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1683 [1645]

Queene Mary. Thinges done the 2. yeare of Q. Mary. Boner in his visitation.

Marginalia1554. Aprill.uen by þe Lord Chauncellor, that they should pay a thousand Markes a peece, and that they should go to prison agayne and there remaine till further order were takē for their punishment.

MarginaliaOctob. 30.Vpon the Tuesday beyng the xxx. of October, the L. Iohn Gray was deliuered out of the Tower, & set at libertie.

MarginaliaNouem. 4.Vpon Sonday the iiij. of Nouember, v. Priestes 

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The incident of five priests doing penance at Paul's Cross on 4 November 1554 is in the chronicle extracts in Foxe's papers (Harley MS 419, fol. 132r).

did penaunce at Paules Crosse, which were contēt to put away their wiues and take vpon them agayne to minister. Euery of them had a Taper in his hand and a rod wherewith the preacher did disple them.

MarginaliaNouem. 7.Vpon Wedensday the vij. of Nouember, the Lord Paget & Syr Edward Hastynges Maister of the horse were sent as Ambassadours, I know not whether, but as it was iudged, to Cardinall Poole, who lay all the sommer before at Bruxelles, & as it was thought, they were sent to accompany and conduct him into Englād, MarginaliaCardinall Poole made Archbishop of Cant.where at that tyme he was nominated and appoynted Byshop of Canterbury.

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Vpon the Friday folowyng the ix. of Nouember M. Barlow late Bishop of Bath and M. Cardmaker were brought before the Counsell in the Starre chamber, where after communication they were commaunded to the Fleete.

MarginaliaNouēb. 10.Vpon the Saterday beyng the x. of Nouember, the Shriues of London had commaundement to take an inuentory of euery one of their goodes which were of M. Throgmortons quest, and to seale vp their doores, which was done the same day. M. Whetstone, M. Lucar, and M. Kyteley, were adiudged to pay ij. thousand pound a peece, & the rest a thousand Markes a peece, to be payd within one fortnight after. Frō this payment were exempted those iiij. which confessed a faulte and submitted thē selues: whose names are these, M. Loe, M. Poynter , M. Beswicke , and M. Cater.

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MarginaliaB. Boner goeth in his visitation.Mention was made a litle before of the visitation of Ed. Boner bishop of London, 

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Foxe continues with anecdotes of Bonner's 1554 visitation of his diocese, also added in the 1570 edition (1570, pp. 1645-46; 1576, pp. 1403-1440 [recte 1404]; 1583, p. 1474). The purpose of these anecdotes was the assassination of Bonner's character. Foxe unsubtly implied that Bonner lusted after his nephew"s wife and behaved improperly with her (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474). Most of the narrative, however, is devoted to describing Bonner's choleric temper; this is the first of a number of anecdotes scattered throughout the Acts and Monuments relating Bonner's rages. As is often the case, however, in Foxe's anecdotes about Bonner, if one reads between the lines, one sees that Bonner's anger was not groundless. The bishop clearly suspected the religious allegiance of the parson of Hadham (probably rightly so, since the rood was not erected and there was no sacrament above the altar) and this, combined with the lack of greeting for Bonner, would have looked like open defiance. It should also be remembered that Bonner was in prison when Foxe heard this story and it probably lost nothing in the telling.

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That Foxe was drawing on oral sources for his narrative of Bonner's visitation is indicated by his statement that the incidents were: 'Testified by such as there and then were present, Rich. K. etc' (1570, p. 1646; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474). Who 'Rich. K.' and the others were may be impossible to determine, but the Sir Thomas Joscelyn who derided Bonner's temper was the father of John Joscelyn, Matthew Parker's secretary. I suspect that Foxe learned of the incident, and the names of witnesses to it, from John Joscelyn. In Foxe's papers (Harley 421, fol. 1r-v) is an incomplete, eyewitness account of a disastrous sermon given by Dr. Henry Bird (Bonner's suffragan and vicar of Dunmow, Essex), preached before Bonner during the same visitation. (In fact, the records of Bonner's visitation show that he visited Dunmow on Friday 12 October immediately before visiting Hadham (Guildhall MS 9537/1, fol. 46v)). It therefore seems probable that the story of Bird's sermon came from the same informant(s) as the story of Bonner striking Joscelyn; Foxe printed the latter but did not print the former which remained in his papers.

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which began (as is sayd) about the moneth of September: for the better preparation whereof were set forth certayne articles to the number of 37. Which articles partly for þe tediousnes of them, partly for that Maister Bale in a certaine treatise hath sufficiently paynted out the same in their coulours, partly also, because I wyll not infecte this booke with them, I slip them ouer, proceeding in the progresse of thys bishop in his visitation in the County of Essex. Who passing through þe said County of Essex, being attended wyth diuers worshipfull of the Shiere (for so they were commaunded) arriued at Sterford in Hertfordshiere, MarginaliaB. Boners behauiour at Sterford. where he rested certayn dayes, solacing him selfe after that painfull peregrination wyth no small feasting and banquetting wyth his attendantes aforesayd, at the house of one Persons his Nephew, whose wyfe he commonly called his fayre Niece (and fayre she was in deede.) He tooke there great pleasure to heare her play vpon the Virginals (wherein she excelled) in so much that euery dynner (sittyng by hys sweete side) she rose and played three seuerall times at hys request of hys good and spirituall deuotion towards her. These certayne dayes thus passed in thys bishoplike fashion, hee proceded in hys popish visitation towardes Hadham hys own house and parish, not past two myles frō Sterford, beyng there most solemnly roong out, as in al other places where as he passed. MarginaliaBoners behauiour at Hadhā.At length drawyng neare vnto Hadham, when he heard no belles there styrring in honor of his holynes, he grew into some coler, and the nerer he approched, the hotter was his fyt, and the quieter the Bels were, the vnquieter was hys moode. MarginaliaBoner in a pelting chafe.Thus rode hee on chafyng and fumyng wyth hym selfe. What meaneth (sayth he) that knaue the Clarke, that he ryngeth not, and the Parson that he meeteth me not? wyth sundry other furious wordes of fiery element. There thys pacient Prelate comming to the towne, alighted, calling for the key of the church, which was then all vnready, for that (as they

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then pretended) he had preuented hys tyme by two houres: whereupon he grewe from coler to playne melancholy, so as no man wyllingly would deale with hym to qualifie the ragyng humor so farre incorporated in hys brest. At last the church doore being opened, the bishop entred, and finding no Sacrament hanged vp, nor roode loft decked after þe popish precept (which had commaunded about the same tyme a well fauoured Roode, & of hable stature vniuersally in all Churches to be set vp) curtalled his small deuotions, and fel from all coler and melancholy to flat madnes in the vppermost degree, swearing and ragyng wyth an huntyng othe or two, and by no beggers, that in hys own church where he hoped to haue seene best order, he found most disorder (to hys honours most heauy discomfort, as he sayd) callyng the Parson (whose name was Doctour Bricket ) knaue and hereticke. MarginaliaD. Bricket Parson of Hadham called knaue of Boner. Who there hūbled him selfe and yelded, as it were, to hys fault, saying he was sory hys Lordship was come before that he and hys parish looked for hym: and therefore could not doe theyr duties to receiue him accordingly: & as for those things lacking, he trusted a short tyme hereafter should compasse that, which hetherto hee could not bryng about. Therefore if it pleased his lordship to come to hys poore house (where hys dynner was prepared) he would satisfie hym in those thinges, which hys lordship thought amysse. Yet thys so reasonable an aunswere nothyng coulde satisfie nor asswage hys passion vnreasonable. For the catholicke Prelate vtterly defied hym and hys chere, commaunding hym out of hys sight, saying: (as hys byworde was) before God thou art a knaue, auaunt hereticke, and therewithall, whether thrusting or striking at him, so it was, that with his hand he gaue Sir Thomas Iosselyn Knight (who was then amongst the rest, and stoode next the bishop) MarginaliaB. Boner striketh hym that standeth next. a good flewet vpon the vpper part of the necke, euen vnder hys eare (as some say which stoode by) but as he him selfe sayd, MarginaliaSyr Thomas Ioßelyn strocken of Boner.hee hyt hym full vpon the eare: whereat he was somwhat astonyed at the sodaynes of the quarell for the tyme. At last he spake and sayd, what meaneth your lordship? haue you ben trayned in Will Sommers Schoole, to stryke hym who standeth next you? The bishop styll in rage either heard not, or would not heare.

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Then M. Fecknam Deane of Paules seing the Byshop still in this vtter rage, sayd: MarginaliaFecknam excuseth B. Boner by the Marsey.O M. Iosselyn, you must beare with my Lord: for truly his long imprisonment in the Marshalsey, and the misusing of hym there hath altered hym that in these passions, he is not ruler of hym selfe, nor it booteth any man to geue hym counsell vntill his heate be past, and then assure your selfe M. Iosselyn, my Lorde will bee sory for those abuses that now he can not see in him selfe. Whereunto he merely replyed & sayd: so it semeth M. Fecknam, for now that he is come forth of þe Marshalsey, he is ready to go to Bedlem. MarginaliaSyr Thomas Josselyns Apopthegma touchyng B. Boner. At which mery cōceite some laughed and moe smiled because the nayle was so truly hyt vpō þe head. The Byshop nothyng abashed at his own folly, gaue a deafe eare, as no maruell it was that he shamed litle to strike a straūger, which spared not the burnyng of so many good men.

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After this worthy combate thus finished and achiued, this martiall Prelate presently taketh hym to his horse agayne (notwithstandyng he was minded to tary at Hadham iij. or iiij. dayes, & so had made prouision in his own house) and leauing his dinner, rode that night with a smal cōpany of his houshold to Ware (where he was not looked for three dayes after) to the great wonder of all the countrey why he so preuented hys day afore stalled.

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At this hasty posting away of this Bishop, his whole traine of attendantes there left him. Also his Doctours and Chapleynes (a few excepted) taried behinde, and dyned at Doct. Brickettes, as merely as he roade towardes Ware all chafingly: which dynner was prepared for the Byshop him self. Now whe-

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OOOo.iiij.
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