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547 [491]

to Lowlers tower. But in the tyme of his wyues sute, whyles he was yet at Fullam, on a tyme beyng desyrous to see her husbande, shee preased to come in at the gate: beynge at that tyme bygge with chylde, the porter lyft vp his foote and stroke her on the belly, that at lēgth she died of the same, but as for the chyld it was destroyed imediatly. And they all were stockte for a long tyme, and then they were let lose in their pryson places. Some with horselockes on their legges, and some hadde other irons. But this paynter would euer be wryting on the walles with chauke or a cole, and in one place he wrote doctor Dodypall woulde make me beleue that the mone were made of grene chese.

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And by the meanes he would be wryting of many thynges, he was manycled by the wrestes, so long tyll the fleshe of his armes was higher then his irons. For by the meanes of his manicles he could not kembe his head, and he remayned so long manicled that his hear was felted together. 

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In a letter Edward Freese sent to Cromwell, he complained of the cruelty of being held in irons (TNA SP 1/37, fo. 176r).

And after þe death of his wyfe, his brother sewed to the kyng for hym. And after long sute, he was brought out in the consistory at Paules, and as his brother didde reporte, they kept him thre dayes without meat, before he came to his aunswere. And then, what by the long imprysonment and by much euill handlyng, and for lack of sustenaūce, the man was so ouerhungred that he coulde saye nothynge, but loke and gase vpon the people, lyke a wylde man, and if they asked hym anye question, he could saye nothyng: but my Lord is a good man. And thus they, when they had spylte his body, and destroyed his wyttes, they sent hym backe agayne to Bearsie abbay, but he came awaye agayne from thence, and wold not tary amongest them, albeit he neuer came to perfect mynd to his dying day. MarginaliaValentine & his wyfe burned in yorke.And his brother of whom I before spake, whose name was Valentine Freese, and his wyfe, gaue their liues at one stake in Yorke, for the testimony of Iesus Christe. 
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Valentine Freese had been arrested (we do not know the reason, but the offence was clearly related to his evangelical convictions) in the Marches of Wales in 1534. He was apparently released through Thomas Cromwell's intervention. In 1540, Freese and his wife were burned on a charge of sacramentarian heresy in York (A. G. Dickens, Lollards and Protestants in the Diocese of York 1509-1538 [Oxford, 1959], pp. 31-32). Foxe also records that in 1533, Valentine Freese had smuggled a file into the bishop of London's palace, enabling Andrew Hewet, a Protestant martyr, to attempt an escape (1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1179; 1576, p. 1008 and 1583, p. 1036).

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Also the wife of the same father Bate, while he was at Fullam, made many suplications to the kyng witout redresse, and at the last she delyuered hym one to his owne handes, and he redde it hym selfe, and appoynted her to go in to chauncery lane, to one whose name as is thought was maister Selyarde. And at the last she gatt a letter of the same Selyarde to the bishop, and when she hadde it, she thought al her sute well bestowed, hopyng that some good should come to her husbande thereby, and because the wycked officers in those dayes, were very crafty and desyrous of bloud, as some others had proued their practise. Some of her frendes would needes see the contente of her letter, and not suffer her to delyuer it to the byshop, and as they thought so they founde indeede, for it was after this maner.

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After commendations hadd, he wrote thus. Loke what you cã gather against father Bate sende me worde by your trustie frend syr William Saxe, that I may certifie the kynges maiestie, & so the poore womã whan she thought her sute hadde bene done, she was in more daūger of her husbandes lyfe. And within shorte space after, it pleased God to deliuer hym. For he gate out in a darke nyght, & so was caught no more, but died within a short tyme after.

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MarginaliaRoy burned in Portingale.In this yeare also, as we doo vnderstande by dyuers notes of olde registers and otherwyse, Frier Roy was burned in Portingale 

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This is William Roy, the evangelical and anti-clerical satirist [ODNB]. Foxe is almost certanly repeating Thomas More on Roy's death (see The Confutation of Tyndale's Answer, ed. L. A. Schuster, Richard C. Marius, James P. Lusardi and Richard J. Schoeck, CWTM 8[3 vols., New Haven, CT, 1973], I, p. 8).

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, but what his examination, or articles, or order of his death was, we can haue no vnderstanding but what his doctrine was, it may be easelye iudged by the testimonies he left here in Englande.

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In the beginning of this yeare whiche we are nowe about, through the complaint of the Clergie made to the kynge. The translation of the newe testamēt with a great nomber of other bookes were forbydden. For they comming into the sterre chamber the xxv. daye of May, and comuning with the kynges councel, after many pretences and long debating, alleaged that the translation of Tindall and Ioye, were not truly translated, and also that in thē were prologues and prefaces, that sounded to heresie, and rayled agaynst the byshops, wherfore all suche bookes were prohibited, and commaundement geuen by the kyng to the byshops, that they callyng to them the best learned men of the Vniuersities, shoulde cause a newe translation to be made, so that the people be not ignoraunt in the lawe of God, notwithstanding this commaundement, the byshops did nothynge at all to the setting fourth of any newe translation, which caused the people muche to study Tyndales translation, by reason whereof many thynges came to lyght, as ye shall hereafter heare.

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This yeare also in the moneth of Maye, the Byshop of London caused all the newe testamentes of Tyndalles translation, and manye other bookes whiche he hadde bought, to bee brought vnto Paules churcheyarde, and there openly to be burned.

Vpon this or some suche lyke occasion (as it appeareth) Cutbert Tunstall byshop of London graunted licēce vnto Syr Thomas More knight Chauncelour of Englande, to reede & retaine by hym all suche bookes, as conteined Luthers heresye (as they called it) the tenure of whiche licence here ensueth. 

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Foxe's source for this letter is Bishop Cuthbert Tunstall's register (Guildhall MS 9531/10, fo. 123r-v).

MarginaliaA letter of byshop Tõstall sent to Sir Thomas MoreCVtbert by the permission of God, byshop of London, vnto the noble and synguler man Syr Thomas More, his derebeloued brother and frende, health in the Lorde and benediction. For so muche as nowe of late, synce

the churche
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