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VIII, 258, fn 2VIII, 259, fn 5VIII, 259, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 284VIII, Appendix: ref page 285VIII, Appendix: ref page 285VIII, Appendix: ref page 285VIII, Appendix: ref page 286VIII, Appendix: ref page 286VIII, Appendix: ref page 287VIII, Appendix: ref page 288VIII, Appendix: ref page 288VIII, 288, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 292VIII, 292, fn 1VIII, 294, fn 2VIII, 296, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 296VIII, Appendix: ref page 297VIII, Appendix: ref page 297VIII, Appendix: ref page 299VIII, Appendix: ref page 302VIII, Appendix: ref page 302VIII, Appendix: ref page 304VIII, Appendix: ref page 305VIII, Appendix: ref page 306VIII, Appendix: ref page 311VIII, 312, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 315VIII, 321, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 322VIII, Appendix: ref page 323VIII, Appendix: ref page 324VIII, 326, fn 1VIII, 326, fn 2VIII, 327, fn 1VIII, 327, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 328VIII, 334, fn 1VIII, 340, fn 4VIII, 259, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 259VIII, 260, fn 2VIII, Appendix: 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Appendix: ref page 614VIII, Appendix: ref page 614VIII, 614, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 614VIII, 614, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 614VIII, Appendix: ref page 614VIII, Appendix: ref page 614VIII, Appendix: ref page 615VIII, 615, fn 1VIII, 615, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 615VIII, 617, fn 1VIII, 619, fn 1VIII, 619, fn 2VIII, 620, fn 1VIII, 621, fn 1VIII, 622, fn 2VIII, 626, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 627VIII, Appendix: ref page 629VIII, 629, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 631VIII, Appendix: ref page 633VIII, Addenda: ref page 638VIII, Appendix: ref page 642VIII, Appendix: ref page 645VIII, Appendix: ref pageVIII, Appendix: ref page 269VIII, 270, fn 1VIII, 270, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 272VIII, Appendix: ref page 647VIII, Appendix: ref page 647VIII, Appendix: ref page 647VIII, Addenda: ref page 647VIII, 650, fn 1VIII, 650, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 650VIII, Appendix: ref page 651651, fn 3VIII, 655, fn 1VIII, 655, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 659VIII, 661, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 661VIII, 661, fn 2VIII, Appendix: ref page 661VIII, Appendix: ref page 662VIII, Appendix: ref page 662VIII, 662, fn 1VIII, 662, fn 2VIII, 662, fn 3VIII, Appendix: ref page 667VIII, 668, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 668VIII, Appendix: ref page 669VIII, Appendix: ref page 671VIII, Appendix: ref page 672VIII, 675, fn 1VIII, 677, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 679VIII, 679, fn 1VIII, Appendix: ref page 679VIII, Appendix: ref page 680VIII, Appendix: ref page 681VIII, Appendix: ref page 683VIII, 683, fn 3VIII, Appendix: ref page 684VIII, Appendix: ref page 684e="cattleypratt" id="c8-274bCP">Some remarks upon Ormanet...VIII, Appendix: ref page 278VIII, Appendix: ref page 684VIII, 684, fn 3VIII, Appendix: ref page 685VIII, Appendix: ref page 685VIII, Appendix: ref page 685VIII, Appendix: ref page 685VIII, 686, fn 2VIII, 686, fn 6VIII, Appendix: ref page 688VIII, Appendix: ref page 688VIII, Appendix: ref page 693VIII, 694, fn 2VIII, 694, fn 3VIII, 698, fn 1VIII, 698, fn 2VIII, 700, fn 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Cattley Pratt References for Book 12
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 258, fn 2

This account is derived from "Historia vera de vitâ, obitu, sepulturâ, accusatione hæreseos, condemnatione, exhumatione, combustione, honorificâque tandem restitutione M. Buceri et Fagii, etc.," Argentinæ, 1562; "which was quickly turned into English by Arthur Golding, under the title of "A briefe Treatise concerning the Burnynge of Bucer and Phagius at Cambridge,'" etc. 16mo. 1562. See Dibdin's Typograph. Antiquities, vol. iv. p. 500; it will be observed, that Foxe's extracts begin at p. 113 of the Latin. Appendix:The ensuing narrative of the Visitation at Cambridge is merely a reprint of Golding's translation.

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 259, fn 5

"Inespecially." Ed. 1563. - ED. Appendix:"Inespecially" is the reading of the first Edition and the "Briefe Treatise." This word occurs rather frequently in Caxton's books; as in the Golden Legend, fol. ccclxi. verso, &c.

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 259, fn 1

"Tra' quali fù non guari dopo Vescovo di Padoua, et ultimamente mori in Madrid nunzio di sua Santita alla corte de Spagna. Il quale come persona di grandissima gravita, e di prudenza singularissima, visito tutti quei Collegi d'Ossonio, e di Cantabrigia, e con grandissimo zelo gli reformo," etc. See "L'Historia Eccles. della Rivoluzion d'INghilterra, da Girol. Pollini," (in Roma, 1594), lib. 3, cap. 19. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 284, line 13 from the bottom

"It. at vii my L. of Chester came to St. Mary's and almost half houre before to hallow the churche, and hallowed a great tubbe full of water and put therein salt asshes and wyne and wente onse round abowte without the churche and thryce within, the Mr. of Xts College, Mr. Percyvell, and Collingwood were his Chaplens and wayted in gray Amyses, and that don Parson Collingwood sayde Masse; and that don my seyde Lorde preched, wherunto was fet my L. of Lynkolne and D. Cole; the Datary tarying at home and my L. of Chychester beinge syck.' (Lamb's Documents, p. 217.)

1583 Edition, page 1987[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 285, line 5

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'compasse' to 'windlass' in the text.} "A windlass" (Ed. 1563). A circuitous route, or "compass," to which last it is altered in later editions.

1583 Edition, page 1987[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 285, line 11

The commencement of an Easter hymn, used in papal processions. It is given in the "Processionale Romanum," p. 71, Edit. Tornaci, 1675, and in Daniel's "Thesaurus Hymnologicus," tom. i. 169: see also Venantii Fortunati Poem. lib. iii. ¶ 7. See Strype's "Memorials under Mary," ch. 26, p. 208; ch. 27, p. 220; ch. 49, pp. 377, 382, 286; Tottenham's "Popery on the Continent," pp. 6, 7; and Lamb's "Collection of Documents," p. 218.

1583 Edition, page 1987[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 285, fn 1

"Inespecially," Ed. 1563, p. 1551. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1987[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 286, line 11

This sentence is made clearer than Foxe's from the Latin; and ... lower "honour" is put in for "order."

1583 Edition, page 1988[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 286, line 14

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'dignified' to 'commenced' in the text.} An academical term, signifying to take a degree (see Todd's Johnson): it is altered after the first Edition to "dignified."

1583 Edition, page 1988[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 287, line 6 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'our eyes' to 'your eyes'.} "Your eyes" in "Briefe Treatise," and Latin "Vestro." Foxe "our eyes."

1583 Edition, page 1988[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 288, line 1

The first Edition reads "inespecially."

1583 Edition, page 1988[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 288, middle

Cashiered, dismissed. See Halliwell.

1583 Edition, page 1988[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 288, fn 1

"Misture," i. e. missing. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1988[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 292, line 14

Hist. Eccles. iv. 38. Eutychius closed any discussion on the subject, by pronouncing the matter too clear to need any debating.

1583 Edition, page 1990[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 292, fn 1

Cronica Joh. Naucleri Præpos. Tubing. Coloniæ, 1579. Vol. ii. Generat. 31. p. 721. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1990[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 294, fn 2

See Le Plat's "Collectio Monumentt. Hist. Conc. trid. illustr." tom. iv. p. 68. This was to hold, however, merely till a generall Council should decide the point. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1991[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 296, fn 1

See "Historia vera," etc. pp. 197-203. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1992[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 296, line 5 from the bottom

Elevated; and in the present case with liquor. Richardson quotes (under the word) from Holland's Plutarch, fol. 387: "Certain Chians there were, who being come to see the city of Sparta, chanced to be well whittled, and stark drunk," &c. And in Calfhill's Latin letter, from which this account is taken, it runs: "Is, ubi jam advesperaverat, ab immanibus suis poculis aliquid temporis intermittens."

1583 Edition, page 1992[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 297, line 16

In Edit. 1563, p. 1559, "so ungentle a prank."

1583 Edition, page 1992[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 297, middle

The author of "An Answer to Martiall's Treatise of the Cross," republished by the Parker Society, and who would in all probability rank with "the grave men, well learned and wise," alluded to by Foxe as then members of Christ Church. A Latin letter addressed by him to Bishop Grindall in 1561, on the subject of the exhumation and restoration of the remains of Peter Martyrs's wife, is given in the "Historia Vera" (fol. 196, verso).

1583 Edition, page 1992[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 299, line 16

The reasons for these representations were thus given in earlier times: "And for this cause Roodes and ymages ben set on hye in the chirches; for as soone as a man cometh into the chirche, he shold see it and have it in his mynde and thynke on Cristis passyon: wherfore crosses and other ymages be full necessary and nedeful, whatsomever these Lollers saye; for and it had not be full profitable, holy faders wolde have destroyed hem many yeres agone. For right as the people done worshyp to the Kingis seale, not for love of that seale, but for love of that kyng that it cometh fro; so Roodes and ymages be set for the Kynges seale of heven and other sayntes in that same wyse: for ymages ben lewed peples bokes; and as Johan Bellet [See Bishop Jewel's Reply to Harding, Art. iii. div. 15. end.] saith, there be thousandes of peple that cannot ymagyne in her [their] hertes how Crist was done on the crosse, but as they see by ymages in the Chirches, and in other places there as they ben." The "Liber Festivalis," fol. xli. Edit. Paris, 1495.

1583 Edition, page 1993[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 302, line 5

In conformity with the tenor of this edict, we may presume, was issued the following reproof to the Mayor and Corporation of Bristol, being an extract from Queen Mary's Privy Council Book, now kept at the Privy Council Office, Whitehall: -
"At Westminster the xxiiiith of August, 1557.
"A lre to the Maior and Aldermen of Bristoll requyring them to conforme themselfs in frequenting the Sermons processions and other publique ceremonye at the Cathedrall churche there to the doings of all other Cities and like corporations wth in the Realme and not to absent themselfs as they have doon of late; nor loke from hensforthe that the Deane and Chapitre shulde waite uppon them or fetche them out of the Cittie wth their crosse and procession, being the same very unsemely and farre out of ordre."

1583 Edition, page 1995[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 302, line 18

In "The Charge of the Quest of Warmot in every Warde," given by Arnold in the "Customs of London," p. 90, inquiry is ordered to be made, "yf there by ony comon ryator, barratur, &c, dwelling wythin the warde." The term is taken from the French, barateur, in low Latin, baraterius, which have the same meaning. (See Mr. Way's note on Promptorium Parv. p. 115, where it is Latinized (p. 23) by pugnax.)

1583 Edition, page 1995[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 304, line 31

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'til' to 'to' in the text.} The preposition "to" is taken for "until," both here and a few lines lower; "yea to the lord legates commissioners." It is the reading of the first three editions of Foxe, altered in those subsequent into "till." Mr. Halliwell quotes an instance of this use from a Lincoln MS.:-
"Theys knyghtis never stynte ne blane
To thay unto the cetè wanne."
Warton's "History of English Poetry" (i. 67, Edit. 1840) furnishes from Robert de Brunne another:-
"Of that gift no thing ne wist
To he was cast oute with Hengist."
The same author (iii. 99) gives another instance of this idiom from Minot's poems on the wars of Edward III:-
"And in that land, trewly to tell,
Ordains he still for to dwell
To time he think to fyght."

1583 Edition, page 1995[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 305, line 6 from the bottom

Or "the Weald, so named of the Saxon word weald, which signifieth, a woodie countrie." (Lambarde's "Perambulation of Kent," p. 189, edit. 1826)

1583 Edition, page 1996[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 306, line 9

In Lyson's "Environs of London" the alms-houses at Isleworth are termed bedehouses. See Boucher's Glossary, under Beades.

1583 Edition, page 1996[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 311, line 22 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'intermitting' to 'intermelling' in the text.} This is the reading of the first Edition, p. 1568. Nares' Glossary and Todd's Johnson furnish instances of its use from Bishop Fisher, Marston, &c. It of course means - what it has been altered into in other Editions - "intermixing."

1583 Edition, page 1998[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 312, fn 1

At a certain period during the solemnization of Mass, a tablet, or small square board (occasionally perhaps constructed in a folding fashion) was exhibited to the communicants, who one after another imprinted upon it the kiss of peace, "hincque dicta la pax." It was more or less ornamented according to the status of the house to which it belonged, or the ingenuity of its monks. It is called by the various names of Pax, Paxbred, and Deosculatorium. (Raine's "St. Cuthbert," p. 129.)
"Shortly after the Agnus ye kiss the Pax, which was the ordinance of Pope Innocent in the year of our Lord 310; and while the boy or parish clerke carrieth the Pax about, ye yourselves alone eat up all, and drink up all. Ah! what riding fools and very dolts make ye the people! ye send them a piece of wood, or glass, or of some metal to kiss, and in the mean season ye eat and drink up all together." (Becon's "Displaying of the Popish Masse," London. 1637, pp. 261-2.) "Minister daturus pacem genuflectit ad dextram celebrantis, et dicto tertio Agnus Dei, cum primâ oratione sequenti, porrigit instrumentum osculandum eidem celebranti." Gavanti "Thesaurus Sac. Rituum," pars 2, tit. x. p. 118, edit. Venet. 1713, where more of such matter (if wanted) may be seen.

1583 Edition, page 1999[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 315, line 6

The condemnation of these five is recorded by Machyn (p. 130) on the day given by Foxe; but he has placed their martyrdom under the vi: one, he says, "was a barber dwellyng in Lym-strett; and on woman was the wyff of the Crane at the Crussyd-frers besyd the Towre-hylle, kepyng of a in ther" (p. 131).

1583 Edition, page 2000[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 321, fn 1

In the Harleian MSS. No. 416, art. 75, is Roger Hall's original information to Mr. Foxe, relating to circumstances touching Joan Bradbridge, Edmund Allin, and Thomas Rede [or Reade]. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2003[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 322, middle

See more in Strype's Annals, I. i. 558, or, in folio, 374.

1583 Edition, page 2003[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 323, line 2 from the bottom

This refers probably to the edict of the council held at Toulouse A. D. 1229 (cap. 14), at which Romanus Bonaventura, Cardinal Deacon of St. Angelo, presided; and which is generally quoted as having been the first instance of Scripture, translated into a vulgar tongue, being publicly prohibited. See Labbe, tom. xi. 430; Basnage's Hist. Eccles. Ref. i. 309; and Horne's "Popery the enemy of Scripture," p. 10.

1583 Edition, page 2003[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 324, line 3

The faculty of teaching with authority, pronouncing judgment ex officio, or propounding doctrine ex cathedrá, is indicated by the same emblem [of keys]. It was mentioned by Christ when reproving the Jewish teachers: "Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in, ye hindered." (Luke xi. 52.)

1583 Edition, page 2003[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 326, fn 1

"Wreck their tyme," Edit. 1563, p. 1571: the subsequent Editions read "wrecke" or "wreake their tine," i. e. vent their spleen: "tine" means vexation. See Todd's Johnson. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2004[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 326, fn 2

In the Harleian MSS. No. 421, art. 52, is the original Confession of John Fishcock, signed by Harpsfield. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2004[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 327, fn 1

"Facinorous," wicked or villainous. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2005[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 327, fn 2

"Rathe," early. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2005[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 328, line 22

As this word is not now of very common occurrence, another instance may be given from the notes to the "Paston Letters" (vol. i. p. 174, edit. 1840):- "The same dager he slewe hym with, he kest (cast) it in a sege, whiche is founden and taken up al to bowyd (bent together)."

1583 Edition, page 2005[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 334, fn 1

"If they did;" that is, if they thought that man was subject to God. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2008[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 340, fn 4

"He is antichrist, that denieth the Father and the Son," 1 John ii. "Every spirit that confesseth not that Christ is come in the flesh, is not of God," 1 John iv. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2011[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 259, fn 2

"Datary," the chief officer of the court of Rome for dispensing benefices. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 259, line 9 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters the text to: 'to be there himself in a readiness, and moreover to admonish all the residue'.} This reading is from the original text of Golding's "Briefe Treatise," &c., and Foxe's first Edition. Foxe's altered text is very inferior in sense, and less faithful to the Latin: "In presence, and also to set forward."

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 260, fn 2

The following is the list as given in the MS. of Corpus Chr. Col. Cambridge, and may supply the name of the commissioner, whom Foxe for some reason was indisposed to mention: "At ix. the commissioners viz. the Vic. D. Segswycke, Mr. Yale, syr James Dyer, the recorder, Mrs. Chapman, Frank, Rust, and Evered sat at the Hall." See "A Collection of Documents from the MS. Library of Corp. Chr. Coll Camb." edited by John Lamb, D. D.; Lond. 1838, p. 198. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 261, line 12

"Inclined" would be a better term than "cleaved;" for the Latin says, "Illa ex longa multorum annorum memoria dejecto pontificis jugo ad sanam doctrinam, quæ hæreseos insimulata est, cœpit propendere."

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 340, fn 5

1 John iv.

1583 Edition, page 2011[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 340, line 6 from the bottom

The words here designated a portion of the Bible are a citation from Baruch, chap. vi. 1-5. The application of the term "Scripture" in a broad way to the Apocryphal books had become rather customary (Rivet. "Isagoge ad Scrip. Sac." cap. vii. ¶ 27), though they are not recognised as such by the Jewish Church. (Horne's Introduction, vol. i. p. 481, edit. 1846. See Bishop Marsh's Comparative View, ch. v.) But this particular passage does not furnish the expression "the living God" (Acts xiv. 15), for which Woodman quotes it to repel the charge of heresy. "Did I not tell you, my lord deputy," cries Gardiner, "how you should know a heretic? He is up with his living God, as though there were a dead God. They have nothing in their mouths, these heretics, but the Lord liveth; the lyving God: the Lord, the Lord, and nothing but the Lord." (Strype's "Memorials under Mary," ch. vii. p. 68.)
Brokes, afterwards Bishop of Gloucester, complains in the same way: "Hath not the like practise been exercised with us these fewe yeres past, by our evangelical brotherhood? Have not we bene likewise by them assaulted with the word of the Lord, urged with the word of the Lorde, pressed with the word of the Lord, ye when the Lorde (our Lord knoweth) ment nothing lesse? was other [either] ergo in pervise [parvise: a porch where disputations took place] other Alleluya at Easter ever more common than was in theyr mouthes, the worde of the Lord and God's boke?" [In a MS. poem composed on Sir John Oldcastle, preserved in the Cotton Library, there occurs:-
"It is unkindly for a knight
That should a king's castle keep,
To babble the Bible day and night
In resting time, when he should sleep."
See Mr. Sharon Turner's "Hist. of England during the Middle Ages," iii. 144, edit. 1830.] (Sermon at Paule's Crosse, Nov. xii. 1553, sign. D. 11. Imprinted by R. Caly.) On the "Seven Generations," see Mr. Russell Hall's "Errors of the Apocrypha," Lond. 1836, p. 11.

1583 Edition, page 2011[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 342, below the middle

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'be contented to be enformed' to 'be contented: be enformed' in the text.} This is the reading of edit. 1563, p. 1576. The subsequent editions read, "be contented to be enformed," or "reformed." Tyndal writes: "For he that doth wrong, lacketh wit and discretion, and cannot amend till he be enformed and taught lovingly." (p. 203 Workes, edit. 1573).

1583 Edition, page 2012[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 343, line 10

Contented, satisfied: see Boucher's Glossary. Wycliffe against the Order of Friers (chap. 42) complains, they "ne be apaied with food and hylling." In the old editions of Sternhold and Hopkins, Psalm lxxxiii. 8 is thus versified:-
"And Assur eke is well apaid
With them in league to be."
See also Bishop Hall's Dedication to a Sermon at Excester, August 24th, 1637. Foxe uses "evil apaid," vol. ii. p. 359, line 9, in the sense of discontent, by a less common application.

1583 Edition, page 2012[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 345, fn 2

Matt x.

1583 Edition, page 2013[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 351, fn 2

"Crede et manducasti." In Joh. Evang. cap. 6. tract. 25, ¶ 12. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2016[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: page 356, last line

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'maner' to 'manners' in the text.} All the old editions read, "it is no maner."

1583 Edition, page 2018[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 367, line 7

i. e. acknowledge. This word occurs in Tyndales's version of Rom. i. 28: "And as it seemed not good unto them to be aknowen of God;" and in Sir Thomas More's Confutation: "His father and his mother he wold not be a knowen of what they were; they were some so good folk of likelihood, that he could not abide the glory. He wold not be a knowen that himself was Priest." In the Paston Letters, also, we have, "and yet he will not be aknowyn;" vol. ii. 139, ed. 1841.

1583 Edition, page 2023[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 372, line 27

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'needs' to 'allgates' in the text.} "Allgates" is an Anglo-Saxon word signifying "at all events," and is used in Wycliffe's version of Rom. xi. 10. See Prompt. Parv. p. 9, Boucher's Glossary, and Halliwell's Dictionary. It is here restored from the first Edition, p. 1580: subsequent Editions read "needs."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 372, line 31

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'as it chaunceth now' to 'as it chanced yet now' in the text.} This is the reading of the first Edition.

1583 Edition, page 2025[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 373, middle

The common explanation of this phrase, "to take encouragement," "to pluck up," hardly suits the present passage. "Heart of grass" is the form in which it sometimes appears: see Nares' Glossary on both forms.

1583 Edition, page 2026[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 379, middle

Maunday Thursday is the Thursday before Easter, and fell on April 2nd, in 1556, which is the true year, and not 1557. Another circumstance points out 1556 as the true year, viz. that George Boyes was elected proctor in 1555, and would therefore be proctor April 2nd, 1556.

1583 Edition, page 2028[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 380, line 4

This is probably Segar Nicholson, mentioned iv. 586, v. 27. He ministered to the wants of Thomas Mountain at Cambridge. (See ... Mr. Nichols's "Narratives," pp. 203, 209.)

1583 Edition, page 2028[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 381, line 7

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'all things in order' to 'all thing in an order' in the text.} "Thing" bears occasionally a plural acceptation, as here, and in the following passage from the Festyvall (fol. lxvi. verso. ed. 1528): "At mydnyght our Lorde was borne, for by kynde all thynge was in peas and rest;" or more plainly in the following: "Then Brandon thanked God that he is so mercyfull and gracyous in all thynge" (fol. xcii. recto).

1583 Edition, page 2029[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 381, line 22

The first Edition, p. 1603, reads, "Then cryed master Marsham and one Bacon," &c.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 382, line 4

The first Edition goes on: "For if thou diligently marke (good reader) herein the labours of every state and degree in al tymes and yeares, who then sitteth so styl in worldly security, as doth the bloody byshops, unles it be to practise pestilent policy, to bring such worthy men to serve their slavishe slaughter, to the poysoning of Christen soules, as here in this history thou mayest se, to the great griefe of a good hart" (p. 1604).

1583 Edition, page 2029[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 385

Foxe states in his first Edition (pp. 1706-7), that he introduced the plate ... "to thentent that he which was the doer therof, beholding the cruelty of the dede, may come the soner to repentance ... God graunt that he that was the doer and the cause therof, as he hath lyfe and fayre warning geven him of God to repente, may have lyke grace withal to lament and repent betime, least peradventure he feele hereafter the bitter taste of God's revenging rodde as the other have done besides."

1583 Edition, page 2030[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 386, fn 1

See Livii Historia, lib. ii. cap. 13. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2031[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 387, line 20

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'lodged' to 'laid' in the text.} The first Edition, p. 1607, reads "laid with the rest;" as it does also later; "which were laid in out-chambers:" the subsequent editions read "lodged."

1583 Edition, page 2031[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 393, line 6

From a reference to this martyr in the Privy Council Book it would appear, that Thurston was alive over this month:-
"At St. James the xiith of Decembre 1557.
"A lre to Anthony Browne, Esq., oone of the Queenes Maties sergeaunts at Lawe, signifieng unto him in aunswere of his, that towching suche as he writeth of to remayne hitherto in Colchester gaole ever syns the execution of Trudge and before, as personnes thenne suspected to have byn his ayders and comforters, he maye onles he hath the more vehementer suspitions against them, bayle them upon substanciall suerties to be fourthe comyng and abide such ordre as the Lawe will at the next assizes. And as for Thurston remayning also in the said gaole as a personne very evill in matters of Religion, notwthstanding he was taken to be reconciled, he is willed to remitt him unto the Ordinary wth such matter as he hath wherewth to charge him."

1583 Edition, page 2033[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 396, line 22

The Edition of 1563 goes on: "doyng by him as a man would use chyldren, whiche because they can not take meate themselves, chammeth it or it be put into their mouthes" (p. 1615).

1583 Edition, page 2034[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 396, line 13 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'S. Rouses' to 'St. Osyth's' in the text.} In the Latin this is "ad S. Roufium" or "Rousium" or "Roustum," for the type is not clear; in 1563 and 1570 "S. Roufes;" in 1576 and all following Editions "S. Rouses;" which is supposed to mean St. Osyth's on the coast of Essex. Addenda:The conjecture that St. Rouses means St. Osyth's is confirmed by a passage in Thomas Mountain's Autobiography: "This vyage [from Colchester to Holland] was tryshe [thrice] attemptyd and always was put bake; and at the laste tyme we were caste a land at sent towsys, wheras I durste not longe tary, bycawse of my lord Darsy, who laye there, havynge a strayte comysyon sent unto hym from quene Marye, to make dyllygent searche for one beynge callyd Trowge over the worlde, and for all souche lyke begars as he was." Mr. Nichols has misread it "sent Towhys" instead of "sent towsys." This colloquial form of "St. Osythe's" is obtained by repeating the final t of "sent" at the beginning of the next word: thus a few lines lower Mountain repeats n, "an noneste man." So, "Tooley Street" is an abbreviation or corruption of "Saint Ooley's or Olave's Street." "S. Rouses" was another colloquial form of "St. Osyth'e;" or Foxe may have mistaken the t in touses for an r, which Mountain's writing suggests as probable.

1583 Edition, page 2034[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 397, line 12 from the bottom

Pale blue, according to Nares, under "Watchet." Chaucer writes, waget, and Skinner thinks it may be wad-chet, the colour of wad or woad. Fr. guesde.
"But he their sonne full fresh and jolly was
All deck'd in a robe of watchet hew."
Spencer, F. Q. v. can. 11, st. 27. Richardson's Dict.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 400, line 17

Chaucer has - "He starte him up out of the bushis thik." Knight's Tale, 1581.

1583 Edition, page 2035[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 402, line 13 from the bottom

The sentence against Jocosa Lewes by the bishop, is among the Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 78.

1583 Edition, page 2036[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 407, middle

There should be a (.) after "I," not a (-), as if the sentence were open. From Nares and Halliwell it seems, that the repetition of the pronoun in this way was common among the dramatists. In prose, Sir Thomas More has it: "For I eat flesh all this Lent, myself I." (Dialogue on Tribulation, p. 126, edit. 1847.)

1583 Edition, page 2038[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 409, line 24 from the bottom

One vehemently suspected may be commanded a general abjuration of all heresies; after which, if he relapses into his former heresy, or associates with and favours heretics, he is delivered over to the secular power as a Relapse." (Chandler's Hist. of Persecution, p. 212; see Sexti Decretall. lib. v. tit. 2, ¶ 4; and Llorente's History of the Inquisition of Spain, Lond. 1826, p. 242..

1583 Edition, page 2039[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 415, line 16

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'gladly' to 'fayne' in the text.} After 1563, "fayne" is changed into "gladly".

1583 Edition, page 2041[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 415, line 14 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'cord' to 'sword' in the text.} All the editions here read "cord;" but this is evidently a mistake, see {later on the same} page, where all the editions read "sword;" and how could a cord be made out of a board?

1583 Edition, page 2042[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 417, line 8 from the bottom

These must be the two referred to by Machyn (p. 152) as "dwellyng in sant Donstans in the Est, of the est syd of sant Donstans chercheyerd with master [Waters] sargant of armes."

1583 Edition, page 2042[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 420, last line

What follows these words in the first edition, p. 1631, gives a better or an additional reason for Margaret Thurston's being deferred; and accords better with her subsequent history, where her "backsliding" is alluded to. "... was mightely attempted of the wicked papistes to relent from her conceived and undoubted truth: and what through infirmity, the fear of the fier, and their flattering perswasions, she yelded unto them after a sort; whereby for that present she was kept backe from martirdome, and committed that daye prysoner to Mote-hall in Colchester, wher before she was prisoner in the Castel aforesaid." The Register of Thomas Bryce also supports this view:-
"When widow Thurstone thei did assaile,
And brought An Banger to death his daunce."
Farr's "Select Poetry of the reign of Queen Elizabeth," I. 172, Parker Soc. edit.

1583 Edition, page 2044[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 261, line 31

"Invitati alius aliò, ubi subesset aliqua ratio officii declarandi aut ostendendæ voluntatis;" from which it appears that "their" refers to the inviters.

1583 Edition, page 1980[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 262, fn 1

See "Hist. Vera," etc. His letter is dated from Trinity college, Cambridge, Mar. 15, 1551. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1981[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 263, line 31

There may be an allusion here to the cardinal's projected "Reform of England," the Decrees of which have been translated into English by Mr. Chancellor Raikes (Chester, 1839) ... The Decrees are dated from Lambeth, 10th of February, 1556, and were reprinted at Dilingen with other treatises of the Cardinal, in 1562. They are included likewise in Le Plat's "Monumentorum ad Historiam Conc. Trid. illustrandam Collectio," tom. iv. pp. 570-599; and in Cardwell's Doc. An. i. 176.

1583 Edition, page 1981[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 424, line 1

In Bridge's History of Northamptonshire by Whalley (vol. i. p. 7) we find, in a list of the Sheriffs of the County, Sir Thomas Tresham as chosen in 2 & 3 of Philip and Mary, i. e. between 25 July, 1555, and 24 July, 1556, so that it does not appear how he could have been sheriff in September or October 1557; and the earlier date assigned {in Book XI} must be the correct one.

1583 Edition, page 2045[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 425, line 10 from the bottom

One "that rostythe mete, assator" (Prompt. Parvulorum, p. 229). Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Essex, among the household servants named in his will, 1361, as "potager, ferour, barber, ewer," &c. mentions "Will de Barton, hastiler." (Royal Wills, p. 52.) The derivation is evidently from hasta. "Haste, a spit or broach." Cotgr.

1583 Edition, page 2046[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 427, middle

This is the wording of Tyndale's, and Coverdale's, and Cranmer's versions, which here commence a sentence, and connect (it will be observed) the close of verse 13 with that following. (See Bagster's Hexapla in loc.) Tyms quotes the passage with the same rendering {in Book XI}.

1583 Edition, page 2046[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 428, line 5 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'thinke' to 'report' in the text.} "Report" is changed after 1563 into "think."

1583 Edition, page 2047[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 429, line 20

There is a process against Nicholas Hurde, Jo. Hurleston, Elizabeth Smyth, Margaret Cole, John Hurleston, Helene Bowring, Margaret Byrell, Ana Penifather, dated Sep. 30, in the Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 69-74.

1583 Edition, page 2047[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 429, line 20 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'accompanied' to 'brought' in the text.} This is the reading of 1563: the subsequent editions give "accompanied," which is the meaning of the other.

1583 Edition, page 2047[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 430, fn 1

In the Harleian MSS. No. 421, art. 63, is John Mille's sentence by Gregory Day, bishop of Chichester. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2048[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 430, fn 2

In the Harleian MSS. No. 421, art. 55, she is called Anne Tree. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2048[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 430, middle

For "Cattesfield" (a place near Hastings) the first edition reads "Rotherfield."

1583 Edition, page 2048[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 433, middle

There is a reference to this martyrdom in an unexpected quarter - Mr. P. Collier's Hist. of English Dram. Poetry, i. 63 - extracted from a MS. in the Cotton Library:-
"The 13 day of November was sant Erkenwold evyn, the 4 and 5 of K. and Quen: whent out of Nugatt unto Smythfeld to be bernyd 3 men: on was Gybsun, the sun of Serjent Gybsun, Serjant of arms, and of the revylls and of the kyngs tentes; and 2 more, the whyche here be ther names - Gybsun, Hald and Sparow, thes 3 men."
The 14th of November having been appointed to be kept sacred to the memory of Bishop Erkenwald, the day on which these martyrs suffered may be more accurately given in the above extract than Foxe. See Weever's Funeral Monuments, p. 359.

1583 Edition, page 2049[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 433, line 5 from the bottom

This fifth article is given more at length in Edition 1563, p. 1638:-
"hath thought, beleved, and spoken, and so doth thinke, beleve, and content to speake, that he being out pryson, and at his own libertie, is not bound to come to his owne parishe churche to heare mattins, masse, and even-song there, or any divine service song or sayde there, as it is now used here in England, and that therefore he hath not come to his own parishe churche of S. Leonards aforesayd, especially these two yeares last past, but..."
In article 6 also: "man child, *(the place he will not name, nor yet the minister, nor the godfathers or godmother, or midwife, or other that was present, saving his own selfe, whom he saith was there present) he the said John caused."

1583 Edition, page 2049[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 436, fn 1

See the Harleian MSS., No. 425, Art. xx. This recantation is dated Oct. 27, 1556. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2050[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 436, fn 2

These articles, together with his declarations and submissions, etc., appear to be given more at length from the Foxian MSS by Strype. See Memorials under Mary, chap. lii. - ED. Appendix:The articles are given in rather an enlarged form in the first Edition, pp. 1640, 41...

1583 Edition, page 2050[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 438, middle

The first Edition goes on: "protestynge with a greate oath" (p. 1642).

1583 Edition, page 2051[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 443, line 9 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt inserts 'dereigned' into the text here.} This word is introduced from the first Edition, p. 1646. It seems to have been omitted afterwards from the meaning being obscure, or through oversight. But some word seems necessary to the sentence. "In some places the substantive deraignment is used in the very literal signification with the French desrayer, or desranger; that is turning out of course, displacing, or setting out of order; as deraignment, or departure out of religion - and deraignment, or discharge of their profession; which is spoken of those religious men who forsook their orders and professions." (Blount, in Todd's Johnson.)

1583 Edition, page 2052[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 445, middle

{Cattley/Pratt alters "12" to "xxii" in the text.} "xxii" is the reading of Edition 1563, and, from what follows, seems the true reading: subsequent Editions read "xii."

1583 Edition, page 2053[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 446, fn 1

This startling statement is illustrated and confirmed in Rivet's "Jesuita vapulans, sive castigat. not. in Epist. ad Balsacum," (Lug. Bat. 1635) cap. 16, from the writings of Claude d'Espence, Mariana the Jesuit, and others. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2053[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 448, fn 1

In Coverdale's "Letters of the Martyrs," it is "addressed to the Christian Congregation in London." - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2054[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 454, fn 1

"In the beginning of this year, in the month of April, by virtue of a commission from Bonner, and some warrants also from the council, Dr. Chedsey and Thomas Mourton, the bishop's chaplains, and John Boswell, his secretary, went down to Colchester and Harwich, to examine the heretics in those parts of Essex, and to condemn them to be burnt; for though they burnt so many - so many, that one Dale, a promoter, told Mr. Living, a minister (and in bonds for religion), 'You care not for burning; by God's blood' (as he swore) 'there must be some other means found for you,' - yet many more remained there." Strype's "Memorials under Mary," chap. lxii., where the proceedings of this commission are, in some measure, detailed. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2055[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 462, fn 1

"Or rather scarce having his wits." Edit. 1563, p. 1654. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2058[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 462, bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'xxvi' to 'thirty-six' in the text.} The articles and sentence against Seman will be found among the Foxian Papers, Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 150: the sentence was read April 1st, 1558. The Editions after 1563 read "xxvi." for "xxxvi."

1583 Edition, page 2059[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 463, middle

The Articles and Sentence against Carman will be found among the Foxian Papers, Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 157: he is there called a "plowright, of Hingham, Norw. dioc:" and the sentence was read 18th Feb. 1558.

1583 Edition, page 2059[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 465, line 11 from the bottom

The following additional matter appears in Edition 1563, p. 1707. "Before mention is made, p. 1655, of one Berye of Ailsam in Norfolke, Commissary, who in Quene Maryes dayes emong other his cruel actes, with one Thomas Knowles a proctor in the Byshops courte, persecuted in the sayd Towne one William Harrison a schole maister, a man very grave and godly, and one who much profited in that vocation, wherby he was faine to flye from his wyfe and children to Bennet Colledge in Cambridge, where he falling sicke came home againe, and lieng very weke in his bed, one of Syr Richard Southwelles men came to him, called maister St. ... and thretned to burne him, and that hys goods should be confiscate to the Quene, if he would not be ordered to obey the lawe, &c. So that he upon theire cruel threates died peacyble in the Lord of that sicknes: hys name therfore be praised: Amen."

1583 Edition, page 2060[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 466, line 7

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'xix.' to '20th' in the text.} The Editions subsequent to 1576 corrupt "xx." into "xix."

1583 Edition, page 2060[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 467, line 3

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'promise' to 'promises' in the text.} All the Editions except 1563 read "promise."

1583 Edition, page 2060[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 467, line 14 from the bottom

For "reader" the Edition of 1563, p. 1670, reads "brother."

1583 Edition, page 2061[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 476, middle

John XXIII., Gregory XII., and Benedict XIII. One object of the assembling of a Council at Constance, A. D. 1414, was to dispose of this Cerberus (Sandini Vitæ Pontiff. Rom. p. 586, edit. 1775), see more in the Introduction to Geddes' "Council of Trent no Free Assembly;" Lond. 1697, pp. 21-23.

1583 Edition, page 2064[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 481, line 15

See Strype's Memorials under Mary, chap. 63, p. 461, folio.

1583 Edition, page 2066[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 481, fn 1

This was William Tyndale's translation, published at Hamburgh under the name of "Thomas Mattewes:" the press was corrected by John Rogers...- ED.

1583 Edition, page 2067[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 482, fn 2

See Hor. Epist. II. 1. 71. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 482, line 11 from the bottom

The allusion here seems unfounded. Baron Lechmere informed Strype "that he (Bp. B.) was born at Hanly in Worcestershire, of one Boner, an honest poor man, in a house called Boner's place to this day, a little cottage of about £5 a year. And that his great grandfather, Bishop Boner's great friend and acquaintance, did purchase this place of the said Bishop in the times of Queen Elizabeth," &c. (Annals, i. pt. ii. 300.)

1583 Edition, page 2067[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 483, middle

The first Edition, p. 1691, goes on: "where they being in good exercises, as ye have heard, by false spies the matter was knowen to the Papistes, and immediately half a score sent to take them: which when they came, chargyng them in the Quenes name to obey, notwithstanding some of them escaped away, and others were apprehended, to the number of xx or theraboutes, of the which number was this Thomas Hinshaw. Who with the rest," &c.

1583 Edition, page 2068[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 483, line 16 from the bottom

An idiom not unfrequent in early times. Sir Thos. More has: "about a tenne year ago;" Workes, p. 900; and in "The letters relating to the Suppression of Monasteries" (p. 85), "Here departe of theym that be under age upon an eight; and of theym that be above age, upon a five wold departe yf they might."

1583 Edition, page 2068[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 484, fn 1

In the original Editions of the Acts and Monuments is a very spirited engraving of this infliction of bishop Bonner. It pourtrays the bishop, with his robes off, belabouring the object of his displeasure in regular schoolboy undress; the representation of this episcopal feat is denominated "The ryght picture and true counterfeyt of Boner, and his crueltye in scourgynge of Goddes Saynctes in his orcharde." - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 485, line 18

The first three English Editions read "with the said Thomas Hinshaw and with Robert Willis." The Robert Willis here mentioned is evidently the same individual with "Robert Willys" mentioned {earlier}; but the editor of the Editions of 1583 took it into his head, that the same family was named either "Milles" or "Willis," and that this Robert Willis was the same individual as Robert Milles, mentioned ... as the brother of John Milles, and as "burnt before at Brentford, as is above signified"; hence he here omits the word "with," evidently for the purpose of connecting Robert Willis as well as Thomas Hinshaw with the word "said:" in conformity with this same notion he conversely alters Milles into Willes; the first time (by an oversight) he leaves Milles to stand, though presently after, he prints "Willes:" here also he throughout prints "John Willes," as the person scourged with Thomas Hinshaw.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 486, line 17 from the bottom

The first Edition, p. 1691, adds, "makyng a crosse and knocking his breat" - a part of the performance which it was perhaps considered, afterwards, would be best omitted. But many had to accommodate much farther.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 488, middle

The first Edition has it, "and the Massemongers underlinges."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 489, line 8

In Foxe's Appendix this name is written "Alcocke or Aucocke," and he is there called a "woad-setter."

1583 Edition, page 2070[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 490

After the account of Alcocke's death, the Edition of 1563 continues (p. 1663):-
"Thus see you what lamentable estate the churche of Hadley was in after the death of D. Taylour: many through weakenes and infirmitie fell to the Poperie: and suche as were more perfect, lyved in great feare and sorowe of hart. Some fled the towne; and wandred from place to place. And some fled beyond the seas, leving all that ever they had to God, and committing them selfes rather to banishment and povertie, then they would against their conscience do any thyng that should displease God, or in any point sound against his holy worde. God be praysed for this goodly tryall, wherein suche as feared God were lyke gold in the furnace purified, and suche as were weake have learned to knowe them selfes, and henceforth to leane to God's strength, and to praye for his helpe, that they may be more strong, and walke more firmely in the waye of Gods word in tyme to come.
"To God our almyghtie father, through Jesus Christ our Saviour, be all honour and glorie, and the Lord graunt us his Holy Ghost, to strengthen and comfort our weakenes, and to leade us through this wretched worlde, so that we may come to that blessed rest ordeyned for his chosen sainctes, Amen. God be praysed for ever, Amen, Amen."

1583 Edition, page 2070[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 264, middle

In Cicero's treatise "De Natura Deorum" (lib. i. ¶ 18) it is argued by the Stoic, that the form or shape which Deity would assume would be the human, accompanied however with merely a quasi body, and quasi blood. But in ¶ 26 it is remarked in refutation of the notion: "Mirabile videtur quod non rideat haruspex, cum haruspicem viderit: hoc mirabilius, quod vos inter vos risum tenere possitis; non est corpus, sed quasi corpus: hoc intelligerem quale esset, si id in ceris fingeretur aut fictilibus figuris: in deo quid sit quasi corpus, aut quasi sanguis, intelligere non possum; ne tu quidem, Vellei; sed non vis fateri. Ista enim a vobis quasi dictata redduntur, quæ Epicurus oscitans hallucinatus est," &c.

1583 Edition, page 1981[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 265, line 10

{Cattley/Pratt omits 'the' before 'amendement' in the text.} All the editions of Foxe read "the amendment:" but "the" is wanting in the "Briefe Treatise," and is therefore omitted as an interpolation of the printer.

1583 Edition, page 1982[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 266, fn 1

"Eft," that is "sometimes." - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 490, middle

In Edition 1563, "the Pope's irreligious religion."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 491, fn 1

"Saying Qui potest capere, capiat, ketch that ketch may". Edit. 1563, p. 1668.

1583 Edition, page 2071[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 493, line 14

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'Alexander' to 'Saunder' in the text.} "Saunder" is, after the first Edition, changed into "Alexander:" the process against Alexander Gouch, or Gotche, will be found in the Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 140-143: he is there said to be "de Colnes:" Colneis was one of the Hundreds of Suffolk, next to Carlsford, in which Grundisburgh is, and next to Loes, in which Woodbridge is.
There is a singular discrepance as to the Christian name of Driver's wife: in the first Edition, pp. 1670, 1671, she is called "Elizabeth" in this heading, and in the heading to her second examination: "the second examination of Elizabeth Driver:" but the same Edition, p. 1672, calles her "Margaret:" in the Harleian MSS. No. 421, fol. 140-143, we find the process against her, and she is there called "Margaret uxorem Nich. Dryver de Grundesburgh." She is there represented as having been formally condemned at St. Mary's, Bury, May 27th, 1558.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 493, line 4 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt adds 'and Dr. Gascoine' to the heading in the text.} The words "and Dr. Gascoine" are put in by the Editor, because he assisted in this, as well as in the next examination.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 494, line 29

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'the old and new Testament' to 'the New Testament' in the text.} This is the reading of the first Edition; those following insert "the Old and" before "the New."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 494, line 43

The first Edition reads "take," which is probablyh a mistake for "tale" or "talke."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 496, fn 1

The 4th of November in 1558 fell on a Friday: so that we must either read "7th of November," or "Friday." - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 497, fn 1

His sentence is recorded on the 27th of May, in the Harleian MSS., No. 421, Art. 68. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 497, line 5

The names of Humfrey and the two Davids are included in the same process with Gouch and Driver, Harleian MSS. No. 421. fol. 140-143. Philip Humfrey is there stated to have been a tailor, of the parish of Onehouse in Suffolk; and Henry Davye a carpenter, of Stradeshull; John Davye a Sherman, of Stradeshull. These - together with Agnes Dame, de Grundesburgh, ("soluta") spinster, and Grace Wighton, de Lavenham, ("soluta") spinster - appeared at St. Mary's Church, Bury, before Dr. Milo Spenser, the Bishop's Vicar General, on Thursday before Whitsuntide, May 26th, 1558: next day Humphrye, the two Davyes, and Margaret Dryver are stated to have been given up, as incorrigible heretics, to Simon Oxford, an under-bailiff of Sudbury: Agnes Dame and Grace Wighton appear to have abjured and received absolution at the Bishop's Palace, Norwich, Sept. 9th, 1558, and were ordered to do penance next Sunday at the Cathedral.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 497, line 16

He was the last Roman Catholic Speaker of the House of Commons. His monument is in Barrow church, Suffolk.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 498, line 26

This is the reading of all the old editions of Foxe, and means "surely." See ... Halliwell's Dict. of Archaic words.

1583 Edition, page 2074[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 499, fn 1

"Vinow" or "vinew," to grow musty. See H. Tooke's "Diversions of Purley," ed. 1840, 346. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2074[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 499, fn 2

See Todd's Johnson's Dictionary, under Aumbry and Almonry. This term is defined by Carter as "a niche or cupboard by the side of an altar, to contain the utensils belonging them unto;" but it is evident that a more extended signification must be given to the word. In some of the larger churches the almeries were numerous and of considerable size, answering to what we should now call closets. See "A Glossary of Architecture," (Lond. 1838) p. 3, etc. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 502, line 22

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'gyrning' to 'gyring' in the text.} The first three Editions read "gyring," which is afterwards changed into "gyrning," which means "grinning:" see Nares' Glossary, and the old Edition of Latimer's Sermons (Parker Soc. Ed. i. p. 547). "Gyring," however, may mean twirling about, making antics. (See Todd's Johnson, v. "Gyre.")

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 505, line 19 from the bottom

"Danger" here means power. The word ... occurs too in a doctrinal statement controverted by Sir Thomas More, in his Dialogue against Tribulation, book ii. ch. vi. - "He (Christ) brought us out of the devil's daunger with his dear precious blood," p. 1175, or p. 99, Edit. 1847: also ch. xvi. p. 1194, or p. 152. Is it not used in the same sense in the authorized version of Matt. v. 21, 22? Dr. Jamieson has a good article on the word in his "Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language."

1583 Edition, page 2077[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 508, fn 3

2 Cor. ii.

1583 Edition, page 2078[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 513, line 10

{Cattley/Pratt adds: 'also the trouble of John Fronton there' to the heading.} In the English translation of the "Inquisitionis Hispanicæ Artes" of Gonzalez de Montes - A discovery of the holy Inquisition of Spayne, &c. Lond. 1568 - the name is given (and no doubt more correctly) "John Framton;" fol. 60 verso: or still better, in Strype, "Frampton;" Annals, I. i. pp. 357, 361.

1583 Edition, page 2080[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 514, line 19

A conical hat. The word is also spelt coppidtanke, coppentante. "A copentank for Caiphas." Gascoigne's Delicate Diet. 1576. Halliwell's Dictionary under copatain. Coppe seems to have been applied generally to the top of anything elevated: see Prompt. Parvulorum and note, p. 91; and for a representation of the thing itself, Puigblanch's Inquisition unmasked, vol. i. 298; Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, act v. sc. i.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 517

{Cattley/Pratt alters the text here to that of the 1563 edition.} The narrative of the sufferings of Wilmot and Fairfax is here given according to the text of 1563, after which it appears to have been most capriciously tinkered by Foxe or his editor.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 521, line 20 from the bottom

In the first Edition, p. 1685, this narrative opens in the third person: "In the reign of Queene Mary, one Thomas Grene, being apprehended and brought before Doctor Story by his own maister, named John Wayland, the promoter, being then a prynter, for a booke called Antichriste, the whiche Thomas Grene did distribute to certen honest menne: Being, I say, brought before Doctor Storye, he asked him where he had the booke, and said I was a traytor," &c.
We may fairly conclude, that the whole was originally in the first person, but Foxe or the printer changed it to the third, in order to give it as a part of his own narrative; but finding it ill assort with what follows, he altered it back again.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 521, line 19 from the bottom

"Antichrist, that is to saye: A true reporte that Antichrist is come, wher he was borne, of his persone, miracles, what tooles he worketh withall, and what shal be his ende: translated out of Latine into Englishe by J. O. imprinted in Sothwarke by Christopher Trutheall, cum priv. reg. 1556."
The printer's name of this volume, which seems to have been written originally by Rodolph Walter, the Swiss Reformer, is supposed to be a feigned one: see Ames' Typogr. Antiq. by Herbert, vol. iii. p. 1451; and Bibliotheca a Conr. Gesnero - per Jo. Frisium; Tiguri, 1583, p. 733.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 523, line 10

This sentence is worded as follows in Edit. 1563, p. 1686: "And I neither mynding, nor able to answere their Doctors, neither knowing whether they alleged them right, said: I nether knew Saint Cyril nor Saint Tertullian; but that whiche is written in the newe testament I understode."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 524, line 19

This is worded in the first Edition, p. 1687, "and I made him manifest."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 524, line 2 from the bottom

The Edit. of 1563 goes on: "Over and besides these above rehearsed wer divers and many other, who for Christe's sake humbled themselves to the beatynges and stripes of the papists, many mo (no dout) then we have knowlege of. For the nature and patience of these godly Martyrs wer such, that the more they suffred for Christ, the lesse they bosted thereof: who would have thought that Boner ever woulde have broughte maister Bartlet Grene above mentioned being a Lawyer and a Gentleman under the unsemely chastisement of a rod, and yet notwithstanding he so did, as the said mayster Grene himselfe declared to a frende of hys [This friend's name was M. Cotton. Foxe's marginal note] in Newgate a litle before his death" (p. 1688).

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 527, line 13

The Edition of 1563 adds; "and the Castle wonne, that never was kept."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 527, line 15

"And so sayd forth." This is the reading in the first three Editions; in the later it has been corrupted into "forsooth." For other instances see Strype's Annals, I. p. 359, line 7 from the bottom. In Bp. Bale's Kynge Johan (p. 5) we have also:- "Of that we shall talk together: say forth thy mind now."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 528, middle

The first Edition appeared at Venice in 1478, and reprints in the following century were rather numerous. The author's English name, who flourished about 1231, was Halifax. See Dibdin's Biblioth. Spencer. iii. 501; Panzer's Annall. Typogr. vii. 145, 525, &c.; and Fabricii Biblioth. mediæ et inf. Latin. tom. iv. 129; who says of it, "Innotuit potissimum Sacroboscus libro decantatissimo de Sphæra Mundi, quem prælectum in Scholis per 400 amplius annos universa legit et trivit tironum Astronomiæ natio." He was a different individual from Jacobus Manlius de Bosco, who wrote "Luminare majus."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 529, line 13

This New Testament, neatly printed in duodecimo in Roman and Italic types, consists of 456 leaves, including the title: "The Newe Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ, conferred diligently with the Greke and best approved translations. - At Geneva, printed by Conrad Badius, M. D. LVII." It is a beautiful book, and now of rare occurrence, printed with a silver type, and on the best paper; by far the best review of the sacred text that had yet been made.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 535, fn 1

This must have been Broke in Norfolk, as this case is placed under "the persecuted in Norfolk," in p. 1678, Edit. 1563.

1583 Edition, page 2089[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 535, line 23

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'incontinently' to 'continently' in the text.} "Continently" in this passage, is adopted from the first Edition, p. 1676, instead of "incontinently" and "immediately," the readings of the later editions.
This word, though not appearing in any of the old English Dictionaries, may be supported from a passage in "Newes concernynge the general councell holden at Trydent ... translated oute of Germayne into English by Ihon Holibush, an. 1548," printed by Thos. Raynald, and extracted in Brydges' British Bibliographer, ii. 294: - "Whan the Turkyshe messaungers had receaved thys coragious answere of the emperiall majesty, they are returned to theyr Lorde, which continently sente over the foresayde letters," &c. Also in Sir Thomas More's Works, page 1180; "The second booke of Comfort against Tribulation," ch. xi. we read, "And then continently following, to thentent that we should compasse us about uppon everye syde, he sheweth in what wyse wee be by the dyvel envyroned," &c. A double example of "continent" occurs in H. Machyn's Diary (Camden Society, 1848): "The xxiiij. day of May [1554] ... Sant Pulcurs parryche went a-bowt their owne parryche and in Smythfeld; as they wher goohyng, ther cam a man unto the prest [that bare] the sacrament, and began to pluke ytt owt of ys hand, and contenent he drew ys dagger, and contenent he was taken and cared to Nuwgate."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 535, line 16 from the bottom

Sir Thomas Cornwallis was high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1553-4, the last year of Edward VI. He raised a considerable force in defence of Mary's claim, and was by her, in gratitude, made a member of the privy council, treasurer of Calais, and comptroller of the household.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 536, middle

The first Edition, p. 1677, reads "Beell," the rest "Boele."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 538, line 9

"To take on" or "behave" seems to be the meaning of this word in this passage. Tyndale in his answer to Sir Thomas More's Dialogue, book iii. ch. xiii. uses it in the same way: "In the 13th he rageth, and fareth exceeding foul with himself." Works, Edit. 1831, vol. ii. p. 157. See Prompt. Parv. p. 150. Sir Thomas himself in the "Debellacion of Salem and Byzance," pt. i. ch. xii. "He fareth in all thys tale, as though we sate together playing at poste." And so Foxe, vol. iii. 349, line 12; and again vol. iv. p. 40, line 12 from the bottom, "he, staring and faring like a madman."

1583 Edition, page 2090[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 548, line 20

This word means weak, debilitated (Richardson's Dict.), and is used by Ridley in its abbreviated form: "Master Latimer was crased" (vii. 427).

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 266, line 12 from the bottom

"Do the worst:" so reads the first Edition, p. 1540: those following "doing," not so well.

1583 Edition, page 1982[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 267, lines 12, 16

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'habits' in the text to 'copes'.} "Copes" is substituted for "habits," the Latin being "capa." "Vestibus ecclesiasticis indutos (capas nuncupant vulgò)." (Latin, fol. 125.) On "capa," see Mr. Way in Prompt. Parv. 60, 61.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 267, lines 13, 14

"Ipsum præfectum ornari illo habitu, quo vestiuntur qui missam celebrant, nisi quod superius capam indueret, ut reliqui." (Lat. fol. 125.) "Ravesheth," or "ravisheth," is the reading of all the editions, and must be the same word as "reveschyd," clothed, in the following citation:-
"The byschop reveschyd hym in holynes,
And so went to the autere."
(MS. Trin. Coll. Camb. quoted in Halliwell, where more.) The Latin account has (fol. 125, verso) "ornari illo habitu, quo vestiuntur."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 549, line 17

The first Edition of the "Acts and Monuments" then proceeds to give some brief notices of Martyrs, which in succeeding editions made way for what Foxe perhaps thought more important matter.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 550, line 23

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'amased' to 'abashed' in the text.} "Abashed" is the reading of 1563, changed afterwards into "amased." See Todd's Johnson. Caxton says (in Johnson's Typographia i. 197), "And thus between playn, rude, and curious, I stand abashed."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 550, line 21 from the bottom

This phrase, which signifies "at intervals" ... Instances of it are given in Halliwell's Dict. in voc.; and one easily accessible appears in the "Liturgical Services of the Reign of Q. Elizabeth," (Parker Soc.), p. 499, middle.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 551, line 10

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'bustleth' to 'buscleth' in the text.} The Edition of 1563, p. 1696, reads "buscleth:" the word seems a form of "buckle" in the sense of "to prepare." The subsequent Editions read "bustleth."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 551, line 15

The first Edition, p. 1696, reads, "as the howr and tyme served."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 551, line 14 from the bottom

A friend of Foxe; "simul et veteri amico meo" (he says in the Rerum in Eccles. gest. Commentarii, p. 637): "Qui postea ad Evangelii cognitionem opera Thomæ Cooperi et quorundam adductus, in manus tandem adversariorum incidit, atque ad Bonerum perducitur."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 552, line 26

The Edition of 1563, p. 1697, more graphically, "they command."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 553, line 20

The Edition of 1563, p. 1698, here gives the following narrative:- "Maister Nownd of Martilsham in Suffolke, justice of peace went to Debnham for to seke for one Moyse, who woulde not come to the Church, and when he could not fynd hym in the towne, he learned that he was in the feld. Thether he rode with his men following hym on fote to catch Moyse; but Moyse being aloft upon a cart, espied the stout Hunter, and perceiving that he was the pray, made hast of the carte and toke him to his feete out of the field. Nownd folowed with hast on horse back, and his men on fote. But Moise lept over a hedge so that the horseman could follow him no longer, but sent hys men after to hallowe and hunt. But God dyd so hyde poor Moyse in a smal covert, that they retorned without their pray. So was the labor of thungodly frustat. The same Nowne playd the watchman himselfe, in seking of Gouch and Drivers wyfe, with a javeling in his hand, lyke a tal speare man, and yet he never killed so much as a rat in his Princes warres. He being on his nags backe an after none, at dronken tyme of the daye toward night, made a lusty course lyke a tall man of war before hys wyfe, and asked her if she thought him not to be a lusty Champion, and so wente forth with hys speare and pytch forkes, and gaged the hay goffes, to seke out the sely soules, that were in quiet rest. But after Quene Elizabeth by the providence of God had obteyned the crown, the same Nownd tourning his typpet and hys tale at Wodbridge, complayned of the greate mysery that pore soules had suffered, and that men in office and authority were compelled to use suche greate violence and persecution against theyr willes. But wold to God that that horse that would not be ruled, but carry a man agaynst hys will, had eyther bene better broken, or faster tied in a halter. And how can such a Justice justly, and with a safe conscience, nowe punish adversaries of Goddes religion, remayning the same, and in the same office?"

1583 Edition, page 2096[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 553, middle

The first Edition, p. 1698, adds "now person of S. Antlins in London:" see Strype's Memorials under Henry VIII. ch. xlix; Life of Parker, I. iii. edit. 1821. The recantation which Tolwyn had to make before Bonner, and the terms of it, form the subject of Bale's "Yet a course at the Romyshe Foxe," Zurich, 1543, published under the name of Harryson.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 553, line 2 from the bottom

The first Edition, p. 1698, proceeds: "She had a very good memory, and no lesse rypenes of witte, very lowly, gentil and loving to every body, and herselfe beloved also both of man and child."

1583 Edition, page 2096[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 554, fn 1

Thus she saw eight monarchs, exclusive of the lady Jane, in about ninety years. - ED. Appendix:To which the first Edition, p. 1698, adds: "The Lord graunt us to imitate her steppes, Amen. Thus did this good Lady finishe her race, and brought her graye heares with much honoure to the grave, whose steppes and life I wishe youth in themselves to make auncient, and the aged to make honorable, in feare and reverence to the holy name of the Lord. Amen."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 554

This account is condensed from that of John Davis himself... It seems that Mr. Canon "Yewer" was Richard, and "Yould" should be Youle:these are corrected in the Index.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 554, line 3 from the bottom

This was doubtless Henry Joliff, "Educated at Cambridge, where he was sometime one of the Proctors. Afterwards being beneficed in Worcestershire he was prebend of Worcester and Rector of Bishop's Hampton. In 1554 he was made Dean of Bristol. He was concerned in Robert Johnson's answer to Bp. Hooper" (Dodd's Church History, i. 522), entitled "Responsio ven. Sacerdotum H. Joliffi et Rob. Johnsoni sub protest. ad Articulos Joh. Hopperi, Anverpiæ 1564. See Biographical Notice to Hooper's Latin Writings (Parker Soc.) p. xix, and Strype's Cranmer, II. 18, and notes, Eccles. Hist. Soc. Edition.

1583 Edition, page 2097[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 555, fn 1

This gentlewoman was a great succourer of the persecuted that came to her house, and specially of good Woodman, whom ye heard of before; and to her he wrote a letter.

1583 Edition, page 2097[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 559, line 18

"Thou art more prest to heare a sinner cire
Then he is quicke to climbe to thee on hye."
Gascoyne in "Select Poetry of the reign of Elizabeth" (Parker Soc.), p. 34.

1583 Edition, page 2098[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 559, middle

On this accompanying circumstance Myles Hoggarde writes:- "At the deathes of which (Martyrs) you shall see more people in Smithfield flocking together in heaps in one day, than you shall see at a good sermon or exhortation mady be some learned man in a whole week." (fol. 49.)
On a subsequent leaf he pursues this topic: "And because our hereticks will needs have their men to be taken for martyrs, some of them counterfeyting the trade of the ancient state of the true Church, gather together the burnt bones of those stinking martyrs, intending thereby (by like) to shrine the same, or to preserve them for relicks; that at such a time as when an heretick is burnt, ye shall see a route enclosing the fire, for that purpose. And when the fire is done, they lie wallowing like pigs in a sty to scrape in that heretical dongehill for the said bones. Yea, and as it is reported, some gossips and fellow disciples of those wicked apostles use the same next to their hearts in the morning, being grated in a cup of Ale to preserve them from the chyncoughe, and such other maladies incident to such hot burning stomacks." (The Displaying of the Protestants, Lond. 1566, fol. 62, verso.)

1583 Edition, page 2098[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 560, line 14 from the bottom

The first Edition (p. 1701) goes on: "To this I might also adjoyne the happy escape of Robert Cole, minister now of Bow in London, from the handes of Maister Petit, Justice in Kent, being hys mortall enemye, and one that soughte his lyfe. Who meeting hym by chaunce, in a narrow lane, not farre from Feversam, and so meeting him, that one of them must needes touche an other, yet so overcame that daunger, that hee was past and gone before the Judge dyd know it was he, and so the sayd Cole escaped."

1583 Edition, page 2099[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 566, fn 1

"Rood-soller," that is the rood-loft, or the chamber (solarium) where the rood was kept. - ED. Appendix:An illustration may be given of this word from Higden's Polychronicon, in his notice of the Council "at Ryall strete of Calne," where Dunstan so "wysely" presided in 978. "Thenne the gistes & the beames of the soler all tobrake, and the soler fell doun; and some were deed & some hurte and maymed for evermore. Soo all yt there were were deed other hurt ful sore, Outake Dunstā alone, that escaped gracyously & wysely." (Lib. vi. cap. 12, London, 1527.)

1583 Edition, page 2101[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 568, fn 1

See Melancthon's Works, folio. Witebergæ, 1601. vol. ii. p. 477. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2101[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 572, fn 1

"Mail," a kind of portmanteau. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2103[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 572, fn 2

"The land's end." i. e. the Essex shore. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2103[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 572, fn 3

"Achates," provision. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2103[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 572, line 6 from the bottom

"Huke," or "Huick," was "a kind of mantle or cloak worn in Spain and the Low Countries." (Nares.) "There was also a female attire, called Hewke, Belg. huycke, which covered the shoulders and head. In the Acta Sanctorum, Jun. vol. iv. 632, a female is described as clothed in habitu seculari, cum peplo Brabantico nigro, Huckam vulgo vocant. Palsgrave gives 'hewke, a garment for a woman, surquayne, froc; huke surquanie;' and Minsheu explains huyke, huike, or huke, to be a mantle, such as women use in Spain, Germany, and the Low Countries, when they go abroad." Mr Albert Way's note on Promptorium Parvulorum, edit. 1843, p. 233; where more.

1583 Edition, page 2103[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 575, middle

"Dagge," a pistol.

1583 Edition, page 2104[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 576, fn 1

It may be supposed that Samogitia, called, in Polish, Ziestwo Zmudskie, is intended. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2104[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 576, line 22

The first Edition, p. 1703, proceeds: "Here lykewise might I speake of maister Harington, and also of that worthy and most godly Lady, the Lady Vayne, whose earnest and pythy letters to maister Philpot, and to maister Bradford are yet to be sene, and by the leave of the Lord hereafter shal appear.
"What a singular and memorial spectacle of Gods mercyful clemency was declared in delyveringe syr Nicolas Throgmorton in the same time of Quene Mari: who not so much for other pretensed causes as especiallye for religion was so stratly pursued, so vehemently hated, so mightely assaulted, that being clered ["For this the jury was severely fined." (Rapin, ii. 38.)] by the inquest of xii. men, yet scarslye could be released; concerning the discourse and proces of whiche man, as we have it in our handes to shewe, so for the notablenes of the matter we would here have put it downe, but that the length therof requireth rather an other tyme to performe the same. [Sir Nicholas was a "fautor" of Bishop Jewel. See Humfrey's Life, p. 83.]
"Fynally as there is no difference of persons with the Lord, so many tymes hys provident and merciful help is no less upon the pore and symple, as upon other worthyer and greater personages, as in the same tyme of Quene Mary wel appered in a certen simple and poore creature, named Thomas Musgrave, who after his condemnation beinge caried to Smithfield, there to be burned, yet notwithstanding was saved, and yet is alyve. Such is the secret and unsearchable operation of Gods power, able to deliver whom hee pleaseth in the middest of death and desperation," &c.

1583 Edition, page 2105[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 577, line 9

A bird-bolt was "an arrow having a ball of wood at the end of it, and sometimes an iron point projecting before the ball, formerly used for shooting at birds." (Todd's Johnson.) See Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, iv. 3.

1583 Edition, page 2105[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 578

The author, in all probability, of the "Register" in Farr's "Select Poetry of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth" (Parker Soc.), i. 162.

1583 Edition, page 2105[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 579, line 3 from the bottom

All the old Editions, even 1563, read "shipper;" but this is no doubt a misprint for "schipper" (Dutch) or "skipper." (See Todd's Johnson.)

1583 Edition, page 2106[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 581, line 23

It is to be observed, that this account of Thomas Rose was first published by Foxe in the Edition of 1576: consequently, the expression "forty-seven years ago" carries us back to 1529, the date assigned by Foxe to the Card Sermons. That Latimer began to preach the Gospel earlier, appears from the notes {in Book XI}.

1583 Edition, page 2106[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 582, line 11

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'Langly' to 'Longland' in the text.} For "Longland," the original text erroneously reads "Longley."

1583 Edition, page 2107[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 583, line 18

Richard Nix, having been Bishop of Norwich ever since 1501, died Jan. 14th, 1536; and William Rugg was elected his successor May 31st following, consecrated July 2nd. (Richardson's Godwin.) This will help to fix the date of this portion of Rose's History.

1583 Edition, page 2107[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 584, note 1

"Tuesday," in the text, is the reading in all the Editions, also "Thursday" three lines lower: as "Tuesday" is mentioned three lines above, it would seem probable that "Tuesday" here is a mistake for "Thursday."

1583 Edition, page 2107[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 585, line 21

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'Hopkins' to 'Hopton' in the text.} For "Hopton," the original text reads erroneously "Hopkins."

1583 Edition, page 2108[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 590, fn 2

"And they answered Joshua, saying. All that thou commandest us we will do, and whither soever thou sendest us we will go. According as we hearkened unto Moses in all things, so will we hearken unto thee: only the Lord thy God be with thee, as he was with Moses. Whosoever he be that doth rebel against thy commandment, and will not hearken unto thy words in all that thou commandest him, he shall be put to death: only be strong and of a good courage." - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2110[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 597, line 4 from the bottom

"William Worcester uses the term kenning to denote a distance at sea, pp. 179, 313; and it appears from Leland that twenty miles was accounted as a kenning, probably, as the extreme distance within ordinary sight: 'Scylley is a Kennyng, that is to say, about a xx miles from the very Westeste pointe of Cornewaulle.' (Itin. iii. fol. 6.)" Mr. Way's note on Prompt. Parvulorum (p. 271), where it is Latinized by Cognicio. See also Boucher's Glossary under Barbicon; and Hall's Chronicle, p. 52, Edit. 1809.

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 598, line 4

"Ausburg" is the reading in Foxe's very inaccurate text of 1583, where this account first appears: but it is most probable that we should here read "Duisburg" or "Duysburg," which was in Cleveland. This suggestion seems quite confirmed by the exactly parallel case of Thomas Mountain: "So with as much speed as I could make, I took waggon, and went up to Germany, and there was at a place called Duisburgh, a free city, being under the Duke of Cleveland." (Wordsworth's Eccles. Biogr. iii. 305, Edit. 1839; or Strype's Memorials, Mary, ch. 24.)

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 598, line 11 from the bottom

The Latin Edition of the "Acts" supplies a notice of a portion of this family, under the head of remarkable "deliverances," which does not appear to have been repeated in the English editions:-
"Possem præterea commemorare, quibus Papistarum inter se discors sententia liberationem in magno periculo attulerit. Quod duabus piis matronis Ipsvichianis Ingforbii mercatoris uxori, et Martini, accidisse videtur. Quæ cum officii ac pietatis gratia Robertum Samuelem, de quo jam dictum est, in carcere Ipsvichiano captivum invisissent, domum forte reversæ noctu in duos incidebant custodes Papistas; qui etsi inscii non essent occulti ipsarum itineris, tamen cum judiciis inter se et sententiis vix satis inter se congruerent, quid ipsis esset faciendum - alter enim retinendas illas atque examinandas censuit: alter vero non item existimabat - illis in hunc modum varia fluctuantibus discordia, ipsæ interim e manibus elapsæ custodum suam utraque domum incolumis reversa est. Quæ quum non multo post iterum conquisitæ ad doctrinæ suæ disquisitionem petebantur, in ædibus Ingforbianis sese per superiora tecti cubicula occultantes, gravi evitato discrimine (ut duobus verbis totum rei exitum perstringam) xxx" (Rerum in Ecclesia gestarum Commentarii, auct. J. Foxo, p. 636. Basil. 1559.)

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 267, line 34

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'order to 'gear' in the text.} "Ibi cum Præpositum et cæteros sese quantum possent cernerent ornantes eo modo quo ab illis antea diximus fuisse præscriptum, superveniunt, cum adhuc illi loco non movissent" (fol. 126). On the authority of the foregoing, Foxe's text has been improved.

1583 Edition, page 1983[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 269, fn 1

"In especially." Ed. 1563, p. 1541. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1983[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 269, line 28

It might be translated into modern English by "a pretty device."

1583 Edition, page 1983[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 269, line 29

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'to suborne the Vniuersitie' to 'to suborn this man' and 'if they had not done so, the other' to 'if he had not done so, they' in the text.} The editions after 1563 read, "to suborn the University," and "if they had not done so, the other," &c.

1583 Edition, page 1983[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 606, line 5

The ensuing account of Elizabeth's apprehension and imprisonment in the Tower is not quite accurate: Foxe, however, himself supplies what is defective in other places of his work. The following are the outlines of what occurred:-
Wyat rose January 25th, 1554: next day Mary wrote to Elizabeth to come to court for her own safety's sake. Elizabeth sent word she was most desirous to come, but begged three or four days' indulgence on account of illness. Her gentlemen afterwards wrote to state her illness and exculpate themselves. (See both Letters in Strype's Memorials, Mary). Wyat removed towards London January 31st, on which Mary went to Guildhall in much excitement, and addressed the citizens, February 1st; after which she left Lord High Admiral Howard and the Lord Treasurer to aid the mayor in resisting Wyat. She then sent commissioners to fetch Elizabeth, no doubt partly at the suggestion of Gardiner, who was with her at Guildhall: who stated it was "the Queen's pleasure that she should be in London the seventh day of that present month." Foxe, however, is wrong in stating here, that these commissioners fetched Elizabeth away the next morning; for he elsewhere states that another commission was sent, viz. Lord Howard, and Sir Edward Hastings, on Saturday, February 11th, who relate their arrival at Ashridge in a letter to Mary of that day, enclosing a plan of their intended journey to town the following week. Foxe on the next page gives a plan closely resembling that. Under this arrangement Elizabeth would have arrived in town on Friday, February 16th, when (according to Foxe, she was shut up in privacy for a "fortnight, till Palm-Sunday," which fell on March 18th, i. e. thirty days after her arrival. The truth is, that plan evidently was not adhered to, in consequence of Elizabeth's illness; and she did not reach town till Thursday, February 22d. (Carte, Cotton MSS. F. 5, and Noaille's Letter to the French king, dated the following Saturday.) Three weeks (not "a fortnight," as Foxe says) from this time, or on Friday, March 16th, Gardiner paid his visit; and on Palm-Sunday, March 18th, she went to the Tower. (Cottom MSS. Vitell. F. 5)

1583 Edition, page 2115[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 607, line 10

D. Cox, in a metrical paraphrase of the Lord's Prayer in Farr's "Select Poetry," p. 504, has-
"Forgive us our offences all
Relieve our careful conscience."

1583 Edition, page 2115[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 607, line 26

{Cattley/Pratt omits 'which was till Palme sonday' from the text.} All the Editions after that of 1563 add, "which was till Palm-Sunday," which clause is here omitted; for though it may have been literally true that Elizabeth was only a fortnight without seeing "lord nor friend," yet it appears to have been three weeks before Gardiner visited her on Friday before Palm-Sunday.

1583 Edition, page 2115[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 607, fn 1

St. Lo, or St. Leo, the captain of the guard. - ED. Appendix: The imprisonment of Sir W. Sentlow on Saturday, February 24th, is mentioned supra ... It corroborates the opinion that Elizabeth arrived in town on Thursday, February 22d.

1583 Edition, page 2115[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 608, middle

"Being Palme-Sonday Even, ii certain Lords of the councell (whose names here also we do omitte"): Edit. 1563, p. 1712. And for "better and more comfortable," five lines lower, we there read "more joyouse and better."

1583 Edition, page 2116[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 610, line 12

Two alphabets: see Halliwell's Dict. of Archaic Words.

1583 Edition, page 2116[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 611, line 2

The first Edition omits "very" before "strange."

1583 Edition, page 2117[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 613, fn 1

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'four' to 'iii' in the text.} The Editions after the first say "four." - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2117[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 613, fn 2

Rather "Bedlingfield;" see Nichols, in his "Progresses of Queen Elizabeth." - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 613, fn 3

"Art the withdrawer and mollifier." Edit. 1563, p. 1713.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 1

"Such a kind of company." Ed. 1563.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 7

This {'She being desirous to know what he meant'} is thus expressed in Ed. 1563: "Whereat she being more greedy, as farre as she durste."

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 614, fn 1

Trinity Sunday, in 1554, fell on May 20th. Appendix:The Edition of 1563, p. 1713, says, "In conclusion, the xvi day of May she was removed from the Tower," &c.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 16

{Cattley/Pratt has 'wafting' instead of 'wayting'. Earlier editions have 'wafting'.} To "waft" is to float (Todd's Johnson) or hover. Hollingshed here uses the term "waiting." May that be a misprint for "waithing," explained in Jamieson's Scottish Dictionary by "wandering, roaming"? Or may "wafting" be a misprint for "waffing," of which the same work gives the meaning "to wave;" and of "waffie" "a vagabond"? "Waffing" is said in the Glossary to Allan Ramsay's Poems, 1721, to mean "wandering." See Brand's Pop. Antiq. III. 122, Edit. 1841.
The reading, however, of "wafting" in this place seems to be supported by the following passage in Cavendish's Life of Wolsey, vol. i. p. 185; "boats full of men and women of the City of London, waffeting up and down in Thames;" which in Dr. Wordsworth's copy (in Eccles. Biogr. i. 565) is "walking up and doune."

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 614, fn 2

Hollinshead says that, at this time, he was sir John Williams. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 22

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'lodged' to 'laid' in the text.} All the Editions but the first read "lodged" for "laid."

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 19 from the bottom

The first Edition says, "he staieing asyde."

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 3 from the bottom

The first Edition reads "doubtful."

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 615, line 5

The Queen had these words requoted before her with additional illustration in after-life: see Walton's Life of Hooker, with Keble's note, Edit. Oxf. 1841, p. 35.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 615, fn 1

Namely, at Winge, in Buckinghamshire. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 615, fn 2

At Ricot, in Oxfordshire. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 615, lines 16 and 13 from the bottom

A term in gambling, the same as the revy. Florio, p. 442. Halliwell's Dict. of Archaic Words, p. 320. To revie is to bet again.

1583 Edition, page 2118[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 617, fn 1

"For in the ende she told him plainly they would forsake him." Ed. 1563, p. 1714.

1583 Edition, page 2119[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 619, fn 1

Of Gardiner it is reported, that in his often discoursing about punishing heretics (as he called them), he would say, "We strip the leaves and lop the bows; but unless we strike at the root, that hope of heretics (meaning the lady Elizabeth), we do nothing." See "The History of the Life, Bloody Reign, and Death of Queen Mary." Lond. 1682. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2120[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 619, fn 2

This was to the lord of Tame's house. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2120[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 620, fn 1

At Winge in Buckinghamshire. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2120[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 621, fn 1

Blomefield, in his "History of Norfolk," vol. iii. p. 481, imagines that Foxe had painted sir Henry Bedingfield's conduct too strongly, because Elizabeth afterwards visited him at Oxburgh in 1578. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2121[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 622, fn 2

Laurence Sheriff was the founder of Rugby school. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2121[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 626, fn 1

2 Kings xxi.

1583 Edition, page 2122[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 627, line 1

In some lines appended to Banner's Homilies, 4to. 1555, the excessive rains are alluded to:-
MAN.
"These stormye showres and ragyng floodes
That dayly us molest -
Alass ye heavens, what may this meane,
Is nature now opprest?
THE AYRE
"Thou man thy case, thy wycked state,
Why wylte thou not lamente;
And spedely God's grace receive
And duly doo repent?
Thy sinnes so greate, and eyes so drye
They wofull ruyne nighe,
For the our stremes doune cause to poure,
Thys plague doth cause us sighe.
Al creatures eke with us now mourne
Thy recheles stuborne harte.
Alas wepe thou, that we may cease,
And thus ease thou thy smarte."

1583 Edition, page 2122[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 629, line 13

The first Edition, p. 1704, proceeds:- "But especiallye is to be noted the terrible stroke of God's hand upon a priest of the same country in Carmerthen, called Sir Richarde, sometyme a Frier. Who, a litle after the martirdome of the said bishop Ferrar, standynge uppon the toppe of a stayre in one master Downes house, dwelling in the said towne of Carmerthen, jestinge at the deathe of maister Ferrar, fel downe soddainly and brake his necke."

1583 Edition, page 2123[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 629, fn 1

"Thorneden or Thornton (for he is writ both ways)," etc. Strype's Memorials under Queen Mary, chap. xv. - ED.

1583 Edition, page 2123[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 631, line 9

Or Golfe. "A rick of corn in the straw laid up in a barn is called in Norfolk, according to Forby, a goaf; every division of the barn being termed a goaf-stede:to goave signifies to stow corn therein. Palsgrave gives 'goulfe of corne, so moche as may lye bytwene two postes, otherwyse a baye.'" Promptorium Parvulorum, Edit. by Way, p. 202, and note.

1583 Edition, page 2124[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 633, line 9 from the bottom

The first Edition, p. 1705, continues:- "At the time of his martirdom, when the sheriffe came to have him awaye, he, to make him selfe the redier to that heavenly journey, did untye his hose, and other his apparell, ere that he went out of the prison, Wherupon as the serife did lead," &c.

1583 Edition, page 2125[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 638, bottom

Foxe has not hitherto mentioned William Maldon at all; but he evidently had intended introducing an account, drawn up by Maldon himself, of his treatment by his own father in the time of Henry VIII. for the Gospel's sake.

1583 Edition, page 2126[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 642, middle

The site of a royal abbey, occupying the northern part of the Island of Oseney, founded in 1279 by Edmund, Earl of Cornwall. Ingram's Memorials of Oxford, vol. iii. p. 11.

1583 Edition, page 2128[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 645, line 16

See Sir Thomas More's Dialogue on Tribulation, II. 5.
"His horse, as he had caught his master's mood,
Snorting, and starting into sudden rage,
Unbidden, and not now to be controll'd,
Rushed to the cliff, and, having reached it, stood!
At once the shock unseated him; he flew
Sheer o'er the craggy barrier," &c.
Cowper's Task, bk. vi.

1583 Edition, page 2129[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page, 269, line 17 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt omits 'thus' from the text}. The editions after 1563 needlessly say, "Thus the vice-chancellor," &c.

1583 Edition, page 1983[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 269, line 13 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt inserts 'and' into the text at this point.} "And" is put in before "for taking up," agreeably to the Latin, and to complete the sentence.

1583 Edition, page 1983[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 270, fn 1

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'better' to 'more' and 'disallowed it' to 'allowed it' in the text.} All the editions after 1563 read "the better part," and the next line "disallowed it:" the Latin (fol. 129) has "comprobatum."

1583 Edition, page 1984[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 270, fn 2

"Greesings," i. e. the stairs, from "gressus." - ED.

1583 Edition, page 1984[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 272, line 29

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'for settyng to the seale' to 'for setting to of the seal agayne'.} "Ad denuo obsignandam."

1583 Edition, page 1984[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 647, line 1

The name of John Tayler, alias Barker, occurs soon after the foundation of the bishopric of Gloucester, and under August 31st, 1569. (See Rudder's Hist. of Gloucestershire.)

1583 Edition, page 2129[Back to Top]
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 647, line 9

William Jennings was appointed first Dean of Gloucester by the charter of foundation, September 3rd, 1541, and died November 4th, 1565. (See Rudder's Hist. of Gloucestershire.)

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 647, line 10 from the bottom

There seems to be some mistake here. Hofmeister, who was a monk of the Augustinian order, attended the second Conference at Ratisbon in 1546, and spoke on the 20th of February. See Actorum Colloquii Ratisbonensis ult. narratio; Lovanii, 1547; and Sleidan, tom. ii. 416, Edit. 1786.
He died in fact at Gunzburg, in 1547, in his thirty-eight year, having according to Romish authority, been poisoned by the heretics! - "Astu et dolo hæreticorum creditur interiisse. Sic enim Seripandus ... in suo diario notavit: Mortuus igitur est Hoffmaisterus, ut credebatur hæreticorum extinctus veneno." Ossingeri Biblioth. Augustiniana (Ingoldst. 1768), p. 448.
The sentiments of Hoffmeister were on some points, however, of so liberal a caste, that his own so-called Catholic brethren might be inclined to get rid of him in some noiseless way. See Rivet's Grotianæ Discussionis Dialysis, sect. 1, ¶ 20; sect. 5, ¶ 11. See also Wolfii Lectiones Memorabiles, tom. ii. 516-17, Edit. 1672, which, in some measure, supports Foxe's representation.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 647, bottom

This account of Dr. Williams's death was furnished to Foxe by the before-mentioned John Loude, who states that he had it from Dean Jennings himself.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 650, fn 1

See Pantaleon, "Rerum in Eccles. gestarum," lib. vii. p. 218, Basileæ, 1563. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 650, fn 2

The title more at length is, "Locorum Communium Collectanea, a Joh. Manlio, pleraque ex lectionibus Ph. Melancthonis excerpta;" in three or four parts: 8vo. Basil. 1563. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 650, middle

Foxe here reads "Clarilocus" in the text, and "Charilocus" {1576 edition} in the margin: "Clarilocus" is the right reading.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 651, middle

The champion's Enchiridion was regarded as a most potent weapon by the anti-Catholics of Reformation times. Bale, under the name of Harryson, writes:-
"The Enchyridion of Eckius that impudent proctour of Antichrist offendeth yow nothynge at all:" [he is alluding to some of Bonner's literary prohibitions] "Everye where ys thys boke sought and enquyred for in cyte, markett and feyer. Everye ser Johan must have yt that can rede, to make hym therwith a Christen curate, a good ghostlye father, and a catholyck member of holye churche. Verye few Popyshe Prestes within my lordes dyocese are at thys same houre without yt, eyther in ther chambers, sleves or bosoms [The Edit. Antverpiæ, 1547, is a neat pocket volume]. For yt ys a most precyouse treasure to hym that wyll heare confessyons and kepe a cure well to Antichristes behove. That embrase the gentyll menne of the Popes lyverye and marke, that culle they, that kysse they, that drawe they to them as a worke of most holye wholsom catholyck doctrine. No lesse myght Harrye Pepwell in Paules churche yearde have out of Michael Hillenius' howse, in Anwerpe, at one tyme than a whole complete prynte ["Prynte," used thrice in this extreact for "edition" or "impression," illustrates Cranmer's meaning] at the holye request of Stokyslaye [Panzer, Annall. Typogr. vii. 252]. In a short space were they dyspached, and a newe prynte in hande, soche tyme as he also commaunded Barlowes dyaloges ["A dialogue describing the original ground of these Lutheran faccions," &c. supposed to be reprinted by Cawood in 1553. See Wood's Athenæ Oxon. i. 365; Dibdin's Ames, iv. 389] to be preached of the curates through out all hys dyocese. I know yt the better, for that he at the same tyme suspended me from preachynge in Estsexe, bycause I wold not leave the gospell and be sworne to the observacyon of hys injunccyons. I have knowne in my tyme more than vi dyverse pryntes of thys erronyouse and devylyshe boke, whych ys a manyfest token that the utteraunce therof hath not bene small." (Yet a course at the Romyshe Foxe, Zurick, 1543, fol. 54, 55.)

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Cattley/Pratt, 651, fn 3

Ex "Appendice Hist. Joan. Carionis; fol. 250;" rather the reverse of fol. 249. The Chronicles of John Carion were printed at Paris in 1543. The work from which Foxe quotes was printed in English at Nuremberg by John Funcke: it was dedicated to Edward the Sixth, and a copy of it is in the British Museum. See Gerhardt's Loci Theolog. loc. xxiii. cap. xi. vol. 12, p. 153, Ed. 1769. - ED. Appendix:Dibdin also, in his Typogr. Antiquities, vol. iv. p. 317, mentions "The thre bokes of Cronicles, whyche John carion gathered wyth great diligence of the best authors, &c.; printed (and apparently translated) by Walter Lynne, 4to. Lond. 1550. Carion's Works are purged in the Roman Expurgatory Index, Mr. Gibbings' reprint, Dublin, 1837.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 655, fn 1

"Salmesville," or Salamonis villa, hod. Salmansweyler. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 655, fn 2

Or rather A. D. 1134; see Playfair's Geog. vol. iv. p. 221. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 659, line 8

Commentaires de l'estat de la Religion et Republique soubs les Rois Henry et Francois second, &c.; 8vo. 1565, fol. 6-9: written by Pierre de la Place. Pierre de la Place was a native of Angouleme, and President of the Court of Aids at Paris. His history commences in 1556, and ends in 1561 with the Conference at Poissy, of which it gives an excellent journal. For a zealous Calvinist the author has written with much moderation, and as a faithful historian. Many original pieces are to be found in his work, which he introduces with skill. He was killed in the massacre of St. Bartholomew. See "Biblioth. Hist." a J. G. Meuselio, vol. vii. pt. ii. p. 227.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 661, fn 1

{Cattley/Pratt alters '1561' to '1560' in the text.} See Henault, "Chron. de l'Hist. de France;" vol. ii. p. 581. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 661, line 9

See Thuani Hist. lib. xxiv. ¶ 24: and "Rerum in Gallia ob religionem gestarum libri tres," 1570. Serranus, or Jen de Serres, is supposed to have been the author of these Commentaries, five parts of which were published, and enlarged Editons, from 1570 to 1590. It tells much for its credibility that Thuanus has made such ample use of the work, and not less so that it should have found a place in the Roman "Index lib. Prohib.," Freytag's "Apparatus Liter." tom. iii. p. 250, and the "Biblioth. Historique de la France," Edit. 1719, p. 408.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 661, fn 2

Admiral Chatillon, one of the leaders of the Huguenots, murdered at the massacre of St. Bartholomew at Paris, in 1572. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 661, bottom

They will be found in the "Rerum in Gallia ob religionem gestarum libri tres," 1570, p. 69. With respect to Charles V, it may be well to consult M'Crie's "History of the Reformation in Spain" (Edinburgh, 1829), p. 246; and to compare Sandoval's account, which was translated and printed separately. See "Hist. captiv. Francisci I., necnon vitæ Caroli V. in Monasterio" (Mediolani, 1715) by Adam Ebert, or in the Spanish original lib. 33, ¶ 9.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 662, line 15

"D'un coup de pistolet" are the words of De la Place (p. 30), which may explain "dag."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 662, line 22

"Ce prêtre perfide et sanguinaire s'etoit déclaré Luthérien dans une entreuve avec le Duc de Wurtemburg à Saverne, afin de ne pas aigrir les Protestants d'Allemagne, et de pouvoir continuer sans obstacle à faire assassiner et massacrer les Calvinistes de France." See Varillas Histoire de Charles IX., tom. i. 122; Cologne, 1684: De Potter's "Lettres de Saint Pie," Bruxelles, 1827, p. ii: and Smedley's Hist. of Reform. in France, ii. 36, 37.
"D'abord il (Card. Lorraine) s'insinua par de basses complaisances dans les bonnes graces de Diane de Poitiers, maitresse de Henri II., qui disposoit de ce Monarque et par lui du Royaume ... Il fut premier qui fit de la Bastile l'instrument ordinaire des vengeances ministérielles ... Il inventa les lettres de cachet ... Il regardoit l'Inquisition comme l'instrument le plus sû de ses vengeances secretes, et il fit tous ses efforts pour introduire en France -
'ce sanglant Tribunal,
Ce monument affreux du pouvoir monacal.'"
Du Massacre de la St. Barthelemi, Discours Historique par Gabr. Brizard; pt. ii. pp. 14-16.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 662, fn 1

Oct. 15th, 1562. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 662, fn 2

Anne de Montmorenci; Nov. 10th, 1567. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 662, fn 3

Jacques d'Albon; in 1562. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 667, line 12

Peter Chastellain, Bishop of Macon.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 668, fn 1

Johannes Bugenhagius. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 668, line 30

Brother to Antony, King of Navarre: see "Laval's Hist. of Ref. in France," book ii. ¶ 5.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 669, line 6

These lines form a portion of a hymn used "in Communi plurimorum Martyrum," and beginning,
"Sanctorum meritis inclyta gaudia."
It appears in the "Expositio hymnorum totius anni secundum usum Sarum," Paris, 1502. fol. xxxix.; in the Salisbury Breviary, Edit. 1535, fol. lxx.; and in Daniel's Thesaurus Hymnologicus, tom. i. p. 203. The reading of "nec" for "non," in the second line, is supported by the two former.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 671, bottom

The following praye of our author, which here follows in Edition 1570, is omitted in all subsequent Editions:- "Almighty God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, of his gracious mercy and for the reverence of his Sonne, either convert the hartes of these bloudy enemyes, or cut short their power, and disapoynt their devises, or els so shorten the perilous dayes of this kingdome of Sathan, that the peaceable kingdome of Christ may be set up for ever by the speedy comyng of hym, Qui venturus est in nubibus cœli. Veni cito, Domine Jesu. Amen."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 672, line 11 from the bottom

The same is stated {earlier in the text}. Machyn chronicles it as two days after: "The xix day of November ded betwyn v and vi in the morning my Lord Cardenall Polle at Lambeth." (Diary, p. 178.)

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 675, fn 1

"Gnathos," flattering and deceitful men. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 677, fn 1

Queen Mary died on Thursday, the 17th of November; on the day before, her death was hourly expected, - an event which gave peace and hope to the persecuted flock of Christ. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 679, line 16

There is a printed account of this Conference in Lambeth library, which the Editor has collated, and finds to correspond, with the exception of a few verbal differences, to Foxe's large type: the Lambeth account, however, gives none of Foxe's small type, except the list of the disputants, and the three propositions in dispute. The title-page of the Lambeth copy is as follows:-
"The declaracyon of the procedynge of a conference, begon at Westminster the last of March, 1559, concerning certaine articles of religion, and the breaking up of the sayde conference by default and contempt of certayne Byshops, parties of the sayd conference.
(#8258;)
"Imprynted at London by Richarde Jugge and John Cawood prynters to the
Queen's Maiestie.
Cum privilegio Regiæ Maiestatis."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 679, fn 1

The bishop of Carlisle and Dr. Sandys, though probably present, took no part in the conference. See Strype on this question. Annals, vol. i. chap. v. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 679, line 2 from the bottom

The Lambeth copy reads "Aylmer."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 680, last line but one

For "proposition," which the Lambeth copy reads, Foxe's text reads corruptly "probation."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 681, line 23

The Lambeth coppy has not the words, "and afterwards Bishop of Winchester."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 683, line 16 from the bottom

Whose words more accurately given are: "Quare non opus est locutione cum oramus, id est, sonantibus verbis ... non ut Deus, sed ut homines audiant," &c. (tom. i. col. 542, Edit. Bened.)

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 683, fn 3

[See his Works; Paris, 1532, vol. iii. fol. 2, col. 1. - ED.]

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 684, line 21

In Renaudot's Liturg. Orient. Collect. tom. i. 64; Biblioth. Patr. iv. col. 39, Edit. Paris, 1576.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 684, line 30

{Cattley/Pratt alters the text from 'in all Churches, be vniforme, and agreeable' to 'accord and harmonize with those of all the churches of God'.} These words are a more correct exhibition of the original, than Foxe's "in all churches be uniform and agreeable."

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Some remarks upon Ormanet and Dr. Cole occur in the latter part of the "Historia vera" (p. 198): "Fuit in Ormaneto nihil notabile præter arrogantiam intolerabilem, quâ re tam mirifice excellebat, ut ne fingi quidem aut cogitari quicquam posset arrogantius. Fuit Colus eruditione ad suam opinionem eximiâ, ad aliorum vero mediocri; naturâ tam insigniter morosâ, ut nihil mirum, si nec sacra Biblia quæ combusserat, nec Christi fautores quos infestaverat, ei placere potuerint. Is nihil ægrius ferre potuit, quam ut a quoquam vel ipse Cicero, vel Plato legeretur. Hoc cur fecerit planè nescimus, nisi ideo fortassis, quòd ingenioso illo suo paradoxo (inscitiam et ignorantiam rerum veræ pietatis et religionis matrem esse) nimiù delectaretur." - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 278, line 17 from the bottom

"By" seems idiomatic: the Latin has "ex authoribus," as concerns the authors.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 684, line 38

Foxe's text improperly inserts "over" after "passing."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 684, fn 3

See his Works, vil. ii. fol. 210. Basil. 1516. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 685, line 8

Foxe's text is improved here, and in the next paragraph, from the original Latin of Ambrose.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 685, line 17 from the bottom

Foxe's text is again somewhat revised from Jerome's Latin.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 685, line 11 from the bottom

But this quotation, it should be observed, is made from the larger genuine commentary upon this Epistle: the two former being taken from the short comment upon the Thirteen Epistles of Paul, which all agree was not of Jerome's writing. See Rivet's Crit. Sac. lib. iv. 5; Oudin. De Scripp. Eccles. i. 845; Labbe in Bellarmin. de Scripp. Eccles. p. 110, Edit. Venet. 1728.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 685, line 3 from the bottom

In the second however; tom. vi. p. 133, edit. 1616.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 686, fn 2

[See Chrysost. inEpist. ad Cor. 2. Hom. 18. ¶ 3. - ED.]

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 686, fn 6

See "Novellæ Constitutiones;" Constit. 123, p. 409. 4to. Basil. 1561. - ED. Appendix:It is to be observed that there is much discrepancy between the different copies of this Constitution, in the original as well as in the Latin translation. In the Edition by H. Scrimger (1558) a whole page is left out, containing, amongst other matters, the passage to which Jewel refers, and which is found in the Greek Edition of Haloander. (Note on Jewel's Replie to Harding, Art. iii.; Works, Edit. Oxf. 1848, vol. ii. 43.) See also Taylor's "Dissuasive from Popery," part. i. ch. i. ¶ 7, which informs us that "this law was rased out of the Latin versions of Justinian. The fraud and design was too palpable: but it prevailed nothing, for it is acknowledged by Cassander and Bellarmine, and is in the Greek copies of Haloander (De Missa, l. 2, c. 13, sect. ad Novellam)." In modern Editions of the Civil Law this paragraph is transferred to Novell. 137, ¶ 6.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 688, line 6

The whole of the ensuing matter to the words "utterly refused that to do," is thus summed up in the Lambeth copy, which afterwards goes on to the end of that parapgraph, and concludes with the word "contempt":-
"And therfore upon Mondaye, the lyke assemblye began agayne at the place and hower appoynted, and ther upon what sinister or dysordered meaninge is not yet fullye knowen (though in some part it be understanded) the bishop of Winchester and his Collegees, and especially Lyncolne, refused to exhibite or reade, accordynge to the former notorious order on Friday, that which they had prepared for the second assertion. And therupon by the lord keper of the great seale they being first gently and favourable required to kepe th'order appointed, and that takinge no place, beinge secondly as it behoved pressed with more earnest requeste; they neyther regardyng the aucthoritye of that place, nor their owne reputacyon, nor the credite of the cause, utterly refused that to do."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 688, middle

See Bishop Jewel's Works, i. 52, 60, Edit. Parker Soc.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 693, line 5

The Lambeth copy reads "stand;" and two lines lower "order to be taken."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 694, fn 2

Dr. Heath, formerly archbishop of York. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 694, fn 3

To this list might be added, Turberville, Watson, Bourne, and Poole. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 698, fn 1

Brixton Causeway. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 698, fn 2

"Waynesworth," Wandsworth. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 700, fn 1

See Strype's Mem. under Mary, vol. iii. part 1, chap. xi. The sermon was preached on the 9th of May, upon "I am the good Shepherd." - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 700, line 12 from the bottom

Mr. Douce thinks (MS. note on copy now in the Bodleian) that Lady Jane must, from her reply, have read the following "narration" in the Liber Festivalis, fol. xliii. (misprinted xlvii.) recto, Edit. Paris, 1495:-
"We rede in saynt Gregorys tyme. There was a woman that hight laciva and se made brede [the "singing cake" of Foxe] for the Pope and other preestys to synge with: and for to housell with the peple. Also whan the Pope come to this woman to yeve her housel: and sayd take here Goddis body: thenne this woman smyled and laughed. Thenne the Pope wytdrew his honde; and layd the ostye upon the aultar: and torned to this woman Lacyva and sayd to her, why smylest thou whan thou shouldest receyve Crystis body:and she sayd why calleste thou that Cristis body that I made with my one handis. Thenne was Gregory the Pope sory for her mysbeleve and bad all the peple pray to God to shewe some miracle for this womans helpe: and whan they had prayed long, Gregory wente to the aulter agen, and founde thosty [the host] torned in to red flesche and blood bledynge; and he sheweth it to this woman," &c.
Lady Jane, however, happily did not follow up the story, nor attend to the object here proposed in this scene: "And therfore lete us do all the worship that we may to the sacrament that we can or maye, and be in noo mysbyleve."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 701, middle

This is doubtful. (See the Addenda to Ridley's Works, p. 543, Parker Soc.; and Jewel's Reply to Harding, Art. iii. div. 26.) A reviewer in the British Critic for April, 1843, declares that this is the same as the treatise which Collier gives some account of, as to be found in C. C. C. Cambridge; and states that it is there prefaced with a dedication to Queen Elizabeth, and that instead of "father" the C. C. C. MS. reads "brother." Moreover, the reviewer argues that Edward VI. never threatened to "strain the bishops" in the direction of images.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 702, fn 1

Deut. iv. 25-27.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 702, fn 4

Wisd. xiv. 11-14.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 702, middle

These words, excepting "worthy," will not be found represented in either the Douay, or the present authorised version of the English Bible. They are absent from the Greek, and also from the better Latin MSS. "Decem e nostris MSS. et quidem emendata pleraque prætermittunt, Græcis codicibus consentance, substantivum verbum sunt; leguntque hoc ordine, Digni qui spem in talibus hab. Lobiense addit sunt, sed alio loco: Sunt digni qui in talibus spem habent. Reliqua nostra exemplaria et sunt adjiciunt et morte: Digni sunt morte qui, &c. expositoribus Lyrano, Holcotio, Carensi, et Richelio, conformiter. At utrumque dubio procul superfluit. Mirum est Glossematicos illos, de iis, quos sequendos sibi proponerent, codicibus, non magis fuisse sollicitos." Lucæ Brugensis "Notationes in Sacra Biblia," Antv. 1580, p. 224. The text as quoted in Foxe is that of Coverdale's Bible, &c.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 704, line 9

"Tertulliani Apologeticum doctissimis commentariis illustrasse refert Nigrius (Hist. Scripp. Florent.) quæ in lucem prodiere cum Tertulliano ipso Basileæ, 1550. Insuper Jo. Alb. Fabricius Biblioth. Latin. ii. 271, elegantem Tertulliani Edit. recenset Parisiis apud A. Wechelium, 1566, duobus voll., quæ integras B. Rhenani notas singulis libris præmissas exhibet, et Apologetico adjunctum Francisci Zephyri Florentini commentarium, sive paraphrasim antea non editam." - Bandini's "Juntarum Tyhpogr. Annales," pars i. pp. 141, 142. The quotations on this page from Augustine are made rather loosely.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 705, fn 3

He was a Florentine of the name of Ricci, or, as he denominated himself according to the custom of the times, P. Crinitus. "Scripsit libros de Poetis Lat., qui unâ cum opere ejus 'De honestâ disciplinâ' excudi solet. Basil. 1532. Paris. 1520." See "Supplementum ad Vossium," Hamb. 1709, p. 768. He did not excel as a writer in the judgment of Vossius, "De Hist. Lat." p. 673, edit. 1651. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 706, fn 2

This occurred in 726; the reflections of the Latin chroniclers upon the circumstance are given in "Goldasti Imperialia Decret. de Cultu Imag." Francorf. 1608, p. 17. See also Mosheim, cent. xviii., part 2. ch. 3, ¶ 10. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 706, fn 3

A. D. 754; the arguments and Decrees of the council are included in what was intended for a refutation. "The Acts of the Second Nicene Council in 787;" but the express words, cited by Ridley as a decree, do not appear, though the substance doubtless may. See Labbe, tom. vii. col. 396, 513-529. As the existing accounts of the Nicene council are supposed to have been corrupted, the decrees of the council assembled by Constantine may also have similarly suffered. See "Dallæi de Imaginibus;" Lug. Bat. 1642, p. 419. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 706, middle

This must be looked for in Paulus Diaconus (lib. xxiii. p. 333), appended to such Editions of Eutropius as that noticed in vol. i. p. 221, note; and other collections. From the great similarity of quotation and argument adopted by the writer of this treatise, and in the second part of the Homily "Against Peril of Idolatry," they would seem to be the work of the same individual. See Hom. Edit. Oxf. 1840, pp. 170, 186, 198.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 708, line 12

Foxe's accuracy in stating that Ridley once went to mass in the Tower, seems to be very questionable. Ridley meant not to allude to any such thing in his conference with Latimer, but to his former practice in his unenlightened state. See the passage in the second Conference, and Second Objection of Antonian, supra, vol. vii. p. 411. Ridley denies that he ever allowed the mass with his presence, vol. vii. pp. 424, 434. In fact Foxe has confounded this with the case of Bishop Ferrar.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 79, fn 2

The introductory sentences throughout are abridged by Foxe; but the following is too characteristic to be so dismissed. "Tom pontifex degradator efficaciter, et ex corde, omni instantiâ, pro miserrimo ilo derelicto intercedit apud judicem sæcularem, ut citra mortis periculum vel mutilationis contra degradatum sententiam moderetur, dicens: 'Domine judex,'" etc. Pontificali. Ven. 1520, p. 203. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, fn 1

A fuller title of Gardiner's book is, "A Detection of the Devil's Sophistrie, wherewith he robbeth the unlearned people of the true byleef, in the most blessed Sacrament of the Aulter;" printed in Aldersgate-strete by John Hereforde, 1546. (Herbert's Typogr. Antiq. by Dibdin, vol iii. p. 557.) The passage from Hilary may be seen, and the discussion upon it, in "The Remains of Th. Cranmer;" edited by Jenkyns, (Oxford, 1833) vol. iii. pp. 249-253. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 709, line 17

This is a remarkable instance of that used plurally; as it is also in, "that sorrowes is not fourmed with grace." (The Festyvall, fol. clxxxii. Ed. 1528.)

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 713

Sir Thomas More has furnished some particulars about Hitton, which, as such notices are not over abundant, we may ... here introduce:-
"Thus rejoiced Tyndale in the death of Hytton, of whose burning he boasteth in his answer to my dialogue [in Tyndale's Practice of Prelates: Works, vol. i. p. 485, edit. 1831], where he writeth thereof, that where I said that I had never founden nor heard of any of them, but that he would forswear to save his life, I had heard he saith of Sir Thomas Hytton whom the Bishops of Rochester and Canterbury slew at Maydstone. Of this man they so highly rejoice, that they have as I said, sett his name in the Kalendar before a book of their English prayers, by the name of St. Thomas the Martyr, in the vigil of the blessed Apostle St. Mathew the xxiii day of February, and have put out for him the holy doctor and glorious martyr St. Polycarpus, the blessed Bp. and the disciple of St. John the Evangelist; for that was his day indeed, and so it is in some calendars marked. Now to the entent that ye may somewhat see what good Christen faith Sir Thomas Hytton was of, this new saint of Tyndale's canonysazion, in whose burning Tyndale so gaily glorieth, and which hath his holy day so now appointed to him, that St. Polycarpus must give him place in the Kalendar; I shall somewhat show you what wholesome heresies this holy martyr held.
"First ye shall understand that he was a Priest, and falling to Luther's sect, and after that to the sect of Friar Huskyn and Zuynglius, cast off matins and Mass, and all divine service, and so became an Apostle sent to and fro between our English heretics beyond the see, and such as were here at home.
"Now happed it so that after he had visited here his holy congregations in divers corners, and luskes [perhaps dirty or blind, unfrequented from lusciosus. See however Todd's Johnson and Richardson's Dict. The Host asking the Chanon's Yeman, in Chaucer, where he dwells, the latter says,- "In the suburbis of a toune (quod he) Lurking in harnis and in lanis blinde." - Prologe 678-9] lanes, and comforted them in the Lord to stand stiff with the devil in their errors and heresies, as he was going back again at Gravesend, God considering the great labour that he had taken already, and determining to bring his business to his well-deserved end, gave him suddenly such a favour and so great a grace in the visage, that every man that beheld him took him for a thief. For whereas there had been certain linen clothes pilfered away that were hanging on an hedge, and Sir Thomas Hytton was walking not far off suspiciously in the meditation of his heresies; the people doubting that the beggarly knave had stolen the clouts, fell in question with him and searched him; and so found they certain letters secreetly conveyed in his coat, written from evangelical brethren here, unto the evangelical heretics beyond the see. And upon those letters founden, he was wyth his letters brought before the most rev. Father in God the Archbp of Canterbury, and afterward as well by his Lordship as by the Reverend Father the Bp of Rochester examined, and after for his abominable heresies delivered to the secular hands and burned. In his examinacion he refused to be sworn to say truth, affirming that neither Bp nor Pope had authority to compell him to swear, which point although it be a false heresy, yet it is likely he refused the oath rather of frowardness than of any respect that he had either in keeping or breaking.
"His father and his mother he wold not be a knowen of what they were; they were some so good folk of likelihood, that he could not abide the glory. He wold not be a knowen that himself was Priest, but said that he had by the space of ix yeres been beyond the see, and there lived by the joiner's craft. Howbeit he said that he had always, as his leisure wold give him leave, and as he could find opportunity, in places where he came, taught the gospel of God after his own minde and his own opinion, not forcing of the determination of the church, and said that he intended to his power so to persevere still." Confutation of Tyndale's answere; prentyd at London by W. Rastell, 1532; Pref. Bb. iii.; or Sir. T. More's Works, London, 1557, p. 344.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 281, middle

See Dr. Lamb's "Collection of Documents," p. 210.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 282, middle

The same as to spere, to ask, inquire, to seek: still in use in the north of England. See Halliwell's Dict. where more, and Dr. Jamieson's "Etymolog. Dict. of Scottish language," under Spere.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 284, line 15 from the bottom

The expense of this purification is recorded in the Registers of Great St. Mary's; from which the following has been extracted, cited in Le Keux's "Memorials of Cambridge":
"1557. For the new hallowyng and reconcyleing of or chyrche, beyng interdycted for the buryall of Mr Bucer, and the charge hereunto belongeyng, frankensense and souch perfumes for the sacrament, and herbes, &c. 8s."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 715, middle

The "Lamentation against the cytye of London, for certayne great vyces used therein," was printed at Nuremberg in 1545. (See Herbert's Typogr. Ant. p. 1558, and Haweis' Sketches of the Reformation, p. 272.) It bore the name of Roderick Mors, and was proscribed.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 718, col. 1, line 6 from the bottom

As this sentence ["had I wist," i. e. had I known] appears from the frequent use of it in old writers to have become almost proverbial, the following notices of its occurrence may not be unacceptable. It is used in a letter from Mr. Cheeke to the Duke of Somerset, temp. Edw. VI. (See Nugæ Antiq. i. 45), where Mr. Park also refers to "Heywood's Dialogue and Epigrams upon English Proverbs:" - "Never trust thou these training toyes ... for feare of had I wist prove a foole." Melbancke's Philotimus, 1583. It is the title and subject of a poem in the first sheet of the "Paradise of Dainty Devices." In a poem entitled "The Way to Thrift" at the end of the "Northern Mother's Blessing," said to be written nine years before the death of Chaucer, and printed for Robert Dexter, 1597, we have -
"And yet beware of Had I wist."
(Brydges' Brit. Bibliog. ii. 555, where more.) It is also used by Latimer {earlier in the text}.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 721, middle

Foxe calls him Julius in the Latin and in 1570; but Jocelinus, in his Letter presenting his "Acts and Monuments" to Magdalen College; and "Julines" and "Julyne" in 1563, and "Julins" in 1576 and all subsequent editions; so that "Julius" would seem to be an error.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 724, fn 2

Rev. vi.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 724, fn 3

Heb. xii.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 725, line 14

This is Michael Trunchfield's wife, mentioned before.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 726

The "Note" of Elizabeth Pepper need not have been printed here, as it will be found inserted in its proper place above. This "Note" is from the Appendix to Edition 1563, p. 1707; but was not reprinted in the Appendix to any subsequent Edition, nor even inserted in its right place, till 1583.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 731, line 3

Alcock is before called "a Shearman."

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 731, fn 1

Hadleigh in Suffolk. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 737, fn 2

Rather Clarencieux, one of the heralds. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 737, fn 3

"Helme-sheaves," haum or stubble. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 738, fn 1

Robert Catlin, made chief justice, anno 1559. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 738, fn 2

Sir James Dyer, knt. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 742, fn 1

See Strype's Annals, III. i. 54-56. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 743, line 4 from the bottom

In a speech delivered on the scaffold, this Romish saint (see Wood's Athenæ, i. col. 388) attempted in some degree to neutralize this charge; and the reason given for his relaxation is no doubt honest. Rome disowns with much readiness schemes, the issue of which she descries from afar is becoming doubtful, and which are not likely to answer.
"To prove," says Dr. Story, "that I was not so cruell as I am reported to be, let this one tale suffice: there were at one time xxviii condempned to the fire, and I moved the Dean of Paules to tender and pity their estate, which after was Abbot of Westminster, a very pitiful minded man, I think the most part of you must know him - it is Mr. Fecknam - and we went up and perswaded with them, and we found them very tractable. And Mr. Fecknam and I laboured to the Lord Cardinal Poole, shewynge that they were nescientes quid fecerunt.
"The Cardinal and we did sue together to the Queen, and laid both swordes together, and so we obteyned pardon for them al, savynge an olde woman that dwelt about Paules churchyard; she would not convert and therefore she was burned. The rest of them received absolution, and that with al reverence; serch the Register and you shall finde it.
"Yea and it was by my procurement that there should be no more burnt in London, for I saw well it would not prevaile." ("A Declaration of the Lyfe and Death of John Story," imprinted at London by Thomas Colwell, 1571, and reprinted in Harleian Miscel. iii. 104.)
The "new torment," to which Foxe subsequently alludes, was "a cage of iron," which Story said, "if I live, I will have made for them (heretiques) with a doer on the side, where they shall be enclosed, and the doer made fast, and the fire to be made under them. And then, said he, they shall know what frying is, and their mouths shall be stopped from blowing out their pestilent doctrines."
This account of Story was drawn up, according to Sanders, a personal friend of the Doctor, by one of the noblemen present at his execution; "ut omnes intelligerent, tantas Joannis Storæi virtutes fuisse atque esse, ut neque post funera ejus ipsorum livor et invidia conquiescat" (De Visibili Monarchia, p. 738.)

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 749, fn 1

See "Lettres de saint Pie V. sur les affaires religieuses en France, par de Potter," Bruxelles 1827. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 749, fn 2

Namely, Henry, and Margaret of Valois. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 749, fn 3

"Vidame," the judge who has charge of a French bishop's temporal jurisdiction. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 750, fn 2

Some of these sufferes will be better known by the names of Pierre de la Ramée; le Chape; and De Lomenie. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 751, fn 2

These were Philip Strozzi and Baron de la Garde. - ED.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 751, middle

"Le quatrieme jour de Decembre, suivant le commandement du Roy, le sieur de Biron accompagné de sept cornettes de cavallerie et de dixhuit enseignes de pietons entra au pays d'Onis pour serrer le Rochellois; et lors commenca la guerre toute ouverte." ("Recueil des choses memorables en France," p. 454, A. Heden, 1603.)

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 751, line 5 from the bottom

The assaults during this memorable siege were nine in all: see the "Recueil", p. 478, and Laval's "Reformation in France," vol. iii. pt. i. page 473.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 753, fn 1

"Paulo post illum tumultum rex Carolus mortuus est." Dinothus, Lib. v. p. 400. De Bello Civili Galllico. Basil. 1582. - ED.

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