Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
871 [871]

kinges maiesty, concerning (as farre fourth as he remēbreth) the iust taking away of the vsurped authoritye of the bishop of Rome: Item, of the iust takinge awaye of Abbeis and other supersticious things, mēcioned in the sayd article. Item of the maintenance of the kinges autority in his yong yeares.

[Back to Top]

To the ix. article, he aunswereth that the sayd bishop in his sermon before the kinges maiesty spake not of the kinges maiesties authority in his yonge yeares: neither as he remembreth, of any ceremonies by name. But hādeled the kinges maiesties authority in such sort, as he semed rather to take awaye autority from his counsayle than to set fourth thautority of a king in yong age.

[Back to Top]

To the x. article, he sayth that the foresayd Duke and counsel, hauing before bene enformed, that diuerse men did diuersly talk of the masse, of the sacramēt of the altar, of the holly communion, some callinge it one thinge and some an other, some affirminge transubstantiacion some the contrary, some the reall, some the bodely, some the fleshly presence of christ, and mindinge as much as they could to stay all thinges that might ingender courage to one or other to dispute in that matter, till it were resolued vpon by lerned men, to be for that purpose called together by the kinges maiesties authority thought good the sayd Duke to sēd to inhibite the sayd bishop to prech therof: who neuertheles preached much of the masse, of the mayntenance of it, of the manner of christes consecration, prouing thereby a carnal presence, a transubstanciacion, that priuate masses were good and godly, animating the kinges maiesty as farre as the same Lorde Paget remembreth to continue them still, that the audiēce was so much offended wythe him, that they were in a greate vproare, and if it had not been for the presence of the kinges maiesty and his counsell, would (as the sayd lord Paget hard say) haue plucked the sayd bishop out of the pulpet.

[Back to Top]

To the xi. article he aunswereth that he hard certaine of the lords, & others of the kings maiesties coūsel, who were senc to the sayde byshop to the tower on the kings maiesties behalfe, reporte the sayde byshops refusall to do in some thing as they required hym to do, for declaration of his conformitie to the kynges maiesties proceadynges.

[Back to Top]

To the xij. xiij. xiiij. article, he aunswereth that he knoweth, that at the tyme mencioned in the articles or thereabout, and there about a letter of the kynges maiesties with a certayne submission to be subscribed by the sayde byshop, waes sent by certayne of the kynges maiesties Counsell to the sayde byshop: and that certayne of the Counsel were sent vnto him at thre sundry times, to requyre his conformitie and subscription to the sayde summission, and certayne articles: Whereunto he neuerthelesse, as the sayde counsaylers declared at their re-retorne, refused to subscribe, as they required him: which reporte he the sayde Lorde Paget herd them make, and was present, when the commission was geuen them to go to the byshop, and to requyre his submission as afore is sayde.

[Back to Top]

To the xv. xvi.xvij. xviij. & xix. articles, he answereth they be true. for he was present, as the byshop hym selfe knoweth.

By me W. Paget.

The aunswere of the Lorde Paget to the Interrogatores ministred of office

To the first, second, & thyrde articles, he aunswereth, that he beleueth verely the late kynge of moste worthie memory, had the sayde byshop in suspition of mislikyng his highnes proceadinges in some thynges of religion: For he hath harde hym saye so vpon sondry occasions. And that his maiestie thought hym the sayde byshop to wylfull in his opinion and muche bent to the Popyshe parte. And for that cause, he hath heard say that his maiestie left hym out of the nomber of those, which his highnes appointed to compyle the last boke of religion.

[Back to Top]

To the fourth, and fifte, he aunswereth that he knoweth that the sayde late kyng of moste worthy memory mislyked the sayde byshop, euer the lenger the worse: And that in his conscience, if the sayde kyng had lyued any whyle lenger then he dyd, he would haue vsed extremytie against the sayde byshop, as farre forth as the law would haue borne his maiestie: thynkyng to haue iuste and sore matter of olde against the sayde byshop in store. not taken awaye by any pardon: and at dyuers tymesaksed the sayde Lorde Paget for a certaine wryting touchyng the sayd byshop, commaunding hym to keepe it, saue that he myght haue it when he called for it. And touching the putting of the sayde bishop out of his testament, it is true that vpon sainte Stephans daye at night, four yeares now past. his maiesty hauing bene very sick and in some perill: after his recouery, furthwith called for the Duke of Somersets grace, for the Lorde priuie seale, for my Lorde of Warwicke, for the late M. of the horse, for maister Denny, for the maister of the horse that now is, and for the said Lorde Paget. at that time his secretary: And then willed Maister Denny to fetch his testament: Who bringeth fourth firste a forme of a testamēt, which his maiesty liked not after he hard, sayinge, that was not it: but there was a nother of a later making, written with the hand of the lord Wriothsly being Secretary: which when Maister Denny had fetched, and he heard it, he semed to maruaile that some were left out vnnamed in it, whome he sayd he ment to haue in, and some in, whome he ment to haue out: a: d so bad the sayd lord Paget, in the presence of the foresayde lordes, to put in some that were not named before, and to put out the bishop of Winchesters name, which was done. And then after his pleasure declared in soundrye things, which he caused to be altered and entred in the will, his maiestye came to the naming of counsellors assistātes to his executors: Wherupon the sayd lord Paget & the others, beginning to name my Lord Marques of Northampton, my lord of Arundell, & the reast of the counsell, not before named as executors: When it came to the bishop of Winchester, he bad put him out, sayinge he was a wilfull man, 

Commentary  *  Close

As Glyn Redworth has observed, Gardiner remained in favour with Henry well in the autumn of 1546. What led to Gardiner's exclusion from the executors of Henry's will was that the bishop with admirable courage and a deplorable sense of timing declined , at the November, to agree to an exchange of episcopal properties with Crown lands. (In theory, these exchanges were equal, in practice they always favoured the Crown). Henry was irate and Gardiner was in disfavour at the crucial time when Henry died. (See Glyn Redworth, In Defence of the Church Catholic: The Life of Stephen Gardiner [Oxford, 1990], pp. 237-40 and Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven, CT, 1996], p. 359).

[Back to Top]
and not mete to be aboute his son the kinges maiesty that now is: Wherupon we passed ouer to the bishop of Westminster, whome his maiestie, bad put out also saying, he was scholed or such like term by the bishoppe of Winchester. And so passinge vnto the rest. he admitted all of counsell without stoppe, sauinge one other man, at whom he made some stick. But neuertheles vpon our suites, relented, and so he was named as a counsellor. This all done, the sayd lord Paget redde ouer to his maiestye what was written, and he came to the place of counsellors. Reading their names, he began to moue the king agayne for the B. of Winchester: & the reste then presente set foote in with him, and did ernestly sue to his maiesty for placing of the sayd bishop emonges the counsellors: but he would in no wise be intreated: saying, he marueled what we ment, & that all we knew him to be a wilful mā: and bad vs be contented, for he should not be about his sonne, nor trouble his coūsell any more. The sayd lorde Paget, and the other were in hand also for the B. of Westminster: but he woulde in no wise be intreated, alleaging only agaynst hym, that he was of Winchesters schooling, or such a like terme.

[Back to Top]

To the sixth and seueneth articles, the sayd lord Paget aunswereth, that no doubt he harde the sayd bishoppe of Winchester diuers times to be against the reformation of religion, and to mislike such as were furtherers of it both in the courte and in his dioces. And that they likewise haue bene offended with him, and thought that he did much let both in his dioces and els wher the setting fourth of such thinges as the kings maiesty went about for the reformation of religion: And for such one, he hath bene alwayes taken. And he beleueth that the sayd B. him selfe hath thought that he hath bene so taken and reputed, and hath misliked him selfe nothing for it.

[Back to Top]

To the vij. and viij. articles, he hath aunswered before in the x. article: and yet neuerthelesse sayth further, that he can not remember any one poynt in religion, to haue been so muche in controuersie and disputation, as the matters of the masse, of the priuate masse, of the manner of consecration, and the manner of presence, and the trāsubstanciation was at that tyme, that the sayd byshoppe preached of all the whiche (as he remembreth) the sayd byshop preached in his Sermon before the kynges maiestie.

[Back to Top]

William Paget.

¶ The aunswere to the Lord Paget to certain interrogatories ministred seuerally vnto him, on the behalf of the bishop of Winchester, as appeareth in 13. Session Pag. 798.

TO the first the sayd lord Paget saythe, that he was present at one time when the said bishopp appeared before the duke of Somerset, then protector, and others of the kinges maiesties connsell about the time (as farre

as he
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield