will, William Tracy named his wife Margaret and his son Richard as executors and left them the residue of his goods. 1570, p. 1186; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1043.

1583 Edition, page 1067
Margaret von Emmerson

Widow of Hamburg; protestant sympathiser; possibly Tyndale and Coverdale translated the 1st five books of the Old Testament at her house in 1529 [D. Daniell, William Tyndale (1994) pp. 198-200]

William Tyndale and Miles Coverdale translated the first five books of the Old Testament in the house of Margaret von Emmerson. 1570, p. 1227; 1576, p. 1050; 1583, p. 1077.

1583 Edition, page 1101[Back to Top]
Margaret Wily

of Horkesley, Essex; wife of William; charged in 1532 with her husband and his family; in prison in Fulham in 1534 [Fines]

Margaret Wily, her husband and his family abjured in 1532. She was charged, along with her sister-in-law, with eating meat broth on St Peter's Eve. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Margaret [Bradford]

Sister of John Bradford. Married, but her married name is unknown.

She and her husband were sent greetings from her brother in a letter he wrote to his mother and others. 1570, p. 1839,1576, p. 1574, 1583, p. 1656.

1583 Edition, page 1680
Margery Austoo

(d. 1557)

Wife of the martyr James Austoo. Of London.

Margery Austoo appeared before Bonner 16 July 1557. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 1576, p. 1911, 1583, p. 2020.

Foxe states that someone entered the place in which Austoo was being held late at night and pulled a knife on her. She saw her attacker and cried to God for help. The person fled without actually attacking her. 1563, p. 1630, 1570, p. 2214, 1576, p. 1910, 1583, p. 2019.

She was condemned 10 September 1557. 1563, p. 1630, 1570, p. 2214, 1576, p. 1910, 1583, p. 2019.

Margery Austoo was burned at Islington on 17 September 1557. 1563, p. 1630, 1570, p. 2214, 1576, p. 1910, 1583, p. 2019.

1583 Edition, page 2037 | 1583 Edition, page 2042
Margery Cooke

Margery Cooke received a letter from John Careless. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, pp. 2108-09, 1576, pp. 1819-20, 1583, p. 1926.

1583 Edition, page 1950[Back to Top]
Margery Goyt

(fl. 1488)

Wife of James Goyt. Of Ashburn.

Margery Goyt was examined by the bishop of Coventry in 1488. 1563, p. 1740.

Margery Kirry

Margery Kirry was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Margery Mearing

Martyr. Of London.

Margery Mearing was examined on 18 December 1557. 1563, p. 1645, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2031.

She gave answers to articles against her. 1563, p. 1645, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1923-24, 1583, p. 2031.

She was condemned on 20 December 1557. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

John Rough was her pastor. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Rough excommunicated her shortly before his arrest. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Mearing visited Rough in prison on the pretence of being his sister. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Margery Mearing went to Roger Sergeant's house and asked if Judas was at home. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Mearing was talking with a friend when she saw Cluney, Bonner's summoner, making his way to her house. Cluney took her away to be examined. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

She was burned with John Rough. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

1583 Edition, page 1857 | 1583 Edition, page 2052
Margery Morice

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Heathfield.

Margery Morice was accused and examined by Christopherson, Richard Briesly (chancellor), Robert Tailor (deputy), Thomas Paccard (civilian), Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale (BD). She was condemned and martyred at Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2024.

1583 Edition, page 2048[Back to Top]
Margery Morris

(d. 1557)

Martyr.

Margery Morris was burned at Lewes on 22 June 1557. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2195, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2003.

[Mother of James Morice.]

1583 Edition, page 2007
Margery Polley

(d. 1555) Of Pepeling, Calais. Martyr.

Margaret Polley, wife of Richard Polley, was accused and brought before Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. She was burned at Tunbridge. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, pp. 1859-60, 1576, pp. 1591-92, 1583, p. 1679.

[Referred to in 1563 as 'Joan Polley'. Foxe erred in stating that Polley came from Pepenbury; see PRO C/85/144/33r.]

1583 Edition, page 1703
Margery Sutton

of St Giles without Cripplegate; wife of John; charged with her husband in 1541 with despising auricular confession [Fines]

Margery Sutton was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Marguerite de Valois

(1492 - 1549)

Sister of François I of France; married (2) Henry of Navarre in 1525; author and patron

After the death of Queen Jane, François I attempted to marry his sister to Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

1583 Edition, page 1112
Marianus Scotus

(1028 - 1082) [ODNB]

Chronicler; Irish Benedictine monk. Lived in Cologne 1056 - 58, in Fulda 1058 - 69, in Mainz 1069 - 82. Wrote a universal chronicle

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. ; 1570, pp. 62, 84, 86, 133; 1576, pp. 38, 58, 59, 96; 1583, pp. 38, 58, 59, 96.

1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 81 | 1583 Edition, page 82 | 1583 Edition, page 83 | 1583 Edition, page 88 | 1583 Edition, page 119
Marinus

C3 soldier in Caesarea; Christian martyr

Marinus was accused by a jealous comrade of being a Christian. Marinus was encouraged to remain staunch by Bishop Theotecnus and was then sentenced to be beheaded. 1570, p. 106; 1576, p. 75; 1583, p. 75.

1583 Edition, page 97
Marinus and Archemius

Martyrs under Decius in Caesarea

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 92; 1576, p. 64; 1583, p. 64.

1583 Edition, page 87
Marinus I (Martinus II)

(d. 884) [Kelly]

Papal ambassador to Constantinople; bishop of Caere; treasurer; archdeacon

Pope (882 - 84)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. 1.

Marinus of Arles

Bishop of Arles in 313 and 314; presided over the Council of Arles in 314

Marinus was one of the bishops of Gaul called by Constantine to attend a synod in Rome in 313 to examine the case of Cæcilian of Carthage. 1570, p. 141, 1576, p. 104, 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 126[Back to Top]
Marion Matthew (or Westden)

of St James', Colchester. Wife of Thomas; knew substantial portions of scripture by heart [Fines]

Marion Matthew, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Marius

Proctor to Pope Leo X

In his appeal to Pope Leo X, Martin Luther said that Marius had reported him to be a heretic. 1570, p. 1476; 1576, p. 1252; 1583, p. 1289.

1583 Edition, page 1313
Mark Burges

(d. 1560)

Master of the ship, the Minion. Martyr.

Mark Burges was burned in Lisbon, Portugal in 1560. 1563, p. 1729, 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

1583 Edition, page 2082
Markes

Around 28 June Bland returned to Collins, where he proceeded against Bland before Master Cockes of Sturray and Markes the apparitor (servant, one who is summoned). 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

1583 Edition, page 1692
Marraunt Haynes

of Oye-Plage, near Calais

Marraunt Haynes was brought in as a witness against John Butler before the council of Calais. 1570, p. 1403; 1576, p. 1196; 1583, p. 1226.

1583 Edition, page 1250[Back to Top]
Marshall

Priest who lived with John Marbeck in Windsor c. 1537-38

At John Marbeck's fifth examination, he was questioned about a book that had belonged to Marshall. 1570, p. 1394; 1576, p. 1189; 1583, p. 1217.

1583 Edition, page 1241
Marsilius of Padua

(1270 - 1342) [G. Holmes, Europe: Hierarchy and Revolt (London, 1975) pp. 146-7]

Italian scholar; born and studied at Padua; rector of the University of Paris in 1313

Argued for the supremacy of the empire and independence from the see of Rome; wrote Defensor Pacis, the theory of the city state, in 1324; excommunicated in 1327

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 143, 1576, p. 106, 1583, p. 105.

1583 Edition, page 128
Martial de Loménie (Lomenius)

(d. 1572)

Third son of Aimery de Loménie, seigneur de Faye, near Limoges.

At the time of Martial de Loménie's death in Paris in the St Bartholomew's Day massacre (24 August 1572), which is the occasion for which Foxe mentions him (1583, p. 2152), he was a secrétaire du roi et des finances and a greffier of the Grand Conseil. According to Crespin's continuator (but Foxe did not include any of these details), Loménie was imprisoned during the massacre and constrained by the comte de Retz to sell his land at Versailles (and perhaps his office as well) to him in return for the hope of escape. But he ended up being massacred with 15 others imprisoned with him. Jacques-Auguste de Thou confirmed the Crespin account, adding that de Retz and Loménie had already been to law over the property at Versailles. There is nothing to substantiate d'Aubigné's account of Loménie's evisceration on the orders of Lansac at the time of his death. (Haag, 7, pp. 119-20)

1583 Edition, page 2176
Martialis

C2 Christian martyred in Rome; called a son of Felicitas; martyred with her. [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Felicitas]

Martialis was beheaded. 1570, p. 67; 1576, p. 44; 1583, p. 44.

1583 Edition, page 67
Martin Algate

Martin Algate. Of Ipswich

Martin Algate's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Martin Balbur

Lawyer of St Andrews

Martin Balbur was one of those who, with Bishop Beaton, persecuted Patrick Hamilton. 1570, p. 1108; 1570, p. 1107; 1576, p. 947; 1583, p. 974.

1583 Edition, page 998
Martin Balfour

(d. 1553) [Fasti ecclesiae scoticanae]

Official of St Andrews (1540 - 45); provost St Salvator's College, St Andrews University (1551 - 53)

Martin Balfour sat on the assize that condemned Sir John Borthwick for heresy. 1563, p. 575; 1583, p. 1259.

1583 Edition, page 1283
Martin Bradbridge

(d. 1557)

Of unknown occupation. Martyr. Of Tenterden, Kent.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Ashford, Kent, 16 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

[Probably the husband of the Widow Bradbridge burned at Canterbury 19 June 1557.]

1583 Edition, page 1994
Martin Bucer

(1491 - 1551)

Protestant divine. [DNB]; Hillerbrand, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Martin Bucer's body was exhumed and burned on Cardinal Pole's orders. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570], 1570, p. 1756; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

Martin Bucer liked John Bradford and exhorted him to preach on several occasions 1563, pp. 1172-73, 1570, pp. 1779-80, 1576, p. 1520 , 1583, p. 1603.

He was mentioned in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge, the inhabitants of which he asked to remember the readings and preaching of God's prophet and true preacher, Bucer. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, p. p. 1808-09, 1576, pp. 1545-47, 1583, p. 1627.

Foxe refers to Martin Bucer's preaching at Cambridge University. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson interdicted St Mary's Church, Cambridge, where Bucer was buried.1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 1959.

Bucer's good character is referred to. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1958.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Bucer and Phagius were condemned. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1959.

Bucer's body was exhumed. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

1583 Edition, page 1608 | 1583 Edition, page 1627 | 1583 Edition, page 1652 | 1583 Edition, page 1978
Martin Bucer

(1491 - 1551) [ODNB]

b. Alsace; theologian; Dominican friar 1508; MA, BTh Heidelberg; present at Luther's disputation

Released from monastic vows in 1521; led reform in Strasbourg; went to England with Fagius; professor at Cambridge (1549 - 51)

Martin Bucer was brought to Cambridge by Edward Seymour. 1563, p. 684; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1296.

Peter Martyr, Martin Bucer and Paul Fagius were welcomed as scholars during the reign of Edward VI. 1570, p. 1552; 1576, p. 1323; 1583, p. 1373.

Catholics defamed Bucer, claiming that on his deathbed he denied that Christ was the messiah. John Redman and other Englishmen knew this to be false. 1570, p. 1439; 1576, p. 1227; 1583, p. 1257.

1583 Edition, page 1281 | 1583 Edition, page 1320 | 1583 Edition, page 1384 | 1583 Edition, page 1397
Martin Donam

of Aldermanbury; charged with others in 1541 with supporting Robert Barnes and other preachers [Fines]

Martin Donam was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229
Martin Hunt

(d. 1556)

Martin Hunt died of starvation in the King's Bench, Southwark, on 29 June 1556. 1563, p. 1527, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

1583 Edition, page 1941
Martin Johnson

Bedridden. Of Ipswich.

Martin Johnson was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Martin Luther

(1483 - 1546) [C. Scott Dixon and Mark Greengrass, www.leedstrinity.ac.uk/histcourse/reformat/biograph.htm]

b. Eisleben; of Wittenberg; German theologian, Augustinian monk, founder of the protestant reformation; translated the bible into German

Luther regarded the Donation of Constantine as fraudulent. 1570, p. 144, 1576, p. 106, 1583, p. 105.

Upon leaving England, William Tyndale went into Saxony and met Luther. 1570, p. 1226; 1576, p. 1050; 1583, p. 1076.

Humphrey Monmouth was accused of helping William Tyndale and William Roy to get to the continent to join Martin Luther. 1570, p. 1133; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 997.

Leo X condemned writings and translations of Martin Luther. 1563, p. 462; 1570, p. 1135; 1576, p. 972; 1583, p. 999.

Leo X issued a bull against Martin Luther, in which his teachings and his works were condemned. 1570, pp. 1459-65; 1576, pp. 1244-47; 1583, pp. 1280-84.

Luther produced an answer to the papal bull and sent an appeal to the pope. 1570, pp. 1465-76; 1576, pp. 1247-52; 1583, pp. 1284-89.

Luther was called to Rome to answer charges of heresy. The duke of Saxony, John Frederick I, pleaded to have him tried by impartial judges. His case, however, was committed to be heard by the legate to Germany, Cardinal Cajetan, a sworn enemy of Luther. The cardinal rejected his case, and Luther appealed from the cardinal to the pope. This appeal was turned down, and Luther appealed to the next general council. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1252; 1583, pp. 1289-90.

Henry VIII issued a proclamation against the heresies of Luther. 1570, p. 1159; 1576, p. 991; 1583, p. 1019.

Robert Barnes fled England and went to Germany, where he found favour with Luther, Melancthon, Bugenhagen, Justus Jonas, Hegendorph, Aepinus, the duke of Saxony and the king of Denmark. 1563, p. 603; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1194.

Catholics defamed Luther, claiming he died of drunkenness. 1570, p. 1439; 1576, p. 1227; 1583, p. 1257.

Luther was one of those Sir Thomas More in The Supplication of Purgatory said the souls in purgatory railed against. 1570, p. 1156; 1576, p. 990; 1583, p. 1017.

1583 Edition, page 43 | 1583 Edition, page 128 | 1583 Edition, page 1021 | 1583 Edition, page 1041 | 1583 Edition, page 1043 | 1583 Edition, page 1100 | 1583 Edition, page 1218 | 1583 Edition, page 1281 | 1583 Edition, page 1303 | 1583 Edition, page 1304
Martin Luther

(1483 - 1546)

German reformer. [H. Hillerbrand (ed.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation, 1996]

In Bradford's last examination, the bishops and council discussed Luther, Zwingli and Oecolampadius after Bradford's denial of transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1197, 1570, p. 1789, 1576, p. 1528, 1583, p. 1611.

Cranmer read the works of Faber, Erasmus and Luther. 1563, pp. 1470-71, 1570, pp. 2032-33, 1576, pp. 1752-53, 1583, pp. 1859-60.

Foxe refers to Luther's death and God's blessing upon him (1570, p. 2307, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 2107). (Hans J. Hillerbrand, ed. The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Reformation. 4 vols. (Oxford: 1996) 2, pp. 461-67)

1583 Edition, page 1635[Back to Top]
Martin Newman

Martin Newman was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Martin Pugson

Probably a bookseller.

Thomas Hinshaw was an apprentice in St Paul's Churchyard to Martin Pugson. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

[No record of a Pugson as a printer; bookseller is the second most likely profession for St Paul's Churchyard. Possibly a book binder.]

1583 Edition, page 2068
Martin V (Oddone Colonna)

(1368 - 1431) [Kelly]

b.Genazzano; studied law at Perugia; protonotary; cardinal-deacon of San Giorgio in Velabro 1402. Pope (1417 - 31); his election ended the schism.

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 5, 1576, p. 4, 1583, p. 4.

1583 Edition, page 27 | 1583 Edition, page 1282
Martina (St Martina)

(d. 226x228) [Catholic Encyclopedia); Roman virgin martyr

Martina was tortured, then killed by the sword. 1570, p. 85; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82[Back to Top]
Mary Fitzroy (née Howard)

(c. 1519 - 1555?) [ODNB]

Duchess of Richmond 1533; daughter of Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk; wife of Henry Fitzroy, duke of Richmond (d. 1536; the marriage was unconsummated); patron of Foxe and Bale

Mary Howard carried the christening robe at the christening of Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Mary Fitzroy had been a principal maid of Queen Anne and reported that she used to carry money about daily to give to the poor. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

1583 Edition, page 1078
Mary Glover

Of Mancetter, Warwickshire. Niece of Hugh Latimer. [DNB sub Robert Glover]

Wife of Robert Glover.

Mary Glover received a letter from her husband when he was imprisoned. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, p. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

John Careless sent greetings to Mary Glover in a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

1583 Edition, page 1734 | 1583 Edition, page 1738 | 1583 Edition, page 1952
Mary Honeywood

(1527 - 1620)

Daughter of Robert Waters, esq. Of Lenham, Kent. [DNB]

Mary Honeywood received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, pp. 1820-21, 1576, pp. 1556-57, 1583, pp. 1638-39.

She received another letter from John Bradford. 1570, pp. 1821-22, 1576, pp. 1557-58, 1583, p. 1640.

[Note that Foxe only refers to her as 'M. H.']

1583 Edition, page 1662[Back to Top]
Mary Marlowe

Wife of Walter Marlowe.

Mary Marlowe was friend and nurse to John Bradford. She made a shirt for him to burn in. 1563, p. 1175, 1570, p. 1781, 1576, pp. 1521-22, 1583, p. 1604.

1583 Edition, page 1629
Mary of Guise

(1515 - 1560) [ODNB]

Queen of Scots 1538, consort of James V; regent of Scotland 1554

Walter Mylne was martyred during the regency of Mary of Guise. 1570, p. 1452; 1576, p. 1238; 1583, p. 1274.

1583 Edition, page 1298
Mary of Hungary

(1505 - 1558)

Sister of Charles V, regent of the Low Countries (1530 - 1555).

Mary of Hungary paid English mariners in Antwerp one hundred pistoles for firing guns to celebrate the (inaccurate) news that Mary Tudor had given birth to a son. 1570, pp. 1772; 1576, pp. 1513; 1583, p. 1596

1583 Edition, page 1620
Mary Queen of Scots

(1542 - 1587) [ODNB]

Queen of Scots (1542 - 67)

Married (1) François, dauphin of France in 1558; queen of France (1559 - 60); married (2) Henry Lord Darnley in 1565; married (3) the earl of Bothwell in 1567; forced to abdicate; imprisoned in England; beheaded

Mary was promised by the Scots to Henry VIII as a wife to Edward VI, which promise was later broken. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

1583 Edition, page 1332
Mary Taylor

Daughter of Margaret and Rowland Taylor

Mary waited with Elizabeth and Margaret Taylor at Aldgate on the morning of 6 February 1555. She saw Rowland Taylor as he was being taken through Aldgate on his way to execution and said farewell to him. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, p. 1700; 1576, p. 1452; 1583, p. 1525.

1583 Edition, page 1549[Back to Top]
Massey

(1556 - 1556)

Baby son of Perotine Massey. Of St Peter's Port, Guernsey.

[Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), pp. 53, 57.]

He was born in the flames as his mother was dying. He was saved by W. House but thrust back into the flames at the insistence of Helier Gosselin, the bailiff. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1851, 1583, p. 1945.

1583 Edition, page 1369 | 1583 Edition, page 1967
Massy

Massy was a 'fatherly old man' who visited George Marsh in prison and tried to persuade him to recant. 1563, p. 1119; 1570, p. 1736; 1576, p. 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, p. 1565.

1583 Edition, page 1589
Master Beston

Imprisoned in connection with illicit books in October 1554, (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p 1403; 1583, p. 1473). Foxe describes him as a merchant. He may be Cuthbert Beeston, the girdler, who stood surety for the former Protestant exile Richard Laughern on 6 September 1560 (Brett Usher, 'Backing Protestantism: The London Godly, the Exchequer and the Foxe Circle' in David Loades, et al., John Foxe: An Historical Perspective (Aldershot, 1999), p. 133).

1583 Edition, page 1497
Master Bingham

John Bland defended himself against accusations of open disputation, stating that he was at Master Ugden's on the Saturday in question. Bland stated that Master Vaughan, Master Oxenden and Master Seth of Overland, as well as Master Ugden were witnesses to Bingham's words to Bland while he was at Master Ugden's. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1667.

1583 Edition, page 1691[Back to Top]
Master Boyer

Bartlett Green wrote a letter to Master Boyer, Master Goring, Master Farneham, Master Fletewood, Master Rosewel, Master Bell, Master Hussey, Master Calthorp and others. 1563, pp. 1465-6, 1570, pp. 2027-28, 1576, p. 1746-47, 1583, pp. 1855-56.

Bartlett Green believed that Master Boyer would look after the 'good and worthy wife Cooper and Bernard le Frenchman'. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1856.

1583 Edition, page 1879
Master Brooke

Master of the Drapers' Company.

Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax appeared in the Drapers' hall with their masters present, and Master Brooke promised ?100 from the company for the boys' protection from the death sentence. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

1583 Edition, page 2084
Master Burley

Scholar at Cambridge in the 1520s

Burley, with other Cambridge scholars, was a member of the Augustinian house under Robert Barnes. 1563, p. 589; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

1583 Edition, page 1216
Master Butler the Elder

Searcher. Of Ipswich.

Master Butler was described as a maintainer in a complaint made against several parishioners in Ipswich made by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Master Cambridge

BTh, a frequenter of the White Horse, Cambridge; possibly the Benedictine of Norwich member of Gonville Hall [Fines]

Cambridge, with other Cambridge scholars, was a member of the Augustinian house under Robert Barnes. 1563, p. 589; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

1583 Edition, page 1216[Back to Top]
Master Chidley

Doctor of law

Chidley was a witness in 1551 to the sentence against Stephen Gardiner and his appellation. 1563, p. 867.

Master David

of S Martin's at the Well with two buckets; his apprentice was one of 11 presented in 1541 for condemning church ceremonies [Fines]

Master David's apprentice was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Master Filles

Thomas Whittle sent a letter to his 'dear brethren' Master Filles and Cutbert.1570, p. 2021; 1576, p. 1742; 1583, p. 1850

1583 Edition, page 1874
Master Goodwin

Scholar and fried of Robert Barnes

During the night after he had been examined by Cardinal Wolsey, Robert Barnes stayed at the house of Thomas Parnell. He wrote throughout the night, dictating to Miles Coverdale, Master Goodwin and Thomas Curson. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

1583 Edition, page 1217
Master Hampton

Of Reading.

Master Hampton was engaged by enemies of Julins Palmer to befriend and then betray him. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1842 [recte 1831], 1583, p. 1937.

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Master Kempton

Of the Black Boy in Watling Street.

Roger Holland was apprentice to Master Kempton at the Black Boy in Watling Street. He caused trouble for his master because of his riotous and wanton behaviour. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

Holland was assisted in his early protestantism by a maid in the house called Elizabeth who advised him on what he should do and whom he later married. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

1583 Edition, page 2063[Back to Top]
Master Lyons

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Lyons was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler to have refused the pax in mass at St Mary Stoke. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Master Maynard

Alderman of Colchester

Agnes George said she had been imprisoned in Colchester at the command of Master Maynard because she refused to attend church. 1563, p. 1524; 1570, p. 2096; 1576, p. 1808; 1583, p. 1915.

1583 Edition, page 1939
Master Monger

A protestant imprisoned in the Counter at Bread Street, Monger sent greetings to John Hooper in a letter dated 3 January 1555. Monger was probably one of the congregation arrested in the churchyard of St Mary-le-Bow on 1 January 1555. 1563, p. 1020.

Master Mosley

Chedsey testified in the presence of Master Moseley and the lieutenant of the Tower that Bartlett Green had denied transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

1583 Edition, page 1876
Master Perry

Preacher at Beverstone.

John Moyer wrote Master Perry a letter which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

1583 Edition, page 2164[Back to Top]
Master Rider

Of Reading.

Master Rider, described as 'a faithful witness of God's truth', having heard of Julins Palmer's treatment in prison, sent his servant to offer any necessities Palmer might need. 1570, p. 2121, 1576, p. 1844 [recte 1832], 1583, pp. 1938.

1583 Edition, page 1962
'Master S.'

M. S. conveyed a letter from the imprisoned John Hooper to Anna Hooper. 1563, p. 1063; 1570, p. 1685; 1576, p. 1438; 1583, p. 1511.

1583 Edition, page 1535
Master Sparke

Draper

Imprisoned in connection with illicit books October 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1576; 1583, p. 1473).

1583 Edition, page 1497
Master Tamage

Roger Bernard was taken in the night in Fransden, Suffolk, by Master Tamage's men because he refused to attend church. 1563, p. 1527; 1570, p. 2098; 1576, p. 1811; 1583, p. 1917.

1583 Edition, page 1941
Master Turner

Of Windsor.

Master Turner's preachings and readings confirmed Robert Smith in the truth. 1583, p. 1691; 1576, p. 1601; 1570, p. 1870; 1563, p. 1252.

1583 Edition, page 1715[Back to Top]
Master Uchiltrie

Uchiltrie sat on the assize that deprived and exiled John Kerr. 1570, p. 1448; 1576, p. 1235; 1583, p. 1272.

He sat on the assize that tried and condemned Adam Wallace. 1570, pp. 1448-50; 1576, pp. 1235-36; 1583, pp. 1272-73.

1583 Edition, page 1296
Master Wickes

Wickes was one of the commissioners charged with carrying out Hooper's execution. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508.

1583 Edition, page 1532
Maternus

(d. c. 315) [Gams]

Bishop of Cologne (313 - c. 315); attended synod of Rome in 313

Maternus was one of the bishops of Gaul called by Constantine to attend a synod in Rome in 313 to examine the case of Cæcilian of Carthage. 1570, p. 141, 1576, p. 104, 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 126
Matilda (Edith, Mold, Matilda of Scotland)

(1080 - 1118) [ODNB]

Daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland; 1st wife of Henry I.

Queen of England (1000 - 18); born Edith, crowned as Matilda; brought up in a nunnery. Henry sought permission to marry, which was granted by Archbishop Anselm and a council of bishops.

The charges levied by Henry I on priests who wished to retain their wives was so heavy that 200 priests came to see the queen. She did not intercede for them. 1570, p. 1332; 1576, p. 1126; 1583, p. 1164.

1583 Edition, page 1188
Matteo Bandello

(1480x85 - 1561x65) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Italian writer of narrative literature; Dominican, bishop of Agen, France

Foxe recounts a story about Cromwell and an Italian merchant taken from Bandello. 1570, pp. 1357-58; 1576, pp. 1158-59; 1583, pp. 1186-87.

1583 Edition, page 1210[Back to Top]
Matthew Bird

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Matthew Bird fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Not related to the Birds of Dedham or Norwich.]

1583 Edition, page 2113
Matthew Butler

Apothecary. Constable of Ipswich.

Matthew Butler was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

He is also described as a curious singing man and a fine organist. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

One night when he was on watch at Cornhill, Argentine came to him with news of Agnes Wardall's return to Ipswich. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

Butler and Argentine conspired against Agnes Wardall. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

1583 Edition, page 1964 | 1583 Edition, page 2113
Matthew Grafton

Registrar

Matthew Grafton was present at the condemnation of Richard Bayfield in 1531. 1563, p. 488; 1570, p. 1164; 1576, p. 995; 1583, p. 1023.

Grafton was present at the James Bainham's examination as a relapse and his condemnation. 1563, pp. 498-500; 1570, pp. 1169-71; 1576, pp. 1000-02; 1583, pp. 1028-29.

1583 Edition, page 1047
Matthew Harbottle

(fl. 1555 - 1569)

Servant to Robert Ferrar of St David's.

Sheriff Leyson took cattle from Ferrar's servant, Matthew Harbottle, but the cattle got sick and died. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[In June 1555 Harbottle sued Griffith Leyson in the Camarthen court of Great Sessions for removing goods and chattels to the value of 20 marks from his property by violence. The case was never resolved due to Leyson's sudden death. Harbottle was alive as late as 1569 when a lease of an advowson to him was ratified by the cathedral chapter of St David's. See Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar: Yorkshire Monk, Reformation Bishop and Martyr in Wales (c.1550-1555) (London, 1997), pp. 246-47, 326.]

1583 Edition, page 2123[Back to Top]
Matthew Hound (de Hound)

of Calais; charged Easter 1540 with listening to James Cocke (Coppen de Hane) read the New Testament; imprisoned in the Fleet; burnt in Flanders [Fines]

After an exhaustive inquisition for heretics, Matthew Hound was one of those brought before the commissioners in Calais in 1540, charged and imprisoned. 1563, p. 665; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1227.

He, with Thomas Broke and others, were sent to England at Cromwell's command. The prisoners were shackled when they went onto the ship. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

Upon arrival in England, the prisoners had their irons removed at the command of Cromwell, who had them imprisoned in the Fleet but promised them speedy release. Cromwell was shortly after beheaded. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

Thomas Audeley discharged those in the Fleet and brought them the king's pardon, although they were deprived of their livings. 1563, p. 668; 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

Shortly after Hound was released from the Fleet, he went to Flanders, where he was burnt. 1563, p. 668; 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

1583 Edition, page 1251
Matthew Mackerell (Makkarell)

(d. 1537) [ODNB]

Abbot of Barlings; by 1524 bishop-suffragan in the York diocese, then Lincoln (suffragan bishop of Chalcedon); executed as traitor

Matthew Mackerell led a rebellion in Lincolnshire in defence of the old religion. 1570, p. 1237; 1576, p. 1059; 1583, p. 1086.

1583 Edition, page 1110
Matthew Paris

(c. 1200 - 1259) [ODNB]

Benedictine monk and English chronicler, based at St Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire; cartographer, artist, hagiographer

Matthew Paris suggested that Paul, nephew of Lanfranc and abbot of St Albans, was actually the son of Lanfranc. 1570, p. 1331; 1576, p. 1135; 1583, p. 1164.

1583 Edition, page 1188 | 1583 Edition, page 1205
Matthew Parker

Chancellor of the diocese of Worcester

By order of the archbishop of Canterbury and convocation, Dr Parker exhumed the body of William Tracy and burned it. 1570, p. 1186; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1042.

Parker examined William Tyndale on charges of heresy. 1563, p. 518; 1570, p. 1225; 1576, p. 1049; 1583, pp. 1075-76.

1583 Edition, page 1066 | 1583 Edition, page 1099
Matthew Parker

(1504 - 1575)

DD (1538) Archbishop of Canterbury (1559 - 1575). (DNB)

Matthew Parker preached honourably at the death of Bucer. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Matthew Parker, Edmund Grindall and Richard Goodrick requested that the body of Peter Martyr's wife be buried honourably. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Elizabeth replaced Cardinal Pole with Parker as archbishop of Canterbury. 1583, p. 2124.

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Matthew Parker

(1504 - 1575) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1525; MA 1527; BTh 1535; DTh 1536; present at Bilney's martyrdom in 1531; chaplain to Anne Boleyn; king's chaplain 1537; vice-chancellor of Cambridge 1545; dean of Lincoln (1552 - 54); archbishop of Canterbury (1559 - 75)

In a letter to Matthew Parker, John Bale included the letter purported to be from Ulrich of Augsburg to Nicholas I. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1129; 1583, p. 1154.

1583 Edition, page 1178
Matthew Plaise

Weaver. Of Stone, Kent.

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Foxe did not know what happened to Plaise after his examination. 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1983.

1583 Edition, page 2006
Matthew Ricarby

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Matthew Ricarby was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

1583 Edition, page 2061
Matthew Stewart

(1516 - 1571) ODNB

Earl of Lennox (1526 - 71); diplomat; regent of Scotland (1570 - 71)

The earl and countess of Lennox, who were in exile and living in Yorkshire at the time, denounced John Hume to Cranmer for speaking against the mass. 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

1583 Edition, page 1321
Matthew Ward

Friar, turned merchant adventurer; married; maintained as a preacher in St Magnus parish c. 1541; committed to the Counter in Bread Street [Fines]

Matthew Ward was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

Ward was committed to prison for marrying while a priest, for holding heretical opinions and on suspicion of being a sacramentary. 1563, pp. 419-20.

1583 Edition, page 1226 | 1583 Edition, page 1229
Matthew White

(d. 1549) Gentleman of Staxton, North Yorkshire; chantry commissioner [R. Manning, 'Violence and Social Conflict in Mid-Tudor Rebellions', The Journal of British Studies, vol. 16, no. 2. (Spring, 1977), p. 35n]

William Ombler, Thomas Dale, Henry Barton and Robert Dale took Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry, murdered them, stripped their bodies and left them in a field. Matthew White's and Savage's wives had them buried. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

1583 Edition, page 1333
Matthew Wythers

(d. 1558)

Matthew Wythers was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

1583 Edition, page 2061
Matthias Flacius Illyricus

(1520 - 1575) [Hillerbrand]

Theologian; professor of Hebrew at Wittenberg 1544; Lutheran reformer; author of Catalogus testium veritatis 1556, Clavis Scripturae Sacrae 1567; organiser of the Magdeburg Centuries

Illyricus testified that he had seen two copies of the letter supposedly sent by Ulrich of Augsburg to Nicholas I. 1570, p. 1321; 1576, p. 1129; 1583, p. 1156.

1583 Edition, page 1180
Matthieu Cauches

Brother of Katherine Cauches. [Ogier, pp. 57, 62]

Matthieu Cauches petitioned in 1563 that his sister's death be avenged. 1570, p. 2129, 1576, p. 1851, 1583, p. 1945.

[Cauches had petitioned the privy council previously in December 1558, protesting at the treatment of his sister. Foxe does not mention this earlier petition. [See Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), p. 62.]

1583 Edition, page 1969[Back to Top]
Maturus

Reputed martyr at Lyons during the reign of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus

Maturus had only recently been baptised when he was martyred. 1570, pp. 69-70; 1576, pp. 46-47; 1583, pp. 46-47.

1583 Edition, page 69
Maud (Matilda) Lane (nèe Parr)

(c. 1507 - 1558/9) [ODNB]

Lady Lane, courtier; Katherine Parr's cousin; married Ralph Lane; gentlewoman to the queen; protestant supporter

Stephen Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

When Thomas Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

1583 Edition, page 1267
Maurice

(d. 1107) [ODNB]

Royal chaplain; chancellor (1078 - 85)

Bishop of London (1085 - 1107); crowned Henry I

Built a new St Paul's (the Anglo-Saxon one burnt down in 1087)

Foxe concludes that the church of St Paul's built by Maurice and his successor Richard was a replacement for an earlier one, possibly destroyed by Vikings. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135
Maurice (Flavius Mauricius Tiberius Augustus)

(d. 602) [W. Baum www.roman-emperors.org]

Cappadocian general; Eastern Roman emperor (582 - 602); he and his five sons were executed

Pope Gregory I was subject to him. 1570, p. 7; 1576, p. 6; 1583; p. 6.

Maurice granted John IV Nesteutes, patriarch of Constantinople, the title of 'universal patriarch'. 1570, p. 16; 1576, p. 13; 1583, p. 13.

He and his sons were killed by his successor, Phocas. 1570, p. 161; 1576, p. 121; 1583, p. 120.

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Maurice (Mauritius) (St Maurice)

(d. late C3 - early C4) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Roman leader of Theban Legion; Christian; massacred with his men

Maurice, having had his troops decimated twice, encouraged them to martyrdom. 1570, p. 111; 1576, p. 79; 1583, p. 79.

Foxe gives an account of the blessing in Rome by Pope Marcellus of Maurice and his troops and of their subsequent martyrdom for refusing to sacrifice to Maximian's gods. 1570, pp. 113-14; 1576, p. 81; 1583, pp. 80-81.

1583 Edition, page 102 | 1583 Edition, page 103 | 1583 Edition, page 2126[Back to Top]
Maurice Griffith

(d. 1558)

BD (1532). Bishop of Rochester (1554 - 1558). [DNB]

Maurice Griffith was created bishop of Rochester (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1487).

Bradford, in a letter to John Treves, referred to a contention between the master of Katherines Hall and the bishop of Rochester, who was master of Pembroke Hall, as to which should have Bradford as a fellow. 1583, p. 1664.

Rochester condemned Christopher Wade and Nicholas Halle 31 June 1555, and they were burned in July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Margaret Polley was accused and brought before Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, pp. 1859-60, 1576, pp. 1591-92, 1583, p. 1679.

Nicholas Hall was condemned by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester, 31 June 1555, and burned about 19 July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, the chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Joan Beach and John Harpole were examined by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

Stephen Gratwick was condemned by the bishop of Winchester and the bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Richard Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Griffith (Rochester), a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 19 May before the bishop of Rochester, Chichester and others. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned and later burned. 1583, p. 2145.

Maurice Griffith died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

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Maurice Griffith

(d. 1558) [ODNB]

Dominican; BTh Oxford 1532; archdeacon of Rochester (1537 - 46); canon of Rochester (1546 - 54)

Bishop of Rochester (1554 - 1558)

Maurice Griffith was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 855.

Maurus Magnentius Rabanus

(d. 856) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Theological and pedagogical writer; studied theology and liberal arts at Tours under Alcuin

Abbot of Fulda 822; archbishop of Mainz 847

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 42, 1300; 1576, pp. 34, 1112; 1583, pp. 34, 1138.

1583 Edition, page 57 | 1583 Edition, page 1162
Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius)

(c. 278 - 312) [M. Di Maio www.roman-emperors.org]

Son of Maximian; married the daughter of Galerius

Roman emperor (306 - 12); entered into civil war with his father Maximian and with Galerius; died at the battle of Milvian Bridge

Maxentius was set up as emperor by the praetorian guard, but was opposed by his father. 1570, p. 118; 1576, p. 85; 1583, p. 84.

He initially feigned favouring the Christians in order to ingratiate himself with the people of Rome. He then instituted persecutions. 1570, p. 119; 1576, p. 85; 1583, p. 85.

The citizens and senators of Rome appealed to Constantine to rid them of Maxentius. Constantine responded and, having received a vision and taking the cross as his standard, defeated Maxentius at Milvian Bridge.1570, pp. 118-19; 1576, pp. 85-86; 1583, pp. 84-85.

While in retreat, Maxentius fell into the Tiber and, weighted down by his armour, drowned. 1570, pp. 39, 119; 1576, pp. 31, 86; 1583, pp. 31, 85.

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Maxima, Donatilla and Secunda

C3 virgin martyrs in Tebourba

Maxima, Donatilla and Secunda were tortured, thrown to wild beasts and then beheaded. 1570, p. 103; 1576, p. 73; 1583, p. 73.

1583 Edition, page 96
Maximianus, Malchus, Martianus, Dionysius, Ioannes, Serapion and Constantinus

C3 Christian soldiers of Decius at Ephesus; martyr

The seven admitted being Christians, but, as they were soldiers of the emperor, they were given time to consider. They hid in a cave, and when Decius returned he ordered the cave to be blocked up. 1570, p. 91; 1576, p. 63; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86
Maximinus

Supposed governor under Maximinus Daia, converted by the virgin martyr Fausta

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 133; 1576, p. 96; 1583, p. 95.

1583 Edition, page 118[Back to Top]
Maximinus

C3 judge in Rome

According to Damasus, Pope Anterus was sentenced to death by Maximinus. 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82
Maximinus Daia

(c. 270 - 313) [M. Di Maio www.roman-emperors.org]

Served as Galerius's caesar in the East (305 - 11)

Roman emperor of the East (311 - 13)

Maximinus fought off a revolt by Maxentius. He renewed persecution of the Christians after the publication of the toleration edict of Galerius. 1570, pp. 114, 117; 1576, pp. 82, 84; 1583, pp. 81, 83.

Maximinus issued contradictory edicts urging persecution and toleration of Christians. He eventually, after defeat by Licinius, turned against the priests of the Roman gods. 1570, pp. 121-22; 1576, pp. 87-88; 1583, pp. 86-87.

Maximinus died of an abdominal complaint. 1570, pp. 39, 122; 1576, pp. 31, 88; 1583, pp. 31, 88.

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Maximinus Thrax

(c. 173 - 238) [M. L. Meckler www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (235 - 38); first of the soldier-emperors; killed with his son by his soldiers

Maximinus was chosen to be emperor by the soldiers, against the wishes of the senate. 1570, p. 84; 1576, p. 57; 1583, p. 57.

He revived the persecution of the Christians, concentrating especially on their leaders. 1570, pp. 85-86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 54
MaximinusOfficer

Minor officer under Constantius and Maximinus Daia

Maximinus attempted to prevent publication of the decree stopping the persecution of Christians. 1570, p. 116; 1576, p. 83; 1583, p. 82.

1583 Edition, page 105[Back to Top]
Maximus and Urbanus

Imprisoned as a result of the Decian persecution [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Novatian]

Supporters of Novatian as pope in 251; written to by Dyonisius of Alexandria and Cyprian of Carthage; agreed to support Cornelius

Maximus and Urbanus were holy men who had suffered greatly during the persecutions. 1570, p. 93; 1576, p. 65; 1583, p. 64.

They repented of their support for Novatian and were reconciled to Cornelius. 1570, p. 93; 1576, p. 65; 1583, p. 65.

1583 Edition, page 87
Maximus of Alexandria

(d. 282) [Gams]; deacon of Alexandria under Dionysius

Patriarch of Alexandria (265 - 82)

He was banished along with Dionysius under Valerian. 1570, p. 102; 1576, p. 72; 1583, p. 72.

1583 Edition, page 95 | 1583 Edition, page 96
Maximus, Diostorus, Demetrius and Lucius

C3 Christian priests continuing to minister during the persecutions under Valerian

They continued to minister while their better-known colleagues were in exile. 1570, p. 103; 1576, p. 73; 1583, p. 72.

1583 Edition, page 95
Mazabanes

(d. 266) [Gams]

Patriarch of Jerusalem (250 - 266)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 61; 1583, p. 61.

1583 Edition, page 84[Back to Top]
Melancia

Legendary matron of Alexandria C3

Foxe gives the story of Philippus and his daughter Eugenia as related by later historians, but believes it to be untrue. 1570, pp. 104-05; 1576, pp. 73-74; 1583, pp. 73-74.

1583 Edition, page 96
Meletius

Early C3 bishop of Lycopolis, Egypt [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Author of the (Egyptian) Meletian schism, and opponent of Peter of Alexandria

Meletius was excommunicated by Peter of Alexandria for sacrificing to the gods. 1570, p. 113; 1576, p. 81; 1583, p. 80.

1583 Edition, page 103
Melga

King of the Picts who invaded Britain with Guanius and was defeated by Gratian Municeps, according to Geoffrey of Monmouth [Pamela Gradon, 'Constantine and the Barbarians: a note on the Old English "Elene"', The Modern Language Review, vol. 42, no. 2, (April, 1947) pp. 170-71]

Having heard that Britain was lacking in men, Guanius and Melga invaded and spoiled churches and murdered women and children. 1570, p. 155; 1576, p. 116; 1583, p. 115.

1583 Edition, page 138
Melito of Sardis

(d. late C2) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Bishop of Sardis; Christian writer and apologist

Melito wrote an Apology to Antoninus Pius, in which he defended the Christians. 1570, pp. 67, 75, 78; 1576, pp. 41, 50, 53; 1583, pp. 41, 50, 53.

He differed with the popes over the day of the observation of Easter. 1570, p. 82; 1576, p. 56; 1583, p. 53.

1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 73 | 1583 Edition, page 76 | 1583 Edition, page 79
Mellitus (St Mellitus)

(d. 624) [ODNB]

Leader of the group of missionaries sent by Gregory I in 601; bishop of London (604 - 616/18); archbishop of Canterbury (619 - 24)

Pope Gregory sent a letter to Mellitus. 1570, p. 159; 1576, p. 119; 1583, p. 118.

Mellitus was sent to the East Saxons and was consecrated bishop of London.1570, p. 159; 1576, p. 119; 1583, p. 118.

Mellitus converted King Sæberht of the East Saxons and built St Paul's. After the king's death, his sons, who had not been converted, expelled Mellitus because, as they had not been baptised, he refused them communion bread.1563, p. 18; 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 141 | 1583 Edition, page 145 | 1583 Edition, page 157
Menas (St Menas)

(d. c. 295) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

of Egypt; Roman soldier; ascetic; martyr

Menas left the army to become a religious hermit. He returned to the city and loudly proclaimed himself a Christian, was arrested and tortured and then beheaded. 1570, pp. 126-27; 1576, pp. 91-92; 1583, pp. 90-91.

1583 Edition, page 113
Menas and Eugraphus

Early Christian martyrs

They converted Hemogenes through their courage under torture. 1570, p. 128; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115
Meniatus

C3 Christian martyred under Decius at Florence

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 91; 1576, p. 63; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86
Mercuria

C3 elderly matron martyred under Decius at Alexandria

Mercuria was tortured and then killed by the sword. 1570, pp. 88-89; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 62.

1583 Edition, page 85[Back to Top]
Meredith ap Thomas

Servant of Robert Ferrar

Accused by Sage Hughes of fathering her illegitimate child, ap Thomas sued her for slander. 1563, pp. 1085 and 1088; 1583, pp. 1544-45 and 1548.

1583 Edition, page 1568
Merewalh

Sub-king of the Magonsaete [ODNB sub Mildrith]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 178; 1576, p. 135; 1583, p. 134.

1583 Edition, page 157
Merifield

of St Matthew's parish; he and his son-in-law with 7 others were presented in 1541 for gathering in the evening and bringing in bad preachers [Fines]

Merifield was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Merlin (Myddin)

(supp. fl. C6) [ODNB]

Welsh poet and seer; historicity not proven

Foxe discounts the legend that Merlin brought the stones of Stonehenge from Ireland. 1570, p. 148; 1576, p. 109; 1583, p. 108.

1583 Edition, page 131
Metras

(d. c. 249) [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Dionysius of Alexandria]

of Alexandria; martyred there by mob

Metras was beaten by the mob at Alexandria, then taken to the suburbs and stoned. 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 61.

1583 Edition, page 84[Back to Top]
Metrodorus

C2 presbyter of the Marcionite heresy; martyred under Marcus Aurelius [Paul Keresztes, 'Marcus Aurelius a Persecutor?', The Harvard Theological Review, vol. 61, no. 3 (July, 1968) pp. 323-324]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 67; 1576, p. 44; 1583, p. 44.

1583 Edition, page 67
Michael Anstey

Prebendary of Sandiacre (1554 - 1572) [Fasti]

He is probably the prebend identified by Robert Glover as 'Temsey' who visited Robert Glover in prison. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

He urged Robert Glover to recant. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

1583 Edition, page 1736
Michael Drome (Drumme)

Clergyman of London diocese [Fines]; one of the migrants from Cambridge to Cardinal College, Oxford

Michael Drome was one of the scholars Wolsey gathered for Cardinal College. 1563, p. 497; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

1583 Edition, page 1056
Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

1583 Edition, page 1727 | 1583 Edition, page 1732 | 1583 Edition, page 1811 | 1583 Edition, page 1936 | 1583 Edition, page 1966 | 1583 Edition, page 1978 | 1583 Edition, page 2029 | 1583 Edition, page 2034 | 1583 Edition, page 2045 | 1583 Edition, page 2047 | 1583 Edition, page 2048 | 1583 Edition, page 2060 | 1583 Edition, page 2123
Michael Hawkes

of St Alban's parish; charged in 1541 for nonattendance and receiving men of new learning [Fines]

Michael Hawkes was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Michael Lobley

Bookbinder of London [Fines]

Michael Lobley was charged in London in 1531 for buying illicit books in Antwerp, speaking against images and pugatory, and saying that Bilney was a good man. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

Edmund Bonner, when nominated to the bishopric of London, told Richard Grafton that John Stokesley had been wrong to persecute those like Lobley for having bibles in English. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

Michael Lobley's wife was acquainted with members of Thomas Cromwell's household. She asked them to speak to him on behalf of Thomas Frebarne, who was in trouble for obtaining pork in Lent for his pregnant wife. 1570, p. 1354; 1576, p. 1156; 1583, pp. 1184-85.

1583 Edition, page 1070 | 1583 Edition, page 1208 | 1583 Edition, page 1215[Back to Top]
Michael Reniger

Of Manchester.

Joyce Lewes was accompanied through the town by a number of billmen, and led by her friends, Michael Reniger and Augustine Bernher, to the place of her execution. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

1583 Edition, page 2037
Michael Trunchfield

Michael Trunchfield was a shoemaker of Ipswich. 1563, p. 1503, 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1893.

He was the husband of Joan Trunchfield, the martyr. 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1894.

[Also referred to as 'Tronchfield']

1583 Edition, page 1917
Michel

Under-sheriff to Sir Anthony Hungerford

Michel burned the writ ordering the deaths of Richard White and John Hunt, as he did not want to be party to their deaths. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

1583 Edition, page 2079
Michele Antonio of Saluzzo

(1495 - 1528)

Marques of Saluzzo (1504 - 28); took part in the Italian wars of Louis XII and Francis I of France; died of wounds at the battle of Aversa

The marques of Saluzzo and Federico da Bozzolo, coming to aid Pope Clement VII, remained in wait at Viterbo when they discovered Rome had been taken by imperial forces in 1527. 1570, p. 1123; 1576, p. 961; 1583, p. 988.

1583 Edition, page 1012
Mildburg (St Milburga)

(d. in or after 716) [ODNB]

Abbess of Much Wenlock; sister of St Mildrith of Thanet; daughter of Merewalh, sub-king of Magonsaete

She and her sisters are mentioned by Foxe as daughters of King Wulfhere of Mercia. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

She and her sisters are mentioned by Foxe correctly as daughters of King Merewalh. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 157
Mildrith (St Mildred)

(fl. 716 - c. 733) [ODNB]

Abbess of Minster in Thanet; sister of St Mildburg of Much Wenlock; daughter of Merewalh, sub-king of Magonsaete

She and her sisters are mentioned by Foxe as daughters of King Wulfhere of Mercia. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

She and her sisters are mentioned by Foxe correctly as daughters of King Merewalh. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 157
Miles Coverdale

(1488 - 1568)

Evangelist, Bible translator, Bishop of Exeter (1551 - 1553) (DNB)

Miles Coverdale associated with John Rogers and William Tyndale in translating the Bible (1563, p. 1022; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He was ordered to attend the Privy Council on 22 August 1553 (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 31 August, Coverdale appeared before the Privy Council and on the next day was commanded to await their pleasure (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

According to Foxe, he wrote a confutation of Weston's Paul's Cross sermon of 20 October 1553. Foxe claimed that he possessed a copy of Coverdale's confutation; it has not survived (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; and 1583, p. 1466).

Coverdale was a signatory to the letter of 8 May 1554 protesting the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41 [Coverdale's signature is on p. 1642]; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; and 1583, p. 1469-71.

Coverdale sent Rowland Taylor a cap to wear at his execution (1570, p. 1704; 1576, p. 1454; 1583, p. 1557).

Throughout 1554, Christian III of Denmark repeatedly requested that Mary release Coverdale from custody and send him to Denmark. Although Mary was reluctant to grant the request, eventually she agreed, sending Coverdale to Denmark in February 1555 (1563, pp. 1081-83; 1570, pp. 1706-7; 1576, pp. 1456-57; 1583, pp. 1529-31).

1583 Edition, page 1433 | 1583 Edition, page 1490 | 1583 Edition, page 1495 | 1583 Edition, page 1506 | 1583 Edition, page 1551 | 1583 Edition, page 1553 | 1583 Edition, page 1780 | 1583 Edition, page 2099
Miles Coverdale

(1488 - 1569) [ODNB]

Bible translator and bishop of Exeter (1551 - 53)

Coverdale, with other Cambridge scholars, was a member of the Augustinian house under Robert Barnes. 1563, p. 589; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

During the night after he had been examined by Cardinal Wolsey, Robert Barnes stayed at the house of Thomas Parnell. He wrote throughout the night, dictating to Miles Coverdale, Master Goodwin and Thomas Curson. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

Thomas Topley had been converted by Richard Foxe and Miles Coverdale; he left his monastery and became a secular priest. 1570, pp. 1189-90; 1576, p. 1018; 1583, pp. 1046-47.

As William Tyndale was travelling to Hamburg, all his books and notes, including his translation of the book of Deuteronomy, were lost in a shipwreck. Miles Coverdale then helped him translate all of the first five books of the Old Testament. 1570, p. 1227; 1576, p. 1050; 1583, p. 1077.

William Tyndale and Miles Coverdale translated the 'Matthew Bible'. Because Tyndale was arrested before it was completed, it was published under the name of Thomas Matthews. 1570, p. 1363; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1191.

Coverdale was the chief overseer of the Great Bible. He used Tyndale's translation and compared it with the Hebrew. 1570, p. 1363; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1191.

Edmund Bonner showed great friendship to Richard Grafton, Edward Whitchurch and especially to Miles Coverdale. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1191.

Miles Coverdale was one of the authors whose books were banned by the proclamation of 1546. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1246.

1583 Edition, page 1070 | 1583 Edition, page 1101 | 1583 Edition, page 1215 | 1583 Edition, page 1216 | 1583 Edition, page 1270
Miles Garnet

Edmund Peerson reported meeting James Smith, Miles Garnet and Richard Bayfield outside the parsonage at St Edmund in Lombard Street, at which time Bayfield said that the others were Pharisees, not Christians. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Miles Huggarde (or Hoggarde)

(fl. 1557)

Hosier. Catholic controversialist [DNB]

Miles Huggarde disputed with Thomas Hawkes about baptism on 3 September 1554. He was enraged when Hawkes taunted him about his lowly social status. 1563, p. 1157; 1570, p. 1765; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1591

1583 Edition, page 1615
Miles Spencer

Chancellor of Norwich (1550 - 1556). [Fasti]

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spencer, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spencer, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Walgrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

Master Spencer persecuted William Hammon and his wife at Norwich for their refusal to accept catholic ceremonies. 1563, p. 1677.

1583 Edition, page 2071 | 1583 Edition, page 2072[Back to Top]
Milguida

Reputed sister of Mildrith and Mildburg; daughter of Merewalh, sub-king of Magonsaete; nun

She and her sisters are mentioned by Foxe as daughters of King Wulfhere of Mercia. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

She and her sisters are mentioned by Foxe correctly as daughters of King Merewalh. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 157
Miller

A clothier.

Bland heard that his fellow prisoner, Miller, a clothier, was excommunicated and then set free. 1563, p. 1227, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1584, 1583, p. 1671.

1583 Edition, page 1695
Milles

Former soldier, bishop in Persia at the time of Lucinius

Failing to convert the citizens of the city in Persia to which he had been sent, he cursed the city and left. 1570, p. 135; 1576, p. 98; 1583, p. 97.

1583 Edition, page 120
Miltiades

C2 Christian rhetorician of Asia Minor; wrote an Apology now lost: excerpts are contained in the work of Eusebius of Caesarea

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 78; 1576, p. 53; 1583, p. 53.

1583 Edition, page 76[Back to Top]
Miltiades (or Melchiades)

(d. 314) [Kelly]

Pope (311 - 314) Presided over the Lateran Synod at Rome in 313

Miltiades received a letter from Constantine, instructing him to set up a synod to examine the cause of Cæcilian of Carthage. 1570, p. 141, 1576, p. 104, 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 41 | 1583 Edition, page 118 | 1583 Edition, page 126
Mings

Registrar of Beccles.

John Denny, Edmund Poole and Thomas Spicer were examined by Dunning and Mings.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Minucius Fundanus

Roman governor of Asia under Hadrian [Paul Keresztes, 'The Emperor Hadrian's Rescript to Minucius Fundanus', Phoenix, vol. 21, no. 2 (Summer, 1967), pp. 120-129]

He is mentioned in the Apology of Melito of Sardis. 1570, p. 75; 1576, p. 51; 1583, p. 51.

Minucius Fundanus received letters from Hadrian, ordering him not to persecute Christians guilty of no other offence than their religion. 1570, p. 66; 1576, p. 41; 1583, p. 41.

1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 74
Mistress Barber

Wife of a fishmonger. Of Fish Street, London.

James Mearing testfied that Barber's clandestine activities were known to Cluney. 1563, p. 1652, 1570, p. 2230, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2033.

Mistress Bird

Mistress Bird was denounced to the authorities for having practiced much wholesome council. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090. [Presumably 'unwholesome council' was meant.]

She was described as a maintainer in a complaint made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Possibly Mrs Bird is related to Matthew Bird.]

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mistress Cheek

A woman visited by Latimer and Bilney gave birth to a child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

1583 Edition, page 1759
Mistress Harris

A schoolmaster's wife.

Dick Adams was asked by Mistress Harris, a schoolmaster's wife, to remember the sacrament when he was about to be hanged. Adams rebuffed her and died deriding the sacrament. 1563, p. 1736, 1583, p. 2145.

1583 Edition, page 2168[Back to Top]
Mistress Irish

Wife of Edmund Irish.

The night before his martyrdom, Ridley was at Edmund Irish's house. Mistress Irish, described by Foxe as 'a great Papist', wept for Ridley. 1563, p. 1376, 1570, p. 1936, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

1583 Edition, page 1793
Mistress Monday

Wife of Master Monday, secretary to the duke of Norfolk.

The old duke of Norfolk witnessed the sudden illness of Stephen Gardiner that preceded his death. Mistress Monday gave an account to Foxe. 1583, pp. 1787-88.

1583 Edition, page 1811
Mistress Nevell

Of Canterbury.

Mistress Nevell was forced to flee Canterbury for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1679.

Mistress Ponder

Mother of Joan Barber. Of Ipswich.

Mistress Ponder was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mistress Shakerley

Of Shakerley, Lancashire.

Mistress Shakerley was Jeffrey Hurst's mother's landlady. Thomas Lelond waited for her arrival before sending his priest, one of his men, and one of Mistress Shakerley's men to search the house for books. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

[This woman's name is also the name of the village in which she lived. It is possible this was a transcription error made by Foxe.]

1583 Edition, page 2099 | 1583 Edition, page 2100
Mistress Walter

Of London.

Swingfield seized Angel's wife, a midwife, while she was at the labour of Mistress Walter. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

1583 Edition, page 2124
Monsieur Vincent

Messenger from Thomas Wolsey to Stephen Gardiner, ambassador to Rome

Vincent was sent with a letter from Wolsey and with instructions from Wolsey and the king for the furthering of Wolsey's bid for the papacy. 1570, p. 1126; 1576, p. 964; 1583, p. 990.

1583 Edition, page 1014
Montanus

C2 Christian convert and prophet [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Montanists]

Advocated virginity and fasting

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. 4; 1570, p. 77; 1576, p. 53; 1583, p. 53.

1583 Edition, page 76
Morgan Philipps

(d. 1577) [Foster]

Catholic divine. Native of Monmouthshire. Precentor of St David's. Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford. [DNB]

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

1583 Edition, page 1841[Back to Top]
Morgan Phillips (Philipps)

(d. 1570) [ODNB]

b. Monmouthshire; Roman Catholic priest; BA Oxford 1538, MA 1542, BTh before 1550; fellow of Oriel College; principal of St Mary Hall, Oxford (1545 - 50); in exile from 1558; co-founded English College at Douai

Doctors Tresham, Chedsey and Morgan Philips were the chief opponents of Peter Martyr in the disputations at Oxford in 1549. 1570, pp. 1552-55; 1576, pp. 1323-26; 1583, pp. 1373-76.

Morgan Phillips was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 841.

1583 Edition, page 1397
MortonJames

(d. 1542) [Fines]

Martyr; burnt by Longland for having Epistle of St James in English

James Morton was burnt together with Thomas Bernard. 1563, p. 621; 1570, p. 1382; 1576, p. 1179; 1583, p. 1207.

1583 Edition, page 1231
Moses

C3 follower of Novatian who left him; martyr

Moses renounced his support of Novatian. He was later imprisoned with Maximus and Nicostratus and died there. 1570, p. 93; 1576, p. 65; 1583, p. 65.

1583 Edition, page 88
'Mother' Benet

(d. 1558)

Widow. Of Mendlesham.

Mother Benet was persecuted out of the town of Mendlesham. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2036.

She returned home secretly and died there. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2036.

Sir John Tyrrel and Symonds would not allow her to be buried in the churchyard. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2036.

Benet asked a friend of Mother Seaman's how she (Seaman) was. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

She discussed good works and covetousness with her husband. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

[Not related to Edward Benet.]

1583 Edition, page 2060
'Mother' Beriff

Midwife. Of Ipswich.

Beriff refused to allow children to be dipped in the fonts. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

She was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
'Mother' Birlingham

Of Reckenhall, Suffolk.

Mother Birlingham was persecuted with her daughter and two sons for not attending mass and was forced to flee. 1563, p. 1677.

Mother Fenkel

Midwife. Of Ipswich.

Mother Fenkel refused to have children dipped in the fonts. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

She was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mother Halle

of Bagington, Coventry. Familiar with the Lollards of Coventry

Mother Halle testified that the Coventry Lollards who were burnt for heresy displayed devotion at the elevation of the sacrament. 1570, p. 1107; 1576, p. 946; 1583, p. 973.

1583 Edition, page 996
Mother Palmer

of St Martin's at the Well with two buckets; one of 11 presented in 1541 for condemning church ceremonies [Fines]

Mother Palmer was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mother Pike

Of Lancashire.

Mother Pike was sent greetings by John Bradford in a letter he sent to his mother and others. 1570, p. 1839, 1576, p. 1574, 1583, p. 1656.

1583 Edition, page 1680[Back to Top]
Mother Semon

Of Mendlesham.

Mother Semon's maid was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Moyse

Labourer. Of Suffolk.

Nunn went to Denham in search of Moyse, whom he chased on horseback through the fields. Moyse managed to escape. 1563, p. 1698.

Mr Armstrong

Of Corby, Lincolnshire.

Armstrong was forced to bear a faggot as penance. He died shortly afterwards. 1563, p. 1681.

Mr Bacon

Of Norwich.

A man named Bacon urged sheriff Thomas Sutton to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

1583 Edition, page 2029
Mr Baker

Miller. Of Nedeham, Suffolk.

Baker's wife was forced out of their home during the persecutions of Ipswich. 1563, p. 1677.

[Back to Top]
Mr Brook

Salter and seller of earthen pots. Of Queen-hyth, London.

James Mearing testified that Brook did not attend church and that he collected and looked after prisoners' money for them. 1563, p. 1652, 1570, p. 2230, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2033.

Mr Chapman

Chapman took part in the examination of certain scholars at Cambridge University on 8 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

[Almost certainly Thomas Chapman. Matric. sizar from St John's (1549), BA (1552 - 1553), MA from Clare (1555). Fellow of Clare and Ord. deacon (London) (1557 - 1558). University preacher (1565). Admitted to Inner Temple in 1560. Thomas Chapman was possibly the son of Robert Chapman, alderman of Cambridge. (Venn)]

1583 Edition, page 1978
Mr Doncaster

Friend of Thomas Bilney

Thomas Bilney requested, and was granted, two nights to spend consulting with his friends, Mr Doncaster and Mr Farmar, when considering whether to recant. His friends convinced him to do so. 1563, pp. 479-80; 1570, p. 1141; 1576, p. 977; 1583, p. 1003.

1583 Edition, page 1027
Mr Downes

A priest called Sir Richard was standing at the top of some stairs in Downes' house. The priest jested at the execution of Robert Ferrar and then fell down the stairs and broke his neck. 1563, p. 1704 (only).

[See Brown, Robert Ferrar, p. 247. Brown suggests he may be Griffith Durinn, who lived in Camarthen in King Street.]

Mr Edgar

Robert Barnes, in his speech at his execution, asked Mr Pope to urge Mr Edgar to give up swearing. 1563, p. 611; 1570, p. 1373; 1576, p. 1171; 1583, p. 1200.

1583 Edition, page 1224[Back to Top]
Mr Edney

Sergeant to the lord mayor of London living above Bishopsgate

Just before Pavier hanged himself, he sent his servants to Edney, asking him to wait for him at Finsbury. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

1583 Edition, page 1079
Mr Evered

Evered took part in the examination of certain scholars at Cambridge University on 8 January. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

1583 Edition, page 1978
Mr Frank

Of unknown position and origin.

Frank acted as one of the queen's commissioners in the examination of certain scholars at Cambridge University on 8 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

1583 Edition, page 1978
Mr Frost

One of the sheriff of Berkshire's gentlemen

The bishop of Salisbury sent a message via Mr Frost to Stephen Gardiner, asking for a pardon for John Marbeck in 1543. 1570, p. 1397; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1220.

1583 Edition, page 1244
Mr Gibson

Sergeant at arms of St Thomas the Apostle, London

Gibson was sent to Cambridge to arrest Robert Barnes and bring him to London. 1563, p. 601; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

1583 Edition, page 1216[Back to Top]
Mr Green

Of Swinstead.

Green was persecuted under Mary for his protestant beliefs. 1563, p. 1681.

Mr Greenway

Greenway fled Kent for fear of persecution during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1679.

Mr Horne

Close friend of Robert Barnes; helped Barnes to escape

In Northampton, Horne gave Barnes advice on escaping his death sentence. Barnes left a suicide note and a pile of clothes on the river-bank and fled to London, from whence he escaped to Antwerp. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

1583 Edition, page 1217
Mr Hunter

Hunter was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside Drs Young, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

1583 Edition, page 1984
Mr Huntington

Minister. Of Boulogne[?]

Master Huntington assisted William Hastlen in avoiding execution in Boulogne in 1547. 1583, p. 2137.

1583 Edition, page 2161[Back to Top]
Mr Johnson

Member of the Islington conventicle. Of unknown occupation. Living in Hammersmith in 1570.

Edward Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from his fellows. He knocked at the gate and asked to come in but a fellow of his named Johnson warned him to go on his way. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

1583 Edition, page 2099
Mr Johnson

[Probably Robert Johnson of St Nicholas Hostel, Registrar of London (d. 1558) (Venn)]

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside Drs Young, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

1583 Edition, page 1984
Mr Machel

Alderman of London.

Machel was persecuted for his protestant beliefs during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1737.

[Probably the Alderman Machel who was doing business with William Cecil. (CSPD, Mary)].

Mr Malte

Tailor to Henry VIII

William Holt was foreman to Mr Malte. 1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1179; 1576, p. 1008; 1583, p. 1036.

1583 Edition, page 1060
Mr Martin

Parson of Tooting Bec

Humphrey Monmouth claimed to have lent Mr Martin books left by William Tyndale. 1570, p. 1133; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 997.

1583 Edition, page 1021[Back to Top]
Mr Paget

Merchant of Bristol

William Gardiner was apprenticed to Paget, and when he was about 26 years old, Paget sent him to Spain. 1563, p. 875; 1570, p. 1542; 1576, p. 1314; 1583, p. 1364.

1583 Edition, page 1388
Mr Parker

Merchant.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend John Story in Antwerp and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

1583 Edition, page 2175
Mr Pope

Robert Barnes, in his speech at his execution, asked Mr Pope to urge Mr Edgar to give up swearing. 1563, p. 611; 1570, p. 1373; 1576, p. 1171; 1583, p. 1200.

1583 Edition, page 1224
Mr Selyard

Officer of Chancery Lane

Rose Bate made supplications to the king on behalf of her husband. She was directed to get a letter from Mr Selyard to the bishop on her husband's behalf, but the letter asked for information against him. 1563, p. 495; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1027.

1583 Edition, page 1051
Mr Smith

of Bucklersbury, London; bookbinder in Mark Lane [ODNB sub Richard Bayfield]

Richard Bayfield, upon his return to England, stayed at the house of Mr Smith, where he was betrayed and arrested. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1161; 1576, p. 993; 1583, p. 1021.

1583 Edition, page 1045[Back to Top]
Mr Stafforton

Man-at-arms at the court of Henry VIII

Underhill related to Foxe the conversation he overheard between young Prince Edward and his councillors, in which the prince questioned the story of St George. Among others who overheard was Stafforton. 1583, p. 1395.

1583 Edition, page 1419
Mr Tracy

Of London.

Master Tracy secretly took a letter to William Plane and asked him to take it to Crome. Someone read the letter while Plane was out of the house and believed Plane to be the author of its defamatory contents. Plane was sent to the Tower. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Plane was racked and tortured in the Tower but refused to reveal that Tracy had written the letter. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Tracy never enquired as to the welfare of Plane's family after his death. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

1583 Edition, page 2151
Mr Waghan

Jailor of the Marshalsea.

William Hastlen was sent to Sir John Brydges' house to write answers to the articles against him and then sent to the Marshalsea, under the watch of Master Waghan, the jailor. 1583, p. 2137.

1583 Edition, page 2161
Mr Waller

Under-sheriff of Laxfield, Suffolk.

Master Thurston, Master Waller and Thomas Lovel prepared the place for Noyes' execution. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2022.

1583 Edition, page 2046
Mr Warren

Tailor in Watling Street, London

Mr Warren was Andrew Hewett's master. 1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1179; 1576, p. 1008; 1583, p. 1036.

1583 Edition, page 1060[Back to Top]
Mrs Alexander Andrew

Wife of the Keeper of Newgate prison

She woke John Rogers on the morning of his execution. 1563, p. 1036; 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

1583 Edition, page 1516
Mrs Algate

Wife of Martin Algate. Of Ipswich.

Martin Algate's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Argentine

Wife of Richard Argentine. A protestant. Of Ipswich.

She died probably during the early years of Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2125, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1941.

1583 Edition, page 1965
Mrs Ashdon

(d.1557)

Martyr. Of unknown origin.

Mrs Ashdon was burned at Lewes, 22 June 1557. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2195, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2003.

[Possibly related to John Ashdon.]

1583 Edition, page 2007
Mrs Baker

Of Nedeham, Suffolk.

Mrs Baker was driven from her house because of her protestant beliefs. 1563, p. 1677.

[Back to Top]
Mrs Barker

Of Chickering, Norfolk.

Mrs Barker gave birth to a child after fleeing Chickering for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1677.

Mrs Beckes

of St Mildred's Breadstreet parish; wife of William; charged with her husband in 1541 as a sacramentary [Fines]

Mrs Beckes was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Benet

Wife of Thomas Benet (Dusgate)

Mrs Benet had willingly lived under poor conditions during her marriage and was subjected to cruel treatment after the arrest of her husband. She provided food for him while he was in prison. 1570, pp. 1182-83; 1576, pp. 1011-12; 1583, pp. 1039-40.

1583 Edition, page 1063
Mrs Bennett

Wife of Robert

William Symonds, although differing greatly from Robert Bennett in religion, was a good friend of his. At Bennett's wife's request, Symonds got from Capon a letter to Gardiner for the deliverance of Bennett. She got Robert Ockham to deliver it and then sent her own man to check on its progress. Robert Bennett was released from prison through the efforts of members of the privy council. 1570, p. 1398; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1221.

1583 Edition, page 1245
Mrs Bird

Wife of Matthew Bird. Of Ipswich.

Matthew Bird's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Not related to the Birds of Dedham or Norwich.]

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Mrs Blomfield

Of Cornfield, Suffolk.

Mrs Blomfield was forced to flee Cornfield for not attending mass. 1563, p. 1677.

[Wife of John Blomfield.]

[Possibly related to Robert Blomfield.]

Mrs Blomfield

Of Little Stonham, Suffolk.

Mrs Blomfield died sometime after the death of William Brown. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

[Wife of Robert Blomfield.]

1583 Edition, page 2089
Mrs Bosome

Wife of Bosome. Of Richmond, Surrey.

Mrs Bosome was called upon to go to church whilst at her mother's house in Richmond. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

She and her mother eventually attended church and she behaved herself accordingly, but they were apprehended by the constable and the churchwarden, named Sanders, who commanded them to appear the following day in Kingston. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

In the ferry across to Kingston, they met the constable and churchwarden , who later lamented to the ferryman that they had let the women pass through their hands. The ferryman told this to the women, who escaped. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Source for a story about Elizabeth Pepper.]

1583 Edition, page 2096 | 1583 Edition, page 2168
Mrs Brage

Wife of Robert Brage. Of Ipswich.

The wife of Robert Brage refused to allow any child to be dipped in the font. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Mrs Bridges

Of Wootton-under-Bridges near Bristol.

Mrs Bridges appeared to be imprisoned for her beliefs but survived. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

She testified to the cruel treatment and deaths of William and Joan Dangerfield, their child and his mother. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

1583 Edition, page 1977
Mrs Bright

Of Romford, Essex.

Rose Allin told Mistress Bright of Romford and her maid, Ann Starkey, of the burning of her hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Mistress Bright tended Rose Allin's wound in her house in Romford, when she and other prisoners stayed in Bright's house on the way to London. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

1583 Edition, page 2031
Mrs Brisley

of St Nicholas Shambles; presented in 1541 for nonattendance, reasoning in the new learning [Fines]

Mrs Brisley was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Broke

Wife of Thomas Broke

Sir Edward Ryngeley was cruel to Thomas Broke's wife when Broke was in prison in Calais. She wrote to Thomas Cromwell, complaining of the way the imprisoned men, especially her husband, were treated. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

Having overheard that the commissioners investigating heresy at Calais were planning to intercept letters from Thomas Broke's wife, Francis Hall warned her. She then wrote letters to Cromwell and her friends, praising the commissioners. They promised her protection, and she managed to have a letter sent secretly to Cromwell. 1563, p. 667.

1583 Edition, page 1251
Mrs Burlingham

Wife of Nicholas Burlingham. Of Winston.

She was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936[Back to Top]
Mrs Bush

Wife of George Bush. Of Ipswich.

George Bush's wife rejected the host after receipt of it. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Bustre

of St Katherine Coleman; presented in 1541 with her husband and son-in-law for working on holy days

Mrs Bustre was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Byshop

of St Benet Fink; wife of Martin Byshop; presented in 1541 for not confessing at Lent or receiving communion at Easter

Mrs Byshop was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Callaway

of London; wife of William

Some plate was stolen from New College, Oxford, and sold to William Callaway in London. Callaway bought the goods in good faith. When John London, warden of the college, discovered that he had bought it and that he was a protestant, he brought a charge of felony against him. Callaway claimed the privilege of 'neck verse', but the judge denied him on the basis that he was a bigamist because his wife had two husbands. 1563, pp. 626-27; 1570, p. 1408; 1576, pp. 1200-01; 1583, p. 1230.

To save her husband, Mrs Callaway swore under oath before the judges that she had never been married before and that her children were born out of wedlock. 1563, p. 627; 1570, p. 1408; 1576, p. 1201; 1583, p. 1230.

1583 Edition, page 1254
Mrs Carlton

Wife of Ralph Carlton. Of Ipswich.

The wife of Ralph Carlton was named by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler as having access to her husband, who was a priest. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Mrs Castle

of St Andrew's Holborne; presented in 1541 for reading scripture in church and meddling [Fines]

Mrs Castle was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Catchpool

Wife of William Catchpool. Of Winston.

She was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Mrs Chamberlain

of St Mary Woolchurch; presented in 1541 with her husband and 6 others for despising ceremonies

Mrs Chamberlain was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Chambers

Of Cartlon, near Buckenham.

Mrs Chambers was forced to flee Norfolk for fear of persecution for her protestant beliefs. 1563, p. 1678.

[Wife of Richard Chambers.]

Mrs Clarke

Wife of William Clarke. Of Ipswich.

The wife of William Clarke was named by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler as having access to her husband, who was a priest. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Mrs Clervis

of St Magnus's parish; wife of Ralph; charged with 10 others in 1541 for supporting preachers of the new learning [Fines]

Mrs Clervis was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Cole

Mrs Cole fled Feversham, Kent, with her husband and children for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1679.

[Wife of Robert Cole.]

Mrs Coleman

Wife of Robert Coleman. Of Ipswich.

Robert Coleman's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Cooke

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged with her husband and another couple in 1541 for insulting the mass [Fines]

Mrs Cooke was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
[Mrs] Cooper

Debtor in Newgate prison.

Bartlett Green believed that Master Boyer would look after Mrs Cooper's welfare. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1856.

1583 Edition, page 1880[Back to Top]
Mrs Crossman

Of Tibenham Long-row, Norfolk.

Mrs Crossman was persecuted for her denial of catholic doctrine. Barbour, constable of the town, searched unsuccessfully for her and her child in her house. 1563, p. 1699, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Mary died before Crossman could be persecuted further. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2097
Mrs Dissel

of St Mary Woolchurch; presented in 1541 with her husband, servant and 5 others for despising ceremonies [Fines]

Mrs Dissel was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Ettis

of St Matthew's parish; presented in 1541 with her husband for maintaining certain preachers and for causing Richard Taverner to preach against the king's injunctions [Fines]

Mrs Ettis was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Fetty

Wife of John Fetty.

John Fetty's wife complained to Brokenbury about her husband's refusal to attend mass. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

She went mad after her husband was taken by the authorities. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

1583 Edition, page 2079 | 1583 Edition, page 2127[Back to Top]
Mrs Filmer

Wife of Henry

Mrs Filmer pleaded with the bishops who were commissioners for the Six Articles to give her husband an audience. She eventually found the bishops of Ely, Salisbury and Hereford together and put her case. 1570, p. 1395; 1576, p. 1189; 1583, p. 1218.

1583 Edition, page 1242
Mrs Finn

Wife of John Finn. Of Ipswich.

John Finn's wife was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Fisher

Butter wife of Hornsey

Mrs Fisher was asked by Thomas Frebarne to obtain pork in Lent for his pregnant wife. She did so, but reported this to the dean of Canterbury. 1570, p. 1354; 1576, p. 1156; 1583, p. 1184.

1583 Edition, page 1208
Mrs Frebarne

Wife of Thomas, fisherman, of Hornsey, Middlesex

Thomas Frebarne's wife was pregnant and had a craving for pork during Lent. He was told that she and the child might die if she didn't have the meat. When her husband was arrested and examined for the offence, she asked to be punished instead. With the help of Thomas Cromwell, her husband was eventually released. 1570, pp. 1354-55; 1576, p. 1156; 1583, pp. 1184-85.

1583 Edition, page 1208
Mrs Freese

(d. c. 1534) wife of Edward [Fines sub Edward Freese]

When pregnant and visiting her husband in prison, Mrs Freese was kicked; the child died immediately and she later died. 1563, pp. 494-95; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1026.

1583 Edition, page 1050[Back to Top]
Mrs Freese

(d. 1540) [Fines]

Wife of Valentine Freese

Valentine Freese and his wife were burnt at the same stake in York. 1563, p. 495; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1027.

1583 Edition, page 1051
Mrs Glaves

Of Pennington, Lancashire.

When Henry Brown's son was given two beads by Glave's wife, Brown threw them in the fire and complained to her about them. She then complained to the Lelond, justice, who chastised him and threatened him with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

1583 Edition, page 2100
Mrs Greene

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged with her husband and 6 others in 1541 for insulting the sacraments and ceremonies of the church [Fines]

Mrs Greene was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Greenwich

Wife of John Greenwich. Of Ipswich, Suffolk.

The wife of John Greenwich was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Greenwich

Wife of Stephen Greenwich. Of Ipswich, Suffolk.

The wife of Stephen Greenwich fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Mrs Grove

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of unknown origin.

Mrs Grove was burned at Lewes on 22 June 1557. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2195, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2003.

1583 Edition, page 2007
Mrs Hammon

Wife of William Hammon. Of Norwich

The wife of William Hammon was persecuted by John Atkins, William Mingey, Miles Spencer, and Master Head for her refusal to accept catholic ceremonies. 1563, p. 1677.

Mrs Harlstone

Wife of John Harlstone. Of unknown origin.

John Harlstone's wife was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

[Not related to Simon Harlstone.]

1583 Edition, page 2047
Mrs Hearst

Wife of James Hearst. Of Ipswich.

James Hearst's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Henrison

of St Thomas the Apostle; presented in 1541 with her husband and 11 others for showing little reverence at mass

Mrs Henrison was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228[Back to Top]
Mrs Hollon

Sister of Elizabeth Lawson. Of Bedfield, Suffolk.

Mrs Hollon was forced to flee her home town for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

1583 Edition, page 2095
Mrs Hubbard

Wife of Thomas Hubbard. Of Mendlesham.

The wife of Thomas Hubbard was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Mrs Hurst

Mother of Jeffrey Hurst. Of Shakersley, Lancashire.

Thomas Lelond spoke with Mrs Hurst during the search of her house for her son's possessions. He called her an old fool and threatened her with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond asked Mrs Hurst where her son Jeffrey and daughter Alice were. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Lelond had John Hurst bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jefrrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), p. 208.]

1583 Edition, page 2100
Mrs Ingforby

Wife of Andrew Ingforby. Of Ipswich.

Andrew Ingforby's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Mother-in-law of Lawrence Humphrey. See ODNB.]

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Jordane

Wife of William Jordane. Of Ipswich.

The wife of William Jordane was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Mrs Latimer

Wife of Latimer, curate deprived under Mary. Possibly of Ipswich.

Latimer's wife was named by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler as having access to her husband, who was a priest. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Not related to Hugh Latimer, the martyr.]

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Laurence

Of Barne Hall, Downham, Essex.

The wife of John Laurence was forced to flee Essex for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1678.

[Wife of John Laurence.]

Mrs Ledley

Of Ashford, Kent.

Mrs Ledley was forced to flee Kent for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1679.

Mrs Man

Wife of Bastian Man. Of Ipswich.

The wife of Bastian Man was described as a maintainer against a complaint made against several parishioners in Ipswich made by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Mantell

Of Canterbury.

The wife of Walter Mantell was forced to flee Canterbury for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1679.

[Probably the wife of either Walter Mantell (the elder) of Horton Priory, Kent or Walter Mantell (the younger) of Horton Priory, Kent, both of whom appear in Book 10 of Acts and Monuments. (The latter's first name is taken from Loades, Two Tudor Conspiracies, p. 80).]

[Back to Top]
Mrs Marbeck

of Windsor; wife of John

After his third examination, John Marbeck, on Stephen Gardiner's orders, was put in irons in the Marshalsea and prevented from seeing anyone, including his wife. She petitioned the bishop for many days to allow her to visit her husband. She was eventually given leave to visit as often as she liked. 1570, pp. 1392-93; 1576, p. 1188; 1583, p. 1216.

1583 Edition, page 1240
Mrs Marsh

Wife to Richard Marsh, rector of St. Pancras Soper Lane. He was deposed for marriage and suspected, in 1554, of sacreligiously stealing the Host from the pyx. He and she were imprisoned on a charge of cohabiting together despite being officially divorced (1563, pp. 1000-01; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1398; 1583, p. 1469).

1583 Edition, page 1493
Mrs Matthew

of Essex.

Mrs Matthew, along with others of Essex, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Mrs Mauling

Wife of John Mauling. Of Winston.

She was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Mrs May

of St Thomas the Apostle; presented in 1541 with her husband and 11 others for showing little reverence at mass

Mrs May was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228[Back to Top]
Mrs Miles

of St Giles without Cripplegate; she and her husband were charged with 6 others in 1541 for insulting the sacraments and ceremonies of the church [Fines]

Mrs Miles was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Mungey

Bonner's sister.

Nicholas Ridley was kind to Mrs Mungey. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham with Ridley and her mother. 1563, p. 1284, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's sister (and mother). 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

John Harpsfield sent greetings to her in a letter to Bonner. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

1583 Edition, page 1741 | 1583 Edition, page 1870
Mrs Ogule

of St Benet's at Paul's Wharf; presented with her husband in 1541 for not being confessed

Mrs Ogule was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Palmer

Mother of Julins Palmer

Julins Palmer's mother cursed him as a heretic and drove him from the house. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842 [recte 1830], 1583, p. 1936.

1583 Edition, page 1960[Back to Top]
Mrs Pierrpoint

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked Bernher to ask Mrs Pierrpoint to ask the sheriff, William Chester, what was planned for him. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

1583 Edition, page 1678
Mrs Pinchbecke

of St Thomas the Apostle; presented in 1541 with her husband and 11 others for showing little reverence at mass

Mrs Pinchbecke was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Platte

of St Benet Fink; presented in 1541 with her husband for reasoning in scripture [Fines]

Mrs Platte was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Potkin

Wife of Potkin. Imprisoned with Alice Benden. Of unknown origin.

While in prison, Alice Benden and another prisoner, the wife of Potkin, devised to live on only 2 1/2 pence a day, to see how well they could sustain penury and hunger before they were forced to endure it. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

1583 Edition, page 2005
Mrs Ramsey

Wife of John Ramsey. Of Ipswich.

The wife of John Ramsey was imprisoned under Mary. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

She was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Not related to Henry Ramsey.]

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Mrs Rawlins

Wife of Erkinald Rawlins.

She and her husband received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, pp. 1813-14, 1576, pp. 1549-50, 1583, p. 1632.

1583 Edition, page 1656
Mrs Richman

Daughter of Mother Fenkel. Wife of Richard Richman. Of Ipswich.

The wife of Richard Richman fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Richmond

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged with her husband in 1541 with despising holy bread and holy water

Mrs Richmond was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Mrs Roberts

Gentlewoman. Of Hawkhurst, Sussex.

Richard Woodman, after his condemnation, wrote a letter to Mistress Roberts of Hawkhurst.1563, pp. 1571-72, 1570, pp. 2194-95, 1576, pp. 1893-95, 1583, pp. 2002-03.

Sir John Guilford tried to force Mrs Roberts to go to church. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Guildford sent his wife to persuade her to go to church. He later sent his servants and officers to hound her. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Mrs Roberts fell ill after the hounding of Guildford and his assistants. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

When Guildford's servant climbed the stairs in Mrs Roberts' house to try to force her into church, his gout returned, making him unable to climb further and so pressure her. He did not return to persecute her. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

1583 Edition, page 2097
Mrs Rought

Wife of Rought. Of Winston.

Mrs Rought was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936[Back to Top]
Mrs Savage

Wife of Savage, merchant of York

After Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry were murdered by the Yorkshire rebels in 1549, with their bodies left in a field, Mrs White and Mrs Savage had them buried. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

1583 Edition, page 1333
Mrs Shalcross

Wife of R. Shalcross. Of Lancashire.

Mrs Shalcross was sent greetings by John Bradford in a letter he sent to his mother and others. 1570, p. 1839,1576, p. 1574, 1583, p. 1656.

1583 Edition, page 1680
Mrs Sheterden

Wife of Nicholas Sheterden.

Mrs Sheterden received a letter from her husband, Nicholas Sheterden. 1563, pp. 1237-38, 1570, pp. 1858-59, 1576, pp. 1590-91, 1583, p. 1678.

1583 Edition, page 1702
Mrs Sheterden, Senior

Mother of Nicholas and Walter Sheterden.

Mrs Sheterden received a letter from her son, Nicholas. 1563, p. 1235, 1570, pp. 1856-57, 1576, p. 1589, 1583, pp. 1676-77.

She received another letter from her son, Nicholas, dated 2 July 1555. 1563, p. 1237, 1570, p. 1858, 1576, p. 1590, 1583, p. 1678.

1583 Edition, page 1700
Mrs Simpson

Wife of Simson, fellow prisoner of Robert Smith.

Mrs Simpson sent Anne Smith money. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

1583 Edition, page 1725[Back to Top]
Mrs Smith

Wife of Humphrey Smith. Of Winston.

Mrs Smith was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Mrs Smith

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged with her husband in 1541 for nonattendance [Fines]

Mrs Smith was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Mrs Swaine

Widow. Of Ipswich.

Mrs Swaine fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Swallow

Wife of William Swallow, bailiff of Chelmsford.

She married Swallow shortly after the death of George Eagles and was taken ill with the falling-sickness. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

1583 Edition, page 2034 | 1583 Edition, page 2124 | 1583 Edition, page 2127
Mrs Tankerfield

Wife of George Tankerfield.

Mrs Tankerfield was tricked by Beard into exposing her husband's whereabouts. George Tankerfield was later attacked by Beard. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

In a letter to his wife,Robert Smith asked that letters to him be delivered to 'sister Tankerfield', who could be trusted to deliver them into his hand. 1563, p. 1267, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

1583 Edition, page 1713 | 1583 Edition, page 1725
Mrs Thomas Hawkes

Thomas Hawkes wrote to his wife, comforting her and instructing her on what to after his death. (1563, pp. 1159-60; 1570, pp. 1768-69; 1576, p. 1510; 1583, pp. 1593-94

1583 Edition, page 1617
Mrs Thorpe

Of Calais.

After the Duke of Guise had taken Calais, John Thorpe and his wife, a godly couple, were cast into the fields and had their child taken from them by the soldiers. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

His wife, who was very ill, was carried nearly a mile by strangers, who took her to a village for the night, where she was able to recover. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

The next day Thorpe and his wife returned to England, where by chance they went to an inn where they found their child sitting by the fireside. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

1583 Edition, page 2099[Back to Top]
Mrs Tolly

Widow. Of Ipswich.

Mrs Tolly was forced to flee Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1677.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Trevisam

Wife of James Trevisam. Of St Margaret Lothbury, London.

John Small, Mrs Trevisam's servant, was discovered reading from an English Bible to her, her husband and a small group of other people in her house. She and all the others, except for her gravely ill husband, were arrested and imprisoned in Newgate. 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

1583 Edition, page 1689
Mrs Tye

Mariner's wife. Of Ipswich.

Tye's wife was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Mrs Tyms

Wife of William Tyms.

Mrs Tyms gave birth to a child while her husband was imprisoned in the King's Bench. 1570, p. 1793, 1576, pp. 1794-96, 1583, p. 1900.

William Tyms wrote a letter of thanks to parishioners who had been kind to his wife. 1570, p. 1793, 1576, pp. 1794-96, 1583, p. 1900.

1583 Edition, page 1923
Mrs Wats

Wife of William Wats.

Wats' wife tried unsuccessfully to persuade Wats to leave the house where he was being kept while the constables slept. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

A stranger persuaded Wats to depart with his wife. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Wats' wife returned home to Seal, thinking her husband had gone away but he returned home. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

When the constables came to search for Wats he could not be found, so they took his wife and set her in the stocks for two days. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

1583 Edition, page 2095[Back to Top]
Mrs White

Wife of Matthew White of Staxton, North Yorkshire; sister of Clopton.

After Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry were murdered by the Yorkshire rebels in 1549, with their bodies left in a field, Mrs White and Mrs Savage had them buried. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

1583 Edition, page 1333
Mrs Whoodles

Wife of John Whoodles. Of Ipswich.

The wife of John Whoodles fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs Wilestone

Wife of George Wilestone.

Mrs Wilestone was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

1583 Edition, page 1739
Mrs Wilson

(d. 1557)

Married woman. Martyr. Of Kent.

Mrs Wilson was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

[Possibly the Christiana Wilson forced to flee Colchester.]

1583 Edition, page 2004
Mrs Wimshurst

Wife of Alexander Wimshurst.

The wife of Alexander Wimshurst was called a whore by Story and Cook. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Her husband would not reveal her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

1583 Edition, page 2096[Back to Top]
Mrs Wolsey

Wife of William Wolsey.

William Wolsey gave money to Thomas Hodilo to give to Wolsey's wife. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1716.

1583 Edition, page 1740
Mrs Wright

Wife of William Wright.. Of 'the windmill', Ipswich.

The wife of William Wright fled Ipswich for fear of persecution.1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Mrs. Babington

Wife of the Warden of the Fleet prison

She joined her husband in trying to force John Hooper to attend mass (1563, p. 1055; 1570, p. 1679; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507).

1583 Edition, page 1530
Mrs. Persons

Married to one Persons, a nephew of Edmund Bonner. When Bishop Bonner visited her husband at Stortford, Hertfordshire, he took great pleasure in her playing at the virginals. Foxe suggests that Bonner's interest in her was lascivious (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474).

1583 Edition, page 1498
Mrs. Richard Bradshaw

George Marsh wrote a letter to her and other co-religionists in and around Bolton, Lancs, instructing them on how to behave in the current time of persecution. 1570, p. 1743; 1576, pp. 1488-89; 1583, pp. 1571-72.

1583 Edition, page 1595[Back to Top]
Mrs. Thomas Richardson

Before surrendering himself, George Marsh visited Mrs Richardson, asking her to pray for him and take care of his family. 1570, p. 1732; 1576, p. 1479; 1583, p. 1562.

1583 Edition, page 1586
Mrs.Bradford

Mother of John Bradford, martyr. Of Manchester.

She was the recipient of letter by John Bradford, who sent greetings to her and others dear to him, which included his father, John Treves, Thomas Sorrocold, Laurence Bradshaw, James Bradshaw and their wives and families. 1570, pp. 1805-06,1576, pp. 1541-42, 1583, p. 1624.

She received a farewell letter from her son. 1570, pp. 1838-39, 1576, pp. 1573-74, 1583, pp. 1656-57.

She received another letter from her son, a little before he burned. 1570, p. 1839, 1576, p. 1574, 1583, p. 1656.

1583 Edition, page 1648
Mullein

Of Kersey

Mullein is described by Foxe as 'fit to be a hangman'. He heaped faggots around Rowland Taylor at the stake. 1563, p. 1079; 1570, p. 1702; 1576, p. 1453; 1583, pp. 1526-27.

1583 Edition, page 1550
Mussius Aemilianus

(d. 261/262) [C. Koerner www.roman-emperors.org]

Prefect of Egypt (259 - 61); responsible for implementing Valerian's laws against the Christians

Supported the rebellion of the Macriani against Gallien (260 - 61); proclaimed emperor in Egypt; captured and executed

Aemilianus was one of Valerian's chief persecutors of Christians. 1570, p. 97; 1576, p. 68; 1583, p. 68.

Aemilianus banished Dionysius of Alexandria and his deacons because they refused to sacrifice to the gods. 1570, p. 102; 1576, p. 72; 1583, p. 72.

1583 Edition, page 91 | 1583 Edition, page 95[Back to Top]
Mylles

Preacher. Of Adisham.

Bland's clerk did not ring the bell for a Sunday service because Master Mylles' servant had informed him that his master had letters from the lord chancellor stating that he must go to London [Mylles was the preacher there then]. Bland preached in Mylles' place. 1563, p. 1219, 1570, p. 1844, 1576, p. 1578, 1583, p. 1666.

1583 Edition, page 1690
Myrrell

Steward to Stephen Gardiner

Myrrell came to Edmund Bonner to invite him to dine with Gardiner. 1570, p. 1243; 1576, p. 1065; 1583, p. 1091.

1583 Edition, page 1115[Back to Top]
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