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1012 [1012]

K. Henry. 8. The historye and actes of Doct. M. Luther.

disputed without Scriptures, deuised gloses and expositions of his own head, and by distinctions (wherewith the diuinitie of þe Thomistes 

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I.e., the followers of Thomas Aquinas, the great Scholastic theologian.

is full) like a very Proteus, MarginaliaProteus was a monster noted in Poetes, which coulde chaunge hym selfe into all formes & likenes.he auoyded all thinges. After this, Luther being cōmaunded to come no more in the presēce of the Legate, except he woulde recante, notwithstandyng abode there still & would not depart. Then the Cardinall sent for Ioannes Stupitius, 
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Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1525) was the vicar-general of the Observant Augustinians (Luther's order) and he was indeed a spiritual mentor to the young Luther. Staupitz emphasized election and justification in his theology. When the dispute over Indulgences first broke out, Staupitz supported Luther and tried to act as a mediator. Later, Staupitz, deplored Luther's extremism although the personal ties between the two men remained close.

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vicare of þe Augustines and moued hym earnestly to bryng Luther to recant of hys own accorde. Luther taryed the next day also, and nothyng was sayd vnto hym. MarginaliaLuthers answere to the Cardinall.The thyrd day moreouer he taried & deliuered vp his mynde in writyng, in which first he thanked him for his courtesye & great kyndnes, which he perceaued by the wordes of Stupitius 
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Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1525) was the vicar-general of the Observant Augustinians (Luther's order) and he was indeed a spiritual mentor to the young Luther. Staupitz emphasized election and justification in his theology. When the dispute over Indulgences first broke out, Staupitz supported Luther and tried to act as a mediator. Later, Staupitz, deplored Luther's extremism although the personal ties between the two men remained close.

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toward hym, and therefore was the more ready to gratifie hym in what soeuer kynd of office he could doe hym seruice: confessyng moreouer, that where he had bene somwhat sharpe & eger against þe popes dignitie, þt was not so much of his own mynde, as it was to be ascribed to the importunitie of certein which gaue hym occasion. Notwithstādyng, as he acknowledged his excesse therin, so he was ready to shew more moderation in that behalfe hereafter, & also promised to make amendes for þe same vnto þe bishop, & that in þe pulpit, if he pleased. And as touchyng the matter of pardons, he promised also to procede no further in any mention therof, so that his aduersaries lykewise were bounde to kepe silence. But where as he was prest to retract his sentence before defended, for as much as he had sayd nothyng but with a good conscience, & whiche was agreable to þe firme testimonies of the Scripture: therfore he humbly desired the determination therof, to be referred to the Byshop of Rome, for nothing coulde be more gratefull to hym, then to heare the voyce of the church speaking. &c.

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¶ Who doth not see by this so humble and honest submission of Luther, but that, if the bishop of Rome would haue bene aunswered with any reason, or contēted with sufficient meane, he had neuer bene touched any farther of Luther. MarginaliaPride will haue a fall.But the secret purpose of God had a further worke herein to do: for the tyme now was come, when God thought good that pride should haue a fall. Thus while þe vnmeasurable desire of that byshop sought more then inough, MarginaliaÆsopes dogge.and lyke to Æsopes dogge, MarginaliaAll couet, all loose.coueting both to haue the fleshe, and shadow, 

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The citation of Aesop is Foxe's insertion. The reference is to a fable of Aesop's, in which a dog, holding a bone in his mouth, sees his reflection in the water. He thinks it is another dog, with another bone, and greedily lunges for it. As a result he loses the bone he already had.

not onely hee missed that he gaped for, but also lost that whiche he had.

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But to the purpose of our matter agayne: this writyng Luther deliuered to the Cardinall the thyrd day after he was commaunded out of his sight. Whiche letter or writyng the Cardinall did litle regard. When Luther sawe that he would geue no aunswere nor contenaunce to the letter, yet notwithstādyng he remained after that, the fourth day, and nothyng was aunswered: the fift day likewise was passed with lyke silence, and nothyng done. At the length, by the Counsell of his frendes, and specially because the Cardinall had said before, that he had a cōmaundement to imprison Luther and Iohn Stupitius 

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Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1525) was the vicar-general of the Observant Augustinians (Luther's order) and he was indeed a spiritual mentor to the young Luther. Staupitz emphasized election and justification in his theology. When the dispute over Indulgences first broke out, Staupitz supported Luther and tried to act as a mediator. Later, Staupitz, deplored Luther's extremism although the personal ties between the two men remained close.

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the vicare, after that he had made and set vp his appeale where it might be sene and read, hee departed, thynkyng that hee had shewed such daungerous obedience longe enough. Luther a beholder and a doer of these thinges, recordeth the same, & sheweth the cause why he submitted hym self to þe Church of Rome: declaring also þt euen those thynges, which are most truly spoken, yet ought to be mainteyned & defended, with humilitie & feare. Some thynges he suppresseth & conceileth, whiche he supposeth the reader to vnderstand not without grief and sorrow. MarginaliaLuther obedient to the Sea of Rome. At length he protesteth that he reuerenceth and foloweth the Churche of Rome in all thynges, and that he setteth hym selfe onely agaynst those, which vnder the name of the Church of Rome, go about to set forth and commend Babylon vnto vs.

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MarginaliaAn other letter of Luther to the Legate.Thus you haue heard how that Luther being reiected from the speach and sight of Caietanus the Cardinall, after sixe dayes waytyng, departed by the aduise of hys frendes, and returned vnto Wyttenberge, leauyng a letter in writyng to be geuen to the Cardinall, wherin he declared sufficientlye, first his obedience in his comming, the reasons of hys doctrine, hys submission reasonable to the Sea of Rome, his longe waytyng after he was repelled from the Cardinalls speach, the charges of the Duke, and finallye the cause of hys departyng. MarginaliaLuther appealeth from the Cardinall tothe pope.Besides this letter to the Cardinall, he left also an Appellation to the bishop of Rome, from the Cardinall, whiche he caused openly to bee affixed before hys departure.

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MarginaliaThe letters of Caietanus to Duke Fridericke.After that Luther was thus departed and returned agayne into his countrey, Caietanus writeth to Duke Fridericke, a sharpe and a byting letter, in which first he signifieth to him hys gentle interteinement and good will shewed to reduce Luther from his errour. Secondly, he complaineth of the sodaine departing of him, and of Stupicius. 

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Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1525) was the vicar-general of the Observant Augustinians (Luther's order) and he was indeed a spiritual mentor to the young Luther. Staupitz emphasized election and justification in his theology. When the dispute over Indulgences first broke out, Staupitz supported Luther and tried to act as a mediator. Later, Staupitz, deplored Luther's extremism although the personal ties between the two men remained close.

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Thirdly he declareth þe pernicious daunger of Luthers doctrine against the Churche of Rome. Fourthly, he exhorteth the Duke, that as he tendereth his own honour and safety, and regardeth the fauour of the hye Byshop, he will send hym vp to Rome, or expelle hym out of his dominion, for somuch as such a pestilence breeding, as that was, could not, neither ought by any meanes long so to be suffered.

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MarginaliaThe Dukes aunswere to the Cardinall, for Luther.To this letter of the Cardinal, the Duke aunswereth agayne at large, purgyng both Luther, and hym self: Luther, in that he folowyng his conscience grounded vpon the worde of God, would not reuoke that for an errour, whiche coulde bee proued no errour: and him selfe he excuseth thus, that where it is required of hym, to banishe hym his countrey, or to sendy hym vppe to Rome, it woulde be litle honestye for him so to doe, and lesse conscience, vnles he knewe iuste cause, why he shoulde so doe: Whiche if the Cardinall woulde or could declare vnto hym, there should lacke nothyng in hym, which were the parte of a Christian prince to doe, and therfore he desireth hym, to be a meanes vnto the byshop of Rome, that innocencie and truth bee not oppressed, before the crime or errour be lawfully conuicted.

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MarginaliaLuthers letters to Duke Fridericke.This done, the Duke sendeth the letter of the Cardinall, vnto Martine Luther. Who aunswered agayne to the prince, shewyng first howe he came obediently vnto Caietanus, with þe Emperours warrant: and what talke there was betwene thē: howe Caietanus pressed hym agaynst hys conscience & manifest truth, to reuoke these errours. First that þe merites of Christes Passion, were not the treasure of þe popes pardons. Secondly that fayth was necessary in receauyng of the Sacramentes. Albeit in the first he was content to yeld to the Cardinall. In the second, because it touched a great part of our saluation, he could not with a safe conscience relent, but desired to be taught by the Scripture: at least that the matter might be brought into open disputatiō in some free place of Germanie, where the truth might be discussed and iudged of learned mē. The Cardinall not pleased with this, in great anger cast out many manacyng wordes, neyther would admitte him any more to hys presence or speach: where as hee yet notwithstandyng persistyng in his obedience to the Churche of Rome, gaue attendance, waytyng vpon the Cardinals pleasure a sufficient tyme. At last, whē no answere would come, after he had wayted þe space of v. or vi. dayes, to hys great detriment, and greater daunger, by the persuasion of hys frendes, he departed. Wherat if þe Cardinall were displeased, he had most cause to blame hym selfe. And nowe where as the Cardinall threatneth me (sayth he) not to let the action fall, but that the proces therof shalbe pursued at Rome onles I either come and present my selfe, or els be banished your dominions, I am not so much greued for mine own cause, as that you should susteyne for my matter any daūger or perill. MarginaliaLuther ready to be exiled.And therfore seyng there is no place nor countrey, whiche can kepe me frō the malice of mine aduersaryes, I am willyng to departe hence and to forsake my countrey, whether soeuer it shall please the Lorde to lead me: thankyng God which hath counted me worthy to suffer thus much for the glory of Christes name.

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Here
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