Glossary of People
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T. CoastT. HensenT. TylarT.M.TacitusTarasiosTatianTatwineTeclaTelesphorus (St Telesphorus)TeragoneTertullian (Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus)ThadiacusTharatus, Probus, and AndronicusThe Abbot of Clarilocus (Clairlieu: Meurthe et Moselle)TheclaTheobaldTheoctiste, Theodota and EudoxiaTheodolusTheodoraTheodore ITheodore of Tarsus (St Theodore of Tarsus)TheodoretTheodorusTheodorusTheodorusTheodorusTheodorus (Gregory) of NeocaesareaTheodorus (St Theodorus)Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius)Theodosius IITheodotionTheodotus the Money ChangerTheodotus the TannerTheodric of BerniciaTheonas of AlexandriaTheonusTheophilusTheophilus of Caesarea (St Theophilus)TheotechnusTheotecnusThomas (Robert/Stephen) Forman (Farman, Farmer, Ferman)Thomas AbellThomas AddingtonThomas AduetThomas AlenThomas AlseyThomas ap RichardThomas Aquinas (St Thomas)Thomas ArchThomas ArgallThomas ArthurThomas ArundelThomas ArundelThomas AskinThomas AthothThomas AustenThomas Austy (Cornwell)Thomas AvingtonThomas BabamThomas BaconThomas Baghe or WilliamsThomas Barett (Baret, Barrett)Thomas BarnesThomas BateThomas BeardThomas Becket (St Thomas Becket)Thomas BeconThomas Becon (als Theodore Basile)Thomas BekinsawThomas BeleThomas Bell JrThomas BenbridgeThomas Benet (alias Dusgate)Thomas BenionThomas BenoltThomas BenthamThomas BernardThomas BilneyThomas BilneyThomas BlundevilleThomas BoleynThomas BoleynThomas BondThomas BowyerThomas BoyseThomas BrerewoodThomas BriceThomas BrodehillThomas BrokeThomas Brooke (Cobham)Thomas BrownThomas BrowneThomas BrydgesThomas BugeThomas ButcherThomas ButlerThomas CandlerThomas CappesThomas CardenThomas CarewThomas CarmanThomas CastellThomas CaustonThomas ChalenorThomas ChamberlainThomas ChooteThomas ChristenmassThomas ChurchThomas ClarkeThomas Clerke the youngerThomas CobbeThomas ColeThomas CollerdThomas ConstableThomas ConstantineThomas CooperThomas CornishThomas CotisfordThomas CranmerThomas CranmerThomas CrokerThomas CromwellThomas CromwellThomas CullierThomas CulpepperThomas CursonThomas Curson (Felde)Thomas DaleThomas DalyThomas DarbyshireThomas DarbyshireThomas DarcyThomas DarcyThomas DavidThomas De VickThomas DobbeThomas DobsonThomas DougateThomas DruryThomas DungateThomas EffartThomas ElasThomas EminghameThomas EmpsonThomas EveThomas FairfaxThomas FarmanThomas FeerfaneThomas FerrarThomas FieldThomas Fisher (Hawkins)Thomas FlierThomas ForretThomas FouleThomas FowlerThomas FrebarneThomas FreemanThomas FustThomas Garrard (Garret)Thomas GilbertThomas GilfordThomas GoldwellThomas GoodingThomas GoodrichThomas GoodrichThomas GraingerThomas GreenThomas GreenwoodThomas GreshamThomas GroutThomas HaleThomas HardesThomas HardingThomas HardingThomas HarlandThomas HaroldThomas HarvieThomas HarwoodThomas HawesThomas HawkesThomas Hawkes (Hawkyns)Thomas HaywardThomas HempsteadThomas HendenThomas HerneThomas HigbedThomas HillsThomas HinshawThomas HittonThomas HittonThomas HodiloThomas HogekingThomas HortonThomas HosierThomas HowardThomas HowardThomas HowardThomas HowardThomas HubbardThomas HudsonThomas HudsonThomas HusseyThomas II of YorkThomas IvesonThomas JenensThomas JohnsonThomas KeldeThomas KightelyThomas KnowlesThomas KymeThomas LancasterThomas LanghamThomas LanquetThomas LawneyThomas LawrenceThomas le CollThomas LeeThomas LeghThomas LeighThomas LelondThomas LeverThomas LeyesThomas LinacreThomas LinleyThomas LockerThomas LosebyThomas LoundThomas LovelThomas LupsetThomas LynacresThomas MabsThomas MagnusThomas ManningThomas MarshamThomas MartinThomas MartinThomas MatthewThomas MelsterThomas Merial (Murell)Thomas MerseThomas MillesThomas MontagueThomas MooreThomas MoreThomas MoreThomas MoreThomas MoretonThomas MoretonThomas MorseThomas MouseThomas NectonThomas NetThomas NeveThomas NightingaleThomas NorfolkThomas NorgateThomas NorrisThomas OsmundThomas PaccardThomas ParkerThomas ParkerThomas ParkerThomas ParnellThomas ParretThomas ParryThomas PartonThomas PatmoreThomas PeacockThomas PellesThomas PepperThomas PhillipsThomas PlummerThomas PowthreadThomas PoyntzThomas PyotThomas RadcliffeThomas RadcliffeThomas RainoldsThomas RamsayThomas RavensdaleThomas RaynoldesThomas ReadThomas RidleyThomas Robertson (Robinson)Thomas RoseThomas RoseThomas RowThomas RussellThomas RysleyThomas SadlerThomas SampsonThomas SaulterThomas SaundersThomas SedgwickThomas SedgwickThomas SeymourThomas ShadwellThomas SimsonThomas SmithThomas Some (Solme)Thomas SommersThomas SorrocoldThomas Sotherton [or Sutterton or Sutton]Thomas SouthernThomas SpicerThomas SpilmanThomas SpratThomas SpurdanceThomas SpurgeThomas StarcheyThomas SteilbeThomas StempeThomas StephensThomas StiffeThomas SturgeonThomas SymonThomas TailourThomas TaylorThomas Temys (Temmys, Temse)Thomas ThackerThomas ThackhamThomas ThirlbyThomas ThirlbyThomas ThirtelThomas ThompsonThomas TimperleyThomas TomkinsThomas TopleyThomas TrenthamThomas TurnerThomas TyeThomas UnderdowneThomas UnderhillThomas UpcherThomas VachellThomas VauxThomas VavasourThomas WarbartonThomas WatsonThomas WattesThomas WayThomas WeldonThomas WellsThomas WendyThomas WendyThomas WentworthThomas WentworthThomas WhartonThomas WhartonThomas WhetstoneThomas WhiteheadThomas WhittleThomas WhoodThomas WilcockesThomas WilliamsThomas WilsonThomas WimpleThomas WinseleyThomas WittonThomas WolseyThomas WolseyThomas WoodThomas WoodThomas WoodgateThomas WoodingtonThomas Woodward, the elderThomas WottonThomas WriothesleyThomas YoungThomasin a WoodThomasine BarberThomsonThraseas of EumeniaThyrsus, Lucius, Callinicus, Appollonius, Philemon, Asilas and LeonidesTiberius (Tiberius Claudius Nero)Tiberius Claudius PompeianusTiburtius (St Tiburtius)TimotheusTimotheus (St Timotheus)Timothy MaltTingleTitus (Titus Flavius Vespasianus)Titus Livius (Livy)ToittusTollerTollin [or Tolwyn]Tomas ArnalTomsonTrabulaTrajan (Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus)Trajan DeciusTrapnelTrayfordTrebellius PollioTrebonianus GallusTreheronTrigonianTrinianTristram SwaddellTryphoTryphon (St Tryphon)Tulle BustreTutsamTwyfordTyeTyrannio (St Tyrannius)Tytilus of East Anglia
Glossary of People in the 1583 Edition | T
T. Coast

Haberdasher. Of London.

Coast was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

1583 Edition, page 2061
T. Hensen

Of Oundle.

Hensen, a supporter of godly preachers, was so badly assaulted that he feared to return to his house and died in Queen Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1681.

T. Tylar

(d. 1558)

Member of the Islington conventicle. Of London.

Tylar was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

1583 Edition, page 2061
T.M.

Signatory of the letter of 8 May 1554 concerning the proposed disputation at Cambridge (1563, p. 1003; 1570, p. 1641; 1576, p. 1400; 1583, p. 1471).

1583 Edition, page 1495
Tacitus

(d. 276) [R. McMahon www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (275 - 76); died on return from a successful campaign in Asia Minor

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 39, 107; 1576, pp. 31, 76; 1583, pp. 31, 75.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 98
Tarasios

(c. 730 - 806)

Patriarch of Constantinople (784 - 806)

Supporter of icons; appointed by Irene; presided over the Council of Nicea in 787;

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 176; 1576, p. 133; 1583, p. 132.

1583 Edition, page 155
Tatian

C2 Assyrian Christian convert; trained in Greek philosophy; writer, theologian [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Tatian wrote about Justin Martyr and his persecution by Crescens. 1570, p. 59; 1576, p. 45; 1583, p. 45.

1583 Edition, page 68
Tatwine

(d. 734) [ODNB]

Archbishop of Canterbury (731 - 34)

He is listed by Foxe: 1570, p. 178; 1576, p. 135; 1583, p. 134.

1583 Edition, page 157
Tecla

Early virgin martyr

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 133; 1576, p. 96; 1583, p. 95.

1583 Edition, page 118[Back to Top]
Telesphorus (St Telesphorus)

(d. c. 136) [Kelly]

Pope (c. 125 - c. 136); martyr

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. ; 1570, p. 62, 77; 1576, p. 38, 53; 1583, pp. 38, 52.

1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 75
Teragone

Martyr in Spain under Decius, according to Bede.

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 92; 1576, p. 64; 1583, p. 64.

1583 Edition, page 87
Tertullian (Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus)

(c. 155 - c. 230) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

of Carthage; Christian convert and writer, church leader

Tertullian was a man of learning and eloquence who defended the Christians under persecution. 1570, p. 80; 1576, p. 55; 1583, p. 55.

Tertullian commended Irenæus for his learning. 1570, p. 80; 1576, p. 55; 1583, p. 55.

Tertullian recorded that Christianity came to Britain in the time of Pope Eleutherius in C2. 1570, p. 145; 1576, p. 107; 1583, p. 106.

Tertullian was a married priest, according to Jerome. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1128; 1583, p. 1154.

1583 Edition, page 35 | 1583 Edition, page 38 | 1583 Edition, page 58 | 1583 Edition, page 63 | 1583 Edition, page 73 | 1583 Edition, page 76 | 1583 Edition, page 78 | 1583 Edition, page 91 | 1583 Edition, page 129 | 1583 Edition, page 1092 | 1583 Edition, page 1161 | 1583 Edition, page 1178 | 1583 Edition, page 1196
Thadiacus

Bishop of York (fl. 586) [Gams]

Thadiacus and Theonus, bishop of London, after the destruction of their churches and the flight of their people, went into Wales. 1563, p. 16; 1570, p. 154; 1576, p. 115; 1583, pp. 113-24.

1583 Edition, page 137
Tharatus, Probus, and Andronicus

(d. early C4); of Tarsus in Cicilia; martyrs

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 110; 1576, p. 79; 1583, p. 78.

1583 Edition, page 101
The Abbot of Clarilocus (Clairlieu: Meurthe et Moselle)

The suffragen bishop of Metz.

Foxe simply reports his dying at the sound of a firing gun (1570, p. 2306, 1576, p. 1996, 1583, p. 2106).

1583 Edition, page 2130
Thecla

(fl. C8) [ODNB sub Leoba]

Kinswoman of Leoba; joined Boniface and Leoba in Germany

Abbess of Kitzingen; abbess of Ochsenfurt

Leoba and Thecla were the only nuns allowed to enter Fulda. 1570, p. 172; 1576, p. 130; 1583, p. 129.

1583 Edition, page 152[Back to Top]
Theobald

(c. 1090 - 1161) [ODNB]

b. Eure, Normandy; monk at Bec; prior 1126; abbot 1136

Archbishop of Canterbury (1139 - 61); his household became an academy for clerks

Foxe says that in Theobald's time priests were allowed to have wives and that their wives and children had the right to inherit property. 1570, p. 1335; 1576, p. 1138; 1583, p. 1167.

1583 Edition, page 1191
Theoctiste, Theodota and Eudoxia

(d. early C4) Daughters of Athanasia

Martyred with their mother, Cyrus and John at Canopus, Egypt

They were executed with their mother for refusing to worship the Roman gods. 1570, p. 127; 1576, p. 92; 1583, p. 91.

1583 Edition, page 114
Theodolus

Said in Passio S. Alexandri Papae to be an early C2 Christian priest

Theodolus was a deacon of Pope Alexander I and was imprisoned with him. 1570, p. 63; 1576, p. 38; 1583, p. 38.

1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 63
Theodora

Legendary early virgin martyr

Theodora refused to sacrifice to the gods and was placed in a brothel. She was disguised by Didymus and escaped, but turned herself in when he was arrested. They were both beheaded and their bodies burnt. 1570, p. 91; 1576, pp. 63-64; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86[Back to Top]
Theodore I

Pope (642 - 49) [Kelly]

Greek of Jerusalem, son of a bishop; struggled against Monothelitism and against Paul, patriarch of Constantinople

Theodore I was the son of a bishop. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1129; 1583, p. 1154.

1583 Edition, page 1178
Theodore of Tarsus (St Theodore of Tarsus)

(602 - 690) [ODNB]

b. Tarsus; archbishop of Canterbury (668 - 90)

Studied at Constantinople; arrived in England in 669; reformed the English church; established a school at Canterbury

Theodore was sent by Pope Vitalian to be archbishop of Canterbury. He introduced the Latin service and Roman ritual. He ordained three bishops on his own authority. 1570, pp. 166, 167; 1576, pp. 125, 126; 1583, pp. 124, 125.

Theodore replaced Wilfrid as bishop of York with Ceadda. He was supported in this by King Ecgfrith of Northumbria. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

Theodore called a synod at Thetford, which resulted in decrees on clerical discipline. 1570, p. 167; 1576, p. 126; 1583, p. 125.

He attended the sixth Council of Constantinople, presided over by Pope Agatho. 1570, p. 167; 1576, p. 126; 1583, p. 125.

When Wilfrid was restored to the bishopric of York by King Osred I, Ceadda was consecrated bishop of Mercia by Theodore. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

Theodore divided Mercia into five bishoprics. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

Theodore of Tarsus was one of the sources used by William the Conqueror to compile a book of canons and ordinances to govern the clergy. 1570, p. 1302; 1576, p. 1114; 1583, p. 1139.

1583 Edition, page 42 | 1583 Edition, page 147 | 1583 Edition, page 157 | 1583 Edition, page 1163[Back to Top]
Theodoret

(c. 393 - c. 457) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Theologian, author; bishop of Cyrus, Syria (423 - 57)

Involved in the Nestorian controversy in opposition to Cyril of Alexandria and John of Antioch

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 20, 86, 137, 1299; 1576, pp. 16, 60, 100, 1112; 1583, pp. 16, 59, 99, 1137.

1583 Edition, page 39 | 1583 Edition, page 82 | 1583 Edition, page 122 | 1583 Edition, page 1161
Theodorus

Christian tortured under Julian the Apostate

Theodorus, for singing a psalm at the removing of the body of Babylas, was severely tortured. 1570, p. 138, 1576, p. 100, 1583, p. 99.

1583 Edition, page 122[Back to Top]
Theodorus

Captain of Lucinius; martyr

Theodorus, having broken the emperor's idols, was tortured and then beheaded. 1570, p. 135; 1576, p. 98; 1583, p. 97.

1583 Edition, page 120
Theodorus

C4 martyr under Licinius

Theodorus was crucified, had nails driven into his armpits and was finally beheaded. 1570, p. 123; 1576, p. 88; 1583, p. 88.

1583 Edition, page 111
Theodorus

According to Nicephorus, bishop of Tyre and martyr under Licinius

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 123; 1576, p. 88; 1583, p. 88.

1583 Edition, page 111
Theodorus (Gregory) of Neocaesarea

(d. c. 270) [Gams]

Bishop of Neocaesarea in Pontus (c. 240 - 264); pupil of Origen; attended the Council of Antioch in 269 that condemned Paul of Samosata

[According to Bede, he was martyred in the reign of Decius.]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 92, 106; 1576, pp. 64, 76; 1583, pp. 64, 75.

1583 Edition, page 87 | 1583 Edition, page 98[Back to Top]
Theodorus (St Theodorus)

(d. 306) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Soldier martyred at Amasea

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 128; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115
Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius)

(c. 346 - 395) [D. Woods www.roman-emperors.org]

b.Spain; Roman general; emperor in the east 379; named his son Arcadius co-emperor in 383; his sons ruled east and west

Theodosius decreed that no one should be buried within a church. 1570, p. 9, 1576, p. 8, 1583, p. 8.

1583 Edition, page 31 | 1583 Edition, page 86 | 1583 Edition, page 124 | 1583 Edition, page 128[Back to Top]
Theodosius II

401-450 [Geoffrey S. Nathan www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor in the East (408 - 450)

Ward of the Persian king Yazdegerd I, who helped to ensure he succeeded his father; dominated by older sister Pulcheria

Pope Leo wished Theodosius to call a church council in Italy. 1563, p. 619, 1570, p. 1216, 1576, p. 1041, 1583, p. 1068.

1583 Edition, page 122 | 1583 Edition, page 1092
Theodotion

Mid-C2 Greek Jewish scholar who translated the Hebrew bible into Greek [www.jewishencyclopedia.com]

His work was used by Origen

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 79; 1576, p. 54; 1583, p. 54.

1583 Edition, page 77
Theodotus the Money Changer

One of the leaders of the followers of Theodotus the Tanner at Rome; persuaded Natalius to become bishop of the sect c. 200 [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Zephyrinus]

He offered Natalius money to lead the sect. 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82
Theodotus the Tanner

(fl. late C2) [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Zephyrinus]

Heretical teacher at Rome; excommunicated by Pope Victor

He taught Aselepodotus and Theodotus the Money Changer. 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82[Back to Top]
Theodric of Bernicia

King of Bernicia C6 [ODNB sub Ida]

Son of Ida

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

1583 Edition, page 133
Theonas of Alexandria

(d. 299) [Gams]

Patriarch of Alexandria (282 - 99)

He is mentioned by Foxe. 1570, p. 104; 1576, p. 73; 1583, p. 73.

1583 Edition, page 96
Theonus

C6 Anglo-Saxon bishop of London [Gams]; said to have fled into Wales

Theonus and Thadiacus, bishop of York, after the destruction of their churches and the flight of their people, went into Wales. 1563, p. 16; 1570, p. 154; 1576, p. 115; 1583, pp. 113-24.

1583 Edition, page 136
Theophilus

C3 elderly man who proclaimed himself Christian at Alexandria during persecution

With the soldiers Ammon, Zenon, Ptolomeus and Ingenuus, Theophilus urged constancy on the Christians under trial and proclaimed himself to be a Christian. 1570, p. 90; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 62.

1583 Edition, page 85
Theophilus of Caesarea (St Theophilus)

(d .c. 190) [Gams]

Bishop of Caesarea, Palestine; writer

Theophilus supported Pope Victor I in celebrating Easter on a Sunday. 1570, p. 82; 1576, p. 56; 1583, p. 53.

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 78; 1576, p. 53; 1583, p. 53.

1583 Edition, page 76 | 1583 Edition, page 79
Theotechnus

Persecutor in the east under Galerius C4

Theotechnus worked to destroy the reputation of the Christians in Athens and then erected an image of Jupiter that was made to appear to demand the banishment of the Christians. 1570, p. 116; 1576, p. 83; 1583, pp. 82-83.

1583 Edition, page 105
Theotecnus

(d. c. 303?) [Gams]

Bishop of Caesarea, Palestine (c. 260 - c. 303)

Theotecnus took Marinus, a Christian soldier, into the church and had him choose between the sword and the New Testament. Marinus chose the latter and was martyred. 1570, p. 106; 1576, p. 75; 1583, p. 75.

1583 Edition, page 98
Thomas (Robert/Stephen) Forman (Farman, Farmer, Ferman)

(d. 1528) BTh Cambridge 1512; rector of All Hallows, Honey Lane 1524; president of Queens' College, Cambridge; charged in 1528 [Fines]

Thomas Forman, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Thomas Abell

(d. 1540) [ODNB]

Roman Catholic priest and martyr. BA Oxford (1514); MA (1518). Queen Catherine's chaplain. Attainted of misprision and concealment of treason in 1534 for support of Elizabeth Barton; imprisoned for six years; hanged, drawn and quartered

Thomas Abell, the queen's chaplain, preached and wrote a book in defence of her marriage to the king. 1570, p. 1196, 1576, p. 1024, 1583, p. 1052.

Abell was associated with Elizabeth Barton (Joan of Kent). He was convicted of misprision of treason, had his goods confiscated and was imprisoned. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1055.

Powell, Fetherston and Abell were executed on the same day as the Protestant martyrs Barnes, Garrard and Jerome. 1563, p. 613; 1570, p. 1375; 1576, p. 1173; 1583, p. 1201.

1583 Edition, page 1076 | 1583 Edition, page 1225
Thomas Addington

Foxe reports that 'one master Addington' was sent to the Tower on 14 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).An entry in the APC, p. 403, reveals that Addington's first name was Thomas and that he was still in the Tower in March 1554.

1583 Edition, page 1491
Thomas Aduet

Of St Michael at Queenhythe. Presented in 1541 for reasoning in scripture

Thomas Aduet was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Thomas Alen

Fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge; witness of Bilney's martyrdom

Thomas Alen testified that Thomas Bilney died without recanting. 1570, p. 1150; 1576, p. 984; 1583, p. 1011.

1583 Edition, page 1035
Thomas Alsey

Of Copford.

Apparitor of the consistory court at Colchester.

Thomas Alsey was to accompany John Kingston to Colchester to collect the 22 people charged with heresy. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

In his letter to Bonner, Kingston said that Alsey was to deliver 22 people to Bonner for examination. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

1583 Edition, page 1996[Back to Top]
Thomas ap Richard

(d. 1553)

Chaplain of Robert Ferrar; Ferrar's commissary at Cardigan

Thomas ap Richard was accused of celebrating a communion, at a wedding, with 'superstitious' ceremonies; Ferrar denied this. 1563, pp. 1086, 1090 and 1095; 1583, pp. 1545, 1548 and 1551.

He was denounced to the privy council by Hugh Rawlins and Thomas Lee for conducting a wedding without having the banns read. 1563, p. 1089; 1583, p. 1547.

[For ap Richard's death see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), p. 227].

[Foxe calls him 'Thomas Prichard'.]

1583 Edition, page 1568
Thomas Aquinas (St Thomas)

(c. 1225 - 1274) [Ralph McInerny, John O'Callaghan, 'Saint Thomas Aquinas', The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2005 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.) ]

Italian philosopher, theologian; developed scholastic tradition; doctor of the church; Dominican; lectured at the University of Paris, preached and wrote, including Summa theologica. Son of count of Aquino.

Foxe mentions him: 1570, pp. 2, 81576, pp. 2, 6-71583, pp. 2, 7.

1583 Edition, page 25
Thomas Arch

Of Lichfield.

Thomas Arch was examined by Draycot and Bayne and then later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Thomas Argall

(1499/1500 - 1563) [ODNB]

Administrator, registrar of the prerogative court of Canterbury

William Saye and Thomas Argall were actuaries in the case against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

1583 Edition, page 1383
Thomas Arthur

(d. 1532) [ODNB]

Religious radical; BA Cambridge 1513; MA 1516; fellow of St John's, Cambridge 1517; abjured 1527

While at Cambridge, Thomas Bilney converted to a reformed religion and convinced others there, including Thomas Arthur and Hugh Latimer. Bilney and Arthur left the university, going about teaching and preaching. Cardinal Wolsey had them imprisoned in 1527. 1563, p. 461; 1570, pp. 1134-35; 1576, p. 972; 1583, p. 998.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

Wolsey forced Thomas Arthur, Thomas Bilney, Geoffrey Lome and Thomas Garrard to abjure for speaking against the authority of the pope. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

Edmund Peerson presented a list of charges against Richard Bayfield in 1531, especially concerning Bayfield's praise for Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1018 | 1583 Edition, page 1022 | 1583 Edition, page 1072
Thomas Arundel

(1353 - 1414)

Chancellor. Archbishop of Canterbury (1396 - 1398; 1399 (restored) - 1414) [DNB]

Arundel's death is referred to in Foxe's account of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Thomas Arundel gave sentence against Cobham but died before him, from an illness that caused his tongue to swell so much that he could not swallow. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

1583 Edition, page 1811 | 1583 Edition, page 2127
Thomas Arundel

(1353 - 1414) [ODNB]

bishop of Ely 1373; chancellor (1386 - 89, 1391 - 96, 1407 - 09, 1412 - 13); archbishop of York (1388 - 96); archbishop of Canterbury (1396 - 97, 1399 - 1414); condemned traitor 1397; bishop of St Andrews 1397

In a sermon at the funeral of Queen Anne, Archbishop Arundel praised her for having copies of all four gospels in English. 1563, p. 454.

[Back to Top]
Thomas Askin

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Thomas Askin was burned at Newbury, around 16 July 1556, with John Gwyn and Julins Palmer. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2117, 1576, p. 1840, 1583, p. 1934.

[Note that in 1563 Foxe does not know Askin's christian name.]

1583 Edition, page 1958
Thomas Athoth

(d. 1557)

Minister. Martyr. Of Chichester diocese. Former Augustinian friar. [Fines]

Thomas Athoth was accused and examined by Christopherson, Richard Briesly, Robert Tailor, Thomas Paccard, Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale. He was condemned and martyred at Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

1583 Edition, page 2048
Thomas Austen

Brother of Richard and John Austen.

On Sunday 26 November (1555) Thomas Austen called Bland a heretic. 1563, p. 1218,1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1578, 1583, p. 1665.

Bland's altercation with John Austen on Sunday 3 December (1555) was the reason Thomas Austen accused him of heresy. [The witnesses to Bland's altercation with John Austen that day include: Edmond Mores, Richard Randall, John Hils, William Forstall, and Thomas Gooding.] 1563, p. 1219, 1570, p. 1844, 1576, p. 1578, 1583, p. 1666.

1583 Edition, page 1689
Thomas Austy (Cornwell)

of St Mary Matfelon, London; Lollard, one of the 'known men'. One of those meeting at William Mason's house; owned a notable Lollard library; married Thomas Vincent's daughter; abjured in 1511; refused to wear a faggot in 1527 and condemned to perpetual custody; escaped [Brigden, London, pp. 89-91, 104]

Thomas Austy was charged in London in 1530 with having escaped from perpetual custody. 1570, p. 1185; 1576, p. 1014; 1583, p. 1042.

1583 Edition, page 1066
Thomas Avington

(d. 1556)

Turner. Martyr. Of Ardingley, Sussex. [Fines references: Laurence, p. 69; Bryce, p. 167.]

One of the signatories to the articles of the freewillers in King's Bench, 30 January 1555.

In January 1555 John Trew and Thomas Avington began to emerge as the leading freewillers in the King's Bench. On 1 January 1555 Bradford wrote to freewiller prisoners in the King's Bench (Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 682 [recte 650]-652]. According to Henry Bull, they took offence at this letter and so Bradford wrote a letter to Trew and Avington to try to conciliate them (ibid., pp. 475-76).

Around the time of his condemnation on 30 January 1555, Bradford wrote another letter to Trew and Avington, attempting a reconciliation between himself and them (ECL Ms. 262, fo.101r; Letters of the Martyrs, p. 475).

Avington signed John Trew's confession on 30 January 1555 (Bodley MS. 53, fo.125r; printed in Richard Laurence, ed., Authentic Documents Relative to the Predestinarian Controversy [Oxford, 1819], p. 69 and C. J. Clement, Religious Radicalism in England, 1535-65 [Carlisle, 1997], p. 370).

Thomas Avington was examined and condemned by Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 1522., 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

He was burned at Lewes about 6 June 1556. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-156.]

1583 Edition, page 1938 | 1583 Edition, page 2048
Thomas Babam

of St Margaret's in Fishstreet; presented in 1541 for not being confessed

Thomas Babam was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Thomas Bacon

(d. 1559) [Venn]

Chaplain to Henry VIII, Master of Gonville Hall (1552 - 1559), Canon of Ely (1554). (Venn)

Bacon was one of those who put the common seal of the University of Cambridge to the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. He was examined before Scot, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

1583 Edition, page 1984
Thomas Baghe or Williams

(d. by 7/2/1558) [Fasti]

BTh; DD; chancellor of St Paul's (1530 - 58); archdeacon of Surrey (1531 - 55)

Thomas Baghe was present and agreed to the pronouncement of sentence against Richard Bayfield. 1563, p. 489; 1570, p. 1164; 1576, p.996 ; 1583, p. 1024.

Thomas Baghe, with Sergeant Wever, arrested Andrew Hewett, John Tybal and John Chapman at Chapman's house. They bound Tybal and Chapman with ropes and took them to the bishop's house and sent Hewett to Lollards' Tower. 1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1179; 1576, p.1008 ; 1583, p. 1036.

Baghe took part in the first examination of Anne Askew and rebuked her for speaking scripture, which he said was forbidden to women. 1563, pp. 669-70; 1570, p. 1414; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, p. 1235.

The chancellor was mentioned in a letter sent by the king and council to Edmund Bonner, rebuking Bonner and urging him to use the Book of Common Prayer. 1563, pp. 693-94; 1570, p. 1494; 1576, p. 1266; 1583, p. 1303.

1583 Edition, page 1048 | 1583 Edition, page 1060 | 1583 Edition, page 1259 | 1583 Edition, page 1327
Thomas Barett (Baret, Barrett)

(d. by April 1544) [Emden]

BCL Oxford; DCL 1529; canon of St Paul's (1534 - d.); canon of Lincoln (1539 - d.); college of advocates 1530; chaplain to the king by 1543

Thomas Merial was brought before Bishop Stokesley accused of heresy. He would have been condemned to be burnt but for the intervention of Thomas Barett. 1570, p. 1440; 1576, p. 1228; 1583, p. 1257.

Thomas Barett was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

1583 Edition, page 1088 | 1583 Edition, page 1281
Thomas Barnes

Thomas Barnes and Elice Byrch were detected by Thomas Pyot to Dr Draycot on 27 June 1556 for discussing the fact that two queens had been proclaimed in England after the death of Edward VI. One of them was condemned to bear a fagot for speaking against the mass. 1563, p. 1527.

[Back to Top]
Thomas Bate

Thomas Bate was one of those sheltered by Christopher Ravins. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Thomas Beard

A tailor in Fleet Street, London. Marian informer against protestants. [Bridgen, London and the Reformation, pp. 454, 569, 626.]

Beard visited John Cardmaker in Newgate prison a few days before Cardmaker's execution and tried to persuade him to recant; Cardmaker refused. 1570, p. 1754; 1576, p. 1498; 1583, p. 1581.

Beard discovered John Small reading from an English Bible to a small group in the house of James Trevisam. He denounced the group to the authorities and had them arrest. 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

George Tankerfield's wife was tricked by Beard. She later attacked him. George Tankerfield was then taken to Newgate by Beard and Simon Ponder. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Thomas Beard died wretchedly. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

[NB: Beard tried to obtain banned catholic books during Edward VI's reign; see Brigden, London, p. 454].

1583 Edition, page 1605 | 1583 Edition, page 1689 | 1583 Edition, page 1713 | 1583 Edition, page 2125[Back to Top]
Thomas Becket (St Thomas Becket)

(1120? - 1170) [ODNB]

Chancellor (1154 - 62); archdeacon of Canterbury (1154 - 62); archbishop of Canterbury (1162 - 70); murdered

Becket appealed to Pope Alexander III when Roger, archbishop of York, crowned Henry II's son Henry. 1563, p. 16.

After Becket's murder, King Henry II was compelled to agree to allow appeals to Rome from England.1570, p. 5, 1576, p. 4, 1583, p. 4.

One of the injunctions issued by Henry VIII declared that Becket was not to be considered a saint and martyr, but a rebel and traitor. Becket was said to have attacked William de Tracy. Another gentleman came to his rescue and in the process killed Becket. 1563, pp. 572-73; 1570, p. 1295; 1576, p. 1108; 1583, p. 1134.

1583 Edition, page 27 | 1583 Edition, page 42 | 1583 Edition, page 1121 | 1583 Edition, page 1158 | 1583 Edition, page 1347[Back to Top]
Thomas Becon

(1512 - 1567) [DNB]

Thomas Becon was committed to the Tower, together with John Bradford and 'M. Vernon' (i.e., Jean Veron) by the privy council on 16 August 1553 (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409] and APC IV, p. 322).

Another mention of Becon being sent to the Tower, together with Bradford and Veron, on 16 August 1553 is in 1570, p. 1634; 1576, p 1395; 1583, p. 1465.

A letter from Ridley and his fellow prisoners to Bradford and his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench in 1554 stated that Ridley longed to hear of Father Crome, Doctor Sandys, Masters Saunders, Veron, Beacon and Rogers. 1563, p. 1294, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1724.

[Also referred to as 'M. Beacon']

1583 Edition, page 1433 | 1583 Edition, page 1489 | 1583 Edition, page 1748
Thomas Becon (als Theodore Basile)

(1512 - 1567) [ODNB]

Priest of Norfolk; recanted in 1541; recanted again in 1543 at Paul's Cross, cutting up and burning 11 of his works

Thomas Becon was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1177; 1583, p. 1205.

Becon was one of the authors whose books were banned by the proclamation of 1546. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1246.

1583 Edition, page 1229 | 1583 Edition, page 1270[Back to Top]
Thomas Bekinsaw

Clerk

Bekinsaw was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535.

[NB: This may be the 'Thomas Bekynsaw' in Emden, 1501-1540].

1583 Edition, page 1559
Thomas Bele

of St Magnus's parish; charged with 10 others in 1541 for supporting preachers of the new learning [Fines]

Thomas Bele was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Thomas Bell Jr

Mayor of Gloucester (1554 - 1555)

With the city alderman, Bell visited John Hooper on the evening before the bishop's execution. Hooper thanked them for their visit. 1563, pp. 1059-60; 1570, p. 1682; 1576, p. 1436; 1583, p. 1509. Bell chased away people trying to record Hooper's last words at the stake. 1563, p. 1061; 1570, p. 1683, 1576, p. 1436; 1583, p. 1510.

1583 Edition, page 1533
Thomas Benbridge

(d. 1557)

Gentleman. Unmarried. Of Winchester.

Thomas Benbridge was examined by Dr White, bishop of Winchester. 1563, p. 1667, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

Articles were brought against him. 1563, pp. 1667-68, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

Thomas Benbridge was condemned and then taken to the place of martyrdom by Richard Pecksal, the sheriff, to whom Benbridge gave his jerkin. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

Seaton willed Benbridge to recant at the stake. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

The fire at Benbridge's execution was poorly lit. It first took away Benbridge's beard and then licked his legs. His leather understockings caused the heat to be even more intense, at which Benbridge cried out a recantation. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

Benbridge then tried to push the fire from him and two or three of his friends helped him out of the flames. His friends were later imprisoned for assisting him. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

The sheriff, Pecksal, took Benbridge from the stake, from whence he was transferred to the Fleet. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

Seaton wrote articles for him to subscribe to. Threatened with the stake again, Benbridge subscribed and was returned to prison. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

From prison Benbridge wrote to Seaton retracting his recantation. He was subsequently burned or rather 'broiled' at the stake. 1563, p. 1668, 1570, p. 2246, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

1583 Edition, page 2070
Thomas Benet (alias Dusgate)

(d. 1532) [ODNB; Fines]

Clergyman of Cambridge; fellow of Corpus Christi College (1523 - 25); visited Luther; burnt at Liverydole in Heavitree, near Exeter

At Cambridge, Thomas Benet was well acquainted with Thomas Bilney. He left Cambridge, married and taught school in Torrington and then Exeter. He wrote letters of comfort to William Strowde, imprisoned in Exeter on suspicion of heresy. 1570, p. 1180; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1037.

Benet set up papers on the cathedral door in Exeter proclaiming the pope to be antichrist. The author, yet unknown, was sought eagerly and was cursed from the pulpit with bell, book and candle. Benet, in the audience, betrayed himself by laughing. Benet was arrested and imprisoned. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1037.

Benet was examined and readily confessed to posting the bills. The following day he was sent to the bishop, who had him placed in the bishop's prison in stocks and strong irons. 1570, p. 1182; 1576, p. 1011; 1583, p. 1037.

Canons, priests and monks all worked to get him to recant, but he refused and was condemned to be burnt. 1570, p. 1183; 1576, p. 1012; 1583, p. 1040.

1583 Edition, page 1061[Back to Top]
Thomas Benion

(d. 1557)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Bristol.

Thomas Benion was brought by a constable before Dalby on 13 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Benion was examined and condemned by Dalby on 20 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, pp. 1945-46, 1583, p. 2053.

He was burned at Bristol on 27 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2053.

1583 Edition, page 2076
Thomas Benolt

(d. 1534) [ODNB]

Windsor herald 1504; Norroy king of arms 1510; Clarenceux king of arms 1511

Benolt joined with the French herald to oppose the emperor because of letters sent by Thomas Wolsey. 1563, p. 439; 1570, p. 1123; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 988.

When the Spanish ambassador, Inigo de Mendoza, complained to Thomas Wolsey about his treatment, Wolsey blamed it on Thomas Benolt, saying also that Benolt had intrigued against the emperor with the French herald and would be executed at Calais. Benolt was warned, returned to England by another route, and went to the king, showing him Wolsey's letters of commission. 1570, pp. 1123-24; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

1583 Edition, page 1012
Thomas Bentham

(1513 - 1579)

DD (1565). Perpetual fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford (1546). On the accession of Mary he was removed from the fellowship. He went into exile (see Christina Garrett, The Marian Exiles [Cambridge, 1966], pp. 86-87). Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry (1559). (DNB)

Thomas Bentham was a leader of a clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

He prayed boldly to the congregation at the burning of the last seven martyrs in Smithfield. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

He was picked up by two men in St Katherine's on the pretence of sitting on an inquest for a drowned man, but he protested that he was not suitable for the post and that he was a scholar of Oxford. He was asked for evidence of his position. 1563, p. 1701, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

When Bentham was asked to swear upon a catholic primer, members of the inquest realised his confessional beliefs. 1563, p. 1701, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

A messenger suddenly arrived and dismissed the inquest, giving Bentham the chance to escape. 1563, p. 1701, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

Foxe refers to his installation after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

1583 Edition, page 2098 | 1583 Edition, page 2148
Thomas Bernard

(d. 1542) [Fines]

Martyr; burnt by Longland for teaching the Lord's Prayer in English

Thomas Bernard was burnt together with James Morton. 1563, p. 621; 1570, p. 1382; 1576, p. 1179; 1583, p. 1207.

1583 Edition, page 1231[Back to Top]
Thomas Bilney

(d. 1531)

Preacher and Martyr. Of Norwich. [DNB]

Thomas Bilney brought God's word to the town of Hadleigh, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1445; 1583, p. 1518.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-8, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

1583 Edition, page 1542 | 1583 Edition, page 1754 | 1583 Edition, page 1759 | 1583 Edition, page 1771
Thomas Bilney

(c. 1495 - 1531) [Fines; ODNB]

Proctor of Cambridge; evangelical reformer; martyr burnt at Norwich

While at Cambridge, Bilney converted to a reformed religion and convinced others there, including Thomas Arthur and Hugh Latimer. Bilney and Arthur left the university, going about teaching and preaching. Cardinal Wolsey had them imprisoned in 1527. 1563, pp. 461, 481; 1570, pp. 1134-35; 1576, p. 972; 1583, p. 998.

John Lambert was converted at Cambridge by Thomas Bilney. 1563, pp. 482, 527; 1570, p. 1255; 1576, p. 1075; 1583, p. 1101.

Bilney was well acquainted with Thomas Benet. 1570, p. 1180; 1576, p. 1009; 1583, p. 1037.

Bilney preached repentance and had his books burned. 1570, p. 39; 1576, p. 32; 1583, p. 32.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

Thomas Bilney wrote five letters to Tunstall. 1563, pp. 465-73; 1570, pp. 1140-47; 1576, pp. 977-81; 1583, pp. 1003-08.

Thomas Bilney and John Brusyerd entered into a dialogue on images in Ipswich around the time of Bilney's examination. 1563, pp. 474-79; 1570, pp. 1138-40; 1576, pp. 975-76; 1583, pp. 1001-03.

Bilney initially refused to recant and asked to introduce witnesses; this request was refused by the bishop of London because it was too late in the proceedings. Bilney was given two nights to consult with his friends, and they persuaded him to abjure. 1563, p. 479; 1570, p. 1140; 1576, p. 977; 1583, p. 1003.

Thomas Wolsey forced Thomas Arthur, Thomas Bilney, Geoffrey Lome and Thomas Garrard to abjure for speaking against the authority of the pope. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

Bilney was sentenced to bear a faggot at Paul's Cross and to imprisonment at the pleasure of Cardinal Wolsey. 1563, p. 479; 1570, p. 1140; 1576, p. 977; 1583, p. 1003.

For two years Bilney repented of his abjuration. He moved to Norfolk and preached openly. He was arrested when he gave books to an anchoress he had converted in Norwich. Richard Nix obtained a writ for his burning. 1570, p. 1146; 1576, p. 981; 1583, p. 1008.

Lawrence Staple was charged in London in 1531 for, among other things, receiving four copies of Tyndale's New Testament from Bilney. 1570, p. 1187; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1043.

Edmund Peerson presented a list of charges against Richard Bayfield in 1531, especially concerning Bayfield's praise for Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

Bilney was arrested by the sheriff, Thomas Necton, his good friend. He was examined and condemned by Thomas Pelles. The night before his burning, his friends found him cheerful and enjoying his dinner. He put his finger into the candle flame several times to test the heat. He was burnt the next day at Lollards' Pit in Norwich. 1563, pp. 482-83; 1570, pp. 1150-51; 1576, pp. 984-85; 1583, p. 1012.

Michael Lobley was charged in London in 1531 for, among other things, saying that Bilney was a good man. 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

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Thomas Blundeville

(1522? - 1606?) [ODNB]

Author and translator

Thomas Blundeville held a deed of enfeofment of lands to a 'clericus' and his wife and their heirs that Foxe took to indicate the right of a priest's children to inherit. 1570, p. 1335; 1576, p. 1139; 1583, p. 1167.

1583 Edition, page 1191
Thomas Boleyn

(1477 - 1539)

Earl of Wiltshire and Ormonde. Father of Anne Boleyn. [DNB]

Henry VIII asked the earl of Wiltshire to allow Cranmer to stay at his house in Durham. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861.

The pope's authority was discussed at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford, where it was concluded that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Arragon was not legal, and the pope's authority was denounced. Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Carne and Benet were then sent before the pope to deliver these conclusions. 1563, p. 1472, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861. [1563 has the commission as consisting of: Bonner, Winchester, Sampson, Repps, Goodricke, Latimer, Shaxton, and Barlow.]

The earl of Wiltshire would not kiss the pope's foot. His spaniel bit it. 1570, p. 2034, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861.

1583 Edition, page 1885
Thomas Boleyn

(1476/7 - 1539) [ODNB]

Earl of Wiltshire and earl of Ormond (1529 - 39); father of Anne

Thomas Boleyn, John Stokesley and Edward Lee were sent as delegates to the pope to present the king's case for a divorce from Queen Catherine. 1570, p. 1195; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Thomas Cranmer, John Stokesley, Edward Carne, William Benet and the earl of Wiltshire were sent as ambassadors to the pope to dispute the matter of the king's marriage. 1570, p. 1280; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

Anne Boleyn, her father and her brother maintained many learned men at Cambridge. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

The earl of Wiltshire helped to support Princess Elizabeth's train at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Thomas Boleyn is mentioned in a letter by Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 736; 1583, p. 1345.

Gardiner recalled Thomas Boleyn being called in as a witness by the Lord Protector when delivering articles against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 757; 1570, p. 1527; 1576, p. 1302; 1583, p. 1352.

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Thomas Bond

Shoemaker of Coventry. Martyred for teaching his children 4 April 1519

Thomas Bond, with others accused of teaching their children, was brought back to Coventry on Palm Sunday and condemned for relapse. 1563, pp. 420-21; 1570, p. 1107; 1576, p. 946; 1583, p. 973.

1583 Edition, page 996[Back to Top]
Thomas Bowyer

(1530? - 1556)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Great Dunmow, Essex. [Fines]

Thomas Bowyer was brought before Wiseman of Felstead, who sent him to Colchester Castle and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

On 6 June 1556 Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against him (essentially the same as those against Thomas Whittle). He answered. 1563, pp. 1523-24, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, pp. 1914-16.

Bowyer signed a letter, written with his fellow sufferers, that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

He was imprisoned at Newgate and burned at Stratford-le-Bow on 27 June 1556. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

1583 Edition, page 1938
Thomas Boyse

of Calais

Thomas Boyse testified he himself had not heard Thomas Broke speak heresy, but that Edmund Peyton and Robert Poole had said that he had. 1563, p. 663; 1570, p. 1403; 1576, p. 1196; 1583, p. 1225.

1583 Edition, page 1249
Thomas Brerewood

(d. 1544) [Fasti]

DCL; archdeacon of Barnstaple (1528 - 44); dean of Exeter 1537

Thomas Brerewood was one of the persecutors of Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

Brerewood and Thomas Southern accused their dean, Simon Hayes, of heresy and treason. He was committed to the Fleet until friends procured his release. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1238
Thomas Brice

(c. 1536 - 1570/1)

Martyrologist. Minister. (ODNB) Ordained priest (1560). Curate of Ramsden, Bellhouse (1560). Rector of the parish of Little Bursted (1561 - 1571).

Thomas Brice was in the house of John Seal, in Horting, when the bailiff and others, at the commandment of Sir John Baker, were sent to search for him. They knew his stature and the colour of his garments yet somehow did not recognise him and so he escaped. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

He fled Essex for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1678.

Thomas Brice came home from Wesel with his elder brother John to their father's house and intended to warn Springfield of the danger nearly upon him, when they themselves came close to capture. Servants at an inn allowed them to escape through a secret passage and take a barge out of town. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

[Author of a compendious register in metre (1559) - a verse martyrology.]

[Brother of John Brice.]

1583 Edition, page 2105[Back to Top]
Thomas Brodehill

Weaver.

Thomas Brodehill was denounced to Bishop Bonner by the earl of Oxford and Sir Philip Paris on 1 May 1555. He recanted on 17 May 1555. 1563, p. 1166; 1570, p. 1777; 1576, p. 1518; 1583, p. 1601

[Foxe calls Brodehill ?Brody? in the 1563 edition.]

1583 Edition, page 1625
Thomas Broke

(c. 1513 - in or after 1555) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Religious radical; gentleman of Calais; exchequer official and alderman by 1539; MP for Calais 1539; charged July 1539 and April 1540; imprisoned in the Fleet for 4 months

Thomas Broke was one of those accused of heresy to the privy council by councillors of Calais. Broke, Hare, Cocke and Barber were sent with their accusers to England to be examined by Cranmer, Gardiner, Sampson and other bishops. 1563, p. 661; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1195; 1583, p. 1224.

Sir Richard Long and Francis Hastings charged Thomas Broke and Geoffrey Loveday with aiding Adam Damplip in Calais. Broke was able to prove that he had been daily in the houses of parliament in London during Damplip's time in Calais. 1563, p. 663; 1570, p. 1402; 1576, p. 1196; 1583, p. 1225.

Thomas Broke spoke against the Act of Six Articles in parliament. 1563, pp. 658-59.

Edmund Peyton, Robert Poole and Thomas Boyse testified against Broke. Broke defended himself and the charges were dismissed. 1563, pp. 663-64; 1570, pp. 1402-03; 1576, p. 1196; 1583, pp. 1225-26.

A new commission was sent to Calais to investigate heresy. Broke's servant, Hugh Counsel, was kept imprisoned for a fortnight and examined repeatedly in an attempt to get evidence against Broke. He was dismissed on the day Broke was imprisoned. 1563, p. 665; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1227.

The council of Calais began to doubt whether they could get evidence of heresy against Broke. They imprisoned George Bradway, a clerk in the customs house, and got him to accuse Broke of embezzlement by threatening that otherwise he would be blamed for the offence. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

The wife of Thomas Broke wrote to Thomas Cromwell, complaining of the way the imprisoned men in Calais, especially her husband, were treated. Cromwell wrote to the commissioners in Calais, commanding that Broke and a number of others be sent to England. They were put onto the ship in irons. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

Upon arrival in England, the prisoners had their irons removed at the command of Cromwell, who had them imprisoned in the Fleet but promised them speedy release. Cromwell was shortly after beheaded. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

Thomas Audeley discharged those in the Fleet and brought them the king's pardon, although they were deprived of their livings. 1563, p. 668; 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

1583 Edition, page 1248
Thomas Brooke (Cobham)

Son of the 9th Lord Cobham.

Involved in the Wyatt Rebellion; Foxe reports he was condemned to death for his involvement (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

1583 Edition, page 1491
Thomas Brown

(1519? - 1556)

Martyr. Of Histon, Histi[n]win, Cambs. Lived in Fleet Street, St Bride's parish. Married.

Thomas Brown was aged 37 at his death. He refused to take mass on 26 September 1556 and denied transubstantiation. He was presented by the constable to Bonner. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, pp. 1856-57.

He was examined and condemned by 15 January 1556. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1735, 1583, p. 1857.

Foxe lists Bonner's charges and Brown's answers to the charges. 1563, pp. 1451-54, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, pp. 1735-37, 1583, p. 1857.

Brown was burned at Smithfield, 27 January 1556. 1563, pp. 1451, 1466, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1735 1583, p. 1857.

1583 Edition, page 1868 | 1583 Edition, page 1878 | 1583 Edition, page 1880 | 1583 Edition, page 1881
Thomas Browne

of Cranbrook, Kent

Thomas Browne abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Thomas Brydges

(d. 1559) [ODNB]

Landowner and administrator; JP; member of commissions to confiscate church property; MP Oxfordshire 1559

Thomas Brydges was one of the persecutors of Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

The judges of John Marbeck, Henry Filmer, Anthony Pearson and Robert Testwood at Windsor were John Capon, Sir William Essex, Thomas Brydges, Sir Humphrey Foster, William Franklyn and Thomas Vachell. 1570, p. 1396; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1219.

1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1242[Back to Top]
Thomas Buge

of St Michael's in Wood Street; one of 6 charged in 1541 as sacramentaries [Fines]

Thomas Buge was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Thomas Butcher

of Birbrook, Essex. He and wife were detected c. 1533 [Fines]

Thomas Butcher and his wife, along with others of Birbrook, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Thomas Butler

(fl. 1485)

Of Coventry.

Thomas Butler was accused of heresy. 1563, p. 1739.

Thomas Candler

Thomas Candler was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Much Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

[Possibly the same as, or related to, William Candler.]

1583 Edition, page 2029 | 1583 Edition, page 2040[Back to Top]
Thomas Cappes

Curate of St Mary Magdelen in Old Fishstreet; presented in 1541 for saying that the eucharist was only remembrance

Thomas Cappes was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Thomas Carden

Minister. Of Lympne, Kent.

A congregation were due to meet at Thomas Carden's house at Black-friars, where a watch was laid in wait for them, but they were not caught. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2098
Thomas Carew

Esquire present at the burning of Thomas Benet in 1532

Thomas Carew and John Barnehouse tried, both gently and roughly, to get Thomas Benet to recant at the stake. 1570, p. 1183; 1576, p. 1012; 1583, p. 1040.

1583 Edition, page 1064
Thomas Carman

Martyr. Plowright. Of Higham, Norfolk. (Fines)

Thomas Carman was apprehended at the burning of Richard Crashfield. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

He was examined and condemned by Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Sheriff Woodruff insisted that Thomas Carman's head be broken for getting his cart in the way when Woodruff's children were being brought to him. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Carman was burned on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

1583 Edition, page 2036 | 1583 Edition, page 2059[Back to Top]
Thomas Castell

Thomas Castell was a witness against Giles Harrison when he was presented before Bonner in London in 1541. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229
Thomas Causton

(d. 1555)

Gentleman. Of Hornden on the Hill, Essex. Martyr.

Robert Drakes was presented to the benefice of Thundersley by Lord Rich, at the suit of Master Causton and Master Treheron. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Causton was denounced to Bishop Bonner and detained with Thomas Higbed. Bonner and John Feckenham came to Colchester to try to convert them. When these efforts failed Causton and Higbed were transported to London. 1563, pp. 1103-4; 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was examined by Bonner on 17 February 1555. 1563, p. 1104; 1570, pp. 1716-17; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was examined by Bonner on 18 February 1555. 1563, pp. 1104 and 1108-9; 1570, p. 1717; 1576, pp. 1465-66; 1583, pp. 1539-40 [The 1563 edition gives the date as 'xxviii Feb.', this was probably a misprint].

He was examined by Bonner on 1 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1104-5; 1570, pp. 1717-18; 1576, pp. 1465-66; 1583, p. 1540.

He was examined by Bonner on 8 March 1555. 1563, p. 1105; 1570, p. 1718; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

He was examined and condemned by Bonner on 9 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1105-7; 1570, pp. 1718-19; 1576, pp. 1476-78; 1583, pp. 1541-42.

Causton was sent to Newgate and then taken to Raylegh, Essex, for execution on 26 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1107-8; 1570, pp. 1719-20; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1542.

[Foxe sometimes refers to him as 'Causon' or 'Cawson'.]

1583 Edition, page 1563 | 1583 Edition, page 1919
Thomas Chalenor

Secretary to Sir Henry Knyvet.

Sir Henry Knyvet chose Thomas Chalenor, who spoke Italian, to report to him on Ludovico's talk about Stephen Gardiner's receipt of letters from the pope. 1583, p. 1786.

1583 Edition, page 1810
Thomas Chamberlain

of St Mary Woolchurch; presented in 1541 with his wife and 6 others for despising ceremonies

Thomas Chamberlain was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228[Back to Top]
Thomas Choote

of Birbrook, Essex [Fines]

Thomas Choote and his wife, along with others of Birbrook, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Thomas Christenmass

Of unknown occupation. Possibly of Tunbridge, Kent [not clear in Foxe's syntax]

Thomas Christenmass was itinerant in order to avoid persecution for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

He arrived in Rochester with his travelling companion,William Wats, where they asked an eight-year-old girl if there were any heretics in the town. She told them that there were heretics at the local inn and described them as catholics, hence Christenmass and Wats knew which place to avoid. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

1583 Edition, page 2095
Thomas Church

of Great Chart, Kent

Thomas Church abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Thomas Clarke

John Twyford, who had a grudge against Thomas Merial, brought together a group of men, plied them with wine, and had them give evidence against him. Thomas Clarke was one of these. 1570, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1257.

1583 Edition, page 1281
Thomas Clerke the younger

(d. 1559) [Plumb, p. 183; Fines] of Hughenden; detected at Amersham in 1521; attended a meeting at John Tayor's house in 1530

Thomas Clerke the younger was one of those examined by Bishop Longland, excommunicated and abjured for attending a meeting at John Taylor's house during which Nicholas/Richard Field read the gospel in English and preached. 1570, p. 1119; 1576, p. 958; 1583, p. 985.

1583 Edition, page 1009[Back to Top]
Thomas Cobbe

(d. 1555)

Thomas Cobbe, of Haverhill, Suffolk, was a butcher and a martyr. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14, 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

[Foxe also spells his surname 'Cob'.]

1583 Edition, page 1732
Thomas Cole

(d. 1571)

Of Maidstone, Kent. MA (1550). Headmaster of Maidstone School. Minister. Archdeacon of Essex (1559 - 1571). [Fasti and Venn]

Thomas Cole fled Kent for fear of persecution during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1679.

[Declared that children were not born in original sin. Freewiller. Imprisoned by the privy council in the aftermath of the Bocking Conventicle. See Champlin Burrage, The Early English Dissenters, 2 vols. (Cambridge, 1912), vol.2, p. 3.]

[Preached a sermon on 19 February 1553 before Thomas Cranmer retracting his former freewiller beliefs.]

[Note that Garrett is wrong in saying that he was the dean of Sarum. Christina Garrett, The Marian Exiles (Cambridge, 1966), pp. 122-23.]

[No relation to Robert Cole and Henry Cole.]

Thomas Collerd

Very devout Catholic of Great Marlow, Buckinghamshire

Thomas Collerd was mocked by Elinore Godfrey. 1570, p. 1382; 1576, p. 1179; 1583, p. 1207.

1583 Edition, page 1231
Thomas Constable

(by 1500 - 1558 or later) [Bindoff]

Gentleman of North Yorkshire; apprehended Ombier, the Yorkshire rebel ringleader; MP Grimsby (1554 [Nov], 1555)

William Ombler, leader of the Yorkshire rebels, was spotted and captured by John Word the younger, James Aslaby, Rafe Twinge and Thomas Constable, who took him to York to be tried. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

1583 Edition, page 1333
Thomas Constantine

Constantine was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

1583 Edition, page 1739[Back to Top]
Thomas Cooper

of S Botolph's, Billingsgate; one of 9 presented in 1541 for not being confessed in Lent or receiving at Easter

Thomas Cooper was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Thomas Cornish

Thomas Cornish was a witness against Richard Gibson. 1563, p. 1642.

Thomas Cotisford

Porter at the Fleet

Thomas Cotisford was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 856.

Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 1553) [Fasti; DNB; MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer, 1996]. Martyr

Foxe records the life, condemnation and death of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1470-1503, 1570, pp. 2032-71, 1576, pp. 1752-82, 1583, pp. 1859-90.

Foxe records Cranmer's formative years and early career. His mother was Agnes Hatfield. Cranmer read the works of Faber, Erasmus and Luther. 1563, pp. 1470-71, 1570, pp. 2032-33, 1576, pp. 1752-53, 1583, pp. 1859-60.

Cranmer was asked by Dr Capon to be a founding fellow of Wolsey's college. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Alexander Seton and Edward Foxe lodged with Cressey while Thomas Cranmer was there and dined with him. The following day Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was sent as Henry VIII's ambassador to the emperor. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

He was made archbishop of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was asked by Henry VIII to search the scriptures for a case for his divorce from Catherine of Arragon. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII asked the earl of Wiltshire to allow Cranmer to stay at his house in Durham. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861.

Cranmer went to Mr Cressey's house at Waltham Abbey during the summer plague season. Cranmer's wife was a relative of Cressey. 1570, p. 2033 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

The pope's authority was discussed at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford, where it was concluded that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Arragon was not legal, and the pope's authority was denounced. Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Carne and Benet were then sent before the pope to deliver these conclusions. 1563, p. 1472, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861. [1563 has the commission as consisting of: Bonner, Winchester, Sampson, Repps, Goodricke, Latimer, Shaxton, and Barlow.]

Cranmer met with Cornelius Agrippa. 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1861.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Chersey, a grocer in the city of London, had a kinsman who was a priest and who spent more time in the alehouse than his church. This priest spoke against Cranmer in the alehouse one day. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1863.

The priest was sent to the Fleet. Cromwell forgot about him and eventually sent him to Cranmer. Cranmer in time spoke to the priest and set him free. 1570, pp. 2036-38, 1576, pp. 1756-57, 1583, pp. 1863-64.

Cranmer investigated the case of a woman accused of committing adultery. 1563, pp. 1477-78, 1576, pp. 1570-71.

Cranmer sent a token via W. P. [William Porrege] to a woman falsely accused of adultery, asking for forgiveness for the treatment she received while in custody. 1563, p. 1478, 1576, p. 1751.

Lord Wryosley wept at the bedside of King Henry VIII and saved the life of Mary, Henry and Catherine's daughter. 1563, p. 1478.

Thomas Seymour spoke against Cranmer to the king, which he later regretted. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

Richard Neville, noting that Sir Thomas Seymour was hoping to see Cranmer, brought him to the archbishop at dinner. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

After Cromwell was apprehended, bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Winchester and others tried to take Cranmer out of the king's favour. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

The king sent Sir Anthony Denny to commit Cranmer to the Tower. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Cranmer spoke with the king. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Buttes, the king's physician, spoke to the king about the fact that Cranmer was being forced to wait like a lackey to come into council. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1866.

The king and the council made their peace with Cranmer. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Sir John Gostwicke accused Cranmer of heresy before parliament, citing his sermons at Sandwich and his lectures at Canterbury as evidence. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Prebendaries and justices of Kent accused Cranmer of heresy. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Articles were put to Henry VIII against Cranmer. Henry VIII told Cranmer what these articles were. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

Cranmer's secretary wrote to Buttes and Denny asking for Dr Lee to join the commission, lest nothing be learned by the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

A conspiracy against Cranmer was discovered through some letters that were found, including one by the suffragen of Dover and one by Barbar, a civilian maintained in Cranmer's household as a counsellor in matters of law. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer spoke with Dover and Barber. Barber said that hanging was too good for villains. They asked for Cranmer's forgiveness. 1570, pp. 2042-43, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after a conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer's wife is mentioned as a niece to the wife of Osiander. Cranmer was married while acting as the king's ambassador to Charles the emperor. 1563, p. 1478, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was opposed to the writings of Gardiner. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Rowland Taylor left Cranmer's household to become rector of Hadleigh (1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1495; 1583, p. 1519). [Actually Taylor was Cranmer's chaplain.]

Cranmer commanded Rowland Taylor to make Robert Drakes a deacon. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

In the third year of Edward's reign Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Foxe states that at his death Edward VI bequeathed the throne to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer refused to swear allegience to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, pp. 2045-46, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

The dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk were executed for their support of Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Lady Jane and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe states that those who were blinded with ignorance or malice thought Peter Martyr not a learned man. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472].

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Scory, bishop of Rochester, visited Cranmer. He took a copy of Cranmer's writings about the rumour that he had said the mass (when Thornden had in fact said it) and had it published. Cranmer was commanded to appear before the council and bring an inventory of his goods. 1563, p. 1479, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martyn and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was accused of conspiring with John Dudley, duke of Northumberland. 1563, p. 1483, 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Thomas Cranmer met with Peter Martyr, about 5 September 1553, in London, to discuss a projected disputation where they would defend the Book of Common Prayer. Cranmer was then arrested (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; and 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 13 September Cranmer was ordered to appear before the privy council. On 14 September he was charged by the privy council with treason and spreading seditious libels and was committed to the Tower (1583, p. 1410).

He was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was cited to appear before the queen's commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Rumoured to have celebrated a mass at Canterbury, Cranmer issued a denial or 'purgation' of the rumours on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1553 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was committed to the Tower on 14 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

A rumor spread that Cranmer had recanted his protestant conviction and allowed a mass to be celebrated at Canterbury; he issued a printed denial of this. In the denial, he offered to defend his religious beliefs in open debate together with Peter Martyr. Cranmer was imprisoned and arraigned for treason but ultimately pardoned. He was still charged with heresy (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418).

He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 932 and 937; 1570, pp. 1592-93; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; and 1583, p. 1429).

[NB: There is a summary of Cranmer's disputation on Monday 16 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 933.]

Cranmer disputed with the catholic doctors on 16 April 1554 (1563, pp. 938-56; 1570, pp. 1593-1606; 1576, pp. 1360-70; and 1583, pp. 1430-41).

He disputed with John Harpsfield on the nature of the eucharist as part of Harpsfield's obtaining his D.D. on 19 April 1554 (1563, pp 987-90; 1570, pp. 1629-31; 1576, pp. 1390-91; and 1583, pp. 1460-62).

Cranmer wrote to the privy council on 23 April 1554, protesting at the way in which the Oxford disputations were conducted. Weston opened the letter and refused to deliver it (1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Cranmer to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was summoned, together with Ridley and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant his opinions and denied Weston's claim that he had been defeated in the disputation, claiming that the questions and challenges flew at him without order or giving him time to answer. He was condemned and taken to Bocardo (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer. 1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Ridley was converted through reading Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, p. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he made reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Ridley hoped to see Cranmer before his death, but Cranmer was with Friar Soto. 1570, p. 1936, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayor and sheriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

On 21 April 1554, Cranmer was compelled to observe, from Bocardo, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried the canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

A ten-foot high scaffold was set up in St Mary's church at the east end for Brookes to represent the pope, from which Cranmer was condemned. 1563, p. , 1570, p. 2047 , 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

Cranmer's profession of his faith was spoken in St Mary's church before those who condemned him. 1570, pp. 2050-52, 1576, pp. 1768-69, 1583, pp. 1874-75.

Foxe records Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Foxe records Brookes' oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2054-56, 1576, pp. 1772-73, 1583, pp. 1878-79.

There was a talk between Martyn and Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2052-53, 1576, pp. 1770-72, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Foxe records interrogatories and answers. 1570, p. 2054, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, pp. 1877-78.

The witnesses against Cranmer were Dr Marshall, commissary and dean of Christ's Church; Dr Smith, under commissary; Dr Tresham; Dr Crooke, London; Mr Curtop; Mr Warde; Mr Serles. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, p. 1879.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Foxe records Cranmer's full answer to Brookes' oration against him. 1570, pp. 2057-58., 1576, pp. 1774-75, 1583, pp. 1880-81.

Cranmer stated that he was ambassador in Germany when Warham died. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1774, 1583, p. 1880.

Cranmer met with Dr Oliver and other civil lawyers to discuss the pope's authority. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

A commission was sent from the pope regarding the sentencing of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1490-91.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 177576, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Cranmer appealed. 1570, pp. 2059-61, 1576, pp. 1776-77, 1583, pp. 1882-83.

Cranmer's appeal was put to the bishop of Ely. 1570, p. 2062, 1576, p. 1777, 1583, p. 1883.

Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Cranmer received a letter from Ridley, together with copies of Ridley's account of the disputation, and news about recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, pp. 1464-65; not in LM).

Foxe mentions Cranmer's condemnation and disputation in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Cranmer was degraded. 1563, p. 1493.

Cranmer recanted. 1563, pp. 1497-98, 1570, p. 2062, 1576, pp. 1778-80, 1583, p. 1884.

Witnesses to Cranmer's recantation were Henry Sydall and Friar John de villa Garcina. 1570, pp. 2062-63, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1884.

Lord Williams, Thomas Bridges and Sir John Bourne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

The deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More are referred to in the description of the death of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

Foxe records Cranmer's prayer. 1570, pp. 2064-65, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1886.

Cranmer was pulled from the pulpit. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1887.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

Thomas Cranmer was burned. 1570, p. 2066, 1576, p. 1782, 1583, pp. 1887-88.

Cranmer's letters. 1563, pp. 1483-84, 1489, 1492-93, 1570, pp. 2067-72, 1576, pp. 1782-86, 1583, pp. 1889-93.

Henry VIII directed Cranmer and Cromwell (and others, including Stokesly) to examine John Frith. 1583, pp. 2126-27.

Buswell, a priest, spoke to Edward Benet whilst they were imprisoned together and gave him a copy of Cranmer's recantation. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe includes a copy of the Pope's commission to proceed against Cranmer. 1583, p. 2132.

During his examination Weston and Smith challenged Cranmer over his book of the sacrament. 1583, p. 2135.

William Holcroft was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

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Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1511; MA 1515; archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 56); burnt in 1556

Cranmer acknowledged the help he received from John Frith's book attacking the doctrine of Sir Thomas More. 1563, p. 500; 1570, p. 1176; 1576, p. 1006; 1583, p. 1033.

Thomas Cranmer, John Stokesley, Edward Carne, William Benet and the earl of Wiltshire were sent as ambassadors to the pope to dispute the matter of the king's marriage. 1570, p. 1280; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

Cranmer's separation of the king and Queen Catherine was authorised by parliament. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

The archbishop of Canterbury (Cranmer), along with the bishops of London (Stokesley), Winchester (Gardiner), Bath and Wells (Clerk) and Lincoln (Longland) and other clergy went to see Queen Catherine. She failed to attend when summoned over 15 days, and they pronounced that she and the king were divorced. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

Cranmer was godfather to Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Cranmer was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Cranmer attended a synod in 1537 with other bishops and learned men and with Thomas Cromwell as vicar-general. Cranmer opposed retaining the seven sacraments. He gave an oration to the bishops. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

On the second day of the synod, Thomas Cranmer sent his archdeacon to command Alexander Alesius to cease from disputation. 1570, p. 1353; 1576, p. 1155; 1583, p. 1184.

John Lambert attended a sermon preached by John Taylor at St Peter's in London in 1538. Lambert put ten articles to him questioning transubstantiation. Taylor conferred with Robert Barnes, who persuaded Taylor to put the matter to Archbishop Cranmer. Cranmer called Lambert into open court, where he was made to defend his cause. 1563, pp. 532-33; 1570, pp. 1280-81; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

Cranmer disputed with Lambert at his trial before the king. 1563, pp. 534-35; 1570, p. 1282; 1576, pp. 1096-97; 1583, p. 1122.

Thomas Cranmer alone disputed the Six Articles in parliament. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1110; 1583, p. 1136.

The king sent Thomas Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

Henry asked for a summary of Cranmer's objections to the Six Articles. Cranmer asked his secretary to write up a copy of his arguments against the Six Articles to give to the king.1570, p. 1355; 1576, p. 1157; 1583, p. 1185.

Adam Damplip was brought before Thomas Cranmer, Stephen Gardiner, Richard Sampson and others and examined. The next day, warned by Cranmer that he was likely to be imprisoned and burnt, he fled to the West Country. 1563, p. 657; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1224.

Thomas Broke, Ralph Hare, James Cocke and James Barber were sent from Calais with their accusers to England to be examined by Cranmer, Gardiner, Sampson and other bishops. 1563, p. 661; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1195; 1583, p. 1224.

King Henry wrote to Archbishop Cranmer, ordering that idolatrous images be removed from churches. 1563, p. 625; 1570, p. 1385; 1576, p. 1181; 1583, p. 1210.

For a long period, Henry VIII denied his daughter Mary the title of princess. Thomas Cranmer urged a reconciliation. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1396.

When Claude d'Annebault, the French ambassador, went to see Henry VIII at Hampton Court, lavish entertainment was laid on for him, but he was recalled before he had received half of it. During the course of the banquet, he had private conversation with the king and Archbishop Cranmer about the reform of religion in the two countries. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

Cranmer had sent letters for Henry VIII to sign relating to reform in the church. Gardiner convinced the king that these reforms would jeopardise a league with the king of France and the emperor, so the letters were never signed. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

The young Prince Edward wrote letters in Latin to Thomas Cranmer, his godfather. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

Cranmer praised the learning and wisdom of Prince Edward to his tutor, Richard Coxe. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Richard Coxe wrote to Thomas Cranmer, praising the young Prince Edward. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

When King Henry was on his deathbed, Anthony Denny asked him if he wished a spiritual adviser, and he asked for Thomas Cranmer. Before Cranmer could arrive, however, the king had lost the power of speech. He clasped Cranmer's hand, and shortly after died. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

After the death of Henry VIII, the duke of Suffolk related to Thomas Cranmer how Stephen Gardiner had nearly been arrested at the time of the execution of Germaine Gardiner. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

Cranmer had great difficulty in getting King Edward to sign Joan Bocher's death warrant. 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Charles V requested of Edward VI that his cousin Mary Tudor be allowed to have the mass said in her house. The request was denied, in spite of the strong urgings of Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Thomas Dobbe was brought before Cranmer, who committed him to the Counter, where he died. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to all the other bishops to inform them of the new directive. 1563, pp. 685, 691; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Cranmer, with other learned bishops and learned men, was appointed to draw up a uniform order of common prayer. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Stephen Gardiner wrote to Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley while imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 732-54; 1570, p. 1522; 1576, p. 1297; 1583, p. 1340.

Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, Nicholas Ridley, bishop of Rochester, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May, dean of St Paul's, were commissioned to examine Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 697; 1570, p. 1504; 1576, p. 1275; 1583, p. 1312.

Bonner was summoned to appear before the commissioners. He behaved haughtily, ridiculing his accusers and the commissioners, and spoke in favour of the mass. He appeared first on 10 September 1549 before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre and William May. Sir Thomas Smith was absent. 1563, pp. 698-99; 1570, pp. 1504-06; 1576, pp. 1275-77; 1583, pp. 1312-14.

Bonner appeared for the second time on 13 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May and was further examined. 1563, pp. 699-704; 1570, pp. 1506-08; 1576, pp. 1277-79; 1583, pp. 1314-17.

Bonner appeared for the third time on 16 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir Thomas Smith and William May to answer the articles put to him at the previous session. John Hooper and William Latymer also appeared in order to purge themselves against the slanders of Bonner. 1563, pp. 704-709; 1570, pp. 1508-11; 1576, pp. 1279-80; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

Bonner appeared before the commissioners for the fourth time on 18 September, at which session new articles were drawn up and new witnesses received. 1563, pp. 704-710; 1570, pp. 1508-12; 1576, pp. 1279-81; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

Bonner appeared for the fifth time before the commissioners on 20 September. During an interval, he instructed Gilbert Bourne, his chaplain, Robert Warnington, his commissary, and Robert Johnson, his registrar, to tell the mayor and aldermen of London to avoid reformed preachers. Bonner made his first appellation to the king. As a result of his behaviour during the proceedings, he was committed to the Marshalsea. 1563, pp. 713-717; 1570, pp. 1513-16; 1576, pp. 1282-85; 1583, pp. 1324-26.

Bonner appeared for the sixth time before the commissioners on 23 September, when he presented a general recusation against all the commissioners and a second appellation to the king. A letter was read from Bonner to the mayor of London, Henry Amcottes, and aldermen. 1563, pp. 717-18; 1570, p. 1516; 1576, p. 1285; 1583, pp. 1326-27.

Bonner' seventh appearance before the commissioners took place on 1 October. He presented a declaration, an appellation and a supplication to the king. The commissioners pronounced their sentence definitive. Bonner was imprisoned and deprived of his office. 1563, pp. 718-26; 1570, pp. 1516-19; 1576, pp. 1285-88; 1583, pp. 1327-30.

Cranmer was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

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Thomas Croker

(d. 1556)

Bricklayer. Martyr. Of Gloucester.

Thomas Croker was burned at the stake with Thomas Drowry on 15 May 1556. 1563, p. 1521 [note that Foxe does not know his name in 1563], 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

1583 Edition, page 1935
Thomas Cromwell

(1485?-1540)

Earl of Essex (1540). Vicegeneral of Spiritual Affairs, Lord Privy Seal, lawyer (1523), MP (1524), member of Gray's Inn (1525). (DNB; Bindoff; G. R. Elton, The Tudor Revolution in Government [Cambridge, 1953])

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Cromwell's character is compared to that of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 1382, 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Somerset to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Complaints were sent to Cromwell about a priest who was a relative of Chersey of London. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1863.

The priest was sent to the Fleet. Cromwell forgot about him and eventually sent him to Cranmer. Cranmer in time spoke to the priest and set him free. 1570, pp. 2036-38, 1576, pp. 1756-57, 1583, pp. 1863-64.

After Cromwell was apprehended, bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Cromwell was suspected of protecting John Frith when Frith was imprisoned in the Tower for speaking against the writings of Sir Thomas More. 1583, p. 2126.

Lewes told Richard Wilmot that there had been troubles since the Bible was translated into English, that Crome was a heretic and then falsely accused Cromwell of biblical translation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

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Thomas Cromwell

(in or bef. 1485 - 1540) [ODNB]

Lawyer; king's secretary; chief minister

Earl of Essex 1540; beheaded gruesomely

Thomas Cromwell was the son of a smith. He had an impressive memory and was skilled in languages. He was retained by the English merchants in Antwerp as clerk. He accompanied Geoffrey Chambers to Rome to obtain indulgences for the guild of Our Lady in Boston. 1570, p. 1346; 1576, p. 1149; 1583, pp. 1177-78.

As a young man Cromwell fought with the French at Garigliano. He was then destitute in Italy and was helped by the Italian merchant banker Francesco Frescobaldi. Cromwell years later repaid him with generous interest when Frescobaldi was impoverished in England. 1570, pp. 1357-58; 1576, pp. 1158-59; 1583, pp. 1186-87.

Cromwell confessed to archbishop Cranmer that he had been wild in his youth. He was at the siege of Rome with the duke of Bourbon. 1570, p. 1346; 1576, p. 1149; 1583, pp. 1177-78.

Cromwell, Thomas More and Stephen Gardiner served together in Thomas Wolsey's household. 1563, p. 592; 1570, p. 1347; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1178.

Cromwell was one of Wolsey's chief councillors and was active in the dissolution of the monasteries. After Wolsey's fall and his departure to Southwell, Cromwell entered the king's service. 1570, pp. 1132, 1347; 1576, pp. 969, 1150; 1583, pp. 996, 1179.

Cromwell was knighted, made master of the jewels and admitted to the king's council. Two years later he was made master of the rolls. Shortly before the birth of Prince Edward, Cromwell was created earl of Essex and appointed viceregent. 1570, p. 1348; 1576, p. 1151; 1583, p. 1179.

Cromwell discovered and made public fraudulent miracles. 1570, p. 1359; 1576, p. 1160; 1583, p. 1188.

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

Cromwell urged King Henry to destroy the monastic houses and to grant the lands to the nobility and gentlemen. 1570, p. 1350; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1181.

Edward Lee was sent, under Cromwell, to visit the monasteries and nunneries to release all those in religious orders who wished to leave. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

Cromwell gave an oration at the synod in 1537 of bishops and learned men. 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

Gardiner was a resident ambassador to France in 1538, when Edmund Bonner, through the efforts of Thomas Cromwell, was brought in to replace him. Bonner owed his major preferments to Cromwell. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

Bonner sent a declaration to Cromwell of Stephen Gardiner's evil behaviour. 1570, pp. 1241-44; 1576, pp. 1063-66; 1583, pp. 1090-92.

Through the efforts of Cromwell, the destruction of the abbeys and religious houses was accomplished. 1570, p. 1255; 1576, p. 1075; 1583, p. 1101.

At the end of John Lambert's trial, the king had Cromwell read the sentence of condemnation. On the day of Lambert's execution, Cromwell asked for his forgiveness. 1563, pp. 537, 569; 1570, pp. 1283-84; 1576, pp. 1097-98; 1583, pp. 1123-24.

The king sent Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Thomas Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

The wife of Thomas Broke wrote to Thomas Cromwell, complaining of the way the imprisoned men in Calais, especially her husband, were treated. Cromwell wrote to the commissioners in Calais, commanding that Broke and a number of others be sent to England. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

Cromwell was instrumental in obtaining Edmund Bonner's nomination to the bishopric of London. Cromwell procured letters from King Henry to Francois I that resulted in a licence being granted to print bibles in English at Paris. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

When printing of English bibles was stopped in Paris, Cromwell got the presses and types sent to London. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1191.

Stephen Gardiner was Cromwell's chief opponent. Cromwell had other enemies as well, and in 1540 he was suddenly arrested in the council chamber and committed to the Tower. He was charged with heresy and treason. 1563, p. 598; 1570, p. 1359; 1576, pp. 1160-61; 1583, p. 1189.

Cromwell, having made an oration and prayer, was beheaded by an incompetent axeman. 1563, p. 598; 1570, pp. 1361-62; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1190.

Stephen Gardiner recalled that Cromwell spent a day and a half investigating a matter between Sir Francis Bryan and Gardiner, finally declaring Gardiner an honest man. 1563, p. 756; 1570, p. 1526; 1576, p. 1301; 1583, p. 1351.

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Thomas Cullier

Of Norfolk.

Thomas Cullier was forced to flee Norfolk for fear of persecution for his protestant beliefs. 1563, p. 1678.

[He abjured his opinion that the pope was not head of the catholic church, that auricular confession was not good. He also affirmed his belief in the Real Presence. (BL, Harley, MS.421, fos.146r-147r)]

Thomas Culpepper

(c. 1514 - 1541) [ODNB sub Katherine Howard]

Distantly related to Katherine Howard; courtier who sought favour from her; gentleman of the privy chamber 1537; beheaded

Katherine Howard was accused of adultery with Thomas Culpepper. He was found guilty of high treason and beheaded. 1570, p. 1385; 1576, p. 1181; 1583, p. 1210.

1583 Edition, page 1234
Thomas Curson

Augustinian friar of Westacre, Norfolk [Fines]

Thomas Curson was charged in London in 1530 with leaving his profession and having books of Tyndale and other prohibited writers. 1570, p. 1185; 1576, p. 1014; 1583, p. 1041.

1583 Edition, page 1065
Thomas Curson (Felde)

Augustinian friar of Westacre, Norfolk; charged in 1530 for leaving his profession [Fines]

Curson, with other Cambridge scholars, was a member of the Augustinian house under Robert Barnes. 1563, p. 589; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

During the night after he had been examined by Cardinal Wolsey, Robert Barnes stayed at the house of Thomas Parnell. He wrote throughout the night, dictating to Miles Coverdale, Master Goodwin and Thomas Curson. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

1583 Edition, page 1216[Back to Top]
Thomas Dale

Parish clerk of Seamer, Yorks; rebel 1549; executed

Thomas Dale was one of the ringleaders of a rebellion that began in Seamer and spread through the surrounding area. The rebels were offered a pardon, but refused. He was captured and executed. 1570, pp. 1500-01; 1576, pp. 1271-72; 1583, pp. 1308-09.

William Ombler, Thomas Dale, Henry Barton and Robert Dale took Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry, murdered them, stripped their bodies and left them in a field. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

Thomas Dale was executed with other rebel leaders at York. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

1583 Edition, page 1332
Thomas Daly

of Willesden; witness against Thomas Bilney

Thomas Daly testified that Bilney had preached against pilgrimages. 1570, p. 1149; 1576, p. 983; 1583, p. 1010.

1583 Edition, page 1034
Thomas Darbyshire

(1518 - 1604)

Nephew of Edmund Bonner. Jesuit. DCL (1556). Prebend of Totenhall (1543), Hackney (1554). Rector of Fulham (1558) and St Magnus, near London Bridge (1558). Principal of Broadgates College, archdeacon of Essex (1558). Chancellor of London. Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. (DNB; Foster)

Darbyshire told Thomas Hawkes that the Bible was sufficient for salvation, but not instruction. 1563, p. 1149; 1570, p. 1759; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, p. 1586

On 6 June 1556, Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Henry Adlington, Thomas Bowyer, Lyon Cawch, John Derifall, Agnes George, William Halliwell, Edmund Hurst, Ralph Jackson, Lawrence Parnam, Elizabeth Pepper, John Routh, George Searles, and Henry Wye. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

Five who were martyred at Smithfield on April 12 1557 were first examined by Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 7 July by Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Articles against six martyred at Brentford were administered by Thomas Darbyshire on 20 June 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2042.

Darbyshire examined William Living and his wife. 1563, p. 1673.

Sentence against them was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

1583 Edition, page 1610 | 1583 Edition, page 1938
Thomas Darbyshire

(1518 - 1604)

Nephew of Edmund Bonner. Jesuit. DCL (1556). Prebend of Totenhall (1543), Hackney (1554). Rector of Fulham (1558) and St Magnus, near London Bridge (1558). Principal of Broadgates College, archdeacon of Essex (1558). Chancellor of London. Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. (DNB; Foster)

Darbyshire told Thomas Hawkes that the Bible was sufficient for salvation, but not instruction. 1563, p. 1149; 1570, p. 1759; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, p. 1586

On 6 June 1556, Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Henry Adlington, Thomas Bowyer, Lyon Cawch, John Derifall, Agnes George, William Halliwell, Edmund Hurst, Ralph Jackson, Lawrence Parnam, Elizabeth Pepper, John Routh, George Searles, and Henry Wye. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

Five who were martyred at Smithfield on April 12 1557 were first examined by Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 7 July by Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Articles against six martyred at Brentford were administered by Thomas Darbyshire on 20 June 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2042.

Darbyshire examined William Living and his wife. 1563, p. 1673.

Sentence against them was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

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Thomas Darcy

(in or before 1467 - 1537) [ODNB]

Baron Darcy of Darcy; soldier and rebel; involved in the Pilgrimage of Grace; found guilty of alleged offences after the uprising; beheaded at Tower Hill

Darcy and other rebels were executed in 1537. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1087.

1583 Edition, page 1111
Thomas Darcy

(1506 - 1558) [ODNB

1st Baron Darcy of Chiche; courtier, administrator

Thomas Darcy was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

Thomas David

Skinner of Aldermanbury; charged with others in 1541 with supporting Robert Barnes and other preachers [Fines]

Thomas David was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229[Back to Top]
Thomas De Vick

[Ogier]

Thomas Devick took part in the examination and condemnation of Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. 1563, pp. 1542-43, 1570, pp. 2127-28, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He was later forced to beg pardon for his involvement in the deaths of Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. 1570, pp. 2130-31, 1576, pp. 1851-52, 1583, pp. 1945-46.

1583 Edition, page 1968
Thomas Dobbe

MA Cambridge; fellow of St John's [ODNB sub Roger Hutchinson; Fines]

Junior colleage of Roger Hutchinson; expelled for challenging the rule of clerical celibacy; died in prison at the beginning of the reign of Edward VI

Dobbes wished to marry and was expelled from St John's. He went to London and entered St Paul's during the elevation of the host, whereupon he began preaching against transubstantiation to the people there. He was reported to the archbishop of Canterbury and imprisoned in the Counter, where he died. His pardon had been obtained from Edward Seymour. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

1583 Edition, page 1321
Thomas Dobson

Of Mendlesham.

Thomas Dobson was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Thomas Dougate

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of East Grinstead, Sussex.

Thomas Dougate was accused and examined by Christopherson, Richard Briesly, Robert Tailor, Thomas Paccard, Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale. He was condemned and martyred at Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

1583 Edition, page 2048
Thomas Drury

(d. 1556)

A blind boy. Martyr. Of Gloucester.

Thomas Drowry was imprisoned for 'confessing of the truth'; Drowry received permission to visit John Hooper on the eve of the bishop's execution. Hooper questioned him about his religious beliefs and praised him for his faith. 1563, p. 1059; 1570, p. 1682; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1509.

[NB: Foxe does not name Drowry in these passages; he merely describes him as a blind boy of Gloucester.]

Drowry was confirmed in his faith by Hooper. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

Thomas Drowry was brought before Dr Williams, chancellor of Gloucester. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

He was burned around 15 May 1556. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

Foxe received testimony of Thomas Dowry's death from the registrar of Gloucester, John Taylor (alias Barker). 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

1583 Edition, page 1533 | 1583 Edition, page 1935 | 1583 Edition, page 2129
Thomas Dungate

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Thomas Dungate was burned on 18 July 1556 at Grinstead in Sussex. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1855, 1583, p. 1949.

1583 Edition, page 1973
Thomas Effart

(d. 1580)

Jurat (1558 - 1580). Of S Pierre Port, Guernsey. [Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), p. 57.]

Thomas Effart testified that Perotine Massey informed Nicholas le Conronney that Vincent Gosset had come to her with a silver cup stolen from Conronney's house. 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He begged pardon for the jurats and Dean, Jaques Amy, as well as all the inhabitants of Guernsey for the actions taken against Massey, Gilbert and Cauches. 1570, pp. 2130-31, 1576, pp. 1851-52, 1583, pp. 1945-46.

1583 Edition, page 1967
Thomas Elas

Constable of Bedfield, Suffolk.

Elizabeth Lawson was apprehended in 1556 by Robert Kitrich and Thomas Elas, the two constables of the town. 1563, p. 1677, 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

She was laid in a dungeon and then carried to Norwich, then to Bury St Edmunds, where she was condemned. 1563, p. 1677, 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

1583 Edition, page 2094[Back to Top]
Thomas Eminghame

Canon of St Andrews

Thomas Eminghame sat on the assize that condemned Sir John Borthwick for heresy. 1563, p. 575; 1583, p. 1259.

1583 Edition, page 1283
Thomas Empson

(d. 1540) Benedictine monk of Westminster; Catholic martyr

Thomas Empson was one of those listed by Nicholas Harpsfield as Catholic martyrs. 1570, p. 1385; 1576, p. 1181; 1583, p. 1210.

1583 Edition, page 1234
Thomas Eve

Weaver of London [Fines]

Thomas Eve was charged in London in 1531 for holding heretical opinions. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1188; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

1583 Edition, page 1070
Thomas Fairfax

Master Daubney's servant. Of London.

Thomas Fairfax openly agreed with Wilmot's defence of Dr Crome. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot were ordered to appear before the lord mayor. Smart, the swordbearer, was sent as messenger to them. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

The mayor and Sir Roger Chomley examined Wilmot and Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2059.

The wardens of the Drapers' company were sent to speak to Wilmot and Fairfax when in prison and to make suit to the mayor. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

The mayor went with Wilmot and Fairfax to the council, where they were examined by Winchester and Sir Anthony Brown. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

It was decided that Wilmot and Fairfax be tied to a cart and whipped on three market days through the city. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax appeared in the Drapers' hall with their masters present, and Master Broke [Master of the Drapers] promised £100 from the company for the boys' protection from the death sentence. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax were scourged, during which scourging Brook was particularly brutal. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax never returned to full health. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

1583 Edition, page 2082
Thomas Farman

(d. 1528) [Richard Rex: www.queens.cam.ac.uk/queens/Record/2000/History/Martyr.html]

President of Queens' College, Cambridge (1526 - 27)

When the sergeant at arms came to arrest Robert Barnes at Cambridge and to search for prohibited books, Thomas Farman warned those who were likely to have their rooms searched. 1563, p. 601; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

1583 Edition, page 1216[Back to Top]
Thomas Feerfane

(fl. 1555 - 1596)

Mercer. Of Colchester, Essex.

Feerfane was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Thomas Feerfane was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

He wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Also known as Firefanne, Feerfarne. Son of Joan Dibney by a previous marriage.]

[Thomas Upcher's widow bequeathed his gown to Feerfane. (Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester (Michigan, 1998), p. 224.)]

1583 Edition, page 1996
Thomas Ferrar

Deponent against Roger Hackman

Thomas Ferrar reported words spoken by Roger Hackman at a church ale in North Stoke. 1570, p. 1118; 1576, p. 957; 1583, p. 984.

1583 Edition, page 1008
Thomas Field

of Boxley, Kent

Thomas Field abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Thomas Fisher (Hawkins)

(1515/16 - 1577) [ODNB; Bindoff]

of Warwick; servant of Edward Seymour by 1544; constable of Warwick Castle (1545 - 53); keeper of Banbury Castle and bailiff of Banbury Hundred (1550 - 58); MP Chipping Wycombe (1547); MP Warwick (1554, 1555, 1558, 1559)

Sir Thomas Smith, Richard Whalley and Thomas Fisher were imprisoned with Edward Seymour in the Tower. 1570, p. 1548; 1576, p. 1320; 1583, p. 1370.

1583 Edition, page 1394
Thomas Flier

(d. 1556)

Shoemaker. Of Uttoxeter.

Thomas Flier was examined in the diocese of Lichfield for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

He was slain during a quarrel over a rood screen in a church in Uttoxeter where he was one of the churchwardens or sidesmen. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

1583 Edition, page 1941[Back to Top]
Thomas Forret

(d. 1539/40) [Fines]

Priest of Dollar, Clackmananshire; canon regular of Inch-comb; called Dean; martyr, burnt at Edinburgh

Thomas Forret preached the gospel every Sunday in the church at Dollar at a time when only friars normally preached in Scotland. Friars then reported him as a heretic to George Crichton, bishop of Dunkeld. Crichton counselled him not to preach so often. 1570, p. 1442; 1576, p. 1230; 1583, p. 1266.

Soon afterward, a summons was directed from David Beaton and Crichton upon Thomas Forret, John Beveridge, John Kelowe, Duncan Sympson and Robert Foster, along with three or four others from Stirling. They were condemned for heresy without any opportunity to recant and burnt together on the castle hill in Edinburgh. 1570, p. 1442; 1576, p. 1230; 1583, p. 1266.

1583 Edition, page 1290
Thomas Foule

Of London.

Thomas Foule was a leader of a clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2098
Thomas Fowler

Shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

Fowler fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Thomas Frebarne

Fisherman of Hornsey, Middlesex

Thomas Frebarne's wife was pregnant and had a craving for pork during Lent. He was told that she and the child might die if she didn't have the meat. He husband was arrested and examined for the offence, and sentenced to stand in the pillory with half a pig on each shoulder. With the help of Thomas Cromwell, he was eventually released, but was put out of his house by his landlord, Sir Christopher Barker. 1570, pp. 1354-55; 1576, p. 1156; 1583, pp. 1184-85.

1583 Edition, page 1208
Thomas Freeman

Absolved. [Strype vi, pp. 267-8; significavit (dat. 13 June) C/85/127/21]

Thomas Freeman was examined with the thirteen who were burned together at Stratford-le-Bow. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

He was condemned to die but Cardinal Poole sent dispensation on 3 July 1556 for his life, and he and two other prisoners escaped. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

He signed a letter written with his fellow sufferers that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

1583 Edition, page 1940[Back to Top]
Thomas Fust

(d. 1555)

Hosier. Martyr.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Fust). The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and was signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Thomas Fust was condemned with Robert Smith, George Tankerfield and Stephen Harwood. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

He was burned at Ware, August 1555. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

[Also referred to as Thomas 'Foist'.]

1583 Edition, page 1713 | 1583 Edition, page 1726
Thomas Garrard (Garret)

(1498 - 1540) [ODNB; Fines]

of Lincolnshire; clergyman and protestant reformer

BA Oxford 1518; MA 1524, BTh by 1535; chancellor to Latimer and Cranmer

Burnt as a heretic

Garrard preached repentance and had his books burned. 1570, p. 39; 1576, p. 32; 1583, p. 32.

Thomas Garrard took prohibited books to Oxford and was sought for the same offence in London. 1563, p. 604; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1166; 1583, p. 1194.

Garrard was arrested and taken into custody. He undid the lock and went to see Anthony Dalaber, who gave him his cloak to disguise his escape. 1563, p. 605; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1166; 1583, p. 1194.

After Garrard had escaped, he was apprehended by Cole and returned to the university. He was examined by Cottisford, Hygdon and London, condemned as a heretic and made to bear a faggot with Anthony Dalaber. They were then imprisoned. 1563, p. 609; 1570, p. 1369; 1576, p. 1168; 1583, p. 1197.

When John Frith heard of the examination and bearing of faggots of Dalaber and Garrard, he fled overseas. 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

Thomas Wolsey forced Thomas Arthur, Thomas Bilney, Geoffrey Lome and Thomas Garrard to abjure for speaking against the authority of the pope. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

Thomas Garrard had been curate of All Hallows in Honey Lane. He abjured before the bishops of London, Lincoln and Bath and Wells.1563, pp. 419, 480-81.

Richard Champion and Thomas Garrard were sent to Calais to preach. 1563, p. 658; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1195; 1583, p. 1224.

King Henry commanded that Robert Barnes, Thomas Garrard and William Jerome recant the doctrine they had been preaching. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, p. 1170; 1583, p. 1198.

Garrard first recanted in his sermon and then continued the sermon contrary to his recantation. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, p. 1170; 1583, p. 1198.

Barnes, Garrard and Jerome were committed to the Tower. They were brought together to Smithfield and burnt. 1563, pp. 611-12; 1570, pp. 1371-72; 1576, p. 1170-71; 1583, p. 1199-1200.

Garrard was burnt at Smithfield with Robert Barnes and William Jerome. 1563, p. 610; 1570, p. 1370; 1576, p. 1168; 1583, p. 1197.

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Thomas Gilbert

of St Michael's in Wood Street; one of 6 charged in 1541 as sacramentaries [Fines]

Thomas Gilbert was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227[Back to Top]
Thomas Gilford

Merchant. Of Poole, Dorset.

Thomas Gilford berated William Geffre for his treatment of Maundrel. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

1583 Edition, page 2167
Thomas Goldwell

(1500 - 1585)

Bishop of St Asaph (1555 - 1558) (DNB )

Thomas Goldwell wrote a letter to Richard Thornton, suffragan of Dover, from Brussels on 16 June 1554. 1570, p. 1848, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Thomas Goldwell fled England after the death of Mary. 1583, p. 2102.

1583 Edition, page 1693 | 1583 Edition, page 1826 | 1583 Edition, page 2126
Thomas Gooding

Thomas Gooding was a witness to John Bland's altercation with John Austen on Sunday 3 December 1555. 1563, p. 1219, 1570, p. 1844, 1576, p. 1578, 1583, p. 1666.

1583 Edition, page 1690[Back to Top]
Thomas Goodrich

(d. 1554)

Bishop of Ely (1534 - 1554) [Fasti] and Lord High Chancellor of England (1552 - 1553) [DNB]. Chaplain to Anne Boleyn. [Fasti]

As a member of the privy council, he signed a letter from the privy council to Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

Foxe prints two letters which he claims that Robert Ferrar wrote to Goodrich 1563, pp. 1091-98; 1570, pp. 1725-26; 1576, pp. 1472[recte 1474] -80; 1583, pp. 1552-53 and 1555-56. [NB: See Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), pp. 166-67, for a persuasive argument that these letters were not written to Ferrar.]

Pygot and Wolsey were visited in prison by a chaplain of Bishop Goodrich, Peter Valentius, who was of French birth and who was almoner there for twenty years prior to his meeting with them. Valentius questioned them on their beliefs. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely (Goodrich), William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (bishop of Chichester), William Repps (bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

[Foxe also refers to him as 'Goodricke'.]

1583 Edition, page 1431 | 1583 Edition, page 1579 | 1583 Edition, page 1740
Thomas Goodrich

(1494 - 1554) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1510; MA 1514; DCL 1520s

Bishop of Ely (1534 - 54); lord chancellor (1552 - 53)

Goodrich was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Goodrich attended a synod in 1537 with other bishops and learned men and with Thomas Cromwell as vicar-general. Goodrich opposed retaining the seven sacraments. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

John Marbeck's fourth examination was conducted by John Capon, John Skip, Thomas Goodrich, Robert Oking and William May. 1570, pp. 1393-94; 1576, pp. 1188-89; 1583, pp. 1216-17.

Goodrich recommended Richard Coxe to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 497; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

Goodrich was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Sir John Cheke, William May and Thomas Wendy, king's visitors, attended the disputation at Cambridge in 1549. 1570, p. 1555; 1576, p. 1326; 1583, p. 1376.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Richard Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

1583 Edition, page 1056 | 1583 Edition, page 1088 | 1583 Edition, page 1206 | 1583 Edition, page 1240 | 1583 Edition, page 1354 | 1583 Edition, page 1355 | 1583 Edition, page 1382 | 1583 Edition, page 1400
Thomas Grainger

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged in 1541 with singing against the mass [Fines]

Thomas Grainger was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Thomas Green

Apprentice to the catholic printer John Wayland (fl. 1539 - 1570). [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), pp. 167-68.]

Thomas Green was brought before Dr Story by his master, John Wayland the printer, for a book called 'Antichrist' and so examined. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2262, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Green said he got the book from a Frenchman. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2262, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

He was transferred quickly from Lollard's Tower to the coalhouse by Cluney. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Green was put in the stocks. 1563, p. 1686, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

He was examined again by Story. 1563, p. 1686, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

He was examined again and sent to prison for 14 days. 1563, p. 1686, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

The lord of Windsor's chaplain and others spoke gently to Green, urging him to say who gave him the book. 1563, p. 1687, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

The chaplain asked Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney removed Green to prison again, first to the coalhouse and then the salthouse. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green was removed from the salthouse to Lollard's Tower, where he met with Lion, a Frenchman, who sang psalms in French and put the jailor into a rage. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

John Story commanded Thomas Green be brought to Walbrook before the commissioners. He was eventually sent before Hussey. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Thomas Green told Hussey that John Bean, an apprentice to Tottle, had received a copy of the said book from him. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney delivered Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green was whipped by two beadles. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Nicholas Priestman, one of Green's friends, gave rods for Green to be whipped with. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Story commanded he be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

1583 Edition, page 2084 | 1583 Edition, page 2089
Thomas Greenwood

B.D. (1527); D.D. (1532) [Venn]. Of St John's College.

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College), Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College), Dr Norton (Master of Clare), Dr Philo (Master of Michael House), Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John), Dr Blith (of the King's Hall), Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College), Dr Cliffe (of Clement House), Dr Donnes (of Jesus College), Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel), Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's, Brikenden of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

1583 Edition, page 1759[Back to Top]
Thomas Gresham

Chancellor of Lichfield (1535 - 1558)

Robert Glover believed that when the bishop of Lichfield and Coventry and the chancellor had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to try and do away with Glover while he was in prison 1563, p. 1280, 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Draycot visited Robert Glover in prison. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, pp. 1281, 1148, 1570, pp. 1758-59, 1889., 1576, pp. 1550 [recte 1502], 1618, 1583, pp. 1586, 1712.

1583 Edition, page 1735
Thomas Grout

Servant of Stephen Gardiner

Grout was a deponent in the case of Gardiner. 1563, p. 844.

Thomas Hale

(d. 1557)

Shoemaker. Martyr. Of Bristol.

Thomas Hale was taken from his home by David Herris and John Stone and sent to Newgate on 24 April 1557. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He claimed that Herris and Stone had been looking to persecute him for two years. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He was examined and condemned by Dalby. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He was burned at Bristol on 7 May 1557. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2053.

1583 Edition, page 2076
Thomas Hardes

(d. 1556)

JP in Kent (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6]. Of Hardes, near Canterbury. [Clark, English Provincial Society, p. 50]

Ramsy and Bland were transported to Canterbury to speak with Thomas Hardes, Drenden, Spilman, and Tutsam. 1563, p. 1220, 1570, p. 1845, 1576, p. 1579, 1583, p. 1666.

Bland remained in the castle of Canterbury until 2 March, when he was taken to the chapter house of Christ Church (Canterbury), to the suffragen of Canterbury, Master Collins, Master Mylles and others, then to Master Oxenden, Master Petit, Master Webbe and Master Hardes. 1563, p. 1224, 1570, p. 1848, 1576,, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

1583 Edition, page 1690
Thomas Harding

(1516 - 1572)

John White's chaplain. Of Lincoln. Catholic controvertialist. Born Combe Martin, Devonshire. [DNB]

Author of STC 12758-12763.5.

Jane Grey wrote a letter to Thomas Harding (he had been her father's chaplain) reproving him for apostasy during Mary's reign. The letter is not in the Rerum and, although it is printed in 1563 (pp, 920-22), Harding is unnamed in that edition. He was identified, however, when the letter was reprinted in 1570 (p. 1582-83) and subsequent editions (1576, pp. 1349-41 [recte 1351] and 1583, pp. 1420-21).

Harding participated in the 1554 Oxford disputations, challenging both Ridley and Latimer on Greek vocabulary and grammar (1563, pp. 934, 970 and 981; 1570, pp. 1606, 1616 and 1624; 1576, pp. 1371, 1379 and 1388; 1583, pp. 1441, 1450 and 1456).

On 14 February 1555 Harding went to see Bradford in prison. Harding talked of his fear for Bradford's soul, and that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13.

In February 1555 Willerton, a chaplain to Bishop Bonner, went to speak with John Bradford in prison. They discussed the doctors and scripture and agreed that each would write down his own arguments over transubstantiation. Willerton sent his few sparse answers to Bradford the next morning and went to see him in the afternoon. They discussed whether or not the scriptures should be in the vernacular. Bradford gave Willerton his answers on transubstantiation and told Willerton to form his answers as reasons. 1563, pp. 1199-1200. Willerton was with Creswell, Harding, Harpsfield and others. 1570, p. 1790, 1576, p. 1528, 1583, p. 1612.

Harding was with Creswell, Willerton, Harpsfield and others who visited Bradford in prison in February 1555. 1570, p. 1790.

In his rejoinder against John Jewel [STC 12760], bishop of Salisbury, Harding dismissed Foxe's version of the three Guernsey martyrs as a series of inflammatory lies. He also charged that Perotine Massey was a whore and responsible for the death of her child. 1570, pp. 2130-34, 1576, pp. 1852-55, 1583, pp. 1946-49.

Foxe challenged Harding to disprove the legitimacy of Perotine Massey's marriage to David Jores. 1570, p. 2131, 1576, p. 1853, 1583, p. 1947.

Foxe refuted Harding's case that Massey was responsible for the death of her child. 1570, pp. 2131-32, 1576, p. 1853, 1583, p. 1947.

1583 Edition, page 1444 | 1583 Edition, page 1465 | 1583 Edition, page 1480 | 1583 Edition, page 1636 | 1583 Edition, page 1970
Thomas Harding

(d. 1532) [Thomson; Fines]

of Amersham and Chesham, Buckinghamshire; made to bear a faggot at the burning of William Tilsworth in Amersham in 1511; accused extensively in 1521; charged when 60 years old; burnt at Chesham

Thomas Harding and his wife first abjured under William Smith in 1506, along with many others. Their penance was reduced in 1515, but continued to include an obligation to detect others. In 1522 he was found to have failed this obligation and was forced to wear a badge in the shape of a fagot for life. In 1532 he was reported for reading an English book of prayers in the woods. He was brought before Bishop Longland to be examined. Longland condemned him as a relapse, and he was sentenced to be burnt. 1570, p. 1117; 1576, p. 956; 1583, p. 983.

1583 Edition, page 1007[Back to Top]
Thomas Harland

(d. 1556)

Carpenter. Martyr. Of Woodmancott.

Thomas Harland refused to attend church because the service was in Latin and he did not understand it. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

He was examined and condemned by Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

He was burned at Lewes about 6 June 1556. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless which referred to the martyrdom of Harland. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

1583 Edition, page 1938 | 1583 Edition, page 1953 | 1583 Edition, page 2048
Thomas Harold

A prisoner in the Marshalsea in 1555, Thomas Harold wrote a prayer, 'Beware of Antichrist,' which John Tooley read from the gallows. 1563, pp. 1145-46; 1570, p. 1756; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

1583 Edition, page 1608
Thomas Harvie

of Birbrook, Essex. He, his parents and sister were troubled in the 1530s [Fines]

Thomas Harvie, his parents and sister, along with others of Birbrook, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071[Back to Top]
Thomas Harwood

of Rolvenden, Kent; abjured; witness against the Kent martyrs 1511

Thomas Harwood abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

Thomas Harwood was a witness against John Browne and Edward Walker. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1240; 1583, p. 1276.

1583 Edition, page 1300
Thomas Hawes

Of London.

Thomas Hawes was a witness against Richard Gibson. 1563, p. 1642.

[No known relation to Lawrence Hawes of Cambridge or protestant Hawes of London.]

Thomas Hawkes

(d. 1555)

Gentleman and martyr. Fellow prisoner of Robert Smith.

Thomas Hawkes was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555; he was condemned by Bonner on 8 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

Hawkes sent Anne Smith money. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Foxe describes Hawkes' life and character; Hawkes served in the household of the earl of Oxford (1563, p. 1161; 1570, p. 1758; 1576,pp. 1501-1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

Hawkes refused to allow his infant son to be baptized in a catholic service. The earl of Oxford reported this to Bishop Bonner (1563, p. 1162; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

Hawkes was examined informally by Bonner (1563, pp. 1148-51; 1570, pp. 1758-60; 1576, pp. 1550 [recte 1502]-1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1585-87).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and and John Harpsfield (1563, pp. 1151-52; 1570, pp. 1760-1; 1576, pp. 1551 [recte 1503]-1504; 1583, pp. 1587-88).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and John Bird (1563, pp. 1152-53; 1570, pp. 1761-62; 1576, pp. 1504-05;1583, p. 1588).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Feckenham (1563, pp. 1153-54; 1570, p. 1762; 1576, p. 1505; 1583,pp. 1588-89).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and William Chedsey (1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, pp. 1505-06; 1583, pp. 1589-90).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Bonner on 29 June 1554 (1563, pp. 1155-56; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1590).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Bonner on 30 June 1554 (1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, pp. 1507-08; 1583, p. 1590).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Bonner on 1 July 1554 (1563, pp. 1156-57; 1570, pp. 1764-65; 1583, p. 1590).

A formal examination of Hawkes was held on 3 September 1554 (1563, pp. 1157-58; 1570, pp. 1765-66; 1576, pp. 1507-08; 1583, pp. 1590-91).

Hawkes was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555 and condemned by Bonner on 8 February 1555 (1570, pp. 1705 and 1766; 1576, pp. 1456 and 1508; 1583, pp. 1529 and 1591-92).

Hawkes dined and prayed with Thomas Wattes and other Marian martyrs on the night of 9 June 1555, when they were all detained at an inn at Chelmsford, awaiting execution (1563, p. 1166; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p.1513; 1583, p. 1596).

Foxe describes the martyrdom of Hawkes (1563, p. 1162; 1570, pp. 1766-67; 1576, pp. 1508-09; 1583, pp. 1592-93).

Hawkes sent a letter to a congregation (1563, pp. 1558-59; 1570, pp. 1767-68; 1576, pp. 1509-10; 1583, p. 1593).

Hawkes sent a Letter to his wife (1563, pp. 1159-60; 1570, pp. 1768-69; 1576, p. 1510; 1583, pp. 1593-94).

Hawkes sent a letter to Clement Throgmorton (1570, p. 1769; 1576, pp. 1510-11; 1583, p. 1594).

1583 Edition, page 1553 | 1583 Edition, page 1609 | 1583 Edition, page 1620 | 1583 Edition, page 1625 | 1583 Edition, page 1725
Thomas Hawkes (Hawkyns)

of Hughenden, Buckinghamshire [Fines]

Thomas Hawkes was one of those examined by Bishop Longland, excommunicated and abjured for attending a meeting at John Taylor's house in 1530 during which Nicholas/Richard Field read the gospel in English and preached. 1570, p. 1119; 1576, p. 958; 1583, p. 985.

1583 Edition, page 1009
Thomas Hayward

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origins.

Thomas Hayward was burned in mid-September 1555 at Lichfield. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, pp. 1884-85, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

1583 Edition, page 1732
Thomas Hempstead

of Steeple Bumpstead, Essex; brother to Robert [Fines]

Thomas Hempstead and his wife and son, with many from Steeple Bumpstead, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071[Back to Top]
Thomas Henden

Parson of Staplehurst, Kent.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin, and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Goods seized from the Allins' home were delivered to Thomas Henden, from whom they were later recovered during Elizabeth's reign. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

1583 Edition, page 2003
Thomas Herne

of Cobshill (Coleshill?), Buckinghamshire [Fines]

Thomas Herne was one of those examined by Bishop Longland, excommunicated and abjured for attending a meeting at John Taylor's house in 1530 during which Nicholas/Richard Field read the gospel in English and preached. 1570, p. 1119; 1576, p. 958; 1583, p. 985.

1583 Edition, page 1009
Thomas Higbed

(d. 1555)

Gentleman, martyr

Thomas Higbed was denounced to Bonner and detained at Colchester together with Thomas Causton and Henry Wye. Bishop Bonner and John Feckenham came to Colchester to attempt to convert them. When these efforts failed, Causton and Higbed were transported to London. 1563, pp. 1103-4; 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

Higbed was examined by Bonner on 17 February 1555. 1563, p. 1104; 1570, pp. 1716-17; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was examined by Bonner on 18 February 1555. 1563, pp. 1104 and 1108-09; 1570, p. 1717; 1576, pp. 1465-66; 1583, pp. 1539-40. [The date is given as 'xxviii Feb.' in the 1563 edition; this is probably a misprint.]

He was again examined by Bonner on 1 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1104-05; 1570, pp. 1717-18; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

He was further examined by Bonner on 8 March 1555 1563, p. 1105; 1570, p. 1718; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

Higbed was examined and condemned by Bonner on 9 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1105-07; 1570, pp. 1718-19; 1576, pp. 1466-68; 1583, pp. 1541-42.

Higbed was sent to Newgate and was later taken, together with William Hunter, to Brentwood. He was detained there with Hunter, before being sent to execution at nearby Horndon-on-Hill, Essex. Higbed comforted William Hunter's mother. He was executed on 26 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1107-08; 1570, pp. 1715 and 1719-20; 1576, pp. 1464 and 1468; 1583, pp. 1538 and 1542.

[Foxe sometimes refers to him as 'Higbee'.]

1583 Edition, page 1562 | 1583 Edition, page 1563 | 1583 Edition, page 1939[Back to Top]
Thomas Hills

Tailor, servant to Christopher Raven of Witham, Essex. Called to answer in 1528 [Fines]

Thomas Hills, along with others of Essex, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Thomas Hinshaw

(b. 1537/8?)

Apprentice. Of London.

Thomas Hinshaw was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was arrested for his protestant forms of prayer and reading. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

He was apprentice in St Paul's Churchyard to Martin Pugson. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

He was sent to Newgate, where he remained for around eight weeks. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner sent him before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Hinshaw was set in the stocks at Fulham. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Harpsfield chastised Hinshaw who rebuked him in return, sending Harpsfield into a rage. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Harpsfield told Bonner of how Hinshaw had spoken to him and defied his authority. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner whipped Hinshaw for his rebuke of the clergy. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Articles were brought against Hinshaw. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Shortly after his scourging, Hinshaw fell ill and was returned to his master. He was expected to die but survived, recovering twelve months later, after the death of Mary. He was still alive in [1570 ]. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

1583 Edition, page 2061 | 1583 Edition, page 2067
Thomas Hitton

(d. 1529) [Fines]

of Martham, Norfolk; priest; burnt at Maidstone

Thomas Hitten was imprisoned by Archbishop Warham and Bishop Fisher, tortured and then burnt at Maidstone. William Tyndale mentioned Hitten in his Apology against Sir Thomas More and in The Practice of Prelates. 1563, p. 1134; 1570, p. 971; 1576, p. ; 1583, pp. 997-98.

1583 Edition, page 1021 | 1583 Edition, page 1093[Back to Top]
Thomas Hitton

(d. 1529)

Martyr. Of Martham, Norwich.

Thomas Swainesland, bailiff to William Warham (archbishop of Canterbury) desired Hitton's arrest for heresy. 1583, p. 2136.

In Hitton's first examination Warham questioned him about his acquistion of religious books overseas. 1583, p. 2136.

Hitton's second, third, fourth and fifth examinations were held before Warham. 1583, p. 2137.

Hitton was condemned by Warham and the bishop of Rochester. 1583, p. 2137.

1583 Edition, page 2159
Thomas Hodilo

Beer brewer of Ely.

Thomas Hodilo provided Foxe with an account of the imprisonment and death of Wolsey and Pygot. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622, 1583, p. 1715.

He visited Wolsey in prison and was given money by him to be distributed to Wolsey's wife, kinsfolk and friends, including one Richard Denton. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622, 1583, p. 1715.

1583 Edition, page 1740
Thomas Hogeking

Thomas Hogeking and Simon Barrat stood as sureties for the good behaviour of Ramsy, who had been carried to Canterbury with Bland, until the next general sessions. 1563, p. 1220, 1570, p. 1845, 1576, p. 1579, 1583, p. 1666.

1583 Edition, page 1691
Thomas Horton

(1520 - 1564) (Fines)

Minister. MA (1549). Fellow of King's College, Cambridge (1540 - 1542). Fellow of Pembroke (c. 1548). Prebend of Durham (1560 - 1561). Rector of St Magnus, London (1560 - 1564). Of Catton, Derbyshire. (Venn) Disciple of Bucer. (Fines)

Thomas Horton fled to the Continent to avoid persecution. 1563, p. 1703, 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1973 [incorrectly numbered as 1937], 1583, p. 2081.

He travelled regularly between Germany and England to give sustenance to exiles. 1563, p. 1703, 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

He was taken en route between Maeso and Cologne but managed to be delivered out of danger. 1563, p. 1703, 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

1583 Edition, page 2105
Thomas Hosier

John Twyford, who had a grudge against Thomas Merial, brought together a group of men, plied them with wine, and had them give evidence against him. Thomas Hosier was one of these. 1570, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1257.

1583 Edition, page 1281[Back to Top]
Thomas Howard

(1473 - 1554)

Earl of Surrey and 3rd duke of Norfolk. [DNB]

Thomas Howard was released from the Tower on 10 August 1553 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He presided over the treason trial and condemnation of the duke of Northumberland, his son the earl of Warwick and the marquis of Northampton on 18 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He was sent against Wyatt but was compelled to retreat when his soldiers deserted (1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418).

A letter from Mary to Norfolk, describing Wyatt's capture, and dated 8 February 1554, is printed in 1563, p. 1731 and 1583, p. 2128. [It was omitted from 1570 and 1576.]

The old duke of Norfolk witnessed the sudden illness of Stephen Gardiner that preceded his death. 1583, pp. 1787-88.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Mary sent a letter to him in the first year of her reign. 1583, p. 2128.

In her letter Mary told Howard that three of the Cobhams, Bret, Knevet and Rudstone, and Iseley had been arrested. [The arrest was in connection with the Wyatt rebellion, which Norfolk was sent out to suppress (and failed).] 1583, p. 2128.

1583 Edition, page 1442 | 1583 Edition, page 1489 | 1583 Edition, page 1811 | 1583 Edition, page 1884 | 1583 Edition, page 2151[Back to Top]
Thomas Howard

(1538 - 1572)

Fourth duke of Norfolk. Privy councillor (1562)(DNB)

Thomas Howard was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

1583 Edition, page 2146
Thomas Howard

(1443 - 1524) [ODNB]

2nd duke of Norfolk (1485 - 1524); magnate and soldier.

When Cardinal Campeggi came as legate to England in 1518, he was greeted with processions at every town in Kent, and then at Blackheath by the duke of Norfolk with great ceremony. 1563, p. 418; 1570, pp. 1120-21; 1576, pp. 959-60; 1583, p. 986.

When reaction in Suffolk to Cardinal Wolsey's exactions threatened to turn violent, the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk calmed the people. 1570, p. 1121; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

The duke of Norfolk held the towel for Cardinal Wolsey when Henry VIII attended mass after receiving the papal bull granting him the title of defender of the faith. 1563, p. 441; 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

Thomas Wolsey was indicted for praemunire, his goods were confiscated, and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk were sent to remove from him the great seal. They were then assigned to determine causes in the Star Chamber. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

1583 Edition, page 1010 | 1583 Edition, page 1013
Thomas Howard

(c. 1512 - 1537) [ODNB]

Courtier; 2nd son of Thomas Howard, the 2nd duke of Norfolk

Lord Thomas Howard helped to carry the canopy over Princess Elizabeth at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

1583 Edition, page 1078
Thomas Hubbard

Of Mendlesham.

Thomas Hubbard was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936[Back to Top]
Thomas Hudson

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Selling, Kent.

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Hudson was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. He was burned at Canterbury about 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

1583 Edition, page 1994
Thomas Hudson

(1528? - 1558)

Glover. Martyr. Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was married with three children. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

He was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

He hid among his faggots for around six months to avoid persecution. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

The vicar of Aylsham, Berry, inquired of Hudson's whereabouts to Hudson's wife, threatening to have her burned if she did not reveal his whereabouts. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson walked about the town for three days decrying the mass before returning home to prayer and fast. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

Thomas Hudson's neighbour, John Crouch, went to the constables, Robert Marsham and Robert Lawes, to expose Hudson, and Berry commanded a watch to be made for Hudson. Hudson was eventually caught on 22 April 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson appeared before Berry (who was also commissary), who railed against him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Richard Cliffar begged Berry to be kind to Thomas Hudson. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson was burned at Norwich on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

1583 Edition, page 2059 | 1583 Edition, page 2123
Thomas Hussey

Of the Arches. Gentleman from Lincolnshire; JP in Lincolnshire (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6].

Thomas Hussey was once an officer in the duke of Norfolk's house. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

He had gone to the 'Reuestry' [registry?] to enquire for 'one Stoning' and when told by the undermarshals that there was no one of that name, he entered the house and met John Bradford. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

Thomas Hussey met Bradford and spoke with him after his first examination. He told him that he could organise an escape for him, and that all those who had witnessed the examination could see that they had not reason to hold Bradford, yet Bradford did not want any assistance. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1525, 1583, p. 1609.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Barlett Green wrote a farewell verse in a book of Master Hussey of the Temple 1563, p. 1465, 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Bartlett Green wrote a letter to Master Hussey, Master Boyer, Master Goring, Master Farneham, Master Fletewood, Master Rosewel, Master Bell, Master Calthorp and others. 1563, pp. 1465-66, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

In a letter Green asked Fleetwood to remember Wittrance and Cooke, also stating: 'M Fernham and M Bell, with M Hussey (as I hope) will dispatch Palmer and Richardson with his companions'. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

1583 Edition, page 1633 | 1583 Edition, page 1841 | 1583 Edition, page 1879 | 1583 Edition, page 1891
Thomas II of York

(d. 1114) [ODNB]

Son of Samson, bishop of Worcester; brother of Richard, bishop of Bayeux; nephew of Thomas I, archbishop of York

Royal chaplain; archbishop of York (1108 - 14)

Thomas was the son of a priest. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1129; 1583, p. 1154.

1583 Edition, page 1178
Thomas Iveson

(d. 1555)

Born in Chichester. Carpenter. Of Godstone, Surrey. Martyr.

William Paulet was ordered by the Privy Council to send a writ for Thomas Iveson's execution to the sheriff of Sussex on 12 June 1555. 1583, p. 1581.

Thomas Iveson was apprehended with Derick Carver at the end of October 1554 by Edward Gage, while at prayer in Carver's house. 1563, pp. 1239-40 1570, pp. 1860-61, 1576, pp. 1592-93, 1583, p. 1680.

Iveson was burned in the same month as Carver and Launder. 1563, p. 1243, 1570, p. 1863, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1682.

He gave answers to Bonner in July 1555. 1563, pp. 1243-44, 1570, p. 1863, 1576, pp. 1594-95, 1583, pp. 1682-83.

Robert Smith told his wife in a letter that Iveson had sent her money and in another letter that Iveson was condemned. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Iveson sent money to Anne, Katherine Smith and Anne's mother. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

[Foxe also refers to him as Thomas 'Everson' and 'Juison'.]

1583 Edition, page 1605 | 1583 Edition, page 1704 | 1583 Edition, page 1706 | 1583 Edition, page 1725
Thomas Jenens

Of Abingdon.

Thomas Jenens of Abingdon said that he heard Levar say that Hugh Latimer had teeth like a horse when he saw Latimer being burned. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

1583 Edition, page 2127
Thomas Johnson

Thomas Johnson did penance on 26 June 1556 for swearing by the mass. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1919.

1583 Edition, page 1941
Thomas Kelde

of St Michael at Queenhythe; presented in 1541 for refusing penance and absolution and for eating meat in Lent

Thomas Kelde was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228[Back to Top]
Thomas Kightely

One of the jurors who refused to convict Sir Nicholas Throckmorton; fined £2,000 in consequence (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474).

[NB: Foxe calls him 'Master Kyteley' but Susan Brigden gives his name as Thomas Kightely (Susan Brigden, London and the Reformation, (Oxford, 1989), pp. 553-54)].

One of three Throckmorton jurors released from prison on 21 December 1554, after declaring that they could not pay their fines of £220 and paying £40 instead (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480; C. L. Kingsford, ed. 'Two London Chronicles from the Collections of John Stow' in Camden Miscellany XII (London, 1910), p. 71).

1583 Edition, page 1498
Thomas Knowles

Proctor at the court of John Hopton, bishop of Norwich.

William Harrison was forced to flee from his wife and children for fear of persecution by Berry and Thomas Knowles. He went to Benet College, Cambridge. 1563, p. 1707.

Thomas Kyme

Husband of Anne Askew [ODNB sub Anne Askew]

At her second examination, Anne Askew was asked about her husband, Thomas Kyme. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

1583 Edition, page 1261
Thomas Lancaster

Priest; BTh Oxford by 1536; rector of Offekerque in the Pale of Calais (1536 - 40), where he was introduced to Adam Damplip; imprisoned for bringing books over to England; bishop of Kildare (1550 - 54); chaplain to Elizabeth I; treasurer of Salisbury (1559 - 83); archbishop of Armagh (1567 - 83) [Fines; ODNB]

As Adam Damplip was returning to England from Rome, he passed through Calais and met William Stevens and Thomas Lancaster, who urged him to stay for a while to preach to the people there. 1563, p. 656; 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1223.

Thomas Lancaster was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. He was charged in 1541. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

Thomas Lancaster was imprisoned in the Counter for importing illicit books. 1563, p. 420; 1576, p. 1178; 1583, p. 1206.

1583 Edition, page 1229 | 1583 Edition, page 1230 | 1583 Edition, page 1247
Thomas Langham

of St Mildred's Breadstreet parish; one of 4 charged in 1541 for interrupting divine service [Fines]

Thomas Langham was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Thomas Lanquet

(1520/21 - 1545) [ODNB]

Historian; wrote history of the known world

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 1304; 1576, p. 1116; 1583, p. 1141.

1583 Edition, page 1165
Thomas Lawney

Priest; migrated from Cambridge to a chaplaincy at Cardinal College, Oxford in 1525; kept in ward by the dean after the arrest of Thomas Garrett; preaching in Kent 1536; chaplain to the duke of Norfolk; intimate of Cranmer; chaplain to Charles Brandon, duke of Suffolk in 1540 [Emden; Fines]

Thomas Lawney was one of the scholars Wolsey gathered for Cardinal College. 1563, p. 497; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

1583 Edition, page 1056
Thomas Lawrence

Registrar to the archdeacon of Canterbury; one of the chief supporters of Elizabeth Barton (Joan of Kent); attainted of misprision and concealment of treason in 1534 [ODNB sub Elizabeth Barton]

Thomas Lawrence was associated with Elizabeth Barton (Joan of Kent). He was convicted of misprision of treason, had his goods confiscated and was imprisoned. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1055.

1583 Edition, page 1079[Back to Top]
Thomas le Coll

[Ogier]

Thomas le Coll was one of the justices who pronounced the sentence of execution for heresy on Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. 1563, p. 1543, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1850 [recte 1838], 1583, p. 1944.

1583 Edition, page 1968
Thomas Lee

(d. 1554)

Merchant. Brother-in-law of George Constantine; uncle to Thomas Young's wife.

Thomas Lee was one of Robert Ferrar's chief opponents in the diocese of St David's. 1563, p. 1084; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, p. 1544.

Together with Hugh Rawlins, Lee sent articles to the privy council denouncing Ferrar. 1563, pp. 1085-88; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, pp. 1544-46.

He was accused by Ferrar of improper procedures in collecting evidence against him. 1563, pp. 1093 and 1095; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, pp. 1550 and 1551-52.

Ferrar claimed that Lee was paid by his enemies to accuse him. 1563, p. 1094; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1740; 1583, p. 1550.

Ferrar denounced Lee in a letter to Lord Chancellor Thomas Goodrich. 1563, pp. 1096-97; 1570, p. 1725; 1576, p. 1473; 1583, pp. 1552-53 and 1555-56.

[Lee was reported dead in an indenture of 1 August 1554; see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), p. 227.]

1583 Edition, page 1568
Thomas Legh

(d. 1545) [ODNB

Diplomat; ecclesiastical administrator; BCL Cambridge 1527; DCL 1531; ambassador to Denmark 1532-33; commissioner in royal visitation of monastic houses 1535-40

Legh was sent, under Thomas Cromwell, to visit the monasteries and nunneries to release all those in religious orders who wished to leave. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

1583 Edition, page 1094
Thomas Leigh

Sheriff of London (1555 - 1556) with John Macham. [Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward VI, 4, 396.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including Bath, Worcester and Lichfield, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London and Sir Martin Bowes, knight. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

1583 Edition, page 1851
Thomas Lelond

JP. Of Lancashire. [See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 187, 192.]

The Hurst house was searched under the direction of Thomas Lelond, justice, and Hurst's books were found, including Tindal's translation of the New Testament. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Thomas Lelond spoke with Mrs Hurst during the search of her house for her son's possessions. He called her an old fool and threatened her with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond had John Hurst bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jefrrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Jeffrey Hurst was examined by Lelond. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Thomas Lelond continued to hold office in Elizabeth's time, when he rarely attended church. He blamed his lack of attendance on the fact that he was old. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

He kept Parkinson near to him and said that he could minister to him outside of church. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

When he did go to church the bells on the collar of his dog made a great din. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe recounts his habits at church. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond died suddenly in his chair whilst talking with friends. 1570, p. 2280, 2300 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

1583 Edition, page 2100 | 1583 Edition, page 2125
Thomas Lever

(1521 - 1577)

Archdeacon of Coventry (1559 - 1577). Of Little Lever, Lancashire. [DNB]

In a letter to John Hooper, dated 10 October 1554, Bullinger described Lever as familiar and dear to him. 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1445; 1583, p. 1518.

Thomas Lever's preaching in Lancashire during Edward VI's reign was mentioned by George Marsh. 1570, p. 1744; 1576, p. 1489; 1583, p. 1572.

Thomas Lever's exile was mentioned in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09, 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which Ridley makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

[Foxe calls him Thomas 'Leiver'.]

1583 Edition, page 1542 | 1583 Edition, page 1596 | 1583 Edition, page 1652 | 1583 Edition, page 1804[Back to Top]
Thomas Leyes

(d. 1555)

Of Thorpe, Essex. Prisoner for his beliefs in Newgate.

Thomas Leyes was sent to Newgate by Sir Nicholas Hare. 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

Leyes was examined by Bishop Bonner. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

He became so weak he was removed to a house in the city, where he died. He was cast out into the fields and buried at night. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Leyes). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

1583 Edition, page 1713 | 1583 Edition, page 1726
Thomas Linacre

(c. 1460 - 1524) [ODNB]

Humanist scholar and physician

Thomas Linacre was one of the most noted scholars in England. 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 963; 1583, p. 989.

1583 Edition, page 1013
Thomas Linley

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

1583 Edition, page 2003
Thomas Locker

Of unknown occupation and origin but probably from Essex.

Thomas Locker wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Probably related or married to Alice Locker]

1583 Edition, page 1998[Back to Top]
Thomas Loseby

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Thomas Loseby was accused of heresy and apprehended for not attending church. 1563, p. 1567, 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

He was examined by Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor. Articles were brought against him and answered. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

He was burned at Smithfield on 12 April 1557. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

1583 Edition, page 1998
Thomas Lound

Priest of London [Fines]; had been with Luther two years; imprisoned in the Fleet

Thomas Lound was a teacher of John Rayburne of Risborough. 1570, p. 1119; 1576, p. 958; 1583, p. 985.

1583 Edition, page 1009
Thomas Lovel

Chief Constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', Suffolk.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Lovel and his man, Granmow, broke into the only house nearby that still had a fire lit to make a torch to light the fire for Noyes' pyre. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

[Perhaps related to John Lovel, MP for Dartmouth (1563) (Hasler).]

1583 Edition, page 2045
Thomas Lupset

(c. 1495 - 1530) [ODNB]

Ecclesiastic, scholar; in John Colet's household before 1508; assisted Erasmus to edit the New Testament at Cambridge by mid-1513; saw More's Utopia into print; taught at Oxford 1520; MA 1521; went to Italy and became close to Richard Pace, the ambassador to Venice; returned to England 1527

Thomas Lupset informed the king of the pitiful state of Richard Pace due to royal neglect. 1570, p. 1125; 1576, p. 963; 1583, p. 990.

1583 Edition, page 1014
Thomas Lynacres

Father of Hugh Lynacres.

Thomas Lynacres was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979[Back to Top]
Thomas Mabs

of Aldermanbury; charged with others in 1541 with supporting Robert Barnes and other preachers [Fines]

Thomas Mabs was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229
Thomas Magnus

(1463/4 - 1550) [ODNB]

Administrator; diplomat; archdeacon of East Riding (1504 - 50); canon of Windsor (1520 - 47); JP for all 3 Yorkshire ridings (1538 - 50); founded grammar school and chantry at Newark

Thomas Magnus posted a poem praising the Virgin on the choir door at Windsor. Robert Testwood twice tore it down. Magnus arranged to have letters complaining of Testwood sent from him, the dean and other canons to John Chambre. No action resulted from the complaint. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1212.

1583 Edition, page 1236
Thomas Manning

of Beninden, Kent

Thomas Manning abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Thomas Marsham

(by 1522 - 1557)

Of Norwich. Alderman of Norwich. Alderman (1545 - 1557), auditor (1545), mayor (1554 - 1555), MP for Norwich (1553). [Bindoff]

In the 1563 edition (only), 'master Marsham' is described as having denounced Elizabeth Cooper along with Bacon to the sheriff. [This was almost certainly Thomas Marsham, an alderman of Norwich.] 1563, p. 1603.

Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

1583 Edition, page 1994 | 1583 Edition, page 2090 | 1583 Edition, page 2096 | 1583 Edition, page 2106
Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

1583 Edition, page 1531 | 1583 Edition, page 1602 | 1583 Edition, page 1713 | 1583 Edition, page 1882 | 1583 Edition, page 1895 | 1583 Edition, page 1913 | 1583 Edition, page 1943[Back to Top]
Thomas Matthew

Thomas Matthew was the pen name of John Rogers when translating the Bible. 1563, p. 1022; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484.

1583 Edition, page 1506
Thomas Melster

Vicar of Windsor c. 1541; former friar

A sermon by Thomas Melster offended one of his churchwardens, Henry Filmer. He spoke to the vicar, who thanked him and reformed himself. William Symonds then spoke to the vicar, who reversed his opinion again. Symonds took Melster with him when he went to the bishop to complain of Filmer, a difficult journey for the vicar as he had a sore leg. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1213.

Filmer had got to the bishop first, showing him a bill with notes of the vicar's sermons. The bishop declared that the vicar had preached heresy. He then saw Melster, who admitted his fault and was ordered publicly to recant his heresy. 1570, pp. 1388-89; 1576, pp. 1184-85; 1583, p. 1213.

1583 Edition, page 1236 | 1583 Edition, page 1237
Thomas Merial (Murell)

Bricklayer of St Sepulchre's in ward of Farringdon without; opposed Stokesley's words in 1535 [Fines]

Thomas Merial attended a sermon delivered by Bishop Stokesley, commending the efficacy of masses. John Twyford also attended. Twyford, who had a grudge against Merial, brought together a group of men, plied them with wine, and had them give evidence against him. Merial was taken to Bishop Stokesley. 1570, pp. 1439-40; 1576, p. 1228; 1583, p. 1257.

Merial avoided execution, but was sentenced to bear a faggot. He denied speaking the words attributed to him and produced three witnesses to back him. 1570, pp. 1440-41; 1576, p. 1228; 1583, p. 1257.

1583 Edition, page 1281
Thomas Merse

Thomas Merse wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

1583 Edition, page 1998[Back to Top]
Thomas Milles

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Thomas Milles was burned at Lewes about 20 June 1556. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

1583 Edition, page 1938
Thomas Montague

Clerk

Thomas Montague witnessed the degradation of John Rogers and John Hooper on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1081; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508.

1583 Edition, page 1532
Thomas Moore

(1532? - 1556)

Husbandman. Martyr. Of Leicester.

Thomas Moore denied transubstantiation when examined by Dr Cook and so was condemned. 1563, p. 1611 [recte 1623], 1570, p. 2134, 1576, pp. 1855-56, 1583, p. 1949.

He was burned around 26 June 1556 at Leicester. 1563, p. 1611 [recte 1623], 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1855, 1583, p. 1949.

[This is the merchant's servant burned at Leicester. See 1563, p. 1523, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914 ]

1583 Edition, page 1938 | 1583 Edition, page 1973
Thomas More

(1532? - 1556)

Merchant's servant. Martyr. Of Leicester

Thomas More was burned at Leicester 26 June 1556. 1563, p. 1611.

[Not to be confused with Sir Thomas More.]

1583 Edition, page 1559[Back to Top]
Thomas More

Thomas More was called as a witness against Joan Warren. 1563, p. 1453.

In a letter to Bonner, John Harpsfield recounts that he, Johnson the registrar, Richard Cluney and Thomas More went to Thomas Whittle to see if he had recanted. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

1583 Edition, page 1870
Thomas More

(1478 - 1535)

Lord Chancellor of England and author. [DNB]

On 14 February 1555 Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by Thomas More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13 .

The deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More are referred to in the description of the death of Cranmer. 1563, p. 1499, 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

Sir Thomas More met with a bloody death on Tower Hill. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

Frith's confutation of the writings of Sir Thomas More caused many to seek Frith's destruction. 1583, p. 2126.

1583 Edition, page 1636 | 1583 Edition, page 1909
Thomas Moreton

Priest.

Thomas Moreton was called by Bonner as witness against Joan Warren. 1563, p. 1453.

[Possibly Thomas More]

Thomas Moreton

Prebendary of Broomesbury (St Paul's) (1555 - 1558), resigned [Fasti]; parson of Fulham

Thomas Moreton was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535.

1583 Edition, page 1559[Back to Top]
Thomas Morse

Merchant. Of Leigh

Thomas Morse provided Foxe with the account of Gregory Crow and of three men also saved at sea. 1570, pp. 2093-94, 1576, pp. 1806-07, 1583, pp. 1913-14.

1583 Edition, page 1937
Thomas Mouse

(d. 1558?)

Constable. Of Mendlesham.

Adam Foster was taken from his house by the constable George Revet and Thomas Mouse, at the commandment of Sir John Tyrrel because he would not go to church. Afterwards, both constables were stricken with fear and sickness. Mouse, although young and healthy, pined away. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, p. 1098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Thomas Mouse died miserably sometime after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

1583 Edition, page 1941 | 1583 Edition, page 2127
Thomas Necton

Sheriff of Norwich (1530 - 31) [PRO List of Sheriffs]; friend of Bilney

Foxe says Thomas Necton could be fetched to testify that Thomas Bilney did not recant at his burning. 1570, p. 1150; 1576, p. 984; 1583, p. 1011.

Although Necton was a close friend of Bilney, he was obliged as sheriff to take charge of him after his condemnation. He ensured that he was well looked after. 1570, p. 1150; 1576, p. 984; 1583, p. 1011.

1583 Edition, page 1035
Thomas Net

of St Magnus's parish; charged with 10 others in 1541 for supporting preachers of the new learning [Fines]

Thomas Net was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227[Back to Top]
Thomas Neve

Servant of Stephen Gardiner

Thomas Neve was a deponent in the case of Gardiner. 1563, p. 860.

Thomas Nightingale

(d. 1555)

Rector of Crundale, Kent, from before 1533 to his death early in 1555 [See Valor Ecclesiasticus, sub Crundale].

Thomas Nightingale received pardon and then was struck down suddenly and died in the pulpit. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

Nightingale died suddenly, on 3 March 1555, extolling the restoration of catholicism in England. 1563, p. 1113; 1570, pp. 1730-31; 1583, pp. 1560-61.

[NB: Foxe was correct about the date of Nightingale's death. His successor, Dr John Porter, was appointed in March 1555; see LPL, Register N, fol. 84v].

1583 Edition, page 1584 | 1583 Edition, page 2124
Thomas Norfolk

Sent Roger Whaplode to William Goodridge

Thomas Norfolk sent Roger Whaplode to William Goodridge to ask him to read a bill from the pulpit of St Mary Spital seeking anyone willing to repair the conduit on Fleet Street, the repair to be paid for out of Richard Hunne's estate. The bill also included a prayer for the soul of Hunne. As Hunne had been a condemned heretic, Whaplode and Norfolk were brought before the bishop in 1529 and Goodridge had to publicly revoke his prayer for Hunne at Paul's Cross. 1570, p. 1184; 1576, p. 1013; 1583, p. 1041.

1583 Edition, page 1065
Thomas Norgate

Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

1583 Edition, page 2059[Back to Top]
Thomas Norris

Of Lichfield.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Thomas Osmund

(d. 1555)

Fuller.

Thomas Osborne was denounced to Bishop Bonner by the earl of Oxford and Sir Philip Paris on 1 May 1555. He recanted on 17 May 1555. 1563, p. 1166; 1570, p. 1777; 1576, p. 1518; 1583, p. 1601

Robert Smith told his wife in a letter that Osborne was dead. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

1583 Edition, page 1725
Thomas Paccard

Civil Lawyer. Of Chichester.

Thomas Paccard accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

1583 Edition, page 2048
Thomas Parker

(fl. 1535 - 1581)

Original fellow of Trinity (1546), Lady Margaret Preacher (1556 - 1558). (Venn )

Thomas Parker was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside DrsYoung, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

[Went into exile at the accession of Elizabeth. Graduated DD abroad. Living in Milan in 1581. (Venn)]

1583 Edition, page 1984
Thomas Parker

(fl. 1535 - 1581) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1535/6; MA 1540/41; BTh 1548; original fellow of Trinity (1546), Lady Margaret preacher (1556 - 1558); Roman Catholic priest and Elizabethan exile

One of the spokesmen for Catholic orthodoxy in a disputation on the sacraments held in Cambridge in 1549

In the disputation at Cambridge in 1549, Andrew Perne answered the third disputation, opposed by Thomas Parker, Leonard Pollard, Thomas Vavasour and John Young. 1570, pp. 1556-57; 1576, pp. 1326-28; 1583, pp. 1385-88.

1583 Edition, page 1409[Back to Top]
Thomas Parker

Father-in-law to John Thompson; abjured in the London diocese c. 1504; charged in 1528 [Fines]

Thomas Parker, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Thomas Parnell

Augustinian friar of Cambridge and London; scholar of Robert Barnes [Fines]

Robert Barnes brought Thomas Parnell with him from Louvain to Cambridge. He helped Barnes to improve the scholarship of the Augustinian house there. 1563, p. 589; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

During the night after he had been examined by Cardinal Wolsey, Robert Barnes stayed at the house of Thomas Parnell. Parnell was briefly committed to the Fleet along with Barnes. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

1583 Edition, page 1216
Thomas Parret

(d. 1556)

Thomas Parret died in June 1556 while imprisoned in the King's Bench in Southwark and was buried in the postern on 27 June 1556. 1563, p. 1527, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

1583 Edition, page 1941
Thomas Parry

Not long before Julins Palmer's death, Barwick, an old acquaintance of his, tried to reason with him and warned him of the fire. Thomas Parry was a witness. 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

1583 Edition, page 1960
Thomas Parton

Of Worcester.

Alice Johnson consulted with Thomas Parton and Alice Brook (wife of Nicholas Brook, organ maker) and with certain canons, including Johnson, chancellor to Heath, about John Davis's reading of an English testament. It was decided that Alice Brook's son, Oliver (a school fellow of Davis) feign friendship with him and so gain access to Davis's writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

[Shopkeeper. (See Nichols, Days of the Reformation, p. 61.)]

1583 Edition, page 2097[Back to Top]
Thomas Patmore

Rector of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire [Fines]

Member of the Drapers' Company; one of the early apprentice 'Scripture Men'; in the 1520s one of the Christian Brethren; performed public penance 1530, 1531; condemned to perpetual imprisonment; released through Anne Boleyn's intervention

[Probably the same as Thomas Patmore, priest of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, who lived incognito for a while as a layman in his father's Company; [Brigden, London, pp. 121, 125, 197, 205-7, 222]]

Thomas Patmore had been preferred to the living of Much Hadham by Bishop Fitzjames and continued there peacably for sixteen years until John Stokesley became bishop of London. Stokesley was suspected of wanting the benefice for someone else. He imprisoned Patmore in his own palace and then had him sent to Lollards' Tower, where he was kept in harsh conditions. He was interrogated by Richard Foxford, who asked if he had been at Wittenberg, whether he had met Luther, and what books he had read. 1583, p. 1044.

Patmore was charged with marrying his curate, Simon Smith, to his maid. 1570, p. 1188; 1576, p. 1016; 1583, pp. 1044-45.

Thomas Patmore was charged in London in 1531 with speaking against saints and saying that priests might marry. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1188; 1576, p. 1016; 1583, p. 1044.

Patmore appealed to the king, but was made to abjure and condemned to perpetual prison. 1570, p. 1188; 1576, p. 1016; 1583, p. 1045.

Patmore was imprisoned in Lollards' Tower. Richard Bayfield was originally imprisoned with him, but was moved to the Coalhouse to keep the two suspects apart. Patmore eventually abjured and was condemned to perpetual imprisonment, but was granted a pardon by the king. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1161; 1576, p. 993; 1583, p. 1021.

Patmore's release from prison was obtained through means of Queen Anne Boleyn. The king gave him a commission to the lord chancellor, the archbishop of Canterbury and Secretary Cromwell to investigate the dealings of the bishop of London and his chancellor towards Patmore. 1583, p. 1045.

George Bull said in 1531 that Patmore had reported that a well had sprung up where Wyclif's bones had been burned. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1187; 1576, p. 1016; 1583, p. 1044.

1583 Edition, page 1045 | 1583 Edition, page 1068
Thomas Peacock

(1516 - 1582)

BD (1554). Canon of Norwich (1554 - 1556); rector of Downham, Cambs (1555 - 1569); and prebend of Ely (1556 - 1559 [deprived]). President of Queens' (1558 - 1559). [DNB; Venn]

Peacock preached a sermon in Latin at the assembly of Cambridge graduates and commissioners called by Cardinal Pole, part of Pole's attempt to reintroduce catholicism at the university. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

He preached at the burning of Wolsey and Pygot. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622, 1583, p. 1715.

Thomas Peacock gave a Latin sermon in January 1557, attended by the queen's commission to the University of Cambridge, in which he preached against Bilney, Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2144, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1958.

[Stripped of all his preferments at the accession of Elizabeth. Resigned the presidency of Queens' College in 1559 in order to avoid expulsion. DNB]

1583 Edition, page 1740 | 1583 Edition, page 1980
Thomas Pelles

Doctor of law and chancellor of Norwich diocese [ODNB sub Thos Bilney]

Thomas Bilney was examined and condemned before Thomas Pelles. 1570, p. 1150; 1576, p. 984; 1583, p. 1012.

1583 Edition, page 1036[Back to Top]
Thomas Pepper

Thomas Pepper was the husband of the martyr Elizabeth Pepper. He was a weaver of St James', Colchester. 1563, p. 1523, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

1583 Edition, page 1940
Thomas Phillips

Pointmaker (laces to fasten clothing) of London; accused at Amersham in 1521; read from the New Testament to a Lollard conventicle in London led by John Hacker in the 1520s [L & P VII, p. 155]; imprisoned at Stokesley's pleasure, in prison in 1532 [Narratives of the Days of the Reformation, ed. Nichols, pp. 25-28]

Thomas Phillips was handed over by Sir Thomas More to Bishop Stokesley in 1530. As well as holding heretical opinions, he was charged with having a copy of William Tracy's will and butter and cheese during Lent. He was examined by More and Stokesley and agreed to abjure, but not to openly read the abjuration in the form presented. He appealed to the king and was excommunicated by the bishop. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1185; 1576, p. 1014; 1583, p. 1042.

His congregation sent him a letter of comfort and encouragement on his way to the Tower. 1570, p. 1186; 1576, pp. 1014-15; 1583, p. 1042.

1583 Edition, page 1066
Thomas Plummer

of St Matthew's parish; presented in 1541 for remarks about the sacrament [Fines]

Thomas Plummer was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Thomas Powthread

On the day of her death Joan Waste was accompanied to church by Anthony Draycot, Thomas Powthread, Henry Vernon, Master Dethick of Newhall and many others. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

1583 Edition, page 1976
Thomas Poyntz

(d. 1563) [D. Daniell, William Tyndale (1994)]

of Antwerp; kept a house of English merchants; Tyndale was living with him when arrested

William Tyndale lodged in the house of Thomas Poyntz. He introduced Henry Philips into the house and befriended him, but Thomas Poyntz distrusted Philips. Philips set a trap for Tyndale while Poyntz was away for a few weeks. 1563, pp. 515-16; 1570, pp. 1227-28; 1576, pp. 1050-51; 1583, pp. 1077-78.

After Tyndale had been arrested, Poyntz worked assiduously to gather support to release him from prison. He enlisted the help of the marquess of Bergen op Zoom. When he took letters to the emperor's court at Brussels, he was himself examined. He was kept in prison for a length of time, but finally escaped. 1563, pp. 517-18; 1570, pp. 1228-29; 1576, pp. 1051-52; 1583, pp. 1078-79.

1583 Edition, page 1101[Back to Top]
Thomas Pyot

Of Checkely, Cheshire. (Fines)

Thomas Pyot was examined in the diocese of Lichfield for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

1583 Edition, page 1941
Thomas Radcliffe

(1525? - 1583)

Lord Fitzwalter ['Fitzwaters'] and, from 1557, earl of Sussex. Diplomat, Courtier, and Lord Deputy of Ireland (DNB).

Thomas Radcliffe was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554. Called 'Lord Fitzwaters' by Foxe (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

During John Careless' first examination, Martin pretended, according to Foxe, to desire to help Careless survive. He asked Careless if he would like to go to Ireland with Lord Fitzwalter to do the queen's service, to which Careless replied that he was willing to do the queen service as long as he was alive. 1563, p. 1534, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Thomas Rose had a talk with the earl of Sussex, Sir William Woodhouse and other chaplains. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1979-80, 1583, p. 2085.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton, with the earl of Sussex in attendance. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

1583 Edition, page 1944
Thomas Radcliffe

(1526? - 1583)

Lord Fitzwalter ['Fitzwaters'] and, from 1557, earl of Sussex. Diplomat, Courtier, and Lord Deputy of Ireland (DNB).

Thomas Radcliffe was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554. Called 'Lord Fitzwaters' by Foxe (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

During John Careless' first examination, Martin pretended, according to Foxe, to desire to help Careless survive. He asked Careless if he would like to go to Ireland with Lord Fitzwalter to do the queen's service, to which Careless replied that he was willing to do the queen service as long as he was alive. 1563, p. 1534, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Thomas Rose had a talk with the earl of Sussex, Sir William Woodhouse and other chaplains. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1979-80, 1583, p. 2085.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton, with the earl of Sussex in attendance. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

1583 Edition, page 1497 | 1583 Edition, page 2109
Thomas Rainolds

(d. 1559

Dean of Exeter (1554–59) (Le Neve, Fasti)

According to Foxe, Rainolds was made Dean of Bristol (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467). This is an error. Rainolds was made Dean of Exeter and Henry Joliffe, Dean of Bristol.

1583 Edition, page 1491[Back to Top]
Thomas Ramsay

Canon and dean of the abbey of St Andrews 1527

Thomas Ramsay was one of those who, with Bishop Beaton, persecuted Patrick Hamilton. He was one of those who passed the sentence definitive against him. 1570, pp. 1107-09; 1576, pp. 947-48; 1583, pp. 974-75.

1583 Edition, page 998
Thomas Ravensdale

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of unknown occuptation. Of Rye.

Thomas Ravensdale was accused and examined by Christopherson, Richard Briesly (chancellor), Robert Tailor (deputy), Thomas Paccard (civilian), Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale (BD). He was condemned and martyred at Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

1583 Edition, page 1977 | 1583 Edition, page 2048
Thomas Raynoldes

(1505? - 1559)

Dean of Exeter (1554 - 1559). Bishop-elect of Hereford when Mary died. He never obtained possession. (Foster)

Raynoldes and Blackstone, chancellor of Exeter, persecuted Agnes Prest. 1583, p. 2148.

Thomas Raynoldes died in prison. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

1583 Edition, page 2126 | 1583 Edition, page 2172[Back to Top]
Thomas Read

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Freewiller. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Thomas Read was examined and condemned by Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 1522., 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

Thomas Read had a vision the night before his martyrdom instructing him not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2004.

He was burned at Lewes about 6 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1522, 1602, 1570, pp. 2095, 2196, 1576, pp. 1807, 1895, 1583, p. 1914, 2003.

[Read signed John Trew's confession of 20 January 1555 (new style 1556). See Bodley Ms 53, fo.125r; printed in Richard Laurence, ed. Authentic Documents Relative to the Predestinarian Controversy (Oxford, 1819), p. 70, and L. J. Clement, Religious Radicalism in England, 1535-1565 (Carlisle, 1997), p. 370. Note that Read's signature on the document is 'Thomas Arede'.

Note that the privy council sent a letter on 3 May 1555 ordering that Thomas Rede, presently held in the King's Bench, be examined 'for being chief mover of a leude tumulte at Wallronde in Sussex' (APC V, p. 120). See also Thomas S. Freeman, 'Notes on a Source for John Foxe's Account of the Marian Persecution in Kent and Sussex', Historical Research 67 (1994), pp. 203-211.]

1583 Edition, page 1938 | 1583 Edition, page 2028
Thomas Ridley

(d. 1555?)

Friend of Nicholas Ridley. Of the Bull-head in Cheapside.

Grindal wrote to Nicholas Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had also died. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

1583 Edition, page 1753
Thomas Robertson (Robinson)

(fl. c. 1520 - 1561) [ODNB]

Theologian; BA Oxford 1521; MA 1525; BTh 1539; treasurer of Salisury Cathedral (1540 - 48); chaplain to John Longland, bishop of Lincoln; archdeacon of Leicester 1541; royal chaplain; dean of Durham (1558 - 60); deprived under Elizabeth

Thomas Robertson was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Stephen Gardiner complained to the king about the sermon of Robert Barnes preached during Lent at Paul's Cross. He disputed with Barnes, and Richard Coxe and Thomas Robinson acted as arbiters. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, p. 1169; 1583, p. 1198.

Richard Coxe and Thomas Robinson came in to see Anne Askew after a session of questioning at her second examination. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1238.

1583 Edition, page 1088 | 1583 Edition, page 1222 | 1583 Edition, page 1262
Thomas Rose

'M. Rose' was arrested, along with a congregation of 30 people for whom he was celebrating communion, in the churchyard of St Mary-le-Bow, on 1 January 1555 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480; cf. 1563, p. 1020).

On 3 January 1554, Rose was brought before Stephen Gardiner, informally examined, and then sent to the Tower (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480).

Rose's secret conventicle was discussed in Parliament in 1555. They had prayed that God turn Mary's heart from idolatry or shorten her days. Parliament decreed that certain 'evill prayers' would be treason (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, pp. 1481-82).

A letter was sent to Hooper describing the arrest of Rose and his congregation; the letter is dated 3 January 1555 (1563, p. 1020).

Hooper wrote an answer to this letter (1563, p. 1020; LM, p. 120; 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, p. 1482).

Hooper also sent a letter of encouragement to the members of Rose's congregation imprisoned in the Counter in Bread Street (1563, pp. 1021-22; , pp. 121-23; 1570, pp. 1654-55; 1576, pp. 1411-12; 1583, pp. 1482-83).

1583 Edition, page 1504 | 1583 Edition, page 2063 | 1583 Edition, page 2106
Thomas Rose

(1499/1500 - c. 1576) [ODNB]

of Exmouth, Devon; evangelical reformer and clergyman

When the rood at Dovercourt was burnt in 1532, Thomas Rose burnt its coat. 1563, p. 496; 1570, p. 1173; 1576, p. 1003; 1583, p. 1031.

1583 Edition, page 1055 | 1583 Edition, page 1226
Thomas Row

Charged in London in 1531

Thomas Row was charged for speaking against auricular confession, penance given by priests and the preaching of church doctors. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1187; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1043.

1583 Edition, page 1067
Thomas Russell

Citizen of Norwich

Thomas Russell was present on horseback at the burning of Thomas Bilney. He did not hear Bilney recant. 1570, p. 1150; 1576, p. 984; 1583, p. 1011.

1583 Edition, page 1035
Thomas Rysley

Mayor of Coventry (1554 - 1555) [William Dugdale, Antiquities of Warwickshire, I, 1730, p. 149.]

Robert Glover wrote a letter to the mayor of Coventry in 1555. 1563, p. 1280, 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1712.

The mayor of Coventry warned John Glover of his impending arrest. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

Thomas Sadler

Of unknown occupation or standing. Of Ipswich.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler asked permission to punish Thomas Sadler for words he said to John Bate, the town crier. This was to be an example to others in the town. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Thomas Sampson

(1517? - 1589)

Dean of Chichester (1553) Fasti. Anti-vestiarian leader in Elizabeth's reign (DNB

Was supposed to be arrested at the house of Henry Elsing in Fleet Street but was not present. (John Bradford was, and was arrested). Sampson eluded arrest, much to Stephen Gardiner's fury (1570, p.1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

1583 Edition, page 1489
Thomas Saulter

Thomas Saulter was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Thomas Saunders

Of St Katherine's, London.

Thomas Saunders' child was given a secret protestant baptism. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

1583 Edition, page 2106 | 1583 Edition, page 2168
Thomas Sedgwick

(d. 1573) [ODNB]

Roman Catholic theologian; BA Cambridge 1530; MA 1533; BTh 1545; DTh 1554; deacon in Lincoln 1537; Lady Margaret professor of divinity (1554 - 58); regius professor of divinity (1557 - 61); refused the oath of supremacy in 1559, deprived; imprisoned 1569

In the disputation at Cambridge in 1549, John Madew answered the first disputation, opposed by William Glyn, Alban Langdale, Thomas Sedgewick and John Young. 1570, pp. 1556-57; 1576, pp. 1326-28; 1583, pp. 1376-82.

1583 Edition, page 1400 | 1583 Edition, page 1412
Thomas Sedgwick

(fl. 1550 - 1565)

Vice-master of Trinity (1554 - 1555), Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity (1554 - 1556), Regius Professor of Divinity (1557 - 1559), DD (1554). Deprived of his livings (1559) and listed as a recusant in 1561. (DNB; Venn)

Sedgwick was appointed one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38; 1570, pp. 1591-93; 1576, pp. 1358-59; 1583, pp. 1428-30).

Thomas Sedgwick acted as one of the queen's commissioners who examined certain scholars at Cambridge University on 8 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

He was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside DrsYoung, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

John Hullier appeared before Shaxton, Young, Segewick, Scot, Mitch and others on Palm Sunday eve at Great St Mary's. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

1583 Edition, page 1452 | 1583 Edition, page 1978 | 1583 Edition, page 2028
Thomas Seymour

(c. 1509 - 49) [ODNB]

Lord admiral (1547 - 49); MP Wiltshire 1545; privy councillor (1547 - 49); JP Berkshire, Devon, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Middlesex, Shropshire, Sussex, Wiltshire, Worcestershire 1547

Brother of Jane and Edward, duke of Somerset. Executed for treason

Thomas Seymour was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

Thomas Seymour was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Seymour worked in harmony with his brother Edward, but his marriage to Katherine Parr produced ill feeling between them. He was accused of planning to secure the crown for himself and was beheaded on Tower Hill. 1563, p. 880; 1570, p. 1545; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

Thomas Seymour is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

1583 Edition, page 1213 | 1583 Edition, page 1324 | 1583 Edition, page 1334 | 1583 Edition, page 1391 | 1583 Edition, page 1397
Thomas Shadwell

Public notary in 1531

Thomas Shadwell was present and agreed to the pronouncement of sentence against Richard Bayfield. 1563, p. 489; 1570, p. 1164; 1576, p.996 ; 1583, p. 1024.

1583 Edition, page 1048[Back to Top]
Thomas Simson

Deacon. Freewiller. Of Godstone, Surrey.

Thomas Simson entered John Kemp's house during a meeting with the attention of betraying those present. From that time he sought the company of Kemp and was converted. 1576, pp. 1975-77.

Thomas Simson warned a London congregation away from Aldgate, as the authorities were looking for them. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2057 | 1583 Edition, page 2098
Thomas Smith

of Ridgewell, Essex; accused with his 2 brothers, mother and 2 sisters in 1525 [Fines sub Agnes Smith]

Thomas Smith, his mother, brothers and sisters, with many from Essex, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Thomas Some (Solme)

Augustinian canon of St Osyth's, Essex; published a treatise in 1540; imprisoned; in July 1547 Bonner burned the treatise; Marian exile [Fines]

Thomas Solme was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. He was imprisoned. 1570, p. 1380; 1576, p. 1178; 1583, p. 1206.

1583 Edition, page 1230
Thomas Sommers

Wealthy merchant of London

Thomas Sommers was committed to the Tower for possessing Luther's books; his books were burnt, and he died in prison. 1570, p. 1381; 1576, p. 1178; 1583, p. 1207.

1583 Edition, page 1231[Back to Top]
Thomas Sorrocold

Possibly of Manchester.

Thomas Sorrocold was the recipient of a letter by John Bradford which sent greetings to Bradford's mother and also his father and other friends, which included Thomas Sorrocold, John Treves, Laurence Bradshaw, James Bradshaw and their wives and families. 1570, pp. 1805-06,1576, pp. 1541-42, 1583, p. 1624.

1583 Edition, page 1648
Thomas Sotherton [or Sutterton or Sutton]

(fl. 1553 - 1564)

Lord mayor and sheriff of Norwich. See Muriel McClendon, The Quiet Reformation (Stanford, California, 1999), p. 211. Brother of Leonard.

A man named Bacon urged the sheriff, Thomas Sotherton, to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Sotherton was reluctant to take Cooper into custody, as he had been a servant in the same house as Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Cicely Ormes was delivered to the secular power of the sheriffs, Thomas Sutherton and Leonard Sutherton (brothers), who took her to the Guildhall, where she remained until her death. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

[Note that in 1563 and 1570 Foxe refers to him as Sutterton; in 1576 and 1583, as Sutton.]

1583 Edition, page 2029 | 1583 Edition, page 2047
Thomas Southern

(d. 1556) [Fasti]

Treasurer of Exeter (1531 - 56)

Thomas Southern was a persecutor of Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

Southern and Thomas Brerewood accused their dean, Simon Hayes, of heresy and treason. He was committed to the Fleet until friends procured his release. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1238[Back to Top]
Thomas Spicer

(1537? - 1556)

Labourer. Single man. Of Winston, Suffolk. Martyr.

Thomas Spicer was taken from his bed in his master's house by James Ling and John Keretch of Winston and William Davies of Debenham. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

He refused to follow Sir John Tyrrel's commandment to go to church. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

He was imprisoned in the Eye dungeon in Suffolk.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

He was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Articles were brought against him. 1563, pp. 1521-22, 1570, pp. 2092-93, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

The receipt of a writ about Thomas Spicer from Heath was delayed. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

He was burned at Beccles on 21 May 1556 with John Denny and Edmund Poole. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Thomas Spilman

JP for Kent (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6]

Ramsy and Bland were transported to Canterbury to speak with Masters Hardes (Justice), Drenden, Spilman, and Tutsam. 1563, p. 1220, 1570, p. 1845, 1576, p. 1579, 1583, p. 1666.

1583 Edition, page 1690
Thomas Sprat

Tanner. Of Kent. Once a servant to Master Brent, a justice.

Thomas Sprat left his master to flee to Calais in fear of persecution. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat often returned to England from exile abroad with William Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

In about 1557 Sprat and Porrege returned to England and were approximately three miles from Dover when they were met by Brent, two Blanchendens and others. One of the party knew Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Brent's servant recognised Sprat and informed his master. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat and Porrege were close to being captured when Brent's servant fell from his horse and gave Sprat the chance to run. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Porrege was questioned but allowed to depart. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat ran for about a mile to a wood and managed to escape. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

1583 Edition, page 2105
Thomas Spurdance

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Servant to Henry VIII, Edward VI and Queen Mary. Of Crowfield in Coddenham, Suffolk. (Fines)

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

His second examination was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

Thomas Spurdance was seized by two of his fellow servants, John Haman (alias Barker) and George Looson (both of Coddenham), who carried him to Master Gosnall (or Gonald, of Coddenham, Suffolk). 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1918, 1583, p. 2025.

Spurdance was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

He fled Cornfield for fear of persecution but was taken by Lauson and Barker of Toddenham. 1563, p. 1677.

He was burned at Bury St Edmunds in 1558. 1563, p. 1677, 1583, p. 2025.

1583 Edition, page 2048 | 1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Thomas Spurge

Fuller. Martyr. Of Essex. Probably related to Richard Spurge (brother?)

Thomas Spurge was sent up to London by Lord Rich, Tyrrell and others for examination. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Spurge was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

He remained in the Marshalsea for around one year, until the death of Gardiner. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

After Gardiner's death he and some of his fellow prisoners sent a petition to Heath, after he replaced Gardiner as lord chancellor, on behalf of them all. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, pp. 1788-89, 1583, p. 1895.

On 16 January 1555 Read was sent to the Marshalsea to examine Richard Spurge, Thomas Spurge, George Ambrose and John Cavel. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Read was told during his examination of 16 January 1555 that the Spurges, Ambrose and Cavel had been complained of by the parson of the church in Bocking. The priest had complained to Lord Rich who had taken the complaint further. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Spurge was condemned by Bonner on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He was burned around 24 April 1556 at Smithfield. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Thomas Spurge was one of the recipients of a letter by John Careless to his condemned brethren in Newgate. 1563, pp. 1449-50, 1570, pp. 2105-06, 1576, pp. 1817-18, 1583, pp. 1923-24.

1583 Edition, page 1919 | 1583 Edition, page 1948
Thomas Starchey

of Aldermanbury; charged with others in 1541 with supporting Robert Barnes and other preachers [Fines]

Thomas Starchey was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229
Thomas Steilbe

Thomas Steilbe was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Thomas Stempe

(1523-1581)

Warden of Winchester College (1556 - 1581); canon and prebendary of Winchester (1557 - 1581) [Fasti and Emden, 1501-40]

Thomas Stempe was one of those who examined first Thomas Causton, then Thomas Higbed, in Bonner's palace on 8 March 1555. 1563, p. 1105; 1570, p. 1718; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

1583 Edition, page 1564[Back to Top]
Thomas Stephens

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Biddenden, Kent.

Thomas Stephens was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Wye on 16 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

1583 Edition, page 1994
Thomas Stiffe

Of Lichfield.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Thomas Sturgeon

Mariner. Of Ipswich.

Thomas Sturgeon was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Thomas Symon

of St Magnus's parish; charged with 10 others in 1541 for supporting preachers of the new learning [Fines]

Thomas Symon was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Thomas Tailour

Silkweaver of London

Thomas Tailour was the master of William Hunter. He ordered Hunter to return home when Hunter refused to attend mass. 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

Anthony Browne claimed that Tailour was present at William Hunter's execution; Robert Hunter denied this. 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

1583 Edition, page 1560[Back to Top]
Thomas Taylor

Son of Margaret and Rowland Taylor

On the night of 5 February 1555, Thomas had a final dinner with his parents and John Hull. Rowland Taylor blessed his son and gave him a book in Latin containing the sayings of the martyrs. A copy of Rowland Taylor's will was written inside this book. 1563, pp. 1075-76; 1570, pp. 1699-1700; 1576, p. 1451; 1583, p. 1524.

As Rowland Taylor was being led to execution, John Hull lifted Thomas Taylor and placed him on Rowland Taylor's horse. Rowland Taylor blessed his son and defended clerical marriage and his son's legitimacy. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, pp. 1700-01; 1576, p. 1452; 1583, p. 1525.

1583 Edition, page 1548
Thomas Temys (Temmys, Temse)

(by 1508 - 1575) [Bindoff]

MP Westbury 1529; brother of Joan, the last abbess of the Augustine nunnery, Lacock; spoke in the Commons in 1532 in favour of the king's existing marriage to Catherine

Thomas Temys asked parliament to urge the king to take Queen Catherine back as his wife. The king replied via the Speaker. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

1583 Edition, page 1077
Thomas Thacker

Thacker was imprisoned with John Bland. Thacker recanted. 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1585, 1583, p. 1673.

1583 Edition, page 1696 | 1583 Edition, page 1700
Thomas Thackham

Teacher.

In the 1570 and 1576 editions, Thomas Thackham (who had been in the teaching post that Palmer had taken) was said to have brought Julins Palmer to his first examination by the mayor of Reading. In the 1583 edition, Foxe reports that Thackham has denied being an enemy of Palmer and working against him. He has come to Foxe and sworn an oath to that effect. 1570, pp. 2120-21, 1570, pp. 1842-43, 1583, p. 1937.

1583 Edition, page 1961[Back to Top]
Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) (DNB)

Bishop of Westminster (1540 - 1550). Bishop of Norwich (1550 - 1554). Bishop of Ely (1554 - 1559). [Fasti; DNB]

Thomas Thirlby was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Thirlby was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 22 January 1555. 1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86.

He was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death (1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24).

He was sent as an ambassador to the pope on 19 February 1555. Foxe speculates that this embassy concerned the restoration of monastic lands. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1559.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1563, pp. 1489-92; 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 1775-76, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Thirlby examined and condemned John Hullier. 1563, p. 1515, 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

John Hullier was examined and sent to Cambridge Castle by Thirlby. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Thirlby was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

1583 Edition, page 1497 | 1583 Edition, page 1508 | 1583 Edition, page 1583 | 1583 Edition, page 1876 | 1583 Edition, page 1905 | 1583 Edition, page 1916 | 1583 Edition, page 1930 | 1583 Edition, page 1994 | 1583 Edition, page 2028 | 1583 Edition, page 2126[Back to Top]
Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) [ODNB]

BCL Cambridge by 1521; DCL 1528; DCnL 1530; auditor for Cambridge University 1530/31

Archdeacon of Ely by 1534; bishop of Westminster (1540 - 50); bishop of Norwich (1550 - 54); bishop of Ely (1554 - 50)

When Thomas Thirlby was a scholar at Cambridge, he often played the recorder in his room. At such times Thomas Bilney, living in the room above, would begin to pray. 1563, p. 482.

Thomas Thirlby was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Thirlby was resident ambassador to France with Stephen Gardiner in 1538. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

In a letter to Thomas Cromwell, Edmund Bonner asks for financial help, mentioning that he owes money to Thomas Thirlby and Simon Haynes. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1088.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to the other bishops, including Bonner, to inform them of the new directive. Bonner consented to the changes and wrote to Thomas Thirlby to inform him of them. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London, and Bonner in turn wrote to Thomas Thirlby. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Thirlby was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 829-30, 855.

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Thomas Thirtel

Of unknown occupation. Martyr. Of London.

Thomas Thirtel was accused of heresy either by Lord Rich or by other justices of the peace and constables. He was apprehended for not attending church. 1563, p. 1567, 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

He was examined by Darbyshire, the chancellor. Articles were brought against him and his gave answers. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

He was burned at Smithfield on 12 April 1557. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

1583 Edition, page 1998[Back to Top]
Thomas Thompson

Shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

Thomas Thompson was said to have received communion only twice in seventeen years. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

He fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2113
Thomas Timperley

(1523/24 - 1594)

Of Hintlesham, Suffolk and Flitcham, Norfolk. MP for Bramber (1553), Great Yarmouth (1563). Comptroller of the household of Thomas, fourth Duke of Norfolk (1569), receiver, Suffolk, for 4th duke of Norfolk (by 1572), for Philip, 13th earl of Arundel (by 1589). (Bindoff)

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

1583 Edition, page 2123
Thomas Tomkins

(d. 1555)

Weaver and martyr

Thomas Tomkins' godly life and character are recounted. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533.

Thomas Tomkins was mistreated (notably by having his beard forcibly shaven and his hand burned in a candle flame) while in Bonner's custody. 1563, pp. 1101-2 and 1733; 1570, pp. 1710-11; 1576, pp. 1459-60; 1583, pp. 1533-34.

Foxe mentions that Tomkins was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555, and condemned on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

He was examined on 8 February 1555 by Bishop Bonner. 1563, pp. 1102-3; 1570, p. 1711; 1576, pp. 1460-61; 1583, pp. 1534-35.

He was examined on 9 February 1555 by Bishop Bonner. 1563, p. 1103; 1570, pp. 1711-12; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535.

He was condemned by Bishops Edmund Bonner, Gilbert Bourne and Henry Morgan on 9 February 1555. 1563, p. 1101; 1570, p. 1712; 1576, pp. 1461-62; 1583, p. 1535.

Tomkins was executed on 16 March 1555. 1563, p. 1103; 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1462; 1583, p. 1535 [Foxe says 15 March in 1563, but corrects this in subsequent editions].

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

[NB: Although Foxe does not mention it, Tomkins was a member of a heretical conventicle which was detected in London in January 1545 (See Brigden, London , p. 388)].

[Not to be confused with the composer Thomas Tomkins.]

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Thomas Topley

Augustinian canon of Stoke by Clare, Suffolk. Brother of Robert [Fines]

Thomas Topley had been converted by Richard Foxe and Miles Coverdale; he left his monastery and became a secular priest. He was brought before Cuthbert Tunstall in 1528 and recanted. 1563, p. 418; 1570, pp. 1189-90; 1576, p. 1018; 1583, pp. 1046-47.

1583 Edition, page 1070
Thomas Trentham

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged in 1541 with reasoning against the sacrament of the altar [Fines]

Thomas Trentham was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228[Back to Top]
Thomas Turner

Apparator; jailer of Richard Bayfield

Thomas Turner brought Richard Bayfield out to his condemnation. 1563, p. 488; 1570, p. 1164; 1576, p. 995; 1583, p. 1023.

1583 Edition, page 1047
Thomas Tye

Minister of Great Bentley, Essex.

Allerton was apprehended by Thomas Tye and sent before Bonner for further examination. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2208, 1576, p. 1905, 1583, p. 2013.

John Allerton's first examination was before Bonner, Morton and Tye on 8 April 1557. Allerton wrote an account of it in his own blood. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, pp. 2208-11, 1576, pp. 1905-08, 1583, pp. 2014-16.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Allerton had been said by Tye to have schooled Lawrence Edwards over the baptism of his child. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

Tye persecuted the parish of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

He was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

For the first 12 months of Mary's reign, Tye did not attend church; instead he met with other godly men who also absented themselves from church. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye knew of those not attending church and where they met, and wrote secretly to Bonner about who there were. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye wrote to Bonner exposing William Mount, Alice Mount (his wife) and Rose Allin (his daughter) for not going to church. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye told Bonner that John Love of Colchester had been twice indicted of heresy, that he and his wife and household had fled when his goods were seized, but that he had now returned home. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye wrote to Bonner again stating that he had heard Feckenham preach at Paul's Cross and then left London for Much Wakering. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

On the third Sunday after Trinity 1557, Tye preached at Much Wakering. 1563, p. 1605.

On the fourth Sunday after Trinity 1557, Tye preached at Harwich and reconciled twelve people back into catholicism. 1563, p. 1605.

On the fifth, sixth and ninth Sundays after Trinity 1557, Tye preached at Wakering Magna. 1563, p. 1605.

On the seventh Sunday after Trinity, Tye preached at Langenho. 1563, p. 1605.

On the eighth Sunday after Trinity, Tye preached at Peldone. 1563, p. 1605.

On the tenth Sunday after Trinity, Tye was taken ill and unable to preach. 1563, p. 1605.

On the eleventh Sunday after Trinity, Tye preached at Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1605.

1583 Edition, page 2029 | 1583 Edition, page 2038
Thomas Underdowne

Of Lichfield.

Thomas Underdowne was examined by Draycot and Bayne and then later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Thomas Underhill

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

Thomas Underhill is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

1583 Edition, page 1329[Back to Top]
Thomas Upcher

(d. 1596)

Weaver. Of Bocking, Essex. Minister in Elizabeth's reign in Colchester. Rector of Fordham, Essex (1561 - 1596), curate of St Leonard's (1562 - 1571).

Thomas Upcher was forced to flee Bocking for fear of persecution. 1563 p. 1678.

[Upcher tried unsuccessfully to reconcile predestinarians and freewillers in the winter of 1555 - 1556 (Laurence, Authentic Documents, pp. 57-58). By 1557 Upcher and his family were among the English exiles in Frankfort. He later settled in Thomas Lever's congregation at Aarau. (Christina Garrett, The Marian Exiles (Cambridge, 1966), p. 355).) He was ordained by Grindal on 25 April 1560 and granted permission to officiate without surplice. (Patrick Collinson, Archbishop Grindal [London, 1979], pp. 114, 172-73). Upcher tried to establish a godly moral order at Colchester. (Mark Byford, 'The Price of Protestantism: Assessing the Impact of Religious Change in Elizabethan Essex: The Cases of Heydon and Colchester, 1558-94' (Oxford University PhD, 1998), pp. 196-224, 246, 259-68). Around 1583 Upcher was one of 27 Essex ministers petitioning the privy council against ex officio oaths (Seconde parte of a register, ed. Albert Peel [Cambridge, 1915], I, pp. 225-26.) In 1583 Upcher was one of the signatories to a petition to George Withers, archdeacon of Colchester, requesting that Withers not administer the ex officio oath. (Roland G. Usher, ed., The Presbyterian Movement in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, Camden Society, 3rd Series, 8, [London, 1905], pp. 88-89.) Contributed to a number of letters of John Careless to Henry Bull. See, for example, BL Add. Ms. 19400, fos. 66r and 71r.]

John Careless wrote a letter to T. U.[Thomas Upcher] 1570, p. 2109, 1576, p. 1820, 1583, pp. 1926-27.

John Careless wrote another letter to T. U. [Thomas Upcher] [beginning 'The everlasting peace of God...'] 1570, p. 2112, 1576, p. 1835, 1583, pp. 1929-30.

[Probably not the Upcher involved with the Bocking Conventicle in 1550. See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. Peter Marshall and Alec Ryrie (Cambridge2002), p. 130, n. 4.]

1583 Edition, page 1950
Thomas Vachell

of Reading

Thomas Vachell was one of the persecutors of Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

Ward and Vachell were appointed commissioners to search for books at Windsor. Robert Bennett, Henry Filmer, John Marbeck and Robert Testwood were found to be holding books contrary to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

The judges of John Marbeck, Henry Filmer, Anthony Pearson and Robert Testwood at Windsor were John Capon, Sir William Essex, Thomas Brydges, Sir Humphrey Foster, William Franklyn and Thomas Vachell. 1570, p. 1396; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1219.

Sir Humphrey Foster spoke in favour of John Marbeck's acquital, but Vachell was opposed. When the jury announced guilty verdicts on all the defendants, the judges were unwilling to give judgement. Vachell, the lowest of them all, did so. 1570, pp. 1396-97; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1219.

1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1238 | 1583 Edition, page 1242
Thomas Vaux

(1510 - 1556) (DNB)

2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden

Accompanied Queen to Westminster, 1 October 1553. (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

Spelt 'Vaus' by Foxe.

1583 Edition, page 1490[Back to Top]
Thomas Vavasour

(d. 1585) [ODNB]

Physician and recusant; BA Cambridge 1536; MA 1538; fellow of Trinity; MD Venice 1553; imprisoned at Hull in 1574, died there

In the disputation at Cambridge in 1549, Andrew Perne answered the third disputation, opposed by Thomas Parker, Leonard Pollard, Thomas Vavasour and John Young. 1570, pp. 1556-57; 1576, pp. 1326-28; 1583, pp. 1385-88.

1583 Edition, page 1409
Thomas Warbarton

Weaver

Thomas Warbarton was imprisoned with George Marsh in Lancaster Castle. They prayed together and recited the English litany and passages from the Bible in such loud voices that passers-by gathered underneath the window of the prison to hear them. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, p. 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, pp. 1564-65.

[Warbarton went into exile and resided with the protestant congregation in Aarau, Switzerland; seeGarrett, Marian Exiles, p. 321].

1583 Edition, page 1588
Thomas Watson

(1513 - 1584)

Chancellor of Cambridge University (from 25 September 1553); Master of St. John's (Cambridge) (from 28 September 1553); Dean of Durham (from 18 November 1553); Bishop of Lincoln (1557 - 1559) (DNB)

In the 1553 Convocation, Thomas Watson engaged in a long debate with James Haddon on the meaning of a passage in Theodoret, regarding the Eucharist (John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XVIII day of Octobre MDLIIII, [Emden, 1554], STC 19890, sigs. C8v - D14; 1563, p. 912; 1570, p. 1576; 1576, p. 1344; 1583, p. 1414; also see Rerum, p. 227. Philpot's account, reprinted by Foxe, abridges this argument. It is given in BL Harley 422, fols. 38r - 40r, which was not printed by Foxe, but is printed in R. W. Dixon, A History of the Church of England (6 vols, London, (1884 - 1902), IV, pp. 81 - 85).

Watson, supported by Henry Morgan and John Harpsfield, debated with Richard Cheney on the Real Presence on the fifth day of the 1553 Convocation (1563, pp. 912-17; 1570, pp. 1576-1576 [recte 1577]; 1576, pp. 1344-45; and 1583, pp. 1415-16).

Watson was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 932, 936-38, 973-76; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1618-21; 1576, p. 1358-59 and 1381-83; 1583, pp. 1428-30 and 1451-54).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations of 1554 mentions Watson's debating with Ridley (1563, p. 934; 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1441).

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

On 20 August 1553, Watson preached a sermon at Paul's Cross where, to protect him from a potentially hostile crowd, he was guarded by two hundred soldiers (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

Thomas Watson was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Watson was sent to examine certain scholars at St John's College, Cambridge, on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He gave answer to an oration made by a fellow of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He thanked the fellows of Trinity College for their oration at the arrival of the commissioners. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

The reformation of the University of Cambridge commanded by the queen's commissioners in 1557 was to take place at Watson's discretion. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Watson preached a sermon on Candlemas day. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

Watson was present at the examination of John Rough and denounced him as a heretic. 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

Thomas Rose was imprisoned in the bishop of Lincoln's house in Holborn. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

Watson was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Watson was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

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Thomas Wattes

(d. 1555)

Linen draper and martyr.

Thomas Wattes sold his goods and gave the money to his wife and children. He gave his store of cloth. 1563, p. 1166; 1570, p. 1769; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, p. 1594

He was arrested on 26 April 1555 and brought before Lord Rich. He was examined by Rich and other Essex magistrates and sent by them to Bonner on 27 April. 1563, pp. 1162-63; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, pp. 1511-12; 1583, pp. 1594-95

Wattes was examined by Bonner on 2 May 1555, where he declared that the mass was abominable and the pope a tyrant. Wattes refused Bonner?s exhortations to recant. 1563, pp. 1163-65; 1570, pp. 1770-71; 1576, pp. 1511-12;1583, pp. 1595-96

He was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield on 4 May 1555. Harpsfield urged him to recant, but Wattes refused. He was interviewed informally by Bonner on 10 May; Wattes again refused to recant. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, p. 1596

He was examined formally by Bonner on 17 May, 1555 and condemned on 18 May. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, p. 1596

Wattes was sent to Chelmsford to be executed on 9 June 1555. He was confined in an inn that night with Thomas Hawkes and others. He was burned soon afterwards. 1563, pp. 1165 and 1166; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1513; 1583, p. 1596

1583 Edition, page 1618 | 1583 Edition, page 1625
Thomas Way

Keeper of the Marshalsea

Thomas Way testified to John Tooley's denouncing the pope from the gallows. 1563, pp. 1144-45; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1501; 1583, p. 1585.

1583 Edition, page 1609 | 1583 Edition, page 2111[Back to Top]
Thomas Weldon

of Bray, Berkshire; master of the royal household; went to Anthony Pearson's sermons at Windsor; imprisoned in the Fleet in 1543; pardoned [Fines]

Thomas Weldon was persecuted with Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

He was one of those reported to Stephen Gardiner by William Symonds and John London as a chief helper and supporter of Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1214.

He was among those indicted under the Six Articles but pardoned by the king. 1570, p. 1399; 1576, p. 1193; 1583, p. 1221.

1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1238 | 1583 Edition, page 1245
Thomas Wells

Prosecutor of Kent martyrs in 1511

William Carder, Agnes Grebill and Robert Harrison were tried for heresy in 1511 before William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, Gabriel Sylvester, Thomas Wells and Clement Browne. All three were condemned to burn. 1570, pp. 1454-55; 1576, p. 1240; 1583, pp. 1276-77.

1583 Edition, page 1300
Thomas Wendy

(1500? - 1560)

Court physician. (DNB)

Thomas Wendy called to see if Elizabeth was too ill to be removed from Ashbridge. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

1583 Edition, page 2115[Back to Top]
Thomas Wendy

(1499/1500 - 1560) [ODNB; Bindoff]

BA Cambridge 1519; MA 1522; MD Ferrara; JP Cambridge 1547; attended Cromwell in his last illness; physician to Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary; fellow of the College of Physicians 1551; MP St Albans 1554; MP Cambridgeshire 1555

Henry VIII told one of his physicians of the charges against Katherine Parr; the physician was then sent to treat her when she fell ill, and he divulged the charges to her. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

[NB: Foxe says this was Wendy, but it was possibly Robert Huicke, physician to both the king and queen. (ODNB sub Katherine Parr)]

Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Sir John Cheke, William May and Thomas Wendy, king's visitors, attended the disputation at Cambridge in 1549. 1570, p. 1555; 1576, p. 1326; 1583, p. 1376.

Thomas Wendy was one of those with Edward VI when he died. 1563, p. 900.

1583 Edition, page 1267 | 1583 Edition, page 1400
Thomas Wentworth

(1525 - 1584)

2nd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (DNB)

Accompanied Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

1583 Edition, page 1490
Thomas Wentworth

(1501 - 1550/1) [ODNB; Bindoff]

1st Baron Wentworth; cousin of Edward Seymour

JP Suffolk (1523 - death); privy councillor 1549; chamberlain, the Household (1550 - death); MP Suffolk 1529; sympathetic to religious reformers

John Kirby and Roger Clarke were arrested at Ipswich in 1546 and brought before Thomas Wentworth and other commissioners. When Kirby was burnt at Ipswich, Wentworth wept. 1563, pp. 654; 1570, pp. 1410-11; 1576, pp. 1202-03; 1583, p. 1232.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

He was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

1583 Edition, page 1255 | 1583 Edition, page 1354 | 1583 Edition, page 1355
Thomas Wharton

(1520 - 1572)

2nd Lord Wharton [DNB sub Thomas, 1st Lord Wharton]. Privy councillor (1553 - 1558) [Bindoff, Commons]

Thomas Wharton was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Bishop Bonner, dated 27 November 1554, informing the bishop that Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout the diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76).

A letter was sent about Green's treason to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. He mentioned two letters, one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsberye, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

1583 Edition, page 1500 | 1583 Edition, page 1876
Thomas Wharton

(1520 - 1572) [ODNB; Bindoff]

2nd Baron Wharton (1568 - 72); soldier and administrator; JP Cumberland (1547, 1554 - 48/9); JP Westmorland (1547, 1554 - 58/9, 1564); JP Yorkshire (West Riding)1547; sheriff of Cumberland (1547 - 48); in Princess Mary's household; privy councillor (1553 - 58); MP Cumberland (1542, 1545, 1547, 1553); MP Hedon 1554; MP Yorkshire 1554; MP Northumberland (1554, 1558)

Thomas Wharton entertained Nicholas Ridley when he went to visit Princess Mary. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

1583 Edition, page 1420
Thomas Whetstone

Haberdasher

Sent to the Tower on 25 April 1554 as one of the jurors who refused to find against Sir Nicholas Thorckmorton (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

He and Emmanuel Lucar were the leaders of the eight members of the Throckmorton jury that refused to admit wrong-doing for failing to convict Throckmorton. All of these jurors were called before Star Chamber and ordered to pay 1000 marks each and returned to prison (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473).

On 10 November 1554 he was ordered to pay a fine of £2000 within a fortnight for acquitting Throckmorton (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474).

Foxe calls him 'Master Whetstone', but his first name, the fact that he was a haberdasher and that he was the foreman of the jury that acquitted Throckmorton are in W. D. Hamilton, A Chronicle of England ... by Charles Wriothesley, Windsor Herlad (2 Vols, London, 1875 – 1877) Camden Society First series 11 and 20, p. 115.

Robert Whetston, harberdasher, had already sued for and received a pardon on 4 November 1553 (for complicity in Wyatt's rebellion?) (Calendar of Patent Rolls, Philip and Mary, 1553 - 1554, p. 465).

Whetstone was one of Throgmorton jurors released from the Fleet after paying a fine of £220 each (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480; cf. C. L. Kingsford, ed., Two London Chronicles from the Collections of John Stow in Camden Miscellany XII (London, 1910), p. 41).

1583 Edition, page 1493 | 1583 Edition, page 1497
Thomas Whitehead

Thomas Whitehead was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

1583 Edition, page 1979 | 1583 Edition, page 2142
Thomas Whittle

(d. 1556)

Priest. Martyr. From Essex.

Thomas Whittle was imprisoned in the coal house with Philpot. Bonner was so violent with Whittle's beard that he plucked much of it away and made his face black and blue. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

He was apprehended by Edmond Alabaster. 1563, p. 1454, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1846.

Foxe records the bill of submission. 1563, p. 1454, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, pp. 1737-38, 1583, p. 1846.

Foxe includes Whittle's own account of his recantation and his withdrawal. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846-47.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Robert Johnson wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle, confirming Cluney's and Harpsfield's reports. He mentions that Sir Thomas More's submission was read to him twice to no good effect. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Foxe records Bonner's charges and Whittle's answers to the charges. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Bonner plucked at Whittle's beard so hard that it made his face black and blue. 1570, p. 1964 [marginal note].

Whittle repented after his recantation and took his subscription. 1570, p. 1964 [marginal note], pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738.

His last examination and condemnation took place on 14 January 1556. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

He was burned at Smithfield with Joan Warren on 14 January 1556. 1563, pp. 1451, 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

John Careless wrote a letter to Bartlett Green, Thomas Whittle, Joan Warren, Isabel Foster and certain other prisoners in Newgate. 1570, p. 2107, 1576, p. 1818, 1583, pp. 1924-25.

Thomas Whittle wrote letters to John Careless, John Went and others. 1563, pp. 1457-58, 1570, pp. 2018-22, 1576, pp. 1739-43, 1583, pp. 1847-50.

1583 Edition, page 1821 | 1583 Edition, page 1868 | 1583 Edition, page 1869 | 1583 Edition, page 1871 | 1583 Edition, page 1875 | 1583 Edition, page 1920 | 1583 Edition, page 1938 | 1583 Edition, page 1948
Thomas Whood

(d. 1556)

Minister. Martyr.

Thomas Whood was burned at Lewes about 20 June 1556. 1563, p. 1522., 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1807, 1583, p. 1914.

1583 Edition, page 1938
Thomas Wilcockes

A fishmonger of Coventry

On 20 November 1553, Thomas Wilcockes was sent by the mayor of Coventry, together with Baldwin Clarke, John Careless and Richard Estlin, to the Privy Council for unspecified 'lewde and sediciouse behaviour' on All Hallows Day 1553. (1583, p. 1417). He was imprisoned in the Gatehouse.

1583 Edition, page 1441
Thomas Williams

Witness against Thomas Arthur 1531 at Norwich

Thomas Williams was called as a witness in the examination of Thomas Bilney. 1563, p. 462; 1570, p. 1135; 1576, p. 972; 1583, p. 998.

1583 Edition, page 1022
Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979[Back to Top]
Thomas Wimple

Heard witness statements in 1532

Thomas Wimple was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

1583 Edition, page 1053
Thomas Winseley

Sawyer. Of Horsley Magna, Essex.

Winseley was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Thomas Winseley was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

He wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Probably related to Joan Winseley.]

[Also referred to as Winssey.]

1583 Edition, page 1996
Thomas Witton

Scrivener in Lombard Street. Cousin of Bartlett Green.

In a letter Green said his cousin Thomas Witton would further the delivery of John Grove, Trayford and Rice Aprice. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

1583 Edition, page 1880
Thomas Wolsey

(1475? - 1530)

Cardinal. Archbishop of York. Lord Chancellor. [DNB]

Thomas Wolsey's death is referred to in Foxe's account of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Cranmer was asked by Dr Capon to be a founding fellow of Wolsey's college. 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Cardinals Campeius and Wolsey were in commission from the pope to decide on the issue of Henry VIII's marriage to Katherine. When they failed to reach a decision, the king had the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk send Campeius back to Rome. 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

1583 Edition, page 1811 | 1583 Edition, page 1884[Back to Top]
Thomas Wolsey

(1470/71 - 1530) [ODNB]

BA Oxford 1486; MA 1497; dean of divinity 1500

Dean of York 1513; bishop of Lincoln 1514

Lord chancellor (1515 - 29); archbishop of York (1514 - 30); cardinal (1515 - 30); arrested and died on his way to the Tower

Thomas Wolsey sent delegates to greet Cardinal Campeggi, the newly appointed legate to England, in Calais, hoping to get himself appointed fellow legate. Campeggi complied, and within 30 days a papal bull had arrived in Calais with Wolsey's commission. Wolsey set up a special legate's court in England, richly furnished. 1563, p. 418; 1570, pp. 1120-21; 1576, pp. 959-60; 1583, pp. 986-87.

Wolsey was sent as ambassador to the emperor at Brussels, taking with him the great seal of England, and behaved like a prince. He enriched himself at the expense of the religious houses and commons. 1570, p. 1121; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

In England, Wolsey lived in great luxury. He leased Hampton Court, and then gave the lease to the king. He lodged at times at the king's manor at Richmond. 1570, pp. 1121-22; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

Wolsey suspected that his failure to be selected pope after the death of Adrian VI was due to Richard Pace's lack of effort on his behalf. He turned the king against Pace, causing Pace to go mad. Pace recovered, but Wolsey brought charges against him and he was imprisoned in the Tower for nearly two years, leaving him in a worse mental state than before. 1570, pp. 1124-25; 1576, p. 963; 1583, pp. 989-90.

Wolsey founded Cardinal College at Oxford, and began to build in sumptuous style. He invited the best scholars to join, many of them from Cambridge. He did not live long enough to see it completed. 1563, p. 497; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

Wolsey opposed the emperor because the emperor refused to support his desire to be made pope. 1563, p. 440; 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

Having fallen out with the emperor, Wolsey encouraged Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon. 1570, p. 1192; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

Wolsey attempted to confiscate all copies of Supplication for the Beggars and discovered that the king had a copy. He was determined to forbid the reading of English books, specifically this book and Tyndale's translation of scripture. 1563, p. 449; 1570, p. 1157; 1576, p. 990; 1583, p. 1017.

After Clement VII had been taken prisoner by imperial forces, Wolsey urged Henry VIII to go to the pope's assistance. The king refused to send troops, but allowed Wolsey to take money out of the treasury to help. Wolsey then went to the French court to contribute to the ransom of Clement VII, hiring soldiers and furnishing the French army.1563, p. 439; 1570, pp. 1123; 1576, pp. 961-62; 1583, p. 988.

Stephen Gardiner was sent as ambassador to Rome by Henry VIII during the time of Clement VII to deal with the matter of the king's divorce and to promote Thomas Wolsey as pope. Both the king and Wolsey wrote letters to him. 1570, pp. 1125-29; 1576, pp. 963-67; 1583, pp. 990-93.

Wolsey and Cardinal Campeggi had a legatine commission to consider the matter of the king's divorce. Henry began to suspect that Wolsey was not fully supportive. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

When Queen Catherine learned from the legates that they had been deputed to determine the matter of a divorce between the king and her, she composed an answer to them. She blamed Wolsey as the cause of the proposed divorce. 1563, pp. 456-57; 1570, pp. 1193-94; 1576, p. 1022; 1583, p. 1050.

Wolsey became aware that King Henry favoured Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1195; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Articles against Wolsey were introduced to the House of Commons from the Lords. He confessed to the charges. He departed for Southwell in his diocese of York, but many of his household left him to enter the king's service. 1570, p. 1132; 1576, p. 969; 1583, p. 996.

Wolsey planned a grand enthronement at York without informing the king. The earl of Northumberland was given a commission by the king to arrest Thomas Wolsey at Cawood Castle and turn him over to the earl of Shrewsbury. Although Wolsey protested, he submitted to the arrest. He was taken to Sheffield Castle and placed in the keeping of Shrewsbury. 1570, pp. 1132-33; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 996.

Sir William Kingston was sent to Sheffield Castle to take Wolsey to the Tower. Wolsey was ill, and Sir William treated him gently and made the journey in easy stages. Wolsey died at Leicester Abbey. 1570, p. 1133; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 996.

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Thomas Wood

(fl. 1528 - 1562)

Ex-Franciscan. Vicar of South Weald (1543 - 1559); held prebends in Canterbury and Westminster and a number of livings in the diocese of London; deprived of his livings in 1559 - 1560. Afterwards vicar of Twickenham (Middx) in 1562; deprived the same year [Emden, 1501-40 and Fasti].

On being informed that William Hunter was reading the Bible, Thomas Wood took it 'very hainously.' He examined Hunter, called him a heretic and denounced him to Anthony Browne. 1570, p. 1713; 1576, p. 1462; 1583, p. 1536.

1583 Edition, page 1560
Thomas Wood

Bishop-elect of St Asaph. Never obtained possession.

Thomas Wood was imprisoned in the Marshalsea after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2102.

1583 Edition, page 2126
Thomas Woodgate

Of Chedington, Kent [APC V, p. 110]

The privy council ordered Thomas Woodgate's arrest for clandestine preaching on 1 April 1555. 1583, p. 1561.

[Foxe calls him 'Thomas Wodgate' or 'Wodgat']

1583 Edition, page 1585
Thomas Woodington

(d. by November 1522) [Emden]

BCL Oxford by 1482; DCnL by 1492; dean of arches 1513; official of the court of Canterbury (1520 - 22); JP Gloucester (1496 - 99)

Thomas Woodington was a persecutor of the Kent martyrs in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1240; 1583, p. 1277.

1583 Edition, page 1300[Back to Top]
Thomas Woodward, the elder

Of Mendlehsam.

Thomas Woodward the elder was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Thomas Wotton

(d. 1587)

Of Boughton Malherbe, Kent. JP (1553 - 1587 and Sheriff of Kent (1558 - 1559). Brother-in-law of Robert Rudstone.

Thomas Wotton comitted to the Fleet on 21 January 1554 by the Privy Council for 'obstinate standing against matters of religion' (1583, p. 1418).

1583 Edition, page 1442
Thomas Wriothesley

(1505 - 1550) [ODNB]

Administrator; Cromwell's private secretary; engraver of the Tower mint 1536; MP Hampshire (1539, 1542); JP Hampshire (1538 - 46)

Principal secretary to the king (1540 - 44); clerk of the crown and king's attorney (1542 - 50); privy councillor (1540 - 47, 1548 - 50); lord chancellor (1544 - 47)

Baron Wriothesley 1544; 1st earl of Southampton (1547 - 50)

Stephen Gardiner had Wriothesley and other privy councillors on his side when he reported Windsor heretics to the king. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1214.

Wriothesley took part in the examination of John Marbeck. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

Katherine Parr read and studied the scriptures and discussed them with her chaplains. The king was aware of this and approved, so she began to debate matters of religion with him. When the king became more ill-tempered because of his sore leg, her enemies, especially Stephen Gardiner and Thomas Wriothesley, took the opportunity to turn the king against her. 1570, pp. 1422-23; 1576, pp. 1212-13; 1583, pp. 1242-43.

When Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and her ladies-in-waiting, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

Wriothesley was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

Sir Anthony Knyvet had his jailer rack Anne Askew. When Knyvet refused to have the racking continued, Richard Rich and Thomas Wriothesley racked her themselves. She refused to give any information, but was released by Knyvet. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

The Sunday before Anne Askew was executed, Thomas Wriothesley had George Blage sent to Newgate and then to the Guild Hall, where he was condemned to be burnt. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1245.

Wriothesley was present at Anne Askew's burning. He brought her letters offering the king's pardon if she recanted, but she refused. 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

Thomas Wriothesley was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

1583 Edition, page 1222 | 1583 Edition, page 1235 | 1583 Edition, page 1238 | 1583 Edition, page 1261 | 1583 Edition, page 1266 | 1583 Edition, page 1269 | 1583 Edition, page 1315 | 1583 Edition, page 1392[Back to Top]
Thomas Young

(1507 - 1568)

Precentor of St David's Cathedral (1542 - 1554 and 1559); bishop of St David's (1559 - 1561) and archbishop of York (1561 - 1568). Son-in-law of George Constantine (DNB; Fasti).

Thomas Young was one of six clerics - the others were Walter Phillips, James Haddon, John Philpot, Richard Cheyney and John Aylmer - who refused to subscribe to the articles promulgated in the 1553 convocation. Because Young did not take part in the ensuing debates, Philpot did not learn who he was; only identifying him as 'one other'. Foxe, who would not have known who this was either, also never identified him (1563, p. 906; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1340; and 1583, p. 1410).

Thomas Young was one of Robert Ferrar's chief opponents in the diocese of St David's. 1563, p. 1084; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, p. 1544.

According to Foxe, Young was motivated to act against Ferrar because the bishop proceeded against him for despoiling the church, for simony, and for laxity. 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.

Thomas Young accused Ferrar of praemunire. He disputed with Ferrar over the right of patronage to several benefices. 1563, pp. 1084-85; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, p. 1544.

Young was accused by Ferrar of despoiling church property; Young's opposition to Ferrar is detailed. 1563, pp. 1088-93; 1583, pp. 1546-50.

Young was accused by Ferrar of improper procedure in gathering evidence against him. 1563, pp. 1093 and 1095; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, pp. 1550 and 1551-52. He was accused by Ferrar of ignorance of the law and of acting illegally. 1563, pp. 1094-95; 1583, pp. 1551-52.

Ferrar denounced Young in letters to Lord Chancellor Thomas Goodrich. 1563, pp. 1096-98; 1570, pp. 1725-26; 1576, pp. 1472-1480 [recte 1474]; 1583, pp. 1552-53 and 1556. [NB: When these letters were printed in the 1563 edition, only Young's initials were given. His name was printed in subsequent editions].

Elizabeth replaced Nicholas Heath with Thomas Young as archbishop of York. 1583, p. 2124.

[NB: In the diocese of St David's the precentor ranked second only to the bishop].

1583 Edition, page 1434 | 1583 Edition, page 1568 | 1583 Edition, page 2148
Thomasin a Wood

(d. 1557)

Maid to William Mainard. Martyr. Of unknown origin.

Thomasin Wood was burned at Lewes on 22 June 1557. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2195, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2003.

1583 Edition, page 2007
Thomasine Barber

Daughter of Joan Barber. Of Ipswich.

Thomasine Barber was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Thomson

Thomson was called on to repent by Bradford in a letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09, 1576, pp. 1545-47, 1583, p. 1627.

1583 Edition, page 1652
Thraseas of Eumenia

(d. bef. 300) [Gams]

Bishop of Eumenia; martyr

Thraseas was one of those opposing the position of Pope Victor I concerning the celebration of Easter. 1570, p. 82; 1576, p. 56; 1583, p. 53.

1583 Edition, page 79
Thyrsus, Lucius, Callinicus, Appollonius, Philemon, Asilas and Leonides

Martyrs with Arrianus, governor in Thebes

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 128; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115
Tiberius (Tiberius Claudius Nero)

(42 BCE - 37 CE) [G. G. Fagan www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (14 - 37 CE)

Tiberius began his reign in a moderate fashion, but became cruel and violent. 1570, pp. 37-38; 1576, p. 30; 1583, p. 30.

According to Gildas, Christianity came to Britain in the reign of Tiberius. 1570, p. 145; 1576, p. 107; 1583, p. 106.

1583 Edition, page 53 | 1583 Edition, page 129[Back to Top]
Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus

C2 Roman general of Marcus Aurelius, his father-in-law [H. W. Benario www.roman-emperors.org sub Marcus Aurelius]

b. Syria; senior senator of Rome

Marcus Aurelius referred to him in a letter to the senate and people of Rome. 1570, p. 76; 1576, p. 51; 1583, p. 51.

1583 Edition, page 74
Tiburtius (St Tiburtius)

(d. C2 - C3) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Martyr; buried with St Cecilia and her husband

He was said to have been converted to Christianity by Pope Urban I. 1570, p. 85; 1576, p. 58; 1583, p. 58.

1583 Edition, page 81
Timotheus

C3 Christian who provided information leading to the rescue of Dionysius of Alexandria

His role is described by Dionysius of Alexandria. 1570, p. 90; 1576, p. 63; 1583, p. 62.

1583 Edition, page 85
Timotheus (St Timotheus)

(d. early C4) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Went from Antioch to Rome and preached there; martyr

Timotheus was martyred at Rome under Maximinus Daia. 1570, p. 117; 1576, p. 84; 1583, p. 83.

1583 Edition, page 106
Timothy Malt

Son of Isabel Malt. Born in 1555.

An attempt was allegedly made to purchase Timothy Malt from his mother and pass him off as Mary?s son. 1570, p. 1772; 1576, p. 1513; 1583, p. 1597

1583 Edition, page 1621[Back to Top]
Tingle

Prisoner in Newgate. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Edward Benet was asked by Tingle, a prisoner in Newgate, to bring him a New Testament. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet brought a copy of Coverdale's New Testament to Tingle, telling George the keeper that it was food. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Tingle's keeper realised that Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Tingle died in prison and was buried in a dunghill. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

1583 Edition, page 2099
Titus (Titus Flavius Vespasianus)

(39 - 81) [J. Donahue www.roman-emperors.org]

Son of Vespasian; participated in Judaean campaigns with his father

Roman emperor (79 - 81)

Titus and his father were responsible for the destruction of the Jews. 1570, p. 38; 1576, p. 31; 1583, p. 31.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 58
Titus Livius (Livy)

(c. 56 BCE - AD 17)

b. Padua; Roman historian; wrote history of Rome from its foundation

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 139, 1576, p. 101, 1583, p. 100.

1583 Edition, page 123
Toittus

Franciscan friar at St Andrews 1551

Friar Toittus preached in favour of directing the Lord's Prayer to saints. He was eventually forced to leave St Andrews. 1570, pp. 1450-51; 1576, p. 1237; 1583, p. 1274.

1583 Edition, page 1298[Back to Top]
Toller

Founder. Of London.

Toller informed John Farthing, the rector of St Margaret Lothbury, in 1555 that James Trevisam held unorthodox views about the sacrament of the altar. 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

1583 Edition, page 1689
Tollin [or Tolwyn]

Minister of St Antholins, London early during Elizabeth's reign. [This is mentioned in 1563, p. 1698 only]

Master Tollin held protestant services for Lady Anne Knevet. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

1583 Edition, page 2096
Tomas Arnal

Shoemaker. Of Lichfield.

Tomas Arnal was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Tomson

At the end of his first examination, Careless was told by Martin that he was one of the most pleasant protestants he had talked to 'except it were Tomson'. 1563, p. 1534, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

1583 Edition, page 1944
Trabula

Virgin sister of Simeon, bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon; martyr under Shapur II

When the queen became ill, the magicians and Jews accused Trabula and her sister of using a charm to cause the illness. They were sawn in half. 1570, p. 136; 1576, p. 99; 1583, p. 98.

1583 Edition, page 121[Back to Top]
Trajan (Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus)

(d. 117) [H. W. Benario www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (98 - 117); adopted by Nerva in 97; conducted successful wars against the Dacians and Parthians

His reign is discussed by Foxe: 1570, pp. 55-57; 1576, pp. 36-39; 1583, pp. 36-39.

Trajan generally treated his subjects well and was just, but was cruel to the Christians.1570, p. 57; 1576, p. 39; 1583, p. 39.

Pliny the Younger wrote a letter to Trajan, urging him to stop the persecution of the Christians, and Trajan replied. 1570, p. 57; 1576, pp. 39-40; 1583, pp. 39-40.

1583 Edition, page 59 | 1583 Edition, page 60 | 1583 Edition, page 62 | 1583 Edition, page 1584
Trajan Decius

(d. 251) [G. Nathan and R. McMahon www.roman-emperors.org]

Consul, commander under Philip the Arab

Roman emperor (249 - 51); killed in battle against the Goths

Decius killed Emperor Philip the Arab and his son Philip because they were Christians. 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 60; 1583, p. 59.

Great persecution of Christians took place during his reign. 1570, pp. 86-93; 1576, pp. 60-66; 1583, pp. 59-65.

Pomponius Laetus said that, when Decius was overcome by the Goths, rather than fall into their hands, he threw himself into a whirlpool and drowned. 1570, p. 94; 1576, p. 66; 1583, p. 66.

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Trapnel

(d. c. 1532) [Fines]

Martyr burnt at Bradford-on-Avon

Trapnel was burnt about the same time as John Bent. 1570, p. 1172; 1576, p. 1003; 1583, p. 1030.

1583 Edition, page 1054
Trayford

In a letter Green asked Bartham Calthorp to remember John Grove, an 'honest poor man', along with his 'accomplices' Traiford and Rice Aprice. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

1583 Edition, page 1880
Trebellius Pollio

One of six reputed authors of Historia Augusta [Arnaldo Momigliano, 'An Unsolved Problem of Historical Forgery: The Scriptores Historiae Augustae', Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, vol. 17, no. 1/2. (1954), pp. 22-46]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 105; 1576, p. 75; 1583, p. 74.

1583 Edition, page 97
Trebonianus Gallus

(c. 206 - 253) [R. S. Moore www.roman-emperors.org]

Senator; consul; governor of Upper Moesia

Roman emperor (251 - 53) with his son Volusianus; murdered with his son by mutinous troops

A great plaque raged during the reign of Gallus, so although he issued edicts for the persecution of Christians, the only effect was the exile of bishops 1570, p. 95; 1576, p. 66; 1583, p. 66.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 83 | 1583 Edition, page 88 | 1583 Edition, page 89 | 1583 Edition, page 92
Treheron

Robert Drakes was presented to the benefice of Thundersley by Lord Rich, at the suit of Master Causton and Master Treheron. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

[This is probably Barhtolomew Traheron (1510 - 1558), the protestant writer who (although a layman) was dean of Chichester under Edward VI. He was in exile under Mary, and died abroad. (Bindoff, Commons; Garrett, Marian Exiles; DNB)]

1583 Edition, page 1919[Back to Top]
Trigonian

Trigonian carried out a visitation of abbeys in 1556. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

John Maundrel was called before him at Edington Abbey to answer charges of speaking against the sacrament. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

[No one of this name can be found. It is possible that Sir John Tregonwell, who was a JP in Dorset in 1555, is meant, or (less likely) Robert Trencreke, who was a JP for Cornwall at the same time.]

1583 Edition, page 1918
Trinian

Porter of Christ's hospital. Of London.

Cluney delivered Thomas Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

1583 Edition, page 2085
Tristram Swaddell

Prebend of Rugmere [St.Paul's], deprived in 1560 [Fasti]

Swaddell witnessed the degradation of John Hooper and John Rogers on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508.

He was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535.

[Foxe refers to him as Tristram 'Swadocke'.]

1583 Edition, page 1532 | 1583 Edition, page 1559
Trypho

fl. c. 132 [Joseph Tabory, 'The Crucifixion of the Paschal Lamb', The Jewish Quarterly Review, New Ser., vol. 86, no. 3/4 (January - April, 1996), pp. 395-96.]

Jewish rabbi; refugee from the war in Palestine; engaged in a dialogue with Justin Martyr in Ephesus

[Trypho may have been a real rabbi, or an artificial invention of Justin Martyr]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 73; 1576, p. 49; 1583, p. 49.

1583 Edition, page 72[Back to Top]
Tryphon (St Tryphon)

C3 martyr at Nicfa [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Tryphon was tortured and put to death by the sword. 1570, p. 91; 1576, p. 63; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86
Tulle Bustre

of St Katherine Coleman; presented in 1541 with his wife and son-in-law for working on holy days

Tulle Bustre was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1378; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1204.

1583 Edition, page 1228
Tutsam

Ramsy and Bland were transported to Canterbury to speak with Masters Hardes (Justice), Drenden, Spilman, and Tutsam. 1563, p. 1220, 1570, p. 1845, 1576, p. 1579, 1583, p. 1666.

1583 Edition, page 1690
Twyford

Of London.

Set up stakes in London for martyrs in Henry VIII's reign.

Early in Elizabeth's reign Twyford became very sick and rotted to death.

1583 Edition, page 2129
Tye

Mariner. Of Ipswich.

Tye's wife was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114[Back to Top]
Tyrannio (St Tyrannius)

(d. early C4) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Bishop of Tyre; martyr under Diocletian; captured and drowned at Antioch

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 110; 1576, p. 78; 1583, p. 78.

1583 Edition, page 101
Tytilus of East Anglia

Possibly C6 king of the East Angles [ODNB sub Rædwald]; father of Rædwald, according to Bede

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135[Back to Top]
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