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1267 [1267]

K. Henry. 8. The life and storye of William Tyndall, Martyr.

thynges, and such thynges as hee named, hee required might be of the best, for said he, MarginaliaPhillippes well monyed by the Englishe byshops.I haue money enough. But of this talke came nothyng but that men should thinke hee had some thinges to do, for nothyng els folowed of his talke. So it was to bee suspected, that Philippes was in doubt to moue this matter for hys purpose, to any of the Rulers or Officers of the towne of Antwerpe, for doubt it should come to the knowledge of some Englishmen, and by the meane therof, M. Tyndall should haue had warnyng.

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So Philippes went from Antwerpe to the Court of Bruxelles, which is frō thence xxiiij. English myles, the king hauing there no Ambassadour: for at that time the kyng of England and the Emperour were at a cōtrouersie for the questiō betwene the kyng 

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I.e., the king of England.

and the Ladye Katherine, whiche was Aunte to the Emperour: and the discorde grewe so much, that it was doubted lest there should haue bene warre betwene the Emperour & the kyng, so that Philippes as a traitour both agaynst God and the kyng, was there the better reteyned, as also other traitours moe besides him: who after he had betrayed M. Tyndall into their handes, shewed him selfe agaynst the kynges own person, and there set forth thynges agaynst the king. To make short, the said Philippes did so much there, that he procured to bryng from thence with hym to Antwerpe þe Procurour generall, whiche is the Emperours Atturney, with other certaine Officers, as after foloweth. The whiche was not done with small charges and expēces, from whom so euer it came.

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Within a while after, Pointz sitting at his doore, Philippes man came vnto hym and asked whether M. Tyndall were there, and sayd his maister would come to hym, & so departed. But whether his M. Philippes were in the towne or not, it was not knowen: but at that tyme Pointz heard no more, neither of the master nor of the man. Within three or iiij. daies after, Pointz went forth to the towne af Barrowe, beyng xviij. Englishe myles from Antwerpe, where hee had busines to doe for the space of a moneth or vj. weekes, and in the time of his absence, MarginaliaHenry Philippes traytour and betrayer of M. Tyndall.Henry Philippes came agayne to Antwerpe to the house of Pointz, and commyng in, spake with his wife, asking her for M. Tyndall, & whether he would dyne there with hym, saying: what good meat shall we haue? She aūswered, such as the market will gyue. Thē went he forth againe (as it is thought) to prouide, and set the Officers which he brought with hym from Bruxelles, in the streete, and about the doore 

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The English House at Antwerp enjoyed what amounted to diplomatic immunity. Tyndale had to be arrested outside of the house.

. Then about noone he came agayne & went to M. Tyndall, and desired hym to lende hym forty shyllinges, for (sayd he) I lost my purse this mornyng, commyng ouer at the passage betwene this and Machelyn. MarginaliaThe simplicitie of Maister Tyndall.So M. Tyndall tooke hym xl. shyllynges, the whiche was easie to be had of him, if he had it: for in the wylye subtilities of thys world he was simple and vnexperte.

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Then sayd Philippes, M. Tyndall you shalbe my gest here this day. No sayd M. Tyndall, I go forth this day to dynner, and you shall go with me and be my geste, where you shalbe welcome. So when it was dynner tyme, M. Tyndall went foorth with Philippes, and at the goyng forth of Pointz house, was a long narrowe entrie, so that ij. could not go in a frount. MarginaliaHow Tyndall was betrayed into hys enemies handes.M. Tyndall would haue put Philippes before hym, but Philippes would in no wise, but put M. Tyndall afore, for that he pretended to shewe great humanitie. So M. Tyndall beyng a mā of no great stature, went before, & Philips a tall comely person folowed behynd hym, who had set Officers on either side of þe doore vpon ij. seates: which beyng there, might see who came in the entrie, and commyng through the same entrie, Philippes pointed with his finger ouer M. Tyndals head downe to hym, that the Officers whiche sat at the doore, might see that it was he whō they should take, as the officiers that tooke M. Tyndall, afterward told Pointz, & sayd to Pointz when they had layd hym in prison, that they pitied to see hys simplicite when they tooke hym. Then they tooke hym and brought him to the Emperours Attourney or Procurour generall, where he dyned. Then came the Procurour generall to the house of Pointz, and sēt away all that was there of M. Tyndals, as well hys bookes, as other thynges: MarginaliaTyndall had to the Castle of Fylforde.and from thence Tyndall was had to the Castle of Filford, xviij. Englishe myles from Antwerpe, and there he remayned vntill he was put to death.

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Then incontinent, by the helpe of Englishe Marchauntes, were letters sent in the fauour of Tyndall, to the Court at Bruxelles. MarginaliaLetters sent from England by the lord Cromwell & others, in the behalf of M. Tyndall.Also not long after, letters were directed out of England to the counsaile at Bruxelles, and sent to the Marchaūtes aduēturers to Antwerpe, commaūdyng them to see that with speede they should be deliuered. Then such of the chiefest of the Marchauntes as were there at that tyme, being called together, required the sayd Pointz to take in hand the deliuerie of those letters, with letters also frō them in the fauour of M. Tyndall, to the Lord of Barrowe and others, the whiche Lord of Barrowe (as it was tolde Pointz by the way) at that tyme was departed from Bruxelles, as the chiefest conductour of the eldest daughter of the kyng of Denmarke, to bee maryed to the Palsgraue, whose mother was sister to the Emperour, she beyng chiefe Princesse of Denmarke. Who after hee heard of his departure, did ryde after the next way, and ouertooke him at Akon, where he deliuered to hym his letters. The which when he had receiued and read, hee made no directe aunswere, but somewhat obiectyng, sayd: there was of their countrey men that were burned in England not long before, as in deede there were Anabaptistes burnte in Smithfield, and so Pointz said to him: howbeit sayd he, what soeuer the crime was, if his Lordshippe or any other Noble man had written, requiryng to haue had them, he thought they should not haue ben denyed. Well said he, I haue no leasure to write, for the Princesse is ready to ryde.

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Then sayd Pointz, if it shall please your Lordshyp, I will attende vppon you vnto the next bayting place, whiche was at Mastright. If you so do, sayd the Lord, I will aduise my selfe by the waye, what to write. So Pointz folowed hym from Akon to Mastright, the whiche are xv. Englishe myles a sunder, MarginaliaLetters frō the Lord of Barrow, to the Lord Cromwell concerning Maister Tyndall.& there hee receaued letters of him, one to the counsaile there, an other to the company of þe Marchauntes aduenturers, and an other also to the Lord Cromwell, in England.

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So Pointz rode from thence to Bruxelles, and then and there deliuered to the counsaile, the letters out of England, with the Lord of Barrowes letters also: MarginaliaPoyntz sent with letters frō Bruxels to Englād.and receiued eftsoones aunswere into England of the same by letters, which he brought to Antwerpe to the Englishe Marchauntes: who required him to go with them into Englād, and he very desirous to haue M. Tyndall out of prison, let not for to take paynes with losse of tyme in hys owne busines and occupying, but diligently folowed with the sayd letters, whiche hee there deliuered to the counsaile, and was commaunded by them to tary vntill he had other letters, of the which hee was not dispatched thence in a moneth after. At length the letters beyng deliuered him, hee returned agayne and deliuered them to the Emperours counsaile at Bruxelles, and there taried for aunswere of the same.

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When the sayd Pointz had taryed iij. or iiij. dayes, it was told hym of one that belonged to the Chauncery, that M. Tyndall should haue bene deliuered to hym accordyng to the tenour of the letters 

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A tangled series of events followed Tyndale's arrest. The English merchants at Antwerp were outraged at what they regarded as a violation of their exemption from arrest by the Imperial authorities and protested to the Imperial court at Brussels and to Thomas Cromwell back in England. After initial hesitation, Cromwell succeeded in getting a promise from the Imperial authorities to release Tyndale. At this point, Phillips, fearful for his reward and possibly his safety as well, denounced Thomas Poyntz as a heretic to the Imperial authorities.

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. MarginaliaThe sute of Philips against M. Tyndall.But Philippes beyng there, folowed the sute agaynst M. Tyndall, & hearyng that he should bee deliuered to Pointz, and doubtyng lest hee should be put from his purpose, he knewe none other remedy but to accuse Pointz, saying: that he was a dweller in the towne of Antwerpe, and there had ben a succourer of Tyndall, & was one of the same opinion, & that all this was onely his owne labour and sute to haue M. Tyndall at libertie, and no mans els.

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Thus
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