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1630 [1592]

Quene Mary. Disputation appoynted at Oxforde, touching the Sacrament.

MarginaliaAn. 1554. Aprill.lorum doctrina sana sit & catholica, at cum veritate orthodoxæ fidei consentiens, & vestro cōsensu, & suffragijs comprobetur? That is: MarginaliaI pray you stand good maisters to these iij. poore articles, comming here to you a begging for grace.may it please you to haue an instrument made that the doctrine of these foresayd Articles may be sound and Catholicke, and consonaunt with the veritie of the right meanyng fayth, and that the same may be approued by your consent and voyces? MarginaliaA grace for the articles. Secondly in the sayd congregatiō, an other grace was geuen and graūted, that Doct. Yong being the Vicechauncellour, Doct. Glin, Doct. Atkinson, Doct. Scot, and M. Sedgewicke should go to Oxford to defend the sayd Articles agaynst Caunterbury, London, and Latimer: MarginaliaA grace for the Cambridge Doctors to dispute against Cranmer, Ridley and Latymer. Also to haue letters to the Oxford men, sealed with their common seale: Item, an other grace graunted for M. Sedgewicke, to be actuall Doctour, beyng therupon immediatly admitted. The foresayd letters beyng then drawen out, the third day after (which was the eleuenth day of Aprill) were read in the foresayd Cōgregation house & there sealed.

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Whereupon the next day after (the xij. of the sayd moneth) MarginaliaThe comming of the Cambridge men to Oxford.the foresayd Doctours, with the full grace of that Vniuersitie, set forward to Oxford: and commyng thether the next day after (beyng Friday, the xiij. of April) were lodged all at þe Crosse Inne, with one Wakeclyn,  

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A number of minor but distinct changes were made to this material in the 1570 edition. Some of these appear to have been corrections: e.g. the name of Bonner's servant is given as 'Wakefield' in 1563 (p. 936), but is changed to 'Wakeclyn' (1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

beyng sometyme seruaunt to Byshop Boner.

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MarginaliaThe welcomming of the Cambridge Doctors to Oxford.Anone after their comming, Doct. Crooke presēted them with wyne for their welcome: and shortly after, two of the Bedelles came from the Vicechauncellour of Oxford, and presented the Vicechauncellour of Cābridge with a dish of appels, and a gallon of wyne. After whom next came M. Pye and Fecknam to welcome them. Then after consultation cōcernyng the deliuery of their letters, and instrument of grace (which was in Doct. Seton and Watsons keepyng)  

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Foxe stated in 1563 (p. 936) that documents were in Watson's chambers; in later editions he stated that they were in his keeping (1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

MarginaliaThe Cābridge Doctours repayre to D. Weston. they went all to Lyncolne Colledge to Doct. Weston the Prolocutor, and to the Vicechauncellour D. Tresham: and there they deliuered their letters, & declared what they had done touching the Articles, letters, & graces. 
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Foxe omitted the phrase 'where they had a junkery but sat not down' from the 1570 edition (cf. 1563, p. 936 with 1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429), probably because he thought the phrase too informal or inelegant. (Foxe also purged a marginal note containing the word 'junkery' from the 1570 edition [see textual variant 621M]).

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Half houre after 8. they returned to theyr Inne agayn: but first they cōcluded of a Procession, Sermon, & conuocation to be had the morow folowyng, and that the Doctours of Cambridge should be incorporate in the Vniuersitie of Oxford, and likewise that the Doctours of Oxford should be incorporate in the Vniuersitie of Cambridge. MarginaliaThe three prisoners disseuered, Cranmer in Bocardo, Ridley in Irishes house, Latimer in the Bailifes house.The same day the forenamed prisoners were disseuered, as was sayd afore: Doct. Ridley to Alderman Iryshes house, M. Latimer to an other, and D. Cranmer remained still in Bocardo.

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On Saterday (being the xiiij. of Aprill) at eight of the clocke, the foresayd Vicechaūcellour of Cambridge with the other Doctours of the same Vniuersitie, repayred to Lincolne Colledge agayne, and found the Prolocutour aboue in a Chappel, with the company of the house singyng Requiem Masse, and taryed there vntill the end. MarginaliaConsultation.Then they consultyng altogether in the Maisters lodgyng, about ix. of þe clocke came all to þe Vniuersitie Church called S. Maries, & there, after short consultation in a Chappell, the Vicechaūcellor, þe Prolocutor, &c. of Oxford, caused the Vicechauncellour of Cambridge and the rest of the Doctors of that Vniuersitie, MarginaliaThe doctours in their scarlet robes.to send for theyr scarlet roabes, 

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One change appears to have been a typographical error: 'coapes' [copes] in 1563 (p. 937) became 'roabes' [robes] (1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

brought from Cābridge, saue that Doct. Seton and Watson borowed of the Oxford men. And in this tyme, the Regentes in the Congregation house, had graunted all the Cambridge Doctours theyr graces, to be incorporate there, and so they went vp and were admitted immediatly, Doct. Oglethorp presentyng them, and þe Proctour readyng the statute, and geuyng them theyr othes.

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That done, they came all into the Quier, and there helde the conuocation of the Vniuersitie.  

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Foxe also omitted the words 'being gremials' (cf. 1563, p. 937 with 1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

MarginaliaMasse in pikesauce, in pricksong I would say. They had Masse of the holy Ghost solemnly song in prickesong, by the Quier men of Christes Church. MarginaliaThe causes of their assembly declared.But first the cause of the Conuocation was opened in English, partly by the Vicechauncellour, and partly by the Pro-

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locutour, declaryng that they were sent by the Queene, and wherfore they were sent: and caused Maister Say the Register, openly to read the Commission. That done, MarginaliaCambridge letters read.the Vicechauncellour read Cambridge letters openly, and then concluded that three Notaries, Maister Say for the Cōuocation, a Bedel of Cambridge for that Vniuersitie, & one Maister White for Oxford, MarginaliaThre Notaries assigned. should testifie of theyr doyng: and then willed the sayd Notaries to prouide parchement, that the whole assembly might subscribe to the Articles, saue those that had subscribed before in the Cōuocation house at London and Cambridge: MarginaliaSubscribing to the articles.and so the Vicechauncellour began first: after hym the rest of the Oxford men, as many as could in the Masse tyme.

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The Masse beyng done, they went in procession: MarginaliaProcession in Oxford.First the Quier in their surplices folowed the Crosse: then the first yeare Regentes, and Proctours: then the Doctours of law, and their Bedell before them: then the Doctours of Diuinitie of both Vniuersities intermingled, MarginaliaThe aray of the solemne procession.the Diuinitie and art Bedels goyng before them, the Vicechauncellour and the Prolocutour going together. After them Bachelers of Diuinitie, Regentes, & non Regentes in theyr array: and last of all, the Bachelers of Law and Art. After whom folowed a great company of Scholers & Students not graduate. And thus they proceded through the streete to Christes Church, and there the Quier sang a Psalme, and after that a Collect was read. This done, departed the Commissioners, Doctours, and many other to Lyncolne Colledge, where they dyned with the Maior of the Towne, one Aldermā, foure Bedels, Maister Say, and the Cambridge Notary. After dyner they went all agayne to S. Maries Church: and there, after MarginaliaAn other consultation of the Doctours & priestes.a short consultatiō in a Chappell, all the Commissioners came into the Quier, and sat all on seates before the Altar, to the number of 33. persons: And first they sent to the Maior, that he should bring in Doctor Cranmer, which within a while was brought to them with a great number of rusty bilmen.

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MarginaliaArchbishop Cranmer brought before the Doctours and hie priestes at S. Maries church.Thus the Reuerende Archbishop, when hee was brought before the Commissioners, reuerenced them wyth much humilitie, MarginaliaThe reuerend humilitie and behauiour of the Archb. before thē.and stoode wyth hys staffe in hys hand: who notwithstāding hauing a stoole offred him, refused to sit. Then the Prolocutor sitting in the middest in a scarlet gowne, began with a short Preface or Oration, 

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The first thing that Foxe did in synthesising the accounts of his two informants in the 1570 edition was to eliminate some passages from the previous edition which introduced the first informant's account, (see textual variant 36). Then Foxe took material in the second informant's account describing events unmentioned by the first informant, which took place in the week of 7 to 14 April, and placed it in correct chronological order at the beginning of the account (see textual transposition 7).

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in praise of vnity, and especially in the church of Christ: declaring withall hys bringing vp, and taking degrees in Cambridge, and also how he was promoted by king Henry, and had bene his Counsaillour and a Catholicke mā, one of the same vnitye, and a mēber therof in times paste: but of late yeares dyd seperate and cut of hym selfe from it, by teaching and setting forth of erroneous doctrine, making euery yeare a new fayth: therefore it pleased the Queenes grace, to send them of the Conuocation & other learned men, to bring him to this vnity agayne, if it might be. Then shewed he hym how they of the Cōuocation house, had agreed vpon certayne articles, whereunto they wylled hym to subscribe.

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MarginaliaThe aunswere of the Archb. to Doctor Weston.The Archb. aunswered to the preface very wyttely, modestly, and learnedly, shewing that he was very glad of an vnitie, for as much as it was Conseruatrix omnium rerum publicarum, tam Ethnicorum quam Christianorum. i. the preseruer of all common wealthes, as well of the Heathen, as of the Christiās: and so he dilated the matter with one or two stories of the Romaines common wealth. Whych thing when he had done, he sayd, that he was very glad to come to an vnitie, so that it were in Christ, and agreable to hys holy worde.

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When he had thus spoken hys full mynd, the Prolocutor caused the articles to be read vnto hym, and asked if he would graunt and subscribe vnto them. Then the bishop of Canterbury did reade them ouer three or

foure
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