Latin/Greek Translations for Book 5
Verses prophesying the coming of Antichrist

Foxe text Latin

Cum fuerint anni ... nascetur daemone plenus.

Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

When twelve hundred and sixty years have been completed since the Blessed Virgin gave birth, then Antichrist will be born filled with the Devil.

1570 Edition, page 515 | 1576 Edition, page 426 | 1583 Edition, page 422[Back to Top]
Citation from Horace, Ars Poetica 1.151

Foxe text Latin

Atque ita mentitur ... discrepet imo.

Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

And he so makes things up, and so mixes falsehoods with truths, that the beginning is not at variance with the middle, nor the middle with the end.

1570 Edition, page 703 | 1576 Edition, page 576 | 1583 Edition, page 597[Back to Top]
The Words of the Commission against Lord Cobham

Foxe text Latin

Rex dilectis et fidelibus ... anno primo Henrici quinti.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

The king to his beloved and faithful subjects William de Roos, Henry le Scrope, William Crowmere, mayor of his city of London, Hugh Huls, John Preston, and John Martin, greeting. Know ye that, whereas we are more fully informed, and it is notoriously and manifestly known, that very many of our subjects commonly called Lollards, and others, have traitorously plotted our death contrary to the debt of their allegiance, and have proposed very many other things to the destruction both of the catholic faith and the estate of the lords and magnates both spiritual and temporal in our realm of England, and have made divers congregations and other illicit conventicles for the fulfilling of their nefarious scheme in this part to the disinheriting of ourselves and the manifest destruction of our realm: we, wishing that Lollards of this sort and the other aforementioned persons be chastised and punished in this part according to their merits, and trusting more fully in your fidelity and circumspection, have assigned you, five, four and three of you, of whom we wish the aforementioned mayor and Hugh, our justiciars, to be two, to make enquiry on oath of good and loyal men of the aforementioned city and the suburbs of the same, and of the county of Middlesex, both within and without the liberties, through whom the truth of the matter will better be able to be known concerning all and singular treacheries and insurrections committed and perpetrated by Lollards of this sort in the city, suburbs and county aforementioned, and also concerning every kind of treachery and insurrection, rebellion and felony, in the city, suburbs and county aforementioned, by whatsoever persons and in whatsoever manner committed and perpetrated, and to the hearing and terminating of those same treacheries, insurrections, rebellions and felonies according to the law and custom of our realm of England. And therefore we command you that to certain persons etc., whom etc., and of whom etc., you have made provision for this purpose, you make diligent enquiry concerning the above matters, and hear and determine all and singular the above matters, intending to act in the aforementioned form, etc., saving etc. For we have commanded our sheriffs of London and Middlesex that to certain persons etc., whom etc., of whom etc., its knowledge, making to come into your presence, of whom etc., all etc. from their bailiwick, both within and without the liberties, through whom etc., and to be enquired into. In the matter whereof etc., with the king as witness at Westminster (b)on the tenth day of January. By the king himself. In the patent roll of the first year of Henry the fifth.

1570 Edition, page 704 | 1576 Edition, page 577 | 1583 Edition, page 598[Back to Top]
The Indictment of the Lord Cobham, Sir Roger Acton, and others, with Notes following upon the same.

Foxe text Latin

Parliamenta coronæ coram domino rege ... inquiratur de terra & catallis suis.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

The parliament of the crown in the presence of the lord king at Westminster in Hilary term, in the first year of the reign of King Henry, the fifth after the Conquest, Roll 7 among the parliaments of the king. Otherwise in the presence of William de Roos, Henry le Scrope, William Crowmere, mayor of the city of London, Hugh Huls and associate justiciars of the lord king, for the enquiring on oath of good and lawful men of the lord king's city of London and the suburbs of the same and of the county of Middlesex both within and without the liberties concerning all and singular treasons and insurrections, rebellions and felonies committed and perpetrated in the aforementioned city, suburbs and county, by very many subjects of the lord king commonly called Lollards, and others in the aforementioned city, suburbs and county, and also concerning all treasons and insurrections, rebellions and felonies committed and perpetrated in the aforementioned city, suburbs and county by whomsoever and in whatsoever way, and to the hearing and determining the same treasons, insurrections, rebellions and felonies according to the law and custom of the realm of the lord king of England, by letters patent of the lord king himself sealed at Westminster (a) on Wednesday next after the Feast of the Epiphany in the first year of the reign of King Henry, the fifth after the Conquest (b), on the oath of twelve sworn men it was presented that John Oldcastle of Couling in the county of Kent and others commonly called Lollards who, contrary to the catholic faith, for long rashly held divers heretical opinions and other manifest errors at variance with catholic law, being able to maintain the aforementioned opinions and errors but by no means to implement them as long as the royal power and both the royal estate of our lord the king and the estate and office of prelatical dignity should persevere in prosperity within the realm of England, falsely and traitorously plotting utterly to destroy both the estate of the realm and the estate and office of the prelates and also the orders of the religious within the aforementioned realm of England, and to kill our lord the king, his brothers, prelates and other magnates of the same realm, and to summon men of religion to abandon their divine worship and religious observances and turn to worldly occupations, and totally to despoil of their relics and other religious goods and utterly raze to the ground both the cathedral churches and other churches and religious houses, (c) and to make John Oldcastle ruler of the same realm and order very many governing posts according to their will within the aforementioned realm (d) as it were a people without a head, to the final destruction both of the catholic faith and clergy and of the estate and majesty of the royal dignity within the same realm, have falsely and traitorously ordained and proposed that when he together with (e) very many unknown rebels of the lord king to the number of twenty thousand men from divers parts of England should arrive in warlike manner (f) they should privily rise up and (g) on the Wednesday next after the Feast of the Epiphany in the aforementioned year of the reign of the aforementioned king in the vill and parish of St Giles without the Bar of the old Temple of London should with one mind gather together there in a certain great field and together stand in opposition for the implementing their nefarious sheme set out in the matter above, on which Wednesday indeed in the aforementioned vill and parish the aforementioned John Oldcastle and others persisting in the traitorous intent of this kind falsely and traitorously proposed and planned the murdering of the aforementioned lord our king, his brothers, namely, Thomas duke of Clarence, John of Lancaster and Humphrey of Lancaster and also the aforementioned prelates and magnates, and also the disinheriting of our lord king himself and his heirs from the aforementioned his realm, and the doing and implementing of all and singular the aforementioned things and very many other evil and intolerable things (i), and there arriving in warlike fashion they rode traitorously contrary to their allegiance in the manner of an insurrection to the aforementioned field to vanquish our lord the aforementioned king, had they not by God's grace been hindered by him with his valiant hand. This indictment indeed the lord king has now for certain causes made to come before him for termination. By which it has been commanded that the sheriff should not omit etc. but that he take the aforementioned John Oldcastle if etc., and saving etc. In such wise that he should present him in person before the king at Westminster on this day, namely, Wednesday next after the octave of St Hilary, this same being the term-day to make reply to the lord king concerning the aforementioned matters etc. On which day and at which place in the presence of the lord king the sheriff returned that the aforementioned John Oldcastle was not found in his bailiwick etc. Because of this it was commanded that the sheriff should have him pursued from county to county until he be outlawed, it not etc. And if etc., he should then take him, and saving etc. In such wise that they should present him in person before the lord king on the octave of St John the Baptist next thereafter following. Wheresoever etc. to make reply to the lord king concerning the treasons and felonies previously charged against him. On which octave of St John the Baptist, in the second year of the reign of King Henry, the fifth after the Conquest, John Sutton and John Michel, sheriffs of Middlesex, in the presence of the lord king returned that in the hundred of Braynford in the county of Middlesex on Thursday next before the Feast of St Barnabas the Apostle, in the second year of King Henry, the fifth after the Conquest. And before the preceding last four sheriffs the aforementioned John Oldcastle was summoned and did not appear. And that before none of the same sheriffs was he outlawed, for which reason let there be enquiry concerning his land and his chattels.

1570 Edition, page 705 | 1576 Edition, page 578 | 1583 Edition, page 599[Back to Top]
Unattributed verse

Foxe text Latin

Et si non aliqua nocuisses, mortuus esses

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

And if you had not done harm in some way you would have died.

1570 Edition, page 712 | 1576 Edition, page 583 | 1583 Edition, page 605[Back to Top]
Greek words

Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

So from my rock

1570 Edition, page 716 | 1576 Edition, page 586 | 1583 Edition, page 608[Back to Top]
The king's statute at Leicester

Foxe text Latin

Quocirca rex indicto ... lingua lectitarent, etc.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

Wherefore the king, appointing a council at Leicester (perhaps because London was not safe on account of Cobham's supporters), proposed an edict threatening those persons whosoever thereafter followed this kind of doctrine with savage punishment, being so severe against them as to decree that they should be accounted not just heretics but rebels also, and accordingly were to suffer a double punishment, by being both hanged and burnt, etc.; and then: To such an extent did he strain all his strength and his thoughts against the Wycliffians. At that time all persons who read God's scriptures in their own tongue were called Wycliffians, etc.

1570 Edition, page 717 | 1576 Edition, page 587 | 1583 Edition, page 608[Back to Top]
The printed statute, second year of Henry IV

Foxe text Latin

Quas quidem petitiones ... concessit, ordinavit, etc.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

These petitions of the prelates and the clergy I give printed above. Our king, with the consent of the magnates and other nobles in his realm who were standing in the present parliament, conceded and in all and singular according to the form and effect of the same ordained and decreed that for the rest it be steadfastly observed [...]

Concerning which novelties and excesses previously rehearsed the aforementioned prelates and clergy and also the commonalty of the aforementioned realm who were standing in the same parliament made supplication to the lord king etc. with the assent of the magnates and other nobles of the same realm etc. conceded and ordained etc.

1570 Edition, page 719 | 1576 Edition, page 589 | 1583 Edition, page 610[Back to Top]
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield