Latin/Greek Translations for Book 6
An epigram on Ulricus Han (Gallus)

Foxe text Latin

Anser Tarpeii custos ... opus esse tuis.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

Because the geese which were guardians of the Tarpeian rock kept watch and made a din with their wings, the Gaul fell. The avenger is at hand. Ulricus Gallus, lest they should be called upon for any service, taught that there was no need of your quills.

1570 Edition, page 858 | 1576 Edition, page 706 | 1583 Edition, page 731[Back to Top]
An epitaph on Pope Sixtus

Foxe text Latin

Non potuit sævum ... pacis obit.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

No force was able to obliterate savage Sixtus. He died finally on hearing the word 'peace'.

1570 Edition, page 882 | 1576 Edition, page 725 | 1583 Edition, page 751[Back to Top]
Another on the same Pope

Foxe text Latin

Sixte jaces tandem ... alea, vina, venus.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

At last you, Sixtus, the discord of our age, are brought low. You raged against the gods above: now set Acheron in motion. At last you are brought low, Sixtus, and your death is bewailed by catamites, harlots, pimps, the dice, the drink, and lust.

1570 Edition, page 882 | 1576 Edition, page 725 | 1583 Edition, page 751[Back to Top]
Another

Foxe text Latin

Gaude prisce Nero ... et vitium.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

Rejoice, ancient Nero, Sixtus surpasses you in wickedness. Enclosed here together are every crime and every vice.

1570 Edition, page 882 | 1576 Edition, page 725 | 1583 Edition, page 751[Back to Top]
Verses by Thomas Hatcher

Foxe text Latin

Mira legis, quicuǹ ... passibus illa venit.

Translation

J. Barrie Hall

You, reader, whoever you are, read wondrous portents of an evil end, with punishments atoned for by the imposing of punishment. You, whoever you are to whom the power of the Lord is known, read what is true, with the severity of anger pressing down on the delinquents. Often it happens that bloodshed is augmented by bloodshed, often it happens that anger is overwhelmed by new punishments. All things are subject to the potent right hand of the Lord, who moves men and brute beasts according to his will. The horned bull by struggling eluded the blows of the slaughterman, broke its halter and on a sudden escaped. It happened that the bull went along the road where a large crowd had previously gathered together to see the limbs of a woman perish in the fire, where a close-packed crowd was moving, but out of so large a crowd it single and alone perished. Single and alone it wretchedly scattered the small sheepfold of God and hurled it into the scorching fires. And, as if moving deliberately, it went past them all; this man it tossed on its horns, that one it trampled with its hooves. That one is brought down, his body befouled with oozing blood, while his dug-out innards lie scattered along the roads. Who would not think that these things are done by the Lord who controls the world with his nod, and not tremble at the recollection? Just vengeance attends terrible storms; though late, she comes with unerring step.

1570 Edition, page 941 | 1576 Edition, page 776 | 1583 Edition, page 800[Back to Top]
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