Glossary of People
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AaronAbbess of DennyAbdias (Obadiah)Abedecalaas and AnaniasAbraham CrichtonAbraham WatersAbundusAcha of DeiraAcha, Philemon, Ireneus, Januarius, Festus, Desiderius, Gregorius, Spoletanus, Agapes, Chionia, Hierenea and TheodoraAchaiusAcindymus, Pegasius, Anempodistus and EpidephorusAdalbero of StyriaAdam Damplip (Damlip) (George Bucker)Adam Damplip [or Damlip]Adam FosterAdam SedberghAdam Wallace (Feane)Adauctus and JanuariusAdda of BerniciaAdoAdomnán (St Adomnán)Adrian IAdrian IIAdrian VIAdriana RogersAdula, Vincentius, Sabina and ChristinaAelius LampridiusAemilianusAesc (Oisc, Osca)AeschylusAethelberht II of KentAethelburhAgapetus IAgapitusAgatha (St Agatha)AgathoAgathoAgathoclesAgathonAgathoniceAgilbertAgilulfAgnes (Joan) SmithAgnes BongeorAgnes ChittendenAgnes CuttingAgnes ForemanAgnes GeorgeAgnes GlascockAgnes GlynAgnes GrebillAgnes HarvieAgnes HatfieldAgnes Howard (née Tilney)Agnes IveAgnes of Rome (St Agnes)Agnes PenicoteAgnes PenifatherAgnes PottenAgnes PrestAgnes ReignoldAgnes RouseAgnes SilversideAgnes SpauldingAgnes StanleyAgnes WardallAgnes Wardall, the elderAgnes WhitelockAgnes WilyAgricolusAgrippa IAgrippinaAgrippina and AugustaAgrippinusAlan CopeAlan MeldrumAlan RyseAlan SimpsonAlban (St Alban)Alban LangdaleAlban LangdaleAlbert Krantz (Cranzius)Albert Pighius (Pighe)Albertus MagnusAlbun HillAlchfrithAlcibiadesAlcuinAldfrith of NorthumbriaAldhelmAldroenus (Aldrwn)Aldwulf of the East AnglesAlexanderAlexanderAlexander Alesius (Allane, Alan)Alexander AndrewAlexander BarclayAlexander BretAlexander BrettAlexander BullAlexander CampbelAlexander CampbellAlexander DeringAlexander FrereAlexander GalowayAlexander HosmanAlexander I (St Alexander)Alexander II (Anselm of Lucca)Alexander III (Orlando Bandinelli)Alexander KalfourAlexander LaneAlexander MarbeckAlexander MylneAlexander NowellAlexander of AlexandriaAlexander of JerusalemAlexander SetonAlexander SymmerwayllAlexander WimshurstAlexander YongAlexander [or Saunder] GouchAlfic of KentAlfonso d'AvalosAlfonso d'EsteAlfonso y CastroAlfred (the Great)AlgerAlhflæd of MerciaAlhredAlice AlexanderAlice BendenAlice BirdAlice BrookAlice BrowneAlice CoberleyAlice CokerAlice DoylyAlice GardinerAlice HallingdaleAlice HardingAlice HillesAlice HurstAlice Johnson (alias Collins)Alice LockerAlice MountAlice MuntAlice OxesAlice PotkinsAlice PultonAlice RayburneAlice ShipsideAlice ShipwrightAlice SmithAlice SpencerAlice ThwaitesAlice Wallys [or Wallis]Alice [or Agnes] SnothAlice [or Agnes] SnothAlice [or Elizabeth or Margaret] DriverAllectusAlmachiusAlphege (Ælfheah, Elphege)Amaury (Almeric, Almaric) de BeneAmbrose (St Ambrose)Ambrose DudleyAmmon, Zenon, Ptolomeus and IngenuusAmmonarionAmmonius SaccasAmonesAmphibalusAnabiusAnatolia (St Anatolia)Anatolius of AlexandriaAndhun of SussexAndoclusAndrea CarafaAndreas OsianderAndrew AlexanderAndrew BayntonAndrew BayntonAndrew DuryAndrew HewetAndrew HewettAndrew IngforbyAndrew KempeAndrew MoriceAndrew OliphantAndrew PerneAndrew PerneAndrew PiersonAndrew, Paul, Nicomachus and DionisiaAngel's wifeAnicetus (St Anicetus)Anna HooperAnna of the East AnglesAnne AlbrightAnne AskewAnne Askew (Kyme)Anne BedikeAnne BoleynAnne BradfordAnne Du BourgAnne Fitzwilliam (nèe Sapcote)Anne GloverAnne Herbert (nèe Parr)Anne LacyAnne MooneAnne of ClevesAnne Radcliffe (nèe Calthorp)Anne SeymourAnne SeymourAnne SmithAnne StarkeyAnne Tree [or Try]Anne WarcupAnno II (St Anno)Anselm of Bec (St Anselm)Anselm SeleAnterus (St Anterus)AntheaAnthimus of NicomediaAnthony AfterwhittleAnthony and Robert BeckwithAnthony BarberAnthony BelassisAnthony BrownAnthony BrownAnthony BrowneAnthony BurwardeAnthony ClarkeAnthony CleeAnthony DalaberAnthony DraycotAnthony DraycotAnthony HusseyAnthony HusseyAnthony JonesAnthony KitchenAnthony Kitchin (name in religion: Dunstan)Anthony KnyvetAnthony NorgateAnthony PearsonAnthony PickeringAnthony the Hermit (St Anthony)AntiochusAntoine de BourbonAntoine de PerrenotAntoine DupratAntonino of Florence (Pierozzi) (St Antonino)Antoninus (St Antoninus)Antoninus Pius (Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Pius)Antonio BonvisiAnulinusAnysiaap RuddzAperApiarius of SiccaApollonia (St Apollonia)ApolloniusApollonius of EphesusAppline GrewApprice, JohnAquilaAquila of SinopeAquillaAquilusArbirtromyArcherArchibald CampbellArchibald DouglasAristides the AthenianArius of AlexandriaArmagil WadeArmand de GontautArnold ChestArnoldus Bomelius (Arnold Baumel)ArrianusArtemiusArthemiusArthurArthurArthur ColeArthur ColeArthur FaysieArthur PlantagenetAscepsimasAscla, Philemon and AppoliniusAsclepiadesAsclepiadesAsclepiodotusAselepodotusAsellusAshtonAspasius PaternusAssyriusAthalisAthanasiaAthanasius of AlexandriaAthenagoras of AthensAttalusAtticusAtwellAudas (Abdas)AudaxAugurius and EulogiusAugustine BernherAugustine BernhereAugustine de AugustinisAugustine KyrkeAugustine of CanterburyAugustine of Hippo (St Augustine)Augustine PackingtonAugustine WebsterAugustus (Octavian)AurelianAurelianusAurelianus CyreniusAureliusAurelius Ambrosius Aurelius ConanusAurelius of CarthageAurelius VictorAvitus and SergiusAzadanes and AbdiesusAzades
Glossary of People in the 1583 Edition | A
Aaron

(d. c. 303?) of Verulamium.

Said to have been martyred with St Alban

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 124, 1576, p. 90, 1583, p. 89.

1583 Edition, page 112 | 1583 Edition, page 131 | 1583 Edition, page 138
Abbess of Denny

Abbess of Denny abbey, near Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire; house of Franciscan nuns (Poor Clares)

Humphrey Monmouth claimed to have given money to Denny Abbey and allowed the abbess to borrow books left with him by William Tyndale. 1570, p. 1133; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 997.

1583 Edition, page 1021 | 1583 Edition, page 1021[Back to Top]
Abdias (Obadiah)

Reputed apocryphal writer; 1st bishop of Babylon

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 19, 42; 1576, pp. 15, 34; 1583, pp. 15, 34.

1583 Edition, page 38 | 1583 Edition, page 57
Abedecalaas and Ananias

Christian priests martyred with Simeon of Seleucia-Ctesiphon under Shapur II

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 136; 1576, p. 99; 1583, p. 98.

1583 Edition, page 121
Abraham Crichton

Official of Lothian (1540 - 53) [Fasti ecclesiæ scoticanæ]

Abraham Crichton sat on the assize that deprived and exiled John Kerr. 1570, p. 1448; 1576, p. 1235; 1583, p. 1272.

He sat on the assize that tried and condemned Adam Wallace. 1570, pp. 1448-50; 1576, pp. 1235-36; 1583, pp. 1272-73.

1583 Edition, page 1296
Abraham Waters

Dutchman of St Botolph's, Colchester; abjured in 1527 [Fines]

Abraham Waters, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072[Back to Top]
Abundus

Deacon of Carpophorus, priest, in Tuscia; C4 martyr with Carpophorus

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 129; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115
Acha of Deira

Princess of Deira [ODNB]

2nd wife of Aethelfrith, king of Bernicia; the marriage cemented his claim to Deira and created the kingdom of Northumbria

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

1583 Edition, page 134
Acha, Philemon, Ireneus, Januarius, Festus, Desiderius, Gregorius, Spoletanus, Agapes, Chionia, Hierenea and Theodora

(d. early C4) Martyrs under Maximinus Daia

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 117; 1576, p. 84; 1583, p. 83.

1583 Edition, page 106
Achaius

C3 judge in Caesarea

Achaius sentenced the soldier Marinus to be beheaded because he refused to deny his Christian faith. 1570, p. 106; 1576, p. 75; 1583, p. 75.

1583 Edition, page 98
Acindymus, Pegasius, Anempodistus and Epidephorus

Persian martyrs under Shapur II

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 135; 1576, p. 98; 1583, p. 97.

1583 Edition, page 120[Back to Top]
Adalbero of Styria

(d. c. 1086x1087)

Margrave of Styria (1064 - 82); sided with Henry IV in the investiture controversy

Gregory VII wrote to Adalbero of Styria and other dukes, princes and bishops informing them that they were to shun simonical and married clergy. This included clergy appointed by the emperor. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1128; 1583, p. 1153.

1583 Edition, page 1177
Adam Damplip (Damlip) (George Bucker)

(d. 1543) [ODNB]

Religious radical accused of preaching heresy in Calais; attainted of treason for contacts with Pole; imprisoned in Marshalsea, sent back to Calais and hanged, drawn and quartered

Adam Damplip is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

Damplip had been a religious conservative and chaplain to John Fisher, bishop of Rochester. After Fisher's death, Damplip travelled through France, the Netherlands and Italy and conversed with learned men. 1570, p. 1400; 1576, pp. 1193-94; 1583, p. 1223.

At Rome, Damplip found corruption and abuses in the church. Pole urged him to stay in Rome to deliver lectures, but he refused. Pole gave him a French crown when he left. 1563, p. 656; 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1223.

As Damplip was returning to England from Rome, he passed through Calais and met William Stevens and Thomas Lancaster, who urged him to stay for a while to preach to the people there. He agreed, but only if he obtained licence. He was taken to Lord Lisle, who asked him to stay and preach three or four times a week. Lord Lisle offered him a room in his house and meals at his own table, but Damplip asked only for a room in the town where he could study, and so lodged with William Stephens. 1563, p. 656; 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1223.

Damplip was brought before Thomas Cranmer, Stephen Gardiner, Richard Sampson and others and examined. The next day, warned by Cranmer that he was likely to be imprisoned and burnt, he fled to the West Country. 1563, p. 657; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1224.

Damplip taught school in the West Country for about a year when he was charged under the Six Articles and taken to London, where he was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for about two years. He was confessor to the prisoners there. During this time John Marbeck was also put into the Marshalsea, and the two became acquainted. 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1199; 1583, p. 1228.

Damplip was imprisoned in the Marshalsea with John Marbeck. On the orders of Stephen Gardiner, John Massie took Damplip to Calais. 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1193; 1583, p. 1223.

Damplip was sent to the mayor's prison in Calais along with John Butler and the curate Daniel. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1199; 1583, p. 1229.

Damplip was initially to be tried for heresy, but because his offences occurred before the passage of the Six Articles he was pardoned by act of parliament. He was found guilty of treason because of the French crown he had received from Cardinal Pole and hanged, drawn and quartered. He was not allowed to make a declaration at his execution. 1563, pp. 665-66; 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1199; 1583, p. 1229.

1583 Edition, page 1213 | 1583 Edition, page 1247 | 1583 Edition, page 1252
Adam Damplip [or Damlip]

(d. 1539)

Martyr. Minister. Chaplain to Fisher; on his arrest he fled to Pole in Rome, where he converted to protestantism. [Fines]

At Damlip's execution Sir Ralph Ellerker ordered Damlip's heart to be cut out. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Alias George Bucker.]

1583 Edition, page 2125[Back to Top]
Adam Foster

(1530? - 1556)

Husbandman. Married. Martyr. Of Mendlesham, Suffolk.

Adam Foster was taken from his house by the constable George Revet and Thomas Mouse, at the commandment of Sir John Tyrrel (of Gipping Hall in Suffolk) because he would not go to church. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, p. 1098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

He was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, pp. 1098-99, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

1583 Edition, page 1941
Adam Sedbergh

(c. 1502 - 1537) [VCH Yorkshire, vol. 3 (1974) pp. 138-42; ODNB]

Cistercian monk; deacon of York 1527; last abbot of Jervaulx (1533 - 37); threatened by rebels, joined the Pilgrimage of Grace 1536; condemned for treason, executed. The abbey and possessions reverted to the Crown.

Adam Sedbergh and other rebels were executed in 1537. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1087.

1583 Edition, page 1111
Adam Wallace (Feane)

(d. 1550) [Fines]

b. near Fail, district of Kyle; tutor to the children of the laird of Ormiston; martyr hanged and burnt in Edinburgh

Adam Wallace was brought before the assize in Edinburgh and examined. He was condemned and turned over to the secular power. 1563, p. ; 1570, pp. 1448-50; 1576, pp. 1235-36; 1583, pp. 1272-73.

Wallace was imprisoned in irons, and friars and the dean of Restalrig visited him, unsuccessfully trying to instruct him. He was hanged and burnt. 1570, p. 1450; 1576, p. 1236; 1583, p. 1273.

1583 Edition, page 1296
Adauctus and Januarius

C4 priests of Felix the bishop; martyred in Venosa with him

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 129; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115
Adda of Bernicia

(d. 565?) [ODNB]

King of Bernicia C6; son of Ida

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

1583 Edition, page 133[Back to Top]
Ado

(d. 875) [M. Wesche, Lexikon des Mittelalters]

Archbishop of Vienne (859/60 - 875) Chronicler, martyrologist

He is mentioned by Foxe as a source: 1570, pp. 19, 80, 85, 91, 113, 131; 1576, pp. 15, 55, 58, 63, 81, 95; 1583, pp. 15, 55, 58, 63, 80, 94.

1583 Edition, page 38 | 1583 Edition, page 78 | 1583 Edition, page 81 | 1583 Edition, page 86 | 1583 Edition, page 103 | 1583 Edition, page 117
Adomnán (St Adomnán)

(627/8? - 704) [ODNB]

Of the Irish royal line; 9th abbot of Iona. Writer; wrote a life of St Columba

Adomnán made an ambassadorial visit to King Aldfrith of Northumbria. Adomnán used the Irish style of tonsure, but became convinced by Abbot Ceolfrith of the superiority of the English style. On his return, he reformed many churches to conform with English practice, but was unable to persuade the monks to alter their tonsure. 1570, p. 169; 1576, p. 127; 1583, p. 126.

1583 Edition, page 149
Adrian I

(d. 795) [Kelly]

Pope (772 - 95) Offered resistance to the Lombards with the aid of Charlemagne.

Adrian was a supporter of images, writing a book in support of their use and calling a synod to oppose Felix and others who spoke against them. He clothed the body of St Peter in silver and covered the altar of St Paul with gold cloth. 1570, p. 174, 1576, p. 131, 1583, p. 130.

Empress Irene had Pope Adrian exhume the body of Constantine Copronymus and burn it. She had the ashes thrown into the sea because Constantine had opposed the adoration of images. 1570, p. 176; 1576, p. 133; 1583, p. 132.

Adrian favoured the mass of St Gregory over that of St Ambrose. He called a council that ordained that Gregory's mass should be used universally, and Charlemagne executed the decree. 1570, p. 174, 1576, p. 131, 1583, p. 130.

After the death of Carloman, the brother of Charlemagne, Carloman's wife and children went to Pope Adrian I for protection. He turned them over, with Desiderius, king of the Lombards, to Charlemagne, who kept them in captivity in France. 1570, p. 175; 1576, p. 132; 1583, p. 131.

Charlemagne confirmed the donations to the papacy of his father and added more. He received from Pope Adrian I the title of patrician of the Romans. 1570, p. 174, 1576, p. 132, 1583, p. 131.

Charlemagne sent a letter to King Offa, praising Pope Adrian I. 1570, p. 175; 1576, p. 132; 1583, p. 131

Adrian was said to have granted to Charlemagne the right to choose and ordain the bishop of Rome. 1563, p. 10; 1570, p. 5; 1576, p. 4; 1583, p. 5

King Offa of Mercia established an archbishopric in Lichfield, with the agreement of Pope Adrian. 1570, p. 173, 1576, p. 130, 1583, p. 129.

1583 Edition, page 152 | 1583 Edition, page 153 | 1583 Edition, page 155 | 1583 Edition, page 157
Adrian II

(d. 872) [Kelly]

Cardinal; pope (867 - 72)

Adrian was the son of a married priest. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1128; 1583, p. 1154.

1583 Edition, page 1178
Adrian VI

(1459 - 1523) [Kelly]

b. Utrecht; DTh Louvain (1491); professor of theology; vice-chancellor of Louvain 1497; tutor to Charles V; co-regent (1516-17); bishop of Tortosa 1516; inquisitor; cardinal of Utrecht 1517; pope (1522 - 23)

Thomas Wolsey hoped to succeed Adrian VI as pope. 1570, p. 1125; 1576, p. 963; 1583, p. 989.

1583 Edition, page 1013
Adriana Rogers

Wife of John Rogers

Adriana Rogers petitioned Stephen Gardiner for her husband's release. 1563, p. 1037; 1570, p. 1660; 1576, p. 1416; 1583, p. 1487.

She searched in her husband's cell for his writings. 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1416; 1583, p. 1492.

Accompanied by her ten children, she met John Rogers on his way to the stake. 1570, p. 1664; 1576, p. 1416; 1583, p. 1487.

1583 Edition, page 1508
Adula, Vincentius, Sabina and Christina

(d. early C4) Matyrs at Merida, Spain

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 111; 1576, p. 80; 1583, p. 79.

1583 Edition, page 102[Back to Top]
Aelius Lampridius

One of six "Scriptores Historiae Augustae"

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 139, 1576, p. 103, 1583, p. 102.

1583 Edition, page 125
Aemilianus

C3 judge in Spain; persecutor of Christians

Aemilianus condemned Fructuosus of Tarragona and his two deacons to be burnt for refusing to worship the Roman gods. 1570, p. 105; 1576, p. 74; 1583, p. 74.

1583 Edition, page 97
Aesc (Oisc, Osca)

(d. 512?) [ODNB sub kings of Kent]

By legend son of Hengist

King of Kent (488 - 512)

[Foxe calls him Cosa]

Osca and Octa were captured by Uther Pendragon, but escaped and returned with reinforcements. They were killed in battle. 1570, p. 153; 1576, p. 114; 1583, p. 113.

1583 Edition, page 132 | 1583 Edition, page 136
Aeschylus

(525 - 456 BCE)

Greek playwright

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 138; 1576, p. 100; 1583, p. 99.

1583 Edition, page 122[Back to Top]
Aethelberht II of Kent

(d. 762) [ODNB]

Son of Wihtred; king of Kent with brother Eadberht I, possibly half-brother Alric; then with his nephew; reigned (725 - 62)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 149; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

1583 Edition, page 133
Aethelburh

(fl. C7) [ODNB sub Anna]

Daughter of King Anna of the East Angles; abbess of the Frankish monastery at Faremoutiers-en-Brie

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135
Agapetus I

(d. 536) [Kelly]

Pope (535 - 36); visited Constantinople to try to dissuade Justinian from invading Italy

Agapetus was the son of a married priest. 1570, p. 1319; 1576, p. 1129; 1583, p. 1154.

1583 Edition, page 1178
Agapitus

Legendary 15-year-old martyr in the reign of Severus Alexander

Agapitus refused to sacrifice to idols and was whipped, hung up by his feet, scalded, thrown to wild beasts and finally beheaded. 1570, p. 85; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 58.

1583 Edition, page 81
Agatha (St Agatha)

Virgin and martyr; died at Catania in Sicily, probably in the Decian persecution 250-53 [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Agatha was imprisoned, starved and tortured. 1570, p. 91; 1576, p. 63; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86 | 1583 Edition, page 118
Agatho

Priest at the Synod of Whitby in 664, accompanying Bishop Agelbert and supporting the Roman position

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

1583 Edition, page 146
Agatho

(d. 681) [Kelly]

b. Sicily; monk; pope (678 - 81)

Re-opened amicable relations with Constantinople; upheld the appeal of Wilfred, bishop of York, against the deposition by Theodore, archbishop of Canterbury.

Wilfrid went to Rome to Pope Agatho to complain about having been deprived of the bishopric of York by the archbishop of Canterbury, Theodore of Tarsus. But the friends at Rome of the archbishop and of King Ecgfrith of Northumbria ensured that Wilfrid was unsuccessful. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

Agatho applied to the emperor at Constantinople and his caesars to have his election approved before being consecrated. 1563, p. 620; 1570, p. 1209; 1576, p. 1035; 1583, p. 1062.

Agatho presided over the sixth Council of Constantinople. 1570, p. 167; 1576, p. 126; 1583, p. 125.

1583 Edition, page 147 | 1583 Edition, page 148 | 1583 Edition, page 1086[Back to Top]
Agathocles

(361 - 289 BCE)

Tyrant of Syracuse, Sicily (317 - 304 BCE); king of Sicily (304 - 289 BCE)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 114; 1576, p. 82; 1583, p. 81.

1583 Edition, page 104
Agathon

Legendary early soldier martyr in Alexandria

He rebuked people who were mocking the bodies of dead Christians and was beheaded. 1570, p. 91; 1576, p. 64; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86
Agathonice

C2 Christian martyred under Marcus Aurelius at Pergamum. [Paul Keresztes, 'Marcus Aurelius a Persecutor?', The Harvard Theological Review, vol. 61, no. 3 (July, 1968) p. 323]

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 67; 1576, p. 44; 1583, p. 44.

1583 Edition, page 67
Agilbert

(d. 679x90) [ODNB; Gams]

A Frank who had been ordained bishop before arriving in the kingdom of the West Saxons after 646; had studied in Ireland

Bishop of Dorchester c. 650; bishop of Paris (666/7 - death) Attended the synod of Whitby in 664, supporting the Roman position.

Agilbert went to Northumbria to ordain Wilfrid, abbot of Ripon, priest. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Agilbert, James the deacon of Paulinus, Wilfrid and Alchfrith, son of King Oswiu, and his wife Cyneburh held to the Roman method of calculating the date of Easter. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Agilbert was asked by King Oswiu at the synod of Whitby to put forward the Roman position. Agilbert asked that Wilfrid speak for him, as he was more familiar with the English tongue. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

1583 Edition, page 146 | 1583 Edition, page 156[Back to Top]
Agilulf

(d. 616)(called the Thuringian) [Chris Wickham, Early Medieval Italy (Basingstoke, 1981), pp. 33-36]

King of the Lombards (590 - 616) in Italy

Married the Catholic queen Theodelinda; converted from Arianism in 603; established a truce with the papacy in 598

Agilulf threatened Rome in 593-94. 1570, p. 16; 1576, p. 13; 1583, p. 13.

1583 Edition, page 36
Agnes (Joan) Smith

of Ridgewell, Essex; accused with her 3 sons and 2 daughters in 1525 [Fines]

Agnes Smith, her sons and daughters, with many from Essex, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Agnes Bongeor

Wife of Richard Bongeor. Of Colchester.

Agnes Bongeor's martyrdom was delayed, as her name was incorrectly written on the writ. 1563, pp. 1631-32, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

In their letter to Bonner, Robert Brown and Robert Mainard said that they did not have a prisoner by the name of Agnes Bowyer, wife of Richard Bowyer. They explained that the prisoner was in fact Agnes Bongeor, wife of Richard Bongeor. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

Foxe describes her godly behaviour at her death on 17August 1557. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

1583 Edition, page 2044
Agnes Chittenden

of Canterbury

Agnes Chittenden abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Agnes Cutting

Agnes Cutting was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2098[Back to Top]
Agnes Foreman

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2140, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Agnes George

(1530? - 1556)

Martyr. Of Great Barfield in Essex.

Agnes George was the wife [unlawful?] of Richard George. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1915.

She was committed to prison in Colchester by Maynard [an alderman of Colchester] for not attending church, and then on to Bonner. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. , 1583, p. 1915.

On 6 June 1556 Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against her (essentially the same as those against Thomas Whittle). She answered the articles. 1563, pp. 1523-24, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, pp. 1914-16.

She signed a letter written with her fellow sufferers that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

She was imprisoned at Newgate and burned at Stratford-le-Bow on 27 June 1556. 1563, p. 1527, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1916.

Agnes George was burned at Stratford-le-Bow. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

1583 Edition, page 1938 | 1583 Edition, page 2061
Agnes Glascock

Of Hockley, Essex. [Fines]

Agnes Glascock received a letter from William Tyms. 1570, pp. 2077-78, 1576, p. 1792, 1583, p. 1898.

She received another letter from William Tyms, dated 28 August (1555). 1570, p. 2078, 1576, 1792, 1583, p. 1898.

She received a letter from William Tyms (also addressed to Sister Colfax). 1570, p. 2079, 1576, pp. 1793-94, 1583, p. 1899.

She received a letter from John Careless. 1570, pp. 2114-15, 1576, p. 1837, 1583, pp. 1931-32.

She received a letter from John Careless [Letter to A. G.]. 1570, p. 2115, 1576, pp. 1837-38, 1583, p. 1932.

1583 Edition, page 1922 | 1583 Edition, page 1955[Back to Top]
Agnes Glyn

Agnes Glyn was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

1583 Edition, page 2047
Agnes Grebill

(d. 1511) [ODNB sub Lollard women]

of Tenterden, Kent; taught Lollard beliefs by her husband; he and her sons provided evidence against her; burnt, aged over 60

Agnes Grebill denied the articles put to her, but was testified against by her husband and two sons. Although she was willing to repent and reform, she was condemned to burn. 1570, p. 1454; 1576, p. 1240; 1583, p. 1277.

1583 Edition, page 1300
Agnes Harvie

of Birbrook, Essex. She, her parents and brother were troubled in the 1530s [Fines]

Agnes Harvie, her parents and brother, along with others of Birbrook, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Agnes Hatfield

Mother of Thomas Cranmer. [DNB sub Thomas Cranmer]

Thomas Cranmer's mother was Agnes Hatfield. 1563, pp. 1470-71, 1570, pp. 2032-33, 1576, pp. 1752-53, 1583, pp. 1859-60.

Agnes Howard (née Tilney)

(by 1477 - 1545) [ODNB]

Married the earl of Surrey in 1497; duchess of Norfolk 1514; widowed 1524; godmother to Princess Elizabeth

Agnes Howard carried the infant Elizabeth at her christening. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

1583 Edition, page 1078[Back to Top]
Agnes Ive

of Canterbury; abjured; witness against the Kent martyrs in 1511

Agnes Ive abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

Agnes Ive was a witness against William Carder and Robert Harrison. She had earlier abjured and was therefore was forced to testify or be in danger of relapse. 1570, p. 1454; 1576, p. 1240; 1583, p. 1276.

1583 Edition, page 1300
Agnes of Rome (St Agnes)

(d. early C4) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Young virgin martyr

Agnes withstood torture and was then ordered to be placed naked on a street corner in the brothel area and afterwards was beheaded. 1570, pp. 131-32; 1576, pp. 95-96; 1583, pp. 94-95.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Agnes Penicote

Wife of Penicote the jailor.

Agnes Penicote tricked Alice Coberley into picking up a red-hot key and then mocked her for wincing at the heat, saying that Alice would therefore not be able to cope with the heat of the stake. Alice subsequently recanted. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

1583 Edition, page 1918
Agnes Penifather

Of Lichfield.

Agnes Penifather took Joyes Lewes to the place of her execution. She was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She was examined by the bishop as to the words she spoke to the two priests of Lichfield, John Ady and James Foxe, about Lewes' remains. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

The two priests met with Penifather in her father's house. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She refused to do penance and so was commanded to prison, and the sheriffs were charged with her imprisonment under the threat of £100 forfeit should anyone be allowed to speak with her. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

At the persuasion of her friends, she was compelled to recant. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

1583 Edition, page 2047
Agnes Potten

(d. 1556)

Martyr.

Agnes Potten was the wife of a brewer, Robert Polton, of Ipswich. She was burned 19 February 1556. 1563, pp. 1271, 1503, 1570, p. 1879, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1893.

The night before she was burned, Potten dreamed of the stake and of Queen Mary's friends watching it burn. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1894.

She was burned at Oxford in late February or early March 1556. 1563, p. 1503 [1563 states specifically 19 February 1556, but that this is then changed in subsequent editions to the more vague February/March], 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1894.

[She is also referred to by Foxe as 'Anne Potten' and 'Anne Polton'.]

1583 Edition, page 1728 | 1583 Edition, page 1917
Agnes Prest

Married woman. Martyr. Of Exeter.

James Turberville examined and condemned Agnes Prest. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1943-45, 1583, p. 2049.

Gregory Basset denounced Mrs Prest for talking of scriptures even though she was uneducated. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Walter Raleigh's wife visited Mrs Prest in prison in Exeter in 1558. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Mrs Prest was taken from this prison to the Guildhall in Exeter to be condemned. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2251, 1576, p. 1943, 1583, p. 2049.

1583 Edition, page 2073 | 1583 Edition, page 2172
Agnes Reignold

of Cranbrook, Kent

Agnes Reignold abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Agnes Rouse

of St Osyth; neighbour of Grace Palmer and witness against her

John Rouse, his wife Agnes and John Pole testified that Grace Palmer had spoken heresy. 1570, p. 1187; 1576, p. 1016; 1583, p. 1043.

1583 Edition, page 1067[Back to Top]
Agnes Silverside

(b. 1497?)

Martyr. Widow of a priest called Thomas Silverside (second husband). Her first husband was probably William Downes who had died by 1517 (see Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester (Michigan, 1998), p. 181.) Of Colchester.

Agnes Silverside was imprisoned in the Mote-hall in Colchester. 1563, p. 1607, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

John Boswell wrote in his account of her deposition that she was an obstinate heretic who was willing to burn her rotten old bones. 1563, p. 1607, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

She was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

She was burned by the town wall in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

John Allerton insisted that Agnes Silverside was not a heretic. 1570, p. 2211, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

John Allerton wrote a letter to Agnes Smith, widow. 1563, pp. 1627-28, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2017.

[Alias Smith or May.]

1583 Edition, page 2031 | 1583 Edition, page 2041
Agnes Spaulding

Agnes Spaulding was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2098
Agnes Stanley

Martyr. Of London.

Agnes Stanley was accused of heresy either by Lord Rich or by other justices of the peace and constables. She was apprehended for not attending church. 1563, p. 1567, 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

She was examined by Darbyshire, the chancellor. Articles were brought against her and she gave answers. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

She was burned at Smithfield on 12 April 1557. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

1583 Edition, page 1998
Agnes Wardall

(d. 1556)

Wife of Robert Wardall. Of Ipswich.

Agnes Wardall was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Agnes Wardall was kept abroad from her home for fear of persecution. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

She returned home and learned of Argentine's knowledge of her whereabouts from her maid. Argentine and Butler made a search for her in her house. 1570, pp. 2124-25, 1576, pp. 1846-47, 1583, pp. 1940-41.

Wardall escaped into the fields and hid in a ditch. George Manning discovered where she was and gave her a warning to be still so that his co-searcher, John Bate, did not find her. She remained still and escaped thanks to Manning. 1570, pp. 2124-25, 1576, pp. 1846-47, 1583, pp. 1940-41.

1583 Edition, page 1964 | 1583 Edition, page 2114
Agnes Wardall, the elder

Widow. Of Ipswich.

Agnes Wardell fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

1583 Edition, page 2114
Agnes Whitelock

Spinster. Of Dovercote, Essex.

Agnes Whitelock was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

She was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

She wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Also referred to as Anne Whitelocke]

1583 Edition, page 1996
Agnes Wily

Young girl of Horkesley, Essex; charged in 1532 [Fines]

Agnes Wily, with others, abjured in 1532. She was charged, along with Lucy Wily and the wives of John and William Wily, with eating meat broth on St Peter's Eve. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Agricolus

fl. C4. Officer of Emperor Lucinius in the east

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 123; 1576, p. 88; 1583, p. 88.

1583 Edition, page 111[Back to Top]
Agrippa I

(10 BCE - 44 CE)

Grandson of Herod the Great; friend of Caligula

Governor of Judea (41 - 44 CE)

1570, p. 38; 1576, p. 30; 1583, p. 30.

1583 Edition, page 53
Agrippina

(c. 14 - 59)

Daughter of Germanicus Julius Caesar; sister of Caligula; mother of Nero. Married (1)Domitius Ahenobarbus, (2)Sallustius Crispus Passienus, (3)Claudius, her uncle; exiled in 39.

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 38; 1576, p. 31; 1583, p. 31.

1583 Edition, page 54
Agrippina and Augusta

(d. early C4) Martyrs at Cologne

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 112; 1576, p. 80; 1583, p. 79.

1583 Edition, page 102
Agrippinus

Bishop of Carthage (c. 215 - 20) [Gams]

He started rebaptism. 1570, p. 98; 1576, p. 69; 1583, p. 69.

1583 Edition, page 92
Alan Cope

(d. 1580) [Foster]

Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford.

Alan Cope obtained letters of reference for Julins Palmer from Arthur Cole, president of Magdalen College. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1843 [recte 1831], 1583, p. 1937.

1583 Edition, page 1961[Back to Top]
Alan Meldrum

Canon of St Andrews

Alan Meldrum was one of those who, with Bishop Beaton, persecuted Patrick Hamilton. He was one of those who passed the sentence definitive against him. 1570, pp. 1107-09; 1576, pp. 947-48; 1583, pp. 974-75.

1583 Edition, page 998
Alan Ryse

John Twyford, who had a grudge against Thomas Merial, brought together a group of men, plied them with wine, and had them give evidence against him. Alan Ryse was one of these. 1570, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1257.

1583 Edition, page 1281
Alan Simpson

Of Colchester, Essex. Of unknown occupation.

Indicted for attending an illegal assembly headed by Thomas Purto in 1556. (Court Rolls, Borough of Colchetser, 122/4).

Simpson was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Allin Simpson was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

He wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Not related to Thomas Simson]

1583 Edition, page 1996
Alban (St Alban)

(d. c. 303?) [ODNB]

Christian martyr in Roman Britain at Verulamium (St Albans)

Alban was converted by the example of a Christian priest staying at his house. When the soldiers came for the priest, Alban put on the priest's cloak and went in his place. He refused to worship the Roman gods and was whipped and then beheaded. 1570, pp. 123-24; 1576, p. 89; 1583, p. 88.

1583 Edition, page 111 | 1583 Edition, page 131 | 1583 Edition, page 138
Alban Langdale

Fellow of St Johns College, Cambridge (1534); BD (1544); DD (1554) (Venn). Parson of Buxted, Sussex. Chaplain to Lord Montague.

John Kingston stated that he had requested Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale and Anthony Brown to expose unlawful writings and books. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Alban Langdale accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

Woodman's third examination took place before Alban Langdale and Master James Gage at Montague's house, beside St Mary Overy's, Southwark, on 12 May 1557. 1570, p. 2182-88, 1576, p. 1884-89, 1583, pp. 1992-97.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

[NB: Alban Langdale was one of the Cambridge doctors appointed by the university to participate in the Oxford disputations of 1554. Foxe had in his possession the letter from the vice-chancellor and senate of Cambridge, dated 10 April 1554, authorising the seven theologians to participate in the disputation (Harley 416, fol. 39r), as well as a letter from Cambridge University to Hugh Weston dated 10 April 1554 informing him that the seven were being sent (Harley 422, fol. 101r); both letters specifically described Langdale as one of the seven theologians. But he was not active in the debates and because Foxe's informants do not mention him, he is never mentioned anywhere in Foxe's entire account of the Oxford debates.]

1583 Edition, page 2016 | 1583 Edition, page 2048 | 1583 Edition, page 2142
Alban Langdale

(fl. 1532 - 1580 [ODNB; Venn]

Roman Catholic priest and writer; fellow of St John's College Cambridge 1534; BD 1544; DD 1554; parson of Buxted, Sussex; chaplain to Lord Montague

In the disputation at Cambridge in 1549, John Madew answered the first disputation, opposed by William Glyn, Alban Langdale, Thomas Sedgewick and John Young. 1570, pp. 1556-57; 1576, pp. 1326-28; 1583, pp. 1376-82.

1583 Edition, page 1400[Back to Top]
Albert Krantz (Cranzius)

(c. 1448 - 1517)

German historian; studied law and theology at Rostock and Cologne; rector of the University of Rostock 1482; professor of philosophy and theology; diplomat for the senate of Hamburg; dean of the cathedral chapter 1508

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 1330; 1576, p. 1134; 1583, p. 1163.

1583 Edition, page 1187
Albert Pighius (Pighe)

(c. 1490 - 1542)[Catholic Encyclopedia]

Dutch theologian, mathematician and astronomer. DTh Cologne 1517; defended the authority of the church against the reformers

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 2, 1576, p. 2, 1583, p. 2.

1583 Edition, page 25
Albertus Magnus

(c. 1200 - 1280) [Markus Führer, 'Albert the Great', The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2006 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2006/entries/albert-great/.]

German philosopher and theologian; Dominican friar; taught Thomas Aquinas

Provincial of the Dominican order (1254 - 57); bishop of Regensburg (1260 - 63); doctor of the church

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 57; 1576, p. 37; 1583, p. 37.

1583 Edition, page 60
Albun Hill

(d. 1559)

Physician. Native of Wales. Studied at Oxford and Bologna. [DNB; Foster]

Albun Hill received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, pp. 1819-20, 1576, p. 1555, 1583, p. 1638.

1583 Edition, page 1662
Alchfrith

(fl .c. 655 - c. 665) [ODNB]

Son of Oswiu of Northumbria. Sub-king of Deirans under Oswiu c. 655. As a result of his marriage to Cyneburh, he adhered to the Roman tradition on the keeping of Easter, sided with Wilfrid and against Oswiu at the synod of Whitby.

Agilbert, James the deacon of Paulinus, Wilfrid and Alchfrith, son of King Oswiu, and his wife Cyneburh held to the Roman method of calculating the date of Easter. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Alchfrith and his father both attended the Synod of Whitby in 664. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

1583 Edition, page 146 | 1583 Edition, page 157
Alcibiades

Reputed martyr at Lyon during reign of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus

Alcibiades normally lived on bread and water. In prison, he was chastised by Attalus and began to eat meat. 1570, p. 74; 1576, p. 50; 1583, p. 50.

1583 Edition, page 73
Alcuin

(c. 740 - 804) [ODNB]

Trained at York and taught there; abbot of St Martin's, Tours; royal adviser; major figure in the renaissance in learning and letters under Charlemagne

Alcuin was sent to Charlemagne by Offa of Mercia in hopes of cementing peace between them. Charlemagne held Alcuin in high esteem and made him abbot of Tours. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 129

Upon his return from France to England, Alcuin complained about the state of the country into which he had arrived in letters to Offa of Mercia, Æthelred of Northumbria and Æthelheard, archbishop of Canterbury. 1570, p. 176; 1576, p. 133; 1583, p. 132.

Ecgfrith, Offa's son and successor, reigned only four months. Alcuin said that he died, not for his own offences, but because his father had spilled much blood to guarantee his inheritance. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 130.

1583 Edition, page 152 | 1583 Edition, page 154
Aldfrith of Northumbria

(d. 704/5) [ODNB]

King of Northumbria (685 - 704/5)

Illegitimate son of Oswiu; half-brother of Ecgfrith; teacher and scholar in Ireland

Aldfrith recovered much that had been lost by his predecessors. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

He restored Wilfrid to the bishopric of York, but after about five years removed him again. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 147 | 1583 Edition, page 149
Aldhelm

(d. 709/10) [ODNB]

Scholar; abbot of Malmesbury; bishop of Sherborne 706; prolific writer; said to be founder of Malmesbury abbey

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

1583 Edition, page 148 | 1583 Edition, page 156
Aldroenus (Aldrwn)

Legendary king of Brittany C5

He sent help to defend Britain. 1570, p. 148; 1576, p. 109; 1583, p. 108.

1583 Edition, page 131 | 1583 Edition, page 136
Aldwulf of the East Angles

(d. 713) [ODNB sub Kings of the East Angles]

King of the East Angles (664 - 713)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135
Alexander

C2 Christian martyred in Rome; called a son of Felicitas; martyred with her. [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Felicitas]

Alexander was beheaded. 1570, p. 67; 1576, p. 44; 1583, p. 44.

1583 Edition, page 67
Alexander

Phrygian physician long resident in France; reputed Christian martyr

Alexander was thrown to wild beasts. 1570, p. 70; 1576, p. 48; 1583, p. 48.

1583 Edition, page 71
Alexander Alesius (Allane, Alan)

(1500 - 1565) [ODNB]

b. Scotland; Lutheran theologian and reformer; professor of theology at Leipzig

Cromwell brought Alexander Alesius to a synod of bishops and learned men held in 1537. At Cromwell's request, he addressed the bishops. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

On the second day of the synod, Thomas Cranmer sent his archdeacon to command Alexander Alesius to cease from disputation. 1570, p. 1353; 1576, p. 1155; 1583, p. 1184.

1583 Edition, page 1206[Back to Top]
Alexander Andrew

Keeper of Newgate prison

Andrew prohibited John Rogers from giving food to fellow prisoners. 1563, p. 1063; 1570, p. 1664; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

He brought John Rogers and John Hooper to be degraded. He was characterised by Foxe as a 'cruel enemy to Gods people'. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, pp. 1434-35; 1583, p. 1508.

[Referred to by Foxe as 'Alexander'.]

1583 Edition, page 1517 | 1583 Edition, page 1532
Alexander Barclay

(c. 1484 - 1552) [ODNB]

Poet; clergyman. Benedictine monk at Ely; Franciscan friar at Canterbury; vicar of Wookey, Somerset 1546; vicar of Great Baddow, Essex 1549

Princess Mary complained in a letter to the privy council of the indictment of two of her chaplains, Mallet and Barclay. 1576, p. 1292; 1583, p. 1334.

1583 Edition, page 396 | 1583 Edition, page 1358
Alexander Bret

Alexander Bret witnessed Anne Askew's confession in 1545. 1563, p. 673; 1570, p. 1416; 1576, p. 1207; 1583, p. 1237.

1583 Edition, page 1261[Back to Top]
Alexander Brett

(d. 1554)

Foxe reports that one Bret was one of a group of gentlemen sent to Kent for execution on 27 February 1554 (1570, p. 1638; 1576, p 1397; 1583, p. 1468).

Alexander Brett was the captain of the London Whitecoats (the city militia). Sent against Wyatt, he instead persuaded his men to join the rebels. (J. G. Nichols, ed., The Chronicle of Queen Jane, and of ... Queen Mary, Camden Society, Original series 48 (London, 1850), pp. 38-39 and 61-62).

[NB: This is the same Alexander Brett who was described by Anne Askew as a friend and who stood surety for her].

1583 Edition, page 1492
Alexander Bull

Minor canon of St Peter Westminster (Frere, Marian Reaction, pp. 178-79).

Bull was compelled to divorce his wife in 1553 (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1428).

1583 Edition, page 1452
Alexander Campbel

Transferred from Cupar to St Andrews. Prior of the Dominicans (or Black Friars) at St Andrews. (See John Knox's History of the Reformation in Scotland, ed. W. Croft Dickinson, vol.1, p. 14.)

Alexander was the accuser of Patrick Hamilton who met with a terrible death a few days after the death of Hamilton. [Died in Glasgow.] 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

1583 Edition, page 2127
Alexander Campbell

Prior of the Dominicans [ODNB sub Patrick Hamilton]; appeared to agree with Patrick Hamilton in private, then became his public accuser

Alexander Campbell was one of those who, with Bishop Beaton, persecuted Patrick Hamilton. 1570, p. 1108; 1576, p. 947; 1583, p. 974.

1583 Edition, page 998
Alexander Dering

of Winchester; notary and registrar

Dering was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 842-43, 858.

[Back to Top]
Alexander Frere

of S Martin's at the Well with two buckets; one of 11 presented in 1541 for condemning church ceremonies [Fines]

Alexander Frere was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Alexander Galoway

Canon of Aberdeen

In a letter of 1528 praising the Archbishop Beaton and the Scottish clergy for their condemnation of Patrick Hamilton, the doctors of the University of Louvain mentioned that Alexander Galoway had brought the news to them. 1570, p. 1109; 1576, p. 948; 1583, p. 975.

1583 Edition, page 999
Alexander Hosman

(d. 1557)

Servant to William Mainard. Martyr. Of Rotherfield, Sussex. (Fines)

Alexander Hosman was burned at Lewes on 22 June 1557. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2195, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2003.

1583 Edition, page 2007
Alexander I (St Alexander)

(d. c. 116) [Kelly]

Pope (c. 109 - c. 116)

Pope Alexander I was said to have raised Hermes' son from the dead and to have cured his maid of blindness. Alexander was imprisoned and cured the daughter of his jailer, resulting in the conversion of the whole household. 1576, p. 38; 1583, p. 38.

1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 63 | 1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 75 | 1583 Edition, page 1090
Alexander II (Anselm of Lucca)

(d. 1073) [Kelly]

of Milan; Cluniac monk; bishop of Lucca 1057; pope (1061 - 1073); leading reformer

Alexander II was challenged by the antipope Honorius II. They fought one another; Alexander was declared the legitimate pope at the Council of Mantua in 1064.1563, pp. 13-14.

Hildebrand fought for Alexander II against Cadalus (Honorius II). 1570, p. 1312; 1576, p. 1122; 1583, p. 1148.

Foxe records that Alexander II repented not having the emperor's consent to his election, and that Hildebrand imprisoned and deposed Alexander. In fact, Hildebrand remained Alexander's chancellor and supporter until his death. 1570, p. 6; 1576, p. 5; 1583, p. 5.

Opposition to clerical marriage increased under Alexander II. 1570, p. 1329; 1576, p. 1134; 1583, p. 1163.

William of Normandy sent to Alexander II for support for his invasion of England and was sent his blessing and a consecrated banner. 1563, p. 14.

Appeals were made by Lanfranc, archbishop of Canterbury, and Thomas, archbishop of York, for Alexander to settle the question of primacy between them. 1563, pp. 18-19.

1583 Edition, page 1172 | 1583 Edition, page 1186[Back to Top]
Alexander III (Orlando Bandinelli)

(c. 1100 - 1181) [Kelly]

b.Siena; canon lawyer; cardinal-deacon 1150; cardinal-priest 1151; chancellor 1153; pope (1159 - 81)

The papacy was in schism for 18 years; Alexander moved to France.

Thomas Becket, having stood against the king's laws, went to the pope in France. 1570, p. 1295; 1576, p. 1108; 1583, p. 1134.

1583 Edition, page 27 | 1583 Edition, page 120 | 1583 Edition, page 1158
Alexander Kalfour

Vicar of Kitman, rector of law, official of St Andrews

Alexander Kalfour sat on the assize that condemned Sir John Borthwick for heresy. 1563, p. 575; 1583, p. 1259.

1583 Edition, page 1283
Alexander Lane

Wheelwright. Martyr. Of Bury St Edmunds.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Articles were brought against him and answers made. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

He was burned at Bury St Edmunds in early August 1557. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

1583 Edition, page 2071[Back to Top]
Alexander Marbeck

Provost of Perth 1544

John Charteris, a supporter of protestants, was removed from the office of provost by authority of the governor and was replaced by Alexander Marbeck, a religious conservative. 1570, p. 1443; 1576, p. 1230; 1583, p. 1267.

1583 Edition, page 1291
Alexander Mylne

(c. 1470 - 1548) [ODNB]

BA StAndrews 1494; historian; abbot of Cambuskenneth (1516 - 48); master mason to James V; present at the execution of Patrick Hamilton; 1st president of the college of justice (1532 - 48)

Alexander Mylne was one of those who passed the sentence definitive on Patrick Hamilton in 1528. 1570, p. 1109; 1576, p. 948; 1583, p. 975.

1583 Edition, page 999
Alexander Nowell

(c. 1516/17 - 1602) [ODNB]

BA Oxford 1536; MA 1540; DTh 1545; master of Westminster School 1543; canon of Westminster 1551; MP Looe, Cornwall 1553; protestant exile; dean of St Paul's (1560 - 1602)

John Redman called Alexander Nowell to his deathbed to discuss religion. 1563, pp. 867-74; 1570, pp. 1537-41; 1576, pp. 1310-14; 1583, pp. 1360-64.

1583 Edition, page 1384
Alexander of Alexandria

(d. 326)

Patriarch of Alexandria (313 - 28); opposed Arius

Constantine wrote a letter to Alexander and Arius, urging them to end their differences. 1570, p. 142; 1576, p. 104; 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 126
Alexander of Jerusalem

(d. 251) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Imprisoned under Severus; coajutor with the bishop of Jerusalem, ordained Origen. Died in prison in Caesarea

Alexander suffered greatly under Severus, but survived the persecuton. He was later made bishop of Jerusalem with Narcissus. He built a library there. He died in prison under Decius. 1570, pp. 80, 88; 1576, pp. 55, 61; 1583, pp. 54-55, 60.

1583 Edition, page 77 | 1583 Edition, page 83
Alexander Seton

(d. 1542) [Fines]

Dominican prior of St Andrews; evangelical reformer; chaplain to Charles Brandon (duke of Suffolk); recanted with William Tolwin December 1541

William Tolwin was charged with allowing Alexander Seton to preach against Dr Smith at St Antholin's. Seton himself was detected and presented by three priests. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229 | 1583 Edition, page 1270
Alexander Symmerwayll

When others refused to be involved in the execution of Walter Mylne at St Andrews, Alexander Symmerwayll took him to the fire. 1570, p. 1452; 1576, pp. 1238-39; 1583, p. 1275.

1583 Edition, page 1299
Alexander Wimshurst

(d. 1568)

BA (1545). Chaplain of Magdalen College, Oxford (1546). MA (1546). Rector of Tillington, Sussex (1548), of All Hallows, Bread Street (1559). Canon of Salisbury (1566). (Foster and Fasti)

Bonner sent Robin Caly (Robin Papist) to bring Wimshurst before him. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Caly apprehended Wimshurst. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

When he arrived at St Paul's, Wimshurst saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

He was sent to Cluney's house in Paternoster Row, where he was to be carried forward to Lollard's Tower, but Cluney, his wife and maid had no time to lock up Wimshurst as they were extremely busy. When Wimshurst was left alone in Cluney's hall, a woman came to him and told him this was his chance to escape, which he took. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Died by 9 December 1568. (Fasti)]

1583 Edition, page 2096[Back to Top]
Alexander Yong

Augustinian friar; [Fasti; Ecclesiæ Scoticanæ] principal of St Leonard's College, St Andrews (1517 - 31x33); sub-prior 1533; principal again (1540 - 43)

Alexander Yong was one of those who, with Bishop Beaton, persecuted Patrick Hamilton. 1570, p. 1108; 1576, p. 947; 1583, p. 974.

1583 Edition, page 998
Alexander [or Saunder] Gouch

(1520? - 1536)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Woodbridge, Suffolk.

Master Nunn persecuted Gouch of Woodbridge and Driver's wife of Grundisburgh, both of whom were to be burned near to his house at Grundisburgh. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

A search was made for Gouch and Driver's wife, who were found and sent to Melton prison. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

Gouch was condemned. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

He was burned at Ipswich on 4 November 1558. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiffs, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When they were tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

[Note that Gouch is called Saunder Gouch in 1563, but Alexander Gouch from 1570 et seq.]

1583 Edition, page 2072
Alfic of Kent

(fl. C8) [ODNB sub Aethelbert II]

Son of Wihtred. Possibly king of Kent briefly with half-brothers Aethelbert II and Eadberht I from 725

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 149; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

1583 Edition, page 133
Alfonso d'Avalos

(1502 - 1546)

Marques del Vasto (Guasto); Italian condottieri; fought on the imperial side in the Italian wars; marquese del Pescara 1525; commanded the imperial army in 1542.

The prince of Orange and the marques del Vasto besieged the Castel Sant'Angelo, where Clement VII and many cardinals had taken refuge during the attack on Rome in 1527. 1570, p. 1123; 1576, p. 961; 1583, p. 988.

1583 Edition, page 1012
Alfonso d'Este

(1486 - 1534)

Duke of Ferrara (1505 - 34)

Henry VIII and Thomas Wolsey planned to persuade the duke of Ferrara that it would be in his interests to support Wolsey's bid for the papacy. 1570, pp. 1128-29; 1576, p. 966; 1583, p. 993.

1583 Edition, page 1017[Back to Top]
Alfonso y Castro

(1495 - 1558)

Franciscan theologian and preacher, confessor to Philip II. [DNB].

On 10 February 1555, Castro preached a sermon before Philip II criticising the recent burnings of heretics. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

A copy of his Adversus haereses was given to George Marsh in an effort to induce him to recant. 1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1480; 1583, p. 1563.

On 25 February , at about 8am, two Spanish friars visited Bradford in the Counter. One of them was the king's confessor, the other was Alphonso de Castro. 1563, pp. 1208-11, 1570, pp. 1797-99, 1576, pp. 1534-36, 1583, pp. 1617-19.

Bradford told the servant of the unnamed gentlewoman that he had read the work of Friar Fonse, which stated that all heretics should suffer death. 1570, p. 1803, 1570, p. 1803, 1576, p. 1539 , 1583, p. 1622.

[Alias Friar Fonse or Aphonso de Castro.]

1583 Edition, page 1553 | 1583 Edition, page 1587 | 1583 Edition, page 1641
Alfred (the Great)

(848/9 - 899) [ODNB]

King of the West Saxons and of the Anglo-Saxons (871 - 99)

Youngest son of Aethelwulf of Wessex. Military, legal and educational reformer.

Arthur founded a monastery at Athelney and a convent at Shaftesbury. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

1583 Edition, page 31 | 1583 Edition, page 133 | 1583 Edition, page 156
Alger

Monk of Corbie; opponent of Berengar of Tours

Alger was one of the chief opponents of Berengar of Tours. 1570, p. 1311; 1576, p. 1121; 1583, p. 1147.

1583 Edition, page 1171
Alhflæd of Mercia

(fl. C7) [ODNB sub Peada, Oswiu]

Daughter of Oswiu, king of the Northumbrians. Married Peada, king of the Middle Angles, on her father's condition that he become a Christian

King Penda gave his consent to the marriage of his son Peada with Alhflæd, daughter of Oswiu of Northumbria. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Peada reigned with his brother Wulfhere. He was killed by his wife. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

She was said to have been responsible for her husband's murder. 1570, pp. 150, 164; 1576, pp. 112, 123; 1583, pp. 111, 122.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 145 | 1583 Edition, page 157[Back to Top]
Alhred

(fl. 765 - 774) [ODNB sub Oswulf]

King of Northumbria (765 - 74)

Deprived of the crown by the Northumbrian council, fled to Bamburgh, then to exile with the Picts.

Some accounts say that Alhred expelled his predecessor, Æthelwold Moll. He himself was expelled in turn by his own people. 1570, pp. 150, 175; 1576, pp. 112, 132; 1583, pp. 111, 131.

1583 Edition, page 134 | 1583 Edition, page 154
Alice Alexander

In a letter Bartlett Green stated that Alice Alexander may be innocent and so prove honest. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1856.

1583 Edition, page 1880 | 1583 Edition, page 2061 | 1583 Edition, page 2125[Back to Top]
Alice Benden

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Staplehurst [or possibly Cranbrook], Kent.

Alice Benden was brought before Roberts of Cranbrook on 14 October 1556 for not attending church. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

She remained in prison for fourteen days before she was called before the bishop of Dover. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Alice Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

The Saturday after her release her husband willed her to go to church but she refused. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

On Sunday two weeks later, Alice Benden's husband talked with others of the parish and then had his wife sent to Sir John Guildford, who sent her to prison again. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

The constable's boy escorted Alice to Canterbury castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

While in prison, Alice Benden and another prisoner, the wife of Potkin, devised to live on only 2 1/2 pence a day, to see how well they could sustain penury and hunger before they were forced to endure it. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She lay in prison for nine weeks, sustained by only three farthings a day, which she spent on bread alone, drinking only water. She remained in the same clothes during these nine weeks. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

At the stake Alice Benden gave her handkerchief to John Banks, asking him to remember her by it. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

She gave the lace from about her waist to her jailor, asking him to deliver it to her brother. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

She asked that the shilling her father had sent her when she first went to prison be returned to him. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

She was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-56.]

1583 Edition, page 2004
Alice Bird

Neé Morrant. Of Norwich.

Alice Bird's husband was forced to flee Norwich for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1678.

[Daughter of Jane Morant. Not related to the Birds of Dedham or Ipswich.]

Alice Brook

Catholic. Of Worcester.

Alice Johnson wanted to trap John Davis into being arrested for owning heretical books. She consulted with Thomas Parton and Alice Brook and with certain canons, including Johnson, chancellor to Heath. It was decided that Alice Brook's son, Oliver (a school fellow of Davis), would feign friendship with him and so gain access to Davis's writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

1583 Edition, page 2097
Alice Browne

of the parish of St Sepulchre's, London; daughter of John Browne, who was martyred at Ashford, Kent

Alice Browne was often told the story of her father, John Browne, by her mother. Alice was the source for John Foxe. 1570, p. 1480; 1576, p. 1255; 1583, p. 1293.

1583 Edition, page 1317
Alice Coberley

Wife of William Coberley, the martyr. Of Wiltshire.

Alice Coberley was imprisoned in the penicote's (the keeper's) house while her husband was in prison. 1570, pp. 2073-74, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

She was tricked into picking up a key that the keeper's wife, Agnes Penicote, had heated in flames. When Alice winced at the pain, Agnes mocked that she would not be able to stand the flames of the stake. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

1583 Edition, page 1918[Back to Top]
Alice Coker

Of Stoke, Suffolk.

Alice Coker was the daughter of a woman named Eve, both of whom were persecuted as members of the congregation at Stoke, Suffolk. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2098
Alice Doyly

Buckinghamshire Lollard; married (1) John Wilmot; married (2) William Cottesmere; married (3) Thomas Doyly

Elizabeth Wighthill gave evidence against her mistress, Alice Doyly, in 1520. Alice Doyly was said to have praised the preacher John Hacker and to have spoken against pilgrimages and images. 1570, p. 1118; 1576, p. 957; 1583, p. 984.

1583 Edition, page 1008
Alice Gardiner

Old woman of the White Hart, against the Savoy, later of Colchester. Charged in 1528 [Fines]

Alice Gardiner, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

1583 Edition, page 1072
Alice Hallingdale

Wife of John Hallingdale. Of London.

In the examination of her husband, it was said that their child was baptised in English. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1919, 1583, p. 2026.

1583 Edition, page 2050
Alice Harding

of Amersham, Bucks; wife of Thomas [Fines]; charged, abjured 1511; accused extensively 1521

Thomas Harding and his wife first abjured under William Smith in 1506, along with many others. Their penance was reduced in 1515, but continued to include an annual pilgrimage to Ashridge. In 1522 Alice failed to go. 1570, p. 1117; 1576, p. 956; 1583, p. 983.

1583 Edition, page 1007[Back to Top]
Alice Hilles

of Tenterden, Kent; wife of Robert

Alice Hilles abjured in Kent in 1511. 1570, p. 1455; 1576, p. 1241; 1583, p. 1278.

1583 Edition, page 1302
Alice Hurst

Sister of John and Jeffrey Hurst. Of Shakersley, Lancashire.

John Hurst was bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jeffrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 172, 187, 192.]

1583 Edition, page 2100
Alice Johnson (alias Collins)

Wife of Richard; charged in 1528, imprisoned 1534 at Fulham, starved; sent to Colchester, escaped [Fines]

Richard Johnson and Alice his wife had been persecuted for a long time in Salisbury. They were charged before John Stokesley in 1531 with possessing Wyclif's Wicket. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

Richard Johnson and his wife were imprisoned at Fulham with Edward Freese. 1563, p. 494; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1026.

1583 Edition, page 1050 | 1583 Edition, page 1071 | 1583 Edition, page 2097[Back to Top]
Alice Locker

Of unknown status and origin but probably from Essex.

Alice Locker wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Probably related or married to Thomas Locker]

1583 Edition, page 1998
Alice Mount

(1516 - 1557)

Wife of William Mount. Invalid. Martyr. Of Great Bentley.

Alice Mount asked that her daughter, Rose, fetch a drink for her. On her way back through the house Tyrrel stopped Rose and advised her to encourage her parents to become better catholics. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

She was condemned. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

She was burned in the castle yard in Colchester 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

John Roth's letter to certain brethren condemned in Colchester mentions the Mounts. 1563, p. 1631, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

1583 Edition, page 2029 | 1583 Edition, page 2043
Alice Munt

Spinster. Of Great Bentley, Essex.

Munt was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Alice Munt was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

She wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

[Probably related to William Munt.]

1583 Edition, page 1996
Alice Oxes

Of Norwich.

Berry punched Alice Oxes when she visited him at his house. She apparently died from the blow later that night in her home. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

1583 Edition, page 2060[Back to Top]
Alice Potkins

(1507? - 1556)

Married woman. Of Staplehurst.

Alice Potkins was committed by Master Roberts to prison. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2140, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

A letter was written by fellow prisoners stating that she was in danger of starving to death. 1563, pp. 1547-48, 1570, p. 2140, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Alice Potkin was condemned prisoner for her beliefs. She died of hunger in prison at Canterbury in November 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2140, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

1583 Edition, page 1978
Alice Pulton

Wife of William Flower

Alice Pulton is named as William Flower's wife in articles presented against him. He was charged with marrying her while a priest. 1563, p. [recte 1131]; 1570, p. 1747; 1576, p. 1492; 1583, p. 1575

1583 Edition, page 1599
Alice Rayburne

Sister of John Rayburne

Alice Rayburne accused her brother of disparaging transubstantiation and of favouring services in English. 1570, p. 1119; 1576, p. 958; 1583, p. 984.

1583 Edition, page 1008
Alice Shipside

Wife of George Shipside. Sister to Nicholas Ridley.

Alice Shipside was kind to Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

Ridley had married his widowed sister to his servant George Shipside and provided for them and for her three children. The lease had been lost through the action of Bonner, and Ridley pleaded with Queen Mary to provide relief for his sister. 1570, pp. 1935-36, 1576, p. 1660, 1583, p. 1768.

Ridley's 'friendly farewell' sent greetings to her. 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

1583 Edition, page 1792 | 1583 Edition, page 1794[Back to Top]
Alice Shipwright

of Steeple Bumpstead, Essex; wife of Gilbert [Fines]

Alice Shipwright, along with many others of Steeple Bumpstead, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Alice Smith

of Ridgewell, Essex; accused with her mother, sister and 3 brothers in 1525 [Fines sub Agnes Smith]

Alice Smith, her mother, brothers and sister, with many from Essex, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Alice Spencer

Alice Spencer was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

1583 Edition, page 2098
Alice Thwaites

Married gentlewoman (possibly widowed) of at least 30 years of age. Of Winston.

Alice Thwaites was persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced with two of her servants to flee Winston. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

1583 Edition, page 1936
Alice Wallys [or Wallis]

Wife of William Wallys. Of Colchester.

In a letter to Bonner, John Kingston reported that Alice Wallys had submitted herself, abjured her erroneous opinions and asked for absolution. She was to do penance the following Sunday [the first Sunday after 30 August 1557] at St Peter's church. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Alice was one of nine women who promised to recant. She was allowed to remain at home as she was heavily pregnant at the time. Judgement against her was made in the presence of the bailiffs, the aldermen and the town clerk. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

1583 Edition, page 1996[Back to Top]
Alice [or Agnes] Snoth

(d. 1556)

A widow. Martyr. Of Kent.

Agnes Snoth was committed to the sheriff of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

She was burned on 31 January 1556 at Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on Snoth's condemnation, so that she could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

She was burned at Canterbury on 31 January 1556. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

[Also referred to as Agnes Snottle.]

1583 Edition, page 2077
Alice [or Agnes] Snoth

(d. 1556)

Widow. Martyr. Of the parish of Smarden, Kent.

Agnes Snoth was committed to the sheriff of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

She was burned on 31 January 1556 at Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on Snoth's condemnation, so that she could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

She was burned at Canterbury on 31 January 1556. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

[Also refered to as Agnes Snottle.]

1583 Edition, page 1882
Alice [or Elizabeth or Margaret] Driver

(1528? - 1558)

Martyr. Wife of a husbandman. Of Grundisburgh, Norfolk.

Master Nownd persecuted Gouch of Woodbridge and Driver's wife of Grundisburgh, both of whom were to be burned near to his house at Grundisburgh. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

A search was made for Gouch and Driver's wife, who were found and sent to Melton prison. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Alice Driver was transferred to Bury St Edmunds for examination. 1563, 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

She rebuked Queen Mary, for which the chief justice, Sir Clement Higham, ordered her ears to be cut off. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Alice Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

Alice Driver was examined a second time. 1563, pp. 1671-72, 1570, pp. 2247-48, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, pp. 2048-49.

She was condemned. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

She was burned at Ipswich on 4 November 1558. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiffs, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

[The name of Driver's wife changes throughout. In 1563, pp. 1670-71, she is called Elizabeth in the headings, as well as in the heading to her second examination, but on p. 1672 of 1563 she is called Margaret. In 1570 et seq. she is called Alice.]

1583 Edition, page 2072
Allectus

(d. 296) [ODNB; M. Di Maio, www.roman-emperors.org ]

Murdered Carausius and took the throne

Emperor in Britain (293 - 296); died in battle with Asclepiodotus

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 147; 1576, p. 109; 1583, p. 108.

1583 Edition, page 131
Almachius

Judge during the reign of Severus Alexander (222 - 35)(

Because there was no edict protecting Christians during the reign of Severus Alexander, judges like Almachius could continue to persecute them. 1570, p. 84; 1576, p. 58; 1583, p. 57.

Almachius condemned St Cecilia to death. 1570, p. 85; 1576, p. 58; 1583, p. 58.

1583 Edition, page 80[Back to Top]
Alphege (Ælfheah, Elphege)

(c. 1012) [ODNB]

Bishop of Winchester, archbishop of Canterbury (1006 - 12)

At the behest of Lanfranc, Osbern wrote the lives of Oda, Dunstan and Alphege. 1570, p. 1301; 1576, p. 1113; 1583, p. 1138.

1583 Edition, page 1162
Amaury (Almeric, Almaric) de Bene

(d. 1204 - 1207)

Taught at Paris; his doctrines were condemned by the university in 1204; condemnation ratified by Innocent III; his body was exhumed in 1209, reburied in unconsecrated ground; his followers, Amalricians, were formally condemned at the 4th Lateran Council in 1215

The doctrines of Amaury (Americ) were condemned at the fourth Lateran Council. 1570, p. 1313; 1576, p. 1124; 1583, p. 1149.

1583 Edition, page 1173
Ambrose (St Ambrose)

(c. 340 - 397) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Bishop of Milan (374 - 397); doctor of the church

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 15, 20, 56, 91, 128, 131, 146; 1576, pp. 12, 16, 35, 63, 92, 95, 102, 108; 1583, pp. 12, 16, 35, 63, 91, 94, 101, 107.

1583 Edition, page 35 | 1583 Edition, page 39 | 1583 Edition, page 58 | 1583 Edition, page 86 | 1583 Edition, page 94 | 1583 Edition, page 114 | 1583 Edition, page 117 | 1583 Edition, page 124 | 1583 Edition, page 130 | 1583 Edition, page 153 | 1583 Edition, page 1161 | 1583 Edition, page 1196 | 1583 Edition, page 2028[Back to Top]
Ambrose Dudley

(1528? - 1590)

Third son of the Duke of Northumberland; Earl of Warwick (1561–90) (DNB)

Put in the Tower with Northumberland 25 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

Released from the Tower on 18 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1482).

1583 Edition, page 1489 | 1583 Edition, page 1506
Ammon, Zenon, Ptolomeus and Ingenuus

C3 soldiers under Decius who proclaimed themselves Christians at Alexandria during persecution

Ammon, Zenon, Ptolomeus and Ingenuus urged constancy on the Christians under trial and proclaimed themselves to be Christians. 1570, p. 90; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 62.

1583 Edition, page 85
Ammonarion

C3 virgin martyred under Decius at Alexandria

Ammonarion was tortured and then killed by the sword. 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 62.

1583 Edition, page 85
Ammonius Saccas

(fl. late C2, early C3)

b. Alexandria; started a neoplatonic school there c. 193; teacher of Clement and Origen

Ammonius wrote many books in defence of Christianity. 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82[Back to Top]
Amones

fl. C4. Deacon of Heraclea, Thrace; martyr under Licinius

Amones was tortured and then killed by the sword. 1570, p. 123; 1576, p. 88; 1583, p. 88.

1583 Edition, page 111
Amphibalus

Legendary priest sheltered by St Alban, in whose place Alban was arrested [ODNB sub Alban]

The name is the Latinized Greek equivalent of caracalla, cloak. This was misread as the name of the priest

The name is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 124; 1576, p. 89; 1583, p. 89.

1583 Edition, page 112 | 1583 Edition, page 131
Anabius

Assistant to Claudius, governor in the Italian Alps under Valerian

He assisted at the execution of Pontius. 1570, p. 104; 1576, p. 73; 1583, p. 73.

1583 Edition, page 96
Anatolia (St Anatolia)

Virgin martyr under Decius at Thora [Catholic Encyclopedia]

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 61; 1583, p. 61.

1583 Edition, page 84[Back to Top]
Anatolius of Alexandria

(d. c. 285) scholar; master of mathematics, physics, astronomy, philosophy and rhetoric; head of the Aristotelian school at Alexandria

Bishop of Laodicea (268 - 83); wrote a treatise on the time of the celebration of Easter

Anatolius, in a part of Alexandria besieged by the Romans, arranged with Eusebius for the Romans to allow the escape of those opposing them. 1570, p. 107; 1576, p. 76; 1583, p. 76.

Anatolius was cited by both Colmán, bishop of Northumbria, and Wilfrid to support their opposing positions on the calculation of the date of Easter at the Synod of Whitby in 664. 1570, p. 107; 1576, p. 76; 1583, p. 76.

1583 Edition, page 99 | 1583 Edition, page 146
Andhun of Sussex

C7 ealdorman of the South Saxons [ODNB sub Caedwalla]

With Berhthun drove out Caedwalla, king of the Gewisse in 685; Caedwalla returned in 686

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 149; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

1583 Edition, page 133
Andoclus

C1-2 martyr in Gaul

Andoclus was sent to Gaul by Polycarp of Smyrna. He was beaten and beheaded during the reign of Severus. 1570, p. 80; 1576, p. 55; 1583, p. 55.

1583 Edition, page 78
Andrea Carafa

Count of Sanseverina; viceroy of Naples (1524 - 27)

Having engaged in wars against Charles V, allied to Henry VIII, Francis I was captured at the battle of Pavia by the duke of Bourbon and the viceroy of Naples and taken into Spain in 1525. 1570, p. 1122; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

1583 Edition, page 1011[Back to Top]
Andreas Osiander

(1496? - 1552)

German reformer. [Hillerbrand, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation]

Cranmer's wife is mentioned as a niece to the wife of Osiander. Cranmer was married while acting as the king's ambassador to Charles the emperor. 1563, p. 1478, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

1583 Edition, page 1894
Andrew Alexander

Keeper of Newgate Prison under Mary.

Philpot talked with his keeper, Alexander, during which talk Philpot refused to recant. 1563, p. 1446, 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 1829.

Robert Smith sent his wife a purse of money via Alexander, almost certainly the same person as Philpot's keeper. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Alexander spoke cruelly about his prisoners. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

His body became so swollen and rotten with disease that the stench became intolerable and his body greatly disfigured. He eventually died of his ailment. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

1583 Edition, page 1725 | 1583 Edition, page 1853
Andrew Baynton

Andrew Baynton met with Sir Henry Knyvet and Stephen Gardiner at a council at Ratisbone. 1583, p. 1786.

1583 Edition, page 1810
Andrew Baynton

(1516? - 1564) [ODNB sub Baynton family]

Scholar; served Cromwell; MP Wiltshire, Sussex

William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

1583 Edition, page 1383[Back to Top]
Andrew Dury

Cistercian abbot of Montrose (1525 - 41); bishop of Galloway (1541 - 58) [cistercians.shef.ac.uk/abbeys/melrose.php; Fasti ecclesiae scoticanae]

Andrew Dury sat on the assize that condemned Sir John Borthwick for heresy. 1563, p. 575; 1583, p. 1259.

Dury sat on the assize that deprived and exiled John Kerr. 1570, p. 1448; 1576, p. 1235; 1583, p. 1272.

He sat on the assize that tried and condemned Adam Wallace. 1570, pp. 1448-50; 1576, pp. 1235-36; 1583, pp. 1272-73.

1583 Edition, page 1283 | 1583 Edition, page 1296
Andrew Hewet

(d. c. 1541)

Martyred at Salisbury with fellow interlude players Ramsey and Richard Spenser

Hewet was charged with heresy about the sacrament of the altar and burnt at Salisbury. 1563, p. 617; 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1202.

1583 Edition, page 1226
Andrew Hewett

(d. 1533) [Fines]

of Faversham, Kent. Apprentice tailor; condemned with Frith and burnt with him

Andrew Hewett met with William Holt, who suspected him of heretical beliefs. Holt followed him to a bookseller's house and brought officers to search it. Hewett was arrested there, taken to the bishop's house and put in irons. He had a file passed to him by Valentine Freese, filed off the irons and escaped. 1563, pp. 419, 506; 1570, p. 1179; 1576, p. 1008; 1583, p. 1036.

Wythers, knowing that Andrew Hewett had no idea where to go after his escape from prison, offered to help. He took him into the country and then to the house of John Chapman, where he brought William Holt. He and Holt betrayed Hewett, John Tybal and John Chapman. The three men were arrested. Tybal and Chapman were both bound with ropes and taken to the bishop's house, but kept apart. Hewett was sent to Lollards' Tower. 1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1179; 1576, p. 1008; 1583, p. 1036.

Hewett was examined by Stokesley, Gardiner and Longland. He was condemned and burnt at Smithfield with John Frith. 1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1180; 1576, p. 1009; 1583, p. 1036.

1583 Edition, page 1060
Andrew Ingforby

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Andrew Ingforby, his wife and daughter fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Father-in-law of Lawrence Humphrey. See ODNB.]

1583 Edition, page 2113[Back to Top]
Andrew Kempe

of St Alban's parish; charged in 1541 with disturbing a service by reading the New Testament [Fines]

Andrew Kempe was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Andrew Morice

Andrew Morice was a witness against Giles Harrison when he was presented before Bonner in London in 1541. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1176; 1583, p. 1205.

1583 Edition, page 1229
Andrew Oliphant

Chaplain to John Hamilton, archbishop of St Andrews; dean of Fife 1549; dean of Forthrif (1539 - 44); dean of Linlithglow (1544 - 45) [Fasti ecclesiæ scoticanæ]

Andrew Oliphant ordered Walter Mylne to answer to the articles put to him at his examination. He then pronounced sentence against him. 1570, p. 1452; 1576, p. 1238; 1583, p. 1275.

Oliphant helped Mylne up to the stake. He forbade him to speak, but some of the young men insisted that he be permitted. 1570, p. 1453; 1576, p. 1239; 1583, p. 1275.

1583 Edition, page 1299
Andrew Perne

(1519? - 1589)

DD (1552). Vice-chancellor of Cambridge (1551, 1556, 1559, 1574, 1580). Master of Peterhouse (1554 - 1589). Dean of Ely (1557 - 1589). (DNB)

Andrew Perne spoke out against transubstantiation in the 1553 convocation, whereupon Hugh Weston, the prolocutor, reprimanded Perne for criticising views to which he had earlier subscribed in the convocation. 1563, p. 912; 1570, p. 1576; 1576, p. 1344; and 1583, p. 1414.

Andrew Perne was called on to repent by Bradford in a letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Perne was notified by Cardinal Pole's commission, appointed to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, that he and all Cambridge graduates were to assemble and present all the records belonging to the university or any of the colleges. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

Scot, Watson and Christopherson wrote to Perne commanding him to warn the graduates of their impending visit to Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

In January 1557 Perne acted as queen's commissioner in the examination of certain scholars at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson authorised Perne to be the common factor for the university. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1959.

Perne was deemed by Christopherson to be more catholic than anyone else at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Perne exhibited the second commission sent to seek out heresy at the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

On the day appointed for the judgment of Phagius and Bucer at Cambridge, Perne addressed the commissioners prior to Scot's oration. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

Perne's sermon against Bucer was against his conscience. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1868, 1583, p. 1961.

1583 Edition, page 1438 | 1583 Edition, page 1652 | 1583 Edition, page 1978
Andrew Perne

)1519? - 1589) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1539; MA 1540; BTh 1547; DTh 1552; master of Peterhouse, Cambridge 1553; dean of Ely 1557; vice-chancellor of Cambridge

In the disputation at Cambridge in 1549, William Glyn answered the second disputation, opposed by Andrew Perne, Edmund Grindal, Edmund Guest and James Pilkington. 1570, pp. 1556-57; 1576, pp. 1326-28; 1583, pp. 1382-85.

In the same disputation at Cambridge in 1549, Andrew Perne answered the third disputation, opposed by Thomas Parker, Leonard Pollard, Thomas Vavasour and John Young. 1570, pp. 1556-57; 1576, pp. 1326-28; 1583, pp. 1385-88.

1583 Edition, page 1406 | 1583 Edition, page 1412
Andrew Pierson

(d. 1594)

D.Th. 1551 (Cambridge); Senior Proctor Corpus Christi, Cambridge [DNB]

Foxe records that Pierson was deprived of his living by John Young on 3 October 1553 for administering Edwardine communion and refusing to celebrate mass (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1406).

Neither Foxe nor the DNB list the living from which Pierson was expelled, but John Fines, citing A. F. Northcote, Notes of the History of Monks Eleigh (Ipswich, 1930), gives the living as Monks Eleigh and states that Pierson was presented in 1551. [Significantly this living was in the gift of the archbishop of Canterbury].

[NB: The DNB gives Pierson?s last name as ?Peerson?, Fines as ?Pearson?.]

1583 Edition, page 1490
Andrew, Paul, Nicomachus and Dionisia

of Troada; reputed martyrs under Decius

Andrew and Paul were carried out of the city and stamped to death by the mob. 1570, pp. 88, 91; 1576, pp. 61, 64; 1583, pp. 61, 64.

1583 Edition, page 84[Back to Top]
Angel's wife

Midwife. Of London.

Swingfield seized Angel's wife, a midwife, while she was at the labour of Mistress Walter. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

Angel's wife was taken to Lollard's Tower, 28 weeks pregnant. She gave birth to a boy without assistance in Lollard's Tower. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

Her friends stood surety for her but she was sent by Story to Newgate. Story had accused her of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her home. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

1583 Edition, page 2124
Anicetus (St Anicetus)

(d. c. 166) [Kelly]

Pope (c. 155 - c. 166)

Anthea sent her son Eleutherius to Anicetus to be brought up in the Christian religion. 1570, p. 66; 1576, p. 41; 1583, p. 41.

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 14, 62, 78; 1576, pp. 11, 38, 53; 1583, p. 11, 38, 53.

1583 Edition, page 34 | 1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 67 | 1583 Edition, page 76 | 1583 Edition, page 79
Anna Hooper

(d. Dec. 1555)

Wife of John Hooper; born Anna de Tilley, but Anna de Tserelas when she married Hooper [Garrett, Marian Exiles sub 'Hooper, Daniel'].

Anna Hooper is described by Foxe as a 'Burgonian' (presumably a native of Bruges) and (in 1563) 'of great parentage'. Foxe also states that Hooper married her in Zurich. 1563, pp. 1049-50; 1570, p. 1675; 1576, p. 1429; 1583, p. 1503. [Actually Anna Hooper was from Antwerp and married John Hooper in Basel.]

Bullinger reported to Hooper, in a letter of 10 October 1554, that Hooper's wife and son were in Frankfurt. 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1445; 1583, p. 1518.

In a letter dated 21 January 1555, John Hooper complained that his letters had not been delivered to his wife. 1563, p. 1063; 1570, p. 1685; 1576, p. 1438; 1583, p. 1511.

John Hooper sent her a long letter of consolation dated 13 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1687-90; 1576, pp. 1440-42; 1583, pp. 1513-16.

1583 Edition, page 1527 | 1583 Edition, page 1537
Anna of the East Angles

(d. 654?) [ODNB]

King of the East Angles; came to power after Penda of Mercia invaded and killed Ecgric; killed during an invasion by Penda

Anna was the father of three holy daughters: Æthelthryth, Seaxburh and Æthelburh. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135 | 1583 Edition, page 156
Anne Albright

(d.1556)

Martyr.

Anne Albright was examined at Canterbury, where she denied confession and transubstantiation. She was burned on 31 January 1556 at Canterbury. 1563, pp. 1469-70, 1570, pp. 2031-32, 1576, pp. 1751-52, 1583, p. 1859.

Alias Champnes.

1583 Edition, page 1882
Anne Askew

(1521 - 1546)

Martyr. Second daughter of Sit William Askew of Lincolnshire. [DNB]

Anne Askew was described as a faithful witness of Christ by Robert Glover in a letter to his wife.1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, p. 1710.

In a letter to certain godly women, William Tyms asked them to remember the blessed Anne Askew and her example. 1570, p. 2078, 1576, p. 1792, 1583, pp. 1898-99.

Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot were tormented around the same time as Anne Askew. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

1583 Edition, page 1734 | 1583 Edition, page 1922 | 1583 Edition, page 2082 | 1583 Edition, page 2151
Anne Askew (Kyme)

(c. 1521 - 1546) [ODNB]

Writer, protestant martyr; 2nd daughter of Sir William Askew of Lincolnshire; married name: Kyme

Anne Askew was brought before the Quest at her first examination at Sadler's Hall in 1545. She was then taken to the lord mayor, William Laxton, to be examined. 1563, p. 669; 1570, pp. 1413-14; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, pp. 1234-35.

Laxton committed Anne Askew to prison in the Counter after the examination and refused to take sureties. 1563, p. 670; 1570, p. 1414; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, p. 1235.

Her cousin Christopher Brittayn tried to get her bailed, and she was examined again, this time before Bishop Bonner. At the end of the examination, she signed a confession of faith. After petitions to Bonner from Brittayn and Hugh Weston, she was released from prison and bailed under her sureties, Brittayn and Francis Spilman. 1563, pp. 670-72; 1570, pp. 1414-15; 1576, pp. 1205-07; 1583, pp. 1235-36.

Anne Askew was examined a second time, before the king's council at Greenwich in 1546, where she was condemned. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

She became very ill and was in great pain. She asked to see Hugh Latimer, but was refused and sent to Newgate. She wrote to the council, to the lord chancellor and to the king, setting out her belief about the sacraments. 1563, pp. 683-75; 1570, pp. 1417-18; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1238.

Richard Rich and Sir John Baker went to Anne Askew in the Tower and tried to get her to incriminate others. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Sir Anthony Knyvet had his jailer rack Anne Askew. When Knyvet refused to have the racking continued, Richard Rich and Thomas Wriothesley racked her themselves. She refused to give any information about others, but was released by Knyvet. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

She sent a reply from Newgate to a letter from John Lassells. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

Anne Askew was brought from Newgate to Smithfield in a chair because her torture had left her unable to walk. 1563, p. 677; 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

Wriothesley brought her letters offering the king's pardon if she recanted, but she refused. 1563, p. 677; 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

John Hemmysley, John Lasselles, John Adams and Anne Askew were burnt together at Smithfield. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1421; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, pp. 1240-41.

Stephen Gardiner, in a letter to the Lord Protector, accused John Bale of regarding Anne Askew as a saint. 1563, p. 733; 1583, p. 1343.

1583 Edition, page 1258 | 1583 Edition, page 1269 | 1583 Edition, page 1270 | 1583 Edition, page 1367[Back to Top]
Anne Bedike

of St Alban's parish; charged in 1541 with despising Our Lady and not praying to saints [Fines]

Anne Bedike was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Anne Boleyn

(c. 1500 - 1536) [ODNB]

Queen of England (1533 - 36); 2nd wife of Henry VIII; beheaded

While considering the question of the king's divorce, Cardinal Wolsey became aware that King Henry favoured Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1195; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Anne Boleyn was sent a copy of Simon Fish's Supplication for the Beggars. At the urging of her brother, she showed the book to the king. 1570, p. 448; 1570, p. 1153; 1576, p. 956; 1583, p. 1014.

Parliament approved Thomas Cranmer's separation of Henry and Catherine and his marriage to Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

Henry married Anne Boleyn. She, her father and her brother maintained many learned men at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, pp. 1025-26; 1583, p. 1054.

Anne was crowned and soon after gave birth to a daughter. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Anne had Hugh Latimer placed in the bishopric of Worcester and Nicholas Shaxton in the bishopric of Salisbury. 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

In 1536 parliament declared the marriage of the king and Queen Anne illegitimate and accused the queen of carnal relations with her brother and other men. 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

Anne was imprisoned in the Tower with her brother and others. She was beheaded, delivering a short address before. 1563, p. 526; 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

Catherine of Aragon died in the same year in which Anne Boleyn and William Tyndale were executed. 1570, p. 1232; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

Anne Boleyn is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

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Anne Bradford

Sister of John Bradford.

Anne Bradford was sent greetings by her brother in a letter he sent to his mother and others. 1570, p. 1839,1576, p. 1574, 1583, p. 1656.

1583 Edition, page 1680
Anne Du Bourg

(1520? - 1559)

Anne Du Bourg was a distinguished magistrate in the parlement of Paris who was condemned and executed for heresy before his own tribunal on 23 December 1559. Foxe reports his seizure on the orders of the king by the Constable de Montmorency following the famous mercuriale of the parlement of Paris on 10 June 1559 (1570, p. 2311, 1576, p. 2000, 1583, p. 2110).

1583 Edition, page 2134
Anne Fitzwilliam (nèe Sapcote)

(d. 1576) [ODNB sub Sir William Fitzwilliam (1526-99)]

of Milton, Northamptonshire; wife of Sir William Fitzwilliam (d. 1552); daughter of Sir Richard Sapcote of Elton, Huntingdonshire

After her condemnation, Anne Askew was asked about the duchess of Suffolk, the countess of Sussex, the countess of Hertfordshire, Lady Denny and Lady Fitzwilliam. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

1583 Edition, page 1262
Anne Glover

Wife of John Glover. Of Mancetter, Warwickshire.

Anne Glover was apprehended and taken to Lichfield for examination. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

Anne Glover was examined by the Marian authorities who were seeking her husband. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

After his death John Glover was buried in the churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

[Foxe also refers to her as Agnes Glover.]

1583 Edition, page 1738 | 1583 Edition, page 2047 | 1583 Edition, page 2095
Anne Herbert (nèe Parr)

(before 1514 - 1552) [ODNB]

Daughter of Sir Thomas Parr; wife of William Herbert; countess of Pembroke (1551 - 52); maid in waiting to sister Queen Katherine

Stephen Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

When Thomas Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

1583 Edition, page 1267
Anne Lacy

Widow. Of Nottinghamshire. Sister of Henry Lacy (by 1491 - 1564/65), MP, JP. [Bindoff]

Anne Lacy was driven to hide her Bible and other books in a dunghill. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2073.

Her brother was a justice but was of little help to her. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2073.

Queen Mary died before Lacy could be prosecuted. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2073.

1583 Edition, page 2097
Anne Moone

Wife of Peter Moone.

When Anne Moone appeared before Hopton, he told her husband that her looks were deceptive and that he would rather she would commit adultery with twenty men than disobey the queen and the pope's ordinance. She defied his words. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

When her husband relented, she did too. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

She was allowed to depart to suckle her daughter. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Anne Moone felt troubled at her denial. As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moore and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Hopton and Dunning left without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

1583 Edition, page 1966
Anne of Cleves

(1515 - 1557) [ODNB]

Queen of England (1540); 4th consort of Henry VIII; marriage annulled

Thomas Cromwell arranged the marriage between the king and Anne of Cleeves. 1570, p. 1295; 1576, p. 1109; 1583, p. 1134.

Henry VIII repudiated Anne of Cleves, divorced her and married Katherine Howard at the time of the execution of Cromwell. 1570, pp. 1361, 1385; 1576, pp. 1161, 1181; 1583, pp. 1190, 1210.

Not long before the king's death, Anne of Cleves, along with the king and Queen Katherine Parr and other noblewomen, attended a grand banquet for the French ambassador. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

1583 Edition, page 1158 | 1583 Edition, page 1213 | 1583 Edition, page 1218 | 1583 Edition, page 1234 | 1583 Edition, page 1269
Anne Radcliffe (nèe Calthorp)

(d. 1579x82) [ODNB sub Robert Radcliffe]

Countess of Sussex; in Katherine Parr's household; evangelical

After her condemnation, Anne Askew was asked about the duchess of Suffolk, the countess of Sussex, the countess of Hertfordshire, Lady Denny and Lady Fitzwilliam. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

1583 Edition, page 1262[Back to Top]
Anne Seymour

(1497 - 1587)

Wife of Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset (DNB, sub 'Seymour, Edward'; Complete Peerage)

Released from the Tower on 10 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

1583 Edition, page 1489
Anne Seymour

(c. 1510 - 1587) [ODNB]

née Stanhope; wife of Sir Edward Seymour (1535 - 52); countess of Hertfordshire 1537; duchess of Somerset 1547; imprisoned in the Tower 1551, freed 1553; married Francis Newdegate 1558; protestant patron

After her condemnation, Anne Askew was asked about the duchess of Suffolk, the countess of Sussex, the countess of Hertfordshire, Lady Denny and Lady Fitzwilliam. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Edmund Bonner, in his third examination by the king's commissioners, claimed to have frequently kept company with the Lord Protector and his wife and to have preached before them. 1570, p. 1509; 1576, p. 1279; 1583, p. 1318.

Anne Seymour quarrelled with her sister-in-law, Katherine Parr, now married to Thomas Seymour, encouraging a rift between their husbands. 1570, p. 1545; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

1583 Edition, page 1262 | 1583 Edition, page 1342 | 1583 Edition, page 1391
Anne Smith

Wife of Robert Smith, martyr.

Anne Smith received a letter from her husband which notified her of several tokens (food and money) that were due to be sent to her by several of his fellow prisoners. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

She received another letter from her husband dated 1555. 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

She received another letter from her husband, dated 15 April 1555. 1563, p. 1267, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, 1607, 1583, pp. 1700-01.

She received another letter from her husband. 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1606, 1583, p. 1701.

1583 Edition, page 1724[Back to Top]
Anne Starkey

Maid to Mistress Bright of Romford.

Rose Allin told Mistress Bright of Romford and her maid, Ann Starkey, of the burning of her hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

1583 Edition, page 2031
Anne Tree [or Try]

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Of East Grinstead.

Anne Tree was burned at Grinstead in Sussex on 18 July 1556. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1855, 1583, p. 1949.

[In BL, Harley 421 fos.109r-110v she is referred to as Anne Tree, but Foxe refers to her as Try in Acts and Monuments.]

1583 Edition, page 1973 | 1583 Edition, page 2048
Anne Warcup

or Warcoppe (d. 1571)

Born Anne Symonds; married Cuthbert Warcop of English, Oxon [Hasler, Commons, sub 'Warcoppe, Ralph'].

She was a supporter of heretics in prison during Mary's reign. [Fines]

She aided John Jewel in his flight into exile [Hasler, Commons, sub 'Warcoppe, Ralph'].

She fled with her husband to Frankfurt in the autumn of 1556 [Garrett, Marian Exiles, sub 'Warcope, Cuthbert'].

Anne Warcup received a letter from John Hooper, congratulating her on her constancy for the gospel. 1570, pp. 1641-42; 1576, p. 1444; 1583, p. 1517.

She received a letter from John Bradford. 1563, p. 1194, 1570, pp. 1814-15, 1576, 1584, p. 1633.

She received another letter from John Bradford. (7 February 1555). 1570, p. 1834, 1576, p. 1569, 1583, p. 1651.

Warcup was a great comfort to Ridley. 1563, p. 1295, 1570, p. 1897, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1725.

[NB: Anne Warcop was often associated with Joan Wilkinson, her husband's cousin. Joan Wilkinson stayed with the Warcops at English in 1554 and 1555 and later resided in their household at Frankfurt (Garrett, Marian Exiles.]

1583 Edition, page 1657 | 1583 Edition, page 1749[Back to Top]
Anno II (St Anno)

(c. 1010 - 1075) [Gams; Catholic Encyclopedia]

Archbishop of Cologne (1056 - 75); prominent in the government of Germany during the minority of King Henry IV; leader of the party which deprived Empress Agnes of power in 1062

Chancellor of Italy; helped to settle the papal dispute in favour of Alexander II in 1064

[Foxe calls him Otto]

Anno went to Rome on behalf of the emperor to meet Alexander and was persuaded to support him. 1563, p. 14.

Anno attended the council of Mantua in the time of Pope Alexander II. 1570, p. 1329; 1576, p. 1133; 1583, p. 1162.

1583 Edition, page 1186
Anselm of Bec (St Anselm)

(c. 1033 - 1109) [ODNB]

b. Italy; abbot of Bec (1078 - 93); archbishop of Canterbury (1093 - 1109)

Anselm held a synod at London in which priests were forbidden to marry. 1570, p. 1317; 1576, p. 1126; 1583, p. 1152.

Anselm went further than had Lanfranc. He would not allow lower clergy already married to retain their wives. 1570, p. 1331; 1576, p. 1135; 1583, p. 1164.

Anselm continued to insist that married clergy renounce their wives in spite of the urging of Pope Paschal II to show leniency. 1570, p. 1332; 1576, p. 1136; 1583, p. 1165.

1583 Edition, page 42 | 1583 Edition, page 1162 | 1583 Edition, page 1175 | 1583 Edition, page 1188[Back to Top]
Anselm Sele

Priest. Of unknown parish.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Anterus (St Anterus)

(d. 236) [Kelly]

Pope (November 235 - January 236)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82 | 1583 Edition, page 83
Anthea

Legendary mother of Eleutherius martyred under Hadrian

Anthea sent her son Eleutherius to Pope Anicetus to be brought up in the Christian religion. She was beheaded with her son. 1570, p. 66; 1576, p. 41; 1583, p. 41.

1583 Edition, page 64
Anthimus of Nicomedia

(d. early C4) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Bishop of Nicomedia; martyr

Anthimus brought with him a large number of martyrs and was beheaded. 1570, p. 111; 1576, p. 79; 1583, p. 78.

1583 Edition, page 101[Back to Top]
Anthony Afterwhittle

Anthony Afterwhittle was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

1583 Edition, page 1979
Anthony and Robert Beckwith

Husbandmen of Braintree, Essex. They and their parents were denounced in 1528 [Fines]

Anthony and Robert Beckwith and their parents, along with others of Essex, abjured. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

1583 Edition, page 1071
Anthony Barber

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged in 1541 for allowing his boy to sing against the sacrament [Fines]

Anthony Barber was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Anthony Belassis

(d. 1552) [Fasti

LLD; archdeacon of Colchester (1543 - 1552)

The king's commissioners in 1547 gave the injunctions and homilies addressed to Bishop Bonner, who had submitted a protestation, to Anthony Belassis and Gilbert Bourne to execute. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1309.

1583 Edition, page 1333
Anthony Brown

(1528 - 1592)

Viscount Montague (cr. 1554). Of Sussex. MP Guildford (1545, 1554), Petersfield (1553), Surrey (1554). JP Surrey and Sussex (1554 -1592). Master of the horse to King Philip (1554). (Bindoff)

Sir Anthony Browne was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was sent as an ambassador to the pope on 19 February 1555. Foxe speculates that this embassy concerned the restoration of monastic lands to the church. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1559.

John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 naming Brown as one of the commissioners who had used their commission to seize lands and goods of protestant fugitives. Brown had indicted several people under the charges of treason, as fugitives or for disobedience. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

In his letter to Bonner, John Kingston said that Brown had commanded him to receive his prisoners on 30 August 1557. Kingston related their conversation. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

John Kingston stated that he had requested Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale and Anthony Brown to expose unlawful writings and books. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Brown was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

[Not to be confused with Anthony Brown of Essex.]

Foxe occasionally refers to him as 'Lord Montacute'.

1583 Edition, page 1995 | 1583 Edition, page 2053
Anthony Brown

(1509/10 - 1567)

JP, MP for Lostwithel (1545), Great Bedwyn (1547), Preston (1553), Scarborough (1554), Maldon (1554). Sergeant-at-law and Mary's sergeant (1555). Chief Justice of the Common Pleas (1558 - 1559) and Justice of the Common Pleas (1559 - 1567). A leading early Elizabethan recusant [Bindoff, Commons, sub 'Browne, Anthony II'; DNB].

Sir Anthony Browne was instructed, in a letter of 19 August, to imprison those who criticised the 'Queenes order of religion' or did not attend mass and to report their names to the privy council. 1583, p. 1765. [Foxe's account was taken from APC V, p. 63, but Foxe misdated the incident to 1553; the Privy Council Register says 1554].

He threatened to send William Hunter's father to prison if William did not surrender himself. He interrogated William Hunter, became enraged with Hunter and sent Hunter to Bishop Bonner. 1570, pp. 1713-14; 1576, pp. 1462-63; 1583, pp. 1536-37.

He complained about the lack of wood at William Hunter's execution. He told Hunter that he would no more pray for him than for a dog. 1570, p. 1715; 1576, p. 1464; 1583, p. 1538.

He had Robert Hunter imprisoned in the stocks and then interrogated. 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. He sent him to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

He was present at the execution of Thomas Higbed. 1570, p. 1720; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1542.

Anthony Brown persecuted George Eagles. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Rumours were raised in Chelmsford that Justice Brown had falsely accused diverse honest men who had kept Eagles safe in their houses, in order to discredit Eagles. Someone named Reynold of Chelmsford witnessed this to be false report. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Sir Anthony Hungerford sought the advice of justice Brown on how he should act towards Richard White and John Hunt. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

[NB: Anthony Browne named Sir Edward Saunders as one of the overseers of his will (Bindoff, Commons).]

[Not to be confused with Anthony Brown of Sussex.]

1583 Edition, page 2034 | 1583 Edition, page 2079 | 1583 Edition, page 2084
Anthony Browne

(1528 - 1592) [ODNB]

1st Viscount Montagu (1554 - 92)

MP Guildford (1545, 1547); KB 1547; sheriff of Surrey and Sussex (1552 - 53); MP Petersfield 1553; master of the horse to Philip of Spain 1554; privy councillor under Mary

Anthony Browne was a witness in 1551 to the sentence against Stephen Gardiner and his appellation. 1563, p. 867.

The appearance of Anthony Browne at the scaffold where Edward Seymour was about to be executed produced a cheer from the crowd. They thought, incorrectly, that Browne was bringing a pardon from the king. 1570, p. 1550; 1576, p. 1321; 1583, p. 1371.

1583 Edition, page 1395[Back to Top]
Anthony Burwarde

(d. 1555)

Martyr.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Foxe records the articles against him and his answers 1563, p. 1273. Referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

He was burned on 6 August 1556 according to 1563 (p. 1273), or about 6 September [1556] according to later editions: 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708, at Canterbury.

1583 Edition, page 1732
Anthony Clarke

BTh Oxford (1537). Ex-monk and canon of Chichester.

Anthony Clarke accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

1583 Edition, page 2048
Anthony Clee

Of Vyes, Wiltshire. Of unknown occupation.

Anthony Clee was a friend of John Maundrel. He spoke to him about the risks Maundrel was taking in returning home during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

1583 Edition, page 1918
Anthony Dalaber

(d. 1562) [Emden; Fines]

Student of Gloucester College, Oxford; student of John Clerk and friend and associate of Thomas Garrard

John Clerk warned Anthony Dalaber that if he continued to follow him, he would be subjected to scorn, persecution and imprisonment. Dalaber refused to leave him, and on his behalf visited the many students and scholars influenced by Clerk. 1563, p. 609; 1570, p. 1369; 1576, p. 1168; 1583, p. 1196.

Anthony Dalaber witnessed and recounted the story of Thomas Garrard's trouble in Oxford. 1563, pp. 604-609; 1570, pp. 1366-69; 1576, pp. 1166-68; 1583, pp. 1194-97.

When Thomas Garrard was sought in Oxford, Dalaber planned to help him escape to Dalaber's brother in Dorset to become his curate and then escape overseas. 1563, p. 604; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1166; 1583, p. 1194.

After Garrard's escape, Dalaber's room was searched in his absence. He was sent for by Anthony Dunstan and examined. Dunstan refused to believe Dalaber's account. 1563, p. 607; 1570, p. 1368; 1576, p. 1167; 1583, p. 1195.

Dalaber was then brought before Cottisford, John Hygdon and John London and examined. He was put into the stocks. He was condemned as a heretic and made to bear a faggot with Thomas Garrard, who had been apprehended. They were then imprisoned. 1563, pp. 608-09; 1570, pp. 1368-69; 1576, pp. 1167-68; 1583, pp. 1196-97.

When John Frith heard of the examination and bearing of faggots of Dalaber and Garrard, he fled overseas. 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

1583 Edition, page 1056 | 1583 Edition, page 1218[Back to Top]
Anthony Draycot

(d. 1571)

Chancellor of Lincoln under Longland; chancellor of Coventry under Bayne. [DNB DCL, 1552; Foster]

John Glover was buried in the Churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Chancellour Draycot examined Thomas Barnes and Elice Byrch on 27 June 1556 regarding their conversation about the proclamation of two queens in England after the death of Edward VI. One of them was condemned to bear a fagot for speaking against the mass. 1563, p. 1527.

Draycot persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

Anthony Draycot had Waste apprehended in Derby. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

Joan Waste was condemned by Anthony Draycot and Ralph Bayne. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

On the day of her death Joan Waste was accompanied to church by Draycot, Thomas Powthread, Henry Vernon, Master Dethick of Newhall and many others. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot preached a violent sermon against Joan Waste. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot demanded that the gentlemen and bailiffs witness Joan Waste's death. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot went to an inn and slept during Joan Waste's execution. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot is described by Foxe as being even more cruel that Ralph Bayne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following (but later dismissed them): John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

As Joyce Lewes took a drink at her execution, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Thomas Parkinson was examined in 1558 by Anthony Draycot and made to do penance. 1563, p. 1681.

Anthony Draycot was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

1583 Edition, page 1738 | 1583 Edition, page 1975 | 1583 Edition, page 1978 | 1583 Edition, page 2047 | 1583 Edition, page 2126[Back to Top]
Anthony Draycot

(d. 1571) [ODNB]

Roman Catholic priest; BCL Oxford 1511; BCnL, DCnL 1522; vicar-general to Longland 1537; prebendary in Lincoln Cathedral 1539; archdeacon of Stow 1543; archdeacon of Huntingdon (1543 - 60); chancellor to Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry and Lichfield; active in pursuit of heretics; deprived under Elizabeth

Bishop Longland and Anthony Draycot were active in enforcing the Six Articles within the diocese of Lincoln. 1570, p. 1382; 1576, p. 1179; 1583, p. 1207.

1583 Edition, page 1231
Anthony Hussey

(d. 1560)

Cranmer's chief registrar. Under Mary registrar in the Court of Arches and of the chapter of St Paul's Cathedral. Governor of the Muscovy Company. Governor of the English merchants in Antwerp. [ See MacCulloch, Cranmer, p. 608 and J. G. Nichols, Narratives, p. 216.]

John Story commanded Thomas Green be brought to Walbrook before the commissioners. He was eventually sent before Hussey. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

Thomas Green told Hussey that John Bean, an apprentice to Tottle, had received a copy of a book called 'Antichrist' from him. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

Elizabeth Young's first examination took place before Hussey. 1570, pp. 2268-69, 1576, pp. 1958-59, 1583, pp. 2065-66.

1583 Edition, page 2085 | 1583 Edition, page 2089 | 1583 Edition, page 2169
Anthony Hussey

(d. 1560)

Cranmer's chief registrar; registrar in the court of Arches and of the chapter of St Paul's Cathedral under Mary; governor of the Muscovy Company; governor of the English merchants in Antwerp. [See MacCulloch, Cranmer, p. 608 and J. G. Nichols, Narratives, p. 216.]

Anthony Hussey was present and agreed to the pronouncement of sentence against Richard Bayfield. 1563, p. 489; 1570, p. 1164; 1576, p.996 ; 1583, p. 1024.

1583 Edition, page 1048[Back to Top]
Anthony Jones

Anthony Jones was examined by Draycot and Bayne and later dismissed. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

[Alias Pulton.]

1583 Edition, page 1979
Anthony Kitchen

(1477 - 1563)

Bishop of Llandaff (1545 - 1563) [DNB]

Anthony Kitchen was one of the commissioners who presided over the deprivation of Hooper. 1563, pp. 1054-55; 1570, pp. 1678-79; 1576, pp. 1432-33; 1583, p. 1506.

He imprisoned Rawlins White and persistently tried to induce him to recant. On the verge of condemning White, he postponed reading the sentence to give White a last chance to recant. Finally Kitchen reluctantly pronounced sentence on White. 1570, pp. 1726-27; 1576, pp. 1480 [recte 1474]-63 [recte 1475]; 1583, p. 1558.

[Foxe occasionally calls him Anthony 'Kechin'.]

1583 Edition, page 1530 | 1583 Edition, page 1581
Anthony Kitchin (name in religion: Dunstan)

(1477 - 1563) [ODNB]

Monk of Westminster Abbey, mature vocation 1511; BTh Oxford 1525; prior of students 1526; abbot of Eynsham 1532; DTh 1538; surrendered the abbey in 1538; bishop of Llandaff 1545

After the escape of Thomas Garrard at Oxford in 1528, Anthony Dalaber was taken before Anthony Dunstan, who examined him. 1563, p. 607; 1570, p. 1368; 1576, p. 1167; 1583, p. 1195.

1583 Edition, page 1219
Anthony Knyvet

Brother of William Knyvet

Foxe states that two gentlemen named 'Knevet' were sent to Kent for execution on 27 February 1554 (1570, p. 1638; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1468).

Anthony Knyvet was a Wyatt rebel and a signatory of Wyatt's proclamation (CSP Dom. Mary I, pp. 48 and 49).

William Knyvet was Anthony's brother and another Wyatt rebel (CSP Dom. Mary I, p. 48).

1583 Edition, page 1492[Back to Top]
Anthony Norgate

Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

1583 Edition, page 2059
Anthony Pearson

(d. 1543) [Fines]

Priest of Windsor; popular preacher; burnt with Filmer and Testwood

Anthony Pearson often preached in Windsor, where his sermons were very popular with the people, but not with the conservative clerics, especially William Symonds and John London. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1213.

Symonds and London kept notes of Pearson's sermons. They included the names of all those who frequented the sermons. They reported all of these to Stephen Gardiner. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, pp. 1213-14.

Henry Filmer, Anthony Pearson and John Marbeck were taken to Windsor and put into prison there. Robert Testwood was brought out of his house on crutches and put with them. 1570, p. 1395; 1576, p. 1190; 1583, p. 1218.

Filmer, Pearson, Marbeck and Testwood were put on trial at Windsor and all were found guilty by the jury. 1570, p. 1397; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1219.

Filmer, Pearson and Testwood were burnt together at the same stake. 1570, p. 1397; 1576, p. 1192; 1583, p. 1220.

Pearson preached repentance and was burnt. 1570, p. 39; 1576, p. 32; 1583, p. 32.

1583 Edition, page 55 | 1583 Edition, page 1234 | 1583 Edition, page 1237
Anthony Pickering

Gentleman of Calais; Calais spear [Fines; Lisle Letters]

After an exhaustive inquisition for heretics, Anthony Pickering was one of those brought before the commissioners in Calais in 1540, charged and imprisoned. 1563, p. 665; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1227.

He, with Thomas Broke and others, were sent to England at Cromwell's command. The prisoners were shackled when they went onto the ship. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

Upon arrival in England, the prisoners had their irons removed at the command of Cromwell, who had them imprisoned in the Fleet but promised them speedy release. Cromwell was shortly after beheaded. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

Thomas Audeley discharged those in the Fleet and brought them the king's pardon, although they were deprived of their livings. 1563, p. 668; 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1228.

1583 Edition, page 1251[Back to Top]
Anthony the Hermit (St Anthony)

(d. c. 356/7) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Egyptian ascetic; leader of Christian hermits; influenced early desert monasticism

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. 3.

Antiochus

According to Henry of Erfurt, a persecuter of Christians during the reign of Severus Alexander

Antiochus, while sitting in judgement, suffered a sudden illness and died. 1570, p. 85; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82
Antoine de Bourbon

(1518 - 1562)

Duc de Vendôme, king of Navarre

Foxe mentions his death at the head of the royal army besieging Rouen in the first civil war. He was wounded in the shoulder during the siege of the city and lived long enough to enter it through the breach that his army eventually made in the walls, before dying on 17 November 1562 (1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 2001, 1583, p. 2112). (DNB, 3, cols 35-7)

1583 Edition, page 2135
Antoine de Perrenot

Bishop of Arras; Cardinal Granvelle. Counsellor to the emperor.

Stephen Gardiner arranged with 'Gravuela' secretly to imprison Ludovico to prevent him speaking. 1583, p. 1786.

1583 Edition, page 1811
Antoine Duprat

(1463 - 1535) [Hélène Michaud, La Grande Chancellerie et les écritures royals au XVIe siècle (Paris, 1967), pp. 23-4]

Archbishop of Sens 1525; cardinal 1527; appointed chancellor by Francis I in letters-patent of 7 January 1515 and remained in post until death

One of the purposes Edward Fox was meant to achieve in his embassy to Francis I was to win the French chancellor's support for Henry VIII, since Henry knew that the chancellor was one of those most trusted by the French king in important affairs. 1570, pp. 1220, 1221; 1576, pp. 1044, 1045; 1583, pp. 1071, 1072.

1583 Edition, page 1095[Back to Top]
Antonino of Florence (Pierozzi) (St Antonino)

(1389 - 1459) [Eric Cochrane, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance (Chicago, 1981) pp. 21-22]

Dominican monk; theologian and historian; prior of Cortona; established the convent of San Marco in 1436

Archbishop of Florence (1446 - 59); wrote Summa Moralis

He regarded the Donation of Constantine to be fraudulent. 1570, p. 144, 1576, p. 106, 1583, p. 105.

1583 Edition, page 128
Antoninus (St Antoninus)

(1389 - 1459) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Dominican theologian; historian. Established the convent of San Marco, Florence, in 1436; archbishop of Florence (1446 - 59)

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 16, 62, 65, 85, 132, 1329; 1576, p. 13, 38, 41, 59, 96, 1133; 1583, p. 13, 38, 41, 58, 73, 95, 1162, 1172.

1583 Edition, page 36 | 1583 Edition, page 61 | 1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 81 | 1583 Edition, page 96 | 1583 Edition, page 118 | 1583 Edition, page 1186 | 1583 Edition, page 1196
Antoninus Pius (Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Pius)

(86 - 161) [ODNB]

Roman emperor (138 - 61); chosen by Hadrian as his successor

Advanced into Scotland, built the Antonine Wall; advanced the frontier in Germany

Antoninus was mild and gentle, and there was no persecution of Christians during his reign. He wrote to the people of Asia, ordering that Christians not be persecuted. 1570, p. 67, 74; 1576, pp. 41-42, 50; 1583, pp. 41-42, 50.

In a letter to Henry VIII, Philip Melancthon referred to Antoninus Pius as an emperor who received the apologies and defences of the Christians kindly. 1570, p. 1340; 1576, p. 1144; 1583, p. 1172.

1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 65 | 1583 Edition, page 71 | 1583 Edition, page 1196
Antonio Bonvisi

(1470x75 - 1558) [ODNB]

b. England into Lucca family; merchant; introduced a new method of spinning into the Devon cloth trade; acted as banker for the government; patron of learning; friend of Thomas More; fled to Louvain (1549 - 1558)

In a letter of 1538 to Edmund Bonner and Simon Haynes, Thomas Thirlby recommends to Bonner that he go for money to Bonvisi in Lyons. 1570, p. 1241; 1576, p. 1063; 1583, p. 1089.

1583 Edition, page 1113
Anulinus

Proconsul of Africa under Constantine I

Constantine wrote to Anulinus, instructing him to restore goods to the Christian churches and to ensure that Christian ministers were freed from public duties. 1570, p. 141, 1576, p. 104, 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 126[Back to Top]
Anysia

Supposed martyr of Thessalonica under Maximinus Daia

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 133; 1576, p. 96; 1583, p. 95.

1583 Edition, page 118
ap Ruddz

Of Carmarthen

Ap Ruddz was one of the witnesses against Robert Ferrar. 1563, p. 1093; 1583, p. 1550.

1583 Edition, page 1574
Aper

(d. 284) [W. Leadbetter www.roman-emperors.org, sub Numerian]

Praetorian prefect; father-in-law of Emperor Numerian

Diocletian accused him of causing Numerian's death; killed by Diocletian

Aper was said to have killed Numerian in hopes of becoming emperor himself. 1570, p. 108; 1576, p. 77; 1583, p. 76.

He was killed by Diocletian with his sword in front of the troops. 1570, p. 109; 1576, p. 78; 1583, p. 77.

1583 Edition, page 99 | 1583 Edition, page 100
Apiarius of Sicca

C5 priest in Africa [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Appealed to Zosimus against his excommunication by Urbanus, bishop of Sicca, before 418; reinstated. Appealed four years later against further excommunication to Pope Celestine; reinstated.

Foxe relates the case in connection with the issue of appeals to Rome over the sentence of a metropolitan bishop. 1570, p. 13; 1576, p. 10; 1583, p. 10.

1583 Edition, page 33[Back to Top]
Apollonia (St Apollonia)

(d. 248/9) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Virgin, probably a deaconess, martyred at Alexandria during a local uprising prior to the persecution under Decius

Apollonia had all her teeth knocked out by the mob. When threatened with the fire unless she denied Christ, she jumped into it. 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 62; 1583, p. 61.

1583 Edition, page 84
Apollonius

Said to have been Roman senator under Commodus; beheaded

In spite of the emperor's decree, he was condemned as a Christian by the senate. 1570, p. 76; 1576, p. 52; 1583, p. 51.

1583 Edition, page 74
Apollonius of Ephesus

(fl. 180 - 220) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Anti-Montanist ecclesiastical writer

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1563, p. 4.

Appline Grew

Wife of Edward Grew. Of Broke, Norfolk.

Appline Grew did all she could to comfort her husband during his imprisonment. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

1583 Edition, page 2089
Apprice, John

(d. 1556)

Blind man. Martyr. Of Essex. St Thomas Apostles [Fines]; [Machyn, Diary, p. 105.]

John Apprice was examined and condemned by Bishop Bonner 1 May 1556 for disputing doctrine. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

He was imprisoned in Newgate. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

On 9 May 1556 he appeared in the consistory court of St Paul's and refused to recant. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

On 15 May 1556 he was burned at Stratford-le-Bow with Hugh Laverock. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

1583 Edition, page 1933[Back to Top]
Aquila

Judge in Alexandria under Emperor Severus (r. 193 - 211)

Aquila took part in the persecution of the Christians. 1570, p. 79; 1576, p. 54; 1583, p. 54.

1583 Edition, page 77
Aquila of Sinope

C2 translator of the Old Testament into Greek [www.jewishencyclopedia.com]

Joined the Christians, then Judaism; his translation was used by Origen and Jerome

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 79; 1576, p. 54; 1583, p. 54.

1583 Edition, page 77
Aquilla

C3 Christian wandering abroad in Egypt during the persecutions under Valerian

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 103; 1576, p. 73; 1583, p. 72.

1583 Edition, page 95
Aquilus

Reputed C3 governor at Nicfa

Aquilus was involved in the Decian persecutions. 1570, p. 91; 1576, p. 63; 1583, p. 63.

1583 Edition, page 86
Arbirtromy

Arbirtromy was one of those sent to instruct Adam Wallace in prison in Edinburgh after his condemnation. 1570, p. 1450; 1576, p. 1236; 1583, p. 1273.

1583 Edition, page 1297[Back to Top]
Archer

Shoemaker of Coventry. Martyred for teaching his children 4 April 1519

Archer, with others accused of teaching their children, was brought back to Coventry on Palm Sunday and condemned for relapse. 1563, pp. 420-21; 1570, p. 1107; 1576, p. 946; 1583, p. 973.

1583 Edition, page 996
Archibald Campbell

(1498 - 1558) [ODNB]

4th earl of Argyle (1529 - 58); justice-general of Scotland and master of the royal household

The earl of Argyle sat on the assize that judged heretics in Perth. 1570, p. 1443; 1576, p. 1230; 1583, p. 1267.

He sat on the assize that deprived and exiled John Kerr. 1570, p. 1448; 1576, p. 1235; 1583, p. 1272.

He sat on the assize that tried and condemned Adam Wallace. 1570, pp. 1448-50; 1576, pp. 1235-36; 1583, pp. 1272-73.

1583 Edition, page 1291 | 1583 Edition, page 1296
Archibald Douglas

(c. 1489 - 1557) [ODNB]

6th earl of Angus (1513 - 57); second husband of Margaret Tudor, queen of James IV of Scotland; lord chancellor of Scotland (1527 - 28); exiled (1529 - 43); lieutenant-general of the south 1544

The earl of Angus sat on the assize that deprived and exiled John Kerr. 1570, p. 1448; 1576, p. 1235; 1583, p. 1272.

He sat on the assize that tried and condemned Adam Wallace. 1570, pp. 1448-50; 1576, pp. 1235-36; 1583, pp. 1272-73.

1583 Edition, page 1296
Aristides the Athenian

(d. c. 134) Greek Christian author and apologist [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Aristides presented an oration and an apology in defence of the Christian religion to Hadrian. 1570, pp. 66, 78; 1576, pp. 41, 53; 1583, pp. 41, 53.

1583 Edition, page 64 | 1583 Edition, page 73 | 1583 Edition, page 76
Arius of Alexandria

(c. 250/256 - 336)

of Alexandria; early Christian theologian; his views were declared heretical at the Council of Nicea in 325

Constantine wrote a letter to Alexander and Arius, urging them to end their differences. 1570, p. 142; 1576, p. 104; 1583, p. 103.

1583 Edition, page 126
Armagil Wade

Clerk to the king's council

Edmund Bonner appeared before the king's commissioners for the fourth time on 18 September, at which session new articles were drawn up and new witnesses received: Sir John Mason, Sir Thomas Chaloner, William Cecil, Armagil Wade and William Hunnings. 1563, pp. 704-710; 1570, pp. 1508-12; 1576, pp. 1279-81; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

1583 Edition, page 1346
Armand de Gontaut

Baron de Biron (Bironius)

(1524? - 1592)

French noble from the Périgord, and a leading diplomatic and military authority at the French court during the civil wars.

Armand de Gontaut was educated in the service of the king of Navarre and saw extensive military service in Piedmont during the Italian wars. He took a leading part in the major battles of the civil wars (at Dreux, 1562; St-Denis in 1567) and commanded the duc d'Anjou's forces at Jarnac and Moncontour in the third civil war. He was nominated grand-maître de l'artillerie and given the governorship of the Bastille on 5 November 1569. At the same time, he enjoyed a justified reputation as a negotiator, being charged by the French crown with brokering the peace at Longjumeau in 1568, and again at St-Germain-en-Laye in 1570. At the massacre of St Bartholomew he was noted for his intervention in saving the lives of his Huguenot kinsmen.

Given the military government of La Rochelle on 3 February 1573, it was in this context that Foxe briefly mentions his being refused admittance to the town shortly afterwards (1583, p. 2153), a development that was the direct prelude to the famous, lengthy and ultimately unsuccessful siege of La Rochelle, where Biron himself was wounded. (J. Baltaux, M. Barroux, M. Prevost, and etc, eds. Dictionnaire de Biographie Française. 18 vols in progress. (Paris: Librairie Letouzey et Ané, 1932 -), 6, cols 517-18).

1583 Edition, page 2177[Back to Top]
Arnold Chest

of St Giles without Cripplegate; charged with 7 others in 1541 for insulting the sacraments and ceremonies of the church [Fines]

Arnold Chest was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1377; 1576, p. 1175; 1583, p. 1203.

1583 Edition, page 1227
Arnoldus Bomelius (Arnold Baumel)

A young man of Louvain, commended for his learning.

Foxe reported that Arnoldus Bomelius had converted to protestantism but fallen into the company of Tyleman, a Master of Arts at the University of Louvain. This encounter had led him to cast doubt on the veracity of protestant beliefs and ultimately drove him to committing suicide by stabbing himself, the event upon which Foxe concentrates his attentions. It is not clear where Foxe obtained this information (1570, p. 2305, 1576, p. 1996, 1583, p. 2106)

1583 Edition, page 2130
Arrianus

C4 governor of Thebes; martyr

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 128; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115
Artemius

Captain of Egyptian soldiers; martyr under Julian the Apostate

Although other charges were brought against Artemius, he was beheaded because he was a Christian. 1570, p. 138, 1576, p. 100, 1583, p. 99.

1583 Edition, page 122
Arthemius

of Rome; C4 martyr

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 129; 1576, p. 93; 1583, p. 92.

1583 Edition, page 115[Back to Top]
Arthur

(supp. fl. in or before C6) [ODNB]

Legendary warrior and supposed king of Britain

Arthur's reign gave peace to the Britons and to his successors. 1570, p. 153; 1576, p. 114; 1583, p. 113.

1583 Edition, page 135 | 1583 Edition, page 1039
Arthur

(1486 - 1502) [ODNB]

Prince of Wales; eldest son of Henry VII

After Arthur's death, his wife Katherine married his brother Henry. 1563, p. 456; 1570, p. 1192; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

1583 Edition, page 1073
Arthur Cole

(d. 1558) [Foster]

President of Magdalen College, Oxford (1555 - 1558)

Arthur Cole greatly suspected and abhorred Julins Palmer and his friends. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1841 [recte 1829], 1583, p. 1936.

Cole was one of the cardinal's visitors who had a commission to have the bones of Peter Martyr's wife dug up and burned. 1563, pp. 1558 [recte 1570]-1559 [recte 1571].

[In the 1570 edition Foxe incorrectly identifies him as Doctor Coveney, president 1558 - 1561.]

1583 Edition, page 1960
Arthur Cole

(d. 1558) [Emden]

President of Magdalen College, Oxford (1555 - 58); BA 1519; MA 1522; BTh 1554; senior proctor of the University (1527 - 28); canon and prebendary of St George's Chapel, Windsor (1543 - 58); treasurer and canon of Ripon (1544 - 58); cross bearer to Cardinal Wolsey; present at Cranmer's trial

Arthur Cole was a friend of Thomas Garrard and gave him warning that he was being sought for supplying prohibited books. 1563, p. 604; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1166; 1583, p. 1194.

After Garrard had escaped, he was apprehended by Cole and returned to the university. 1563, p. 609; 1570, p. 1369; 1576, p. 1168; 1583, p. 1197.

1583 Edition, page 1218[Back to Top]
Arthur Faysie

A former servant of Rowland Taylor

As Rowland Taylor was being taken to Hadleigh for execution, Faysie tried to speak with him and called Taylor 'a true man'. The sheriff of Essex threatened to arrest Faysie for this. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, p. 1701; 1576, p. 1452; 1583, p. 1525.

[NB: Robert Vesey, a clothier of Hadleigh, bequeathed his house to his son Arthur Vesey in a 1559 will. See J. J. Muskett, Suffolk Manorial Families (3 vols., Exeter, 1900-1910), I, p. 58.]

1583 Edition, page 1549
Arthur Plantagenet

Lord Lisle

(before 1472 - 1542) [ODNB]

Illegitimate son of Edward IV; soldier, diplomat, administrator; lord deputy of Calais

Adam Damplip was asked to stay for a while in Calais to preach to the people there. He agreed, but only if he obtained licence. He was taken to Lord Lisle, who asked him to stay and preach three or four times a week. Lord Lisle offered him a room in his house and meals at his own table. 1563, p. 656; 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1223.

Lord Lisle's servant, Cranwell, was sent to remove the notice of interdict of the king and realm posted at the pope's command on the door of the church at Dunkirk. He removed it and brought it back whole to Lord Lisle. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

Lord Lisle was sent to England and imprisoned in the Tower. The king pardoned him, but he died before he could be released. 1563, p. 665; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

Lord Lisle was one of the Calais councillors who persecuted the protestants there. All of those councillors eventually were imprisoned or died miserably. 1563, p. 668; 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1199; 1583, p. 1228.

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Ascepsimas

Persian bishop; martyr under Shapur II

Ascepsimas, an elderly man, was tortured and died in prison. 1570, p. 136; 1576, p. 99; 1583, p. 98.

1583 Edition, page 121
Ascla, Philemon and Appolinius

(d. early C4) Christian soldiers martyred at Thebes

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 111; 1576, p. 79; 1583, p. 79.

1583 Edition, page 102
Asclepiades

Bishop of Antioch for 8 years early C3 [Gams]

Asclepiades suffered during the reign of Severus. 1570, p. 80; 1576, p. 55; 1583, p. 55.

Foxe finds discrepancies in the dating of his martyrdom. Vincent of Lérins places his martyrdom during the reign of Decius. 1570, pp. 88, 91; 1576, pp. 61, 63; 1583, pp. 61, 63.

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Asclepiades

fl. C4. Captain under Emperor Galerius

Asclepiades invaded Antioch with Galerius to rid the city of Christianity. He had Romanus tortured and had a seven-year-old child whipped and imprisoned. The child was beheaded and Romanus strangled. 1570, pp. 124-26; 1576, pp. 90-91; 1583, pp. 89-90.

1583 Edition, page 112
Asclepiodotus

Pretorian prefect under Constantius I Chorus; sent to Britain in 296 to defeat Allectus, emperor in Britain [M. Di Maio, www.roman-emperors.org, sub Allectus]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 147; 1576, p. 109; 1583, p. 108.

1583 Edition, page 131
Aselepodotus

One of leaders of the followers of Theodotus the Tanner at Rome; persuaded Natalius to become bishop of the sect c. 200 [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Zephyrinus]

He offered Natalius money to lead the sect. 1570, p. 86; 1576, p. 59; 1583, p. 59.

1583 Edition, page 82
Asellus

Priest of the Roman church; papal legate to the Council of Carthage in 419

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 13; 1576, p. 10; 1583, p. 10.

1583 Edition, page 33
Ashton

Of Hill, Lancs.

He visited George Marsh when he was imprisoned in Lancaster castle. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564.

1583 Edition, page 1588[Back to Top]
Aspasius Paternus

C3 proconsul in Africa; persecutor of Christians

Paternus Aspasius banished Cyprian of Carthage during Valerian's reign. 1570, p. 99; 1576, p. 70; 1583, p. 69.

1583 Edition, page 91
Assyrius

C3 wealthy nobleman of Caesarea; Roman senator

Assyrius was present at the martyrdom of Marinus. He wrapped the body in rich cloth, carried it away and buried it honourably. 1570, p. 106; 1576, p. 75; 1583, p. 75.

1583 Edition, page 98
Athalis

Persian Christian priest; suffered under Shapur II

Athalis was whipped and racked until his arms were pulled out of their sockets. 1570, p. 136; 1576, p. 99; 1583, p. 98.

1583 Edition, page 121
Athanasia

(d. early C4) Christian martyred at Canopus, Egypt, with her three daughters and Cyrus and John

Athanasia was known to Cyrus. She and her three daughters were executed for refusing to worship the Roman gods. 1570, p. 127; 1576, p. 92; 1583, p. 91.

1583 Edition, page 114
Athanasius of Alexandria

(c. 298 - 373) [Catholic Encyclopeda; Gams]

Patriarch of Alexandria (326 - 73); doctor of the church; opponent of Arianism

Athanasius praised Origen and used his testimonies against the Arians. 1570, p. 87; 1576, p. 60; 1583, p. 60.

Athanasius wrote that he knew monks and bishops who were married. 1570, p. 1350; 1576, p. 1152; 1583, p. 1181.

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Athenagoras of Athens

(fl. 176/7) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Greek philosopher; Christian convert; Christian apologist

His writings may have helped to stop the persecutions under Marcus Aurelius. 1570, p. 75; 1576, p. 51; 1583, p. 51.

1583 Edition, page 74
Attalus

Reputed martyr at Lyons during the reign of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus

Attalus was from Pergama and a leading member of the Christian congregation there. 1563, p. 4; 1570, p. 69-72; 1576, p. 46-48; 1583, p. 46-48.

1583 Edition, page 69
Atticus

(d. 425) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Patriarch of Constantinople (406 - 25); opponent of John Chrysostom, but changed his attitude after Chrysostom's death in 407

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 13; 1576, p. 10; 1583, p. 10.

1583 Edition, page 33
Atwell

A summoner of Brentwood, Essex

Atwell denounced William Hunter, when he observed him reading the Bible in English, to Thomas Wood. 1570, pp. 1712-13; 1576, p. 1462; 1583, p. 1536.

1583 Edition, page 1560[Back to Top]
Audas (Abdas)

C5 bishop of Susa, Persia; martyr under Yazdegerd I

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 137, 1576, p. 100, 1583, p. 99.

1583 Edition, page 122
Audax

Reputed to have been the executioner of Anatolia, who was converted by her behaviour [Catholic Encyclopedia sub Anatolia]. Martyred with her at Thora under Decius

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 88; 1576, p. 61; 1583, p. 61.

1583 Edition, page 84
Augurius and Eulogius

(d. 259); deacons of Tarragona under Fructuosus

Having refused to worship the Roman gods, Bishop Fructuosus was imprisoned with his deacons, Augurius and Eulogius, for six days and then burnt with them. 1570, p. 105; 1576, p. 74; 1583, p. 74.

1583 Edition, page 97
Augustine Bernher

(d. 1567)

Clerk and servant of Latimer. Of Swiss or Belgian origin. [DNB]

When Hugh Latimer was committed to the Tower on 13 September 1553, 'his servant Austen' was allowed to attend him (1583, p. 1410) ('one Anstey, his servant' in APC IV, p. 346).

Augustine Bernher received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

He received a letter from Nicholas Ridley. 1570, p. 1902, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

He was a friend of Robert Glover. Information about Robert Glover's death was given to Foxe by Bernher. 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

John Careless wrote a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

John Careless wrote another letter to A.B. [Augustine Bernher] 1570, pp. 2115-16, 1576, pp. 1838-39, 1583, pp. 1932-33.

Bernher was de facto leader of the clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-56.]

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Augustine Bernhere

When Hugh Latimer was committed to the Tower on 13 September 1553, 'his servant Austen' was allowed to attend him (1583, p. 1410) ('one Anstey, his servant' in APC IV, p. 346).

1583 Edition, page 1434[Back to Top]
Augustine de Augustinis

(d. 1551) [E. A. Hammond, 'Doctor Augustine, Physician to Cardinal Wolsey and Henry VIII', Medical History, vol. 17, no. 3 (July, 1975) pp. 215-49]

b. Venice; MD; physician to Cardinal Wolsey, then to Henry VIII in 1537

Nephew of Girolamo Ghinucci, papal nuncio and bishop of Worcester; arrested with Wolsey; agent for the king at the imperial court (1530 - 32); elected to the College of Physicians in 1536; left England in 1546

At the time of Thomas Wolsey's arrest, Augustinis was arrested and sent to the Tower. 1570, p. 1133; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 996.

1583 Edition, page 1020
Augustine Kyrke

Latimer, seeing a procession led by Dr Weston, mistakenly thought he was about to be taken to execution. He urged ?Augustine Cooper, a Catchpole? to prepare the fire for him (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

Augustine Kyrke, a cooper, was indeed a sergeant of the bailiff?s keys (or ?catchpole?) in Oxford during the relevant administrative year of 1553 - 1554 (see Carl J. Hammer, ?The Oxford Martyrs in Oxford: The Local History of their Confinements and their Keepers,? Journal of Ecclesiastical History 50 [1999], p. 237).

[Also referred to as 'Augustine Cooper'.]

1583 Edition, page 1488
Augustine of Canterbury

(d. 604) [ODNB]

Monk; first archbishop of Canterbury; sent as a missionary in 597 to Ethelbert of Kent, bretwalda of England, by Pope Gregory the Great

Gregory I sent Augustine to Britain. 1563, p. 16.

After Augustine and the other missionaries had set out on their journey, they turned back through fear. Gregory sent them back with letters of encouragement and help. 1570, p. 155; 1576, p. 116;1583, p. 115.

Augustine met King Æthelbert of Kent and was given permission to live and preach in his kingdom. He and the other missionaries were given a house in Canterbury. The king was converted and built a church and an abbey for Augustine. 1570, p. 156; 1576, p. 117;1583, p. 116.

Augustine went to France to be consecrated bishop. He sent his colleague Laurence to Rome to report on their progress and to deliver a set of questions to Pope Gregory, to which Gregory sent back answers. 1570, pp. 156-58; 1576, pp. 117-19;1583, pp. 116-18.

Gregory sent more missionaries, along with books, implements and letters and a pallium for Augustine. 1570, p. 158; 1576, p. 119;1583, p. 118.

At the direction of Gregory, Augustine consecrated two bishops, one for London and one for York. He then called the bishops and doctors together in assemblies, where the differences between the rites and customs of the Irish church and that of Rome were noted. 1570, pp. 159-60; 1576, pp. 119-20;1583, pp. 118-19.

Augustine baptised thousands of converts in the River Swale on Christmas day. He appointed Laurence as his successor at Canterbury. 1570, p. 160; 1576, p. 120;1583, p. 119.

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Augustine of Hippo (St Augustine)

(354 - 430) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Bishop of Hippo (396 - 430); theologian, doctor of the church

Augustine was called 'papas' or 'father' by the African bishops. 1570, p. 11; 1576, p. 8; 1583, p. 8.

He was present at the Synod of Milevum in 416. 1570, p. 14; 1576, p. 1035; 1583, p. 1062.

He attended the Council of Carthage in 419. 1570, p. 1209; 1576, p. 11; 1583, p. 11.

Augustine praised Cyprian of Carthage. 1570, p. 99; 1576, p. 69; 1583, p. 69.

In their examination for heresy, Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney said that Augustine criticised the large number of laws in the church in his time. 1563, p. 464; 1570, p. 1137; 1576, p. 974; 1583, p. 1000.

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Augustine Packington

Mercer of London, living at Antwerp [Fines]

Augustine Packington favoured William Tyndale, but pretended otherwise to Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of London, then in Antwerp. He offered to procure all the unsold copies of Tyndale's New Testament held by the merchants in the city if Tunstall would provide the money to buy them. Packington then paid Tyndale for the books, and Tyndale immediately had them reprinted. 1563, p. 443; 1570, pp. 1158-59; 1576, p. 991; 1583, p. 1019.

1583 Edition, page 1043 | 1583 Edition, page 1155
Augustine Webster

(d. 1535) [ODNB sub John Houghton]

Prior of the Charterhouse of Axholme, Lincolnshire, and Catholic martyr

John Houghton, Robert Lawrence and Augustine Webster, Carthusian priors, were hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the oath of supremacy. 1570, p. 1217; 1576, p. 1042; 1583, p. 1069.

Webster is one of the Catholic martyrs written of by Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 1375; 1576, p. 1173; 1583, p. 1201.

1583 Edition, page 1093 | 1583 Edition, page 1225
Augustus (Octavian)

(63 BCE - 14 CE) [G. G. Fagan www.roman-emperors.org]

Roman emperor (31 BCE - 14 CE)

Melito of Sardis, in his Apology, refers to the origins of Christianity in the reign of Augustus. 1570, p. 75; 1576, p. 51; 1583, p. 51.

1583 Edition, page 74
Aurelian

(214x215 - 275) [C. Koerner www.roman-emperors.org]

Supreme commander of the cavalry

Roman emperor (270 - 75); reintegrated the eastern provinces, Gaul and Britain; murdered

Aurelian began his reign by treating the Christians well. Thereafter he intended a harsh persecution, but it did not take effect. 1570, p. 107; 1576, p. 76; 1583, p. 75.

1583 Edition, page 54 | 1583 Edition, page 98
Aurelianus

Said in Passio S. Alexandri Papae to be a persecuting magistrate at Rome in early C2

Aurelianus was ordered to arrest Pope Alexander I with his deacons and other Christians. 1570, p. 63; 1576, p. 38; 1583, p. 38.

1583 Edition, page 61[Back to Top]
Aurelianus Cyrenius

Chief steward of Emperor Gallienus

Aurelianus Cyrenius was mentioned by Gallienus to the bishops. 1570, p. 106; 1576, p. 75; 1583, p. 74.

1583 Edition, page 97
Aurelius

C3 young Christian man tortured and banished

Aurelius, after his banishment, was commended by Cyprian of Carthage to a group of Christians as their lector. 1570, p. 94; 1576, p. 66; 1583, p. 65.

1583 Edition, page 88
Aurelius Ambrosius

(fl. C5) [ODNB]

Military leader of Romano-British forces against the Anglo-Saxons

Ambrosia and Uther repeatedly drove the Anglo-Saxons out of Britain. Geoffrey of Monmouth said that he had Hengist beheaded at Conisbrough. 1570, p. 148; 1576, p. 110; 1583, p. 109.

He was said to have killed Vortigern and fought against Aelle, king of the South Saxons. 1570, p. 152; 1576, p. 114; 1583, p. 113.

He was said to have been poisoned by Vortigern's son Pasgen. 1570, p. 153; 1576, p. 114; 1583, p. 113.

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Aurelius Conanus

Legendary C6 king of Britons following Constantine III

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 152; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

1583 Edition, page 135
Aurelius of Carthage

Bishop of Carthage (381/82 - 426) [Gams]

While presiding over the Council of Carthage in 418, Aurelius was called 'papa' by the bishops. 1570, p. 11; 1576, p. 8; 1583, p. 8.

1583 Edition, page 31
Aurelius Victor

(c. 320 - c. 390); author of a history of Rome from Augustus to Julian

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 105, 122, 139; 1576, pp. 75, 88, 103; 1583, pp. 74, 87, 102.

1583 Edition, page 97 | 1583 Edition, page 110 | 1583 Edition, page 125[Back to Top]
Avitus and Sergius

Legendary sons of Philippus, governor of Alexandria C3

Foxe gives the story of Philippus and his daughter Eugenia as related by later historians, but believes it to be untrue. 1570, pp. 104-05; 1576, pp. 73-74; 1583, pp. 73-74.

1583 Edition, page 96
Azadanes and Abdiesus

Persian deacons; suffered under Shapur II

Azadanes and Abdiesus were imprisoned and tortured. 1570, p. 136; 1576, p. 99; 1583, p. 98.

1583 Edition, page 121
Azades

Persian eunuch courtier; martyr under Shapur II

Azades had been a favourite of Shapur II, and after his martyrdom the king called an end to the persecution of Christians, except for their leaders. 1570, p. 136; 1576, p. 99; 1583, p. 98.

1583 Edition, page 121[Back to Top]
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