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1690 [1652]

Quene Mary. Things done the 2. yere of Q. Mary. Order takē by Parlamēt for Q. Maryes child.

MarginaliaAn. 1555. December. Ianuary.About this very time a Post or Messenger 

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No other events for the year 1554 are described in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition, accounts were added of events in London and at court during December 1554 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, pp. 4179 [recte 1479]-1480. These events seem to have come from Foxe's lost chronicle source(s).

was sent from the whole Parlament to the Pope, to desire hym to confirme and establish the sale of Abbey landes and Chauntrie landes: For the Lordes and the Parlamēt woulde graunt nothing in the Popes behalfe before theyr purchase were fully confirmed. 
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When Foxe states that parliament asked the pope 'to Confirme and establish the sale of Abbey landes and Chantry landes,' he means that Parliament asked the pope to confirm the purchasers of such lands in their ownership and not to reclaim them.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 6.Vpon the Thursday following, beyng the. vj. day of December, and S. Nicholas day, all the whole Conuocation both Bishops & other, were sent for to Lambeth to the Cardinall, MarginaliaThe Chapter of Paules absolued by the Cardinall.who the same day forgaue them all theyr periurations, schismes, and heresies, and they all there kneeled downe and receyued hys absolution, and after an exhortation and gratulation for theyr conuersion to the catholike church, made by the Cardinall, they departed.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 12.Vpon the Wedensday being the. xij. of December, fyue of the. viij. men (which lay in the Fleete, that were of Maister Throgmortons quest) were discharged & set at liberty vpon theyr fine payd, MarginaliaThe Quest men of M. Throgmorton put to their fine, and deliuered. which was. cc.xx. li. a peece, and the other foure put vp a Supplication, therin declaryng, that theyr goodes dyd not amount to the sūme that they were appoynted to pay, and so vpon that declaration paying. lx. li. a peece, they were deliuered out of pryson vpon S. Thomas day before Christmas, beyng the. xxj. of December.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 22.Vpon the Saterday folowing, beyng the. xxij. of December, all the whole Parlament had straite cōmaundement, that none of them should depart into their coūtrey thys Christmas, nor before the Parlament were ended. Which commaundement was wonderful contrary to all theyr expectations. For as well manye of the Lordes, as also many of the inferiour sort had sent for theyr horse, and had them brought hyther.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 28.Vpon the Friday following, being the. xxviij. of December and Childermas day, the Prince of Piedmont came to the court at Westminster.

AN. 1155

 

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From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter

The glosses help to hammer home the point that Providence cheated the ungodly of their wish for a child for Mary, on occasion in quite harsh, mocking terms. The glosses also seek to reverse the charge of heresy. There is a marked stridency in the tone, demonstrating Foxe's sensitivity to the charge of heresy being levelled at protestants. There is a reference only to be found in 1570 and an example of the 1583 compositors being more alert in detecting a mistake than they appear usually to have been.

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MarginaliaAn. 1555. MarginaliaIanuary. 1.Vpon Newyeares day at nyght following, 
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Block 36: From the arrest of Rose to Hooper's letter

In the 1570 edition Foxe continues with an account of the arrest of the Bow Church congregation on 1 January 1555 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480). This account also probably came from Foxe's lost chronicle source(s) and it replaced an account of the same event in the 1563 edition, on p. 1020. The reason for this replacement probably was that it was simpler for Foxe, in 1570, to print the new version along with other material, which preceded and followed it, from the same source.

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In any case, the 1570 narrative, based on these chronicle source(s), continued through parliament passing a new act of supremacy and a tumult between the English and the Spanish at Westminster (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480.

certaine honest men and women of the Citie, to the number of xxx. and a Minister MarginaliaM. Rose with 30. persons taken at a Communion in Bow Churchyeard. wyth thē named M. Rose, were taken as they were in a house in Bow churchyard at the Communion, and the same night they were all cōmytted to prison. And on the MarginaliaIanuary. 3.Thursday followyng, beyng the third day of Ianuary, Maister Rose was before the bishop of Winchester being Lord Chauncelour, and from thence the same day he was cōmitted to the Tower, after certayne communication had betwene the Bishop and hym.

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MarginaliaThe Acte of supremacie passed in the Parlament.The same day the Acte for the Supremacie past the Parlament. Also the same day at night was a great tumult betwene Spaniardes & Englishmē at Westminster, whereof was lyke to haue ensued great mischiefe through a Spanish Frier, whch got into the Church, and roong Alarum. MarginaliaA styrre betwene the Spanyardes and English men, at Westminster.The occasion was about. ij. whores whch were in the Cloyster of Westminster with a sort of Spaniardes, whereof whilest some playde the knaues wyth them, other some dyd kepe the entrey of the cloyster wyth Dagges in harneys. In the meane time certayne of the Deanes men came into the Cloister and the Spaniardes discharged their Dagges at them, and hurt some of them. By and by the noyse of thys doing came into the streetes, so that al the whole towne was vp almost, but neuer a stroke was stricken. Notwythstanding the noyse of this doing with the Deanes men, and also the ringing of the Alarum made much ado, and a great number also to be sore afrayd.

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MarginaliaRead before pag. 1647.Ye heard a lytle before the Counsels letter sent to B. Boner, signifying the good newes of Queene Mary to be not onely conceaued, but also quicke with chylde, which was in the moneth of Nouemb. the. xxviij. day. Of thys child great talke began at thys tyme to ryse in euery mans mouth, wyth busy preparation, and much adoe, especially amongest such as seemed in England to cary Spanish harts in English bodies. In number of whom here is not to bee forgotten, nor defrauded of

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hys condigne commendation for hys worthy affection toward his Prince and her issue, one Sir Rich. Southwell: who being the same tyme in the Parlamēt house, when as the Lordes were occupied in other affayres and matters of importance, sodainly starting vp, for fulnes of ioy, braste out in these wordes folowing: MarginaliaThe wordes of Sir Richard Southwell in the Parlamēt house, touching hys younge Maister.Tush my Maister (quoth he) what talke ye of these matters? I would haue you take some order for our young Maister that is now cōming into the worlde apase, lest he finde vs vnprouided. &c. 

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Southwell's exclamation in parliament over the expected birth of Mary's child (1570, p. 1652; 1576, pp. 1409-10; 1583, p. 1480; this probably came from an oral source.

By the which wordes both of hym, & also by þe foresayd letters of the Counsell, and the common talke abroade, it may appeare what an assured opinion was then conceaued in mens heades of Queene Mary to be conceaued and quicke with child: In so much that at the same tyme, and in the same Parlament, there was eftsoons a byll exhibited, and an Act made vpon the same, the wordes whereof, for the more euidēce, I thought here to exemplificate as vnder followeth. 
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The lengthy extract from 1 and 2 Philip and Mary, cap. 10 (printed in 1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, p. 1480) is the fruit of Foxe's delving into the parliament rolls. Foxe's comments following the act, thanking God that the Spanish had not become heirs to the throne (1570, p. 1653; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, p. 1480) help confirm that the Latin verses Foxe printed against the marriage of Philip and Mary were designed to influence Elizabeth against a foreign marriage.

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¶ The wordes of the Acte.

MarginaliaEx Statut. an. 1. & 2. Philip et Mariæ. ca. 10.ALbeit we the Lordes spirituall and temporal, and the cōmons in this present Parlament assembled, haue firme hope and confidence in the goodnes of almighty God, that like as he hath hetherto miraculously preserued the Quenes Maiestie frō many great imminent perils & daūgers: euen so he will of his infinite goodnes, giue her highnes strength, the rather by our continuall prayers, to passe well the daunger of deliueraūce of child, wherwith it hath pleased hym (to al our great cōfortes) to blesse her: MarginaliaThe iudgement of the Parlamēt deceaued in Gods blessing. Yet for as much as al thynges of this world be vncertain, & hauing before our eyes the dolorous experience of this inconstant gouernement duryng the tyme of the reigne of the late kyng Edward the sixt: do playnly see the manifold inconueniences, great daungers and perils that may ensue to this whole Realme, if foresight be not vsed to preuent all euill chaunces if they should happen: For the eschewyng hereof we the Lordes spirituall and temporall and the commons in this present Parliament assembled, for and in consideration of a most special trust and confidence that we haue and repose in the kynges Maiestie, for and concerning the politicke gouernement, order, and administration of this Realme in the tyme of the young yeares of the issue or issues of her Maiesties body to be borne, MarginaliaOrder takē by Parlament for Q. Maries childe.if it should please God to call the Queenes highnes out of this present lyfe duryng the tender yeares of such issue or issues (which God forbyd) accordyng to such order and maner as hereafter in this present Act his hyghnes most gracious pleasure is should be declared and set forth: haue made our most humble sute by the assent of the Queenes highnes, that his Maiestie would vouchsafe to accept and take vpon hym the rule, order, education, and gouernement of the sayd issue or issues to be borne, as is aforesayd, vpō which our sute beyng of his sayd Maiestie most graciously accepted, it hath pleased his highnes not onely to declare, that like as for the first part his Maiesty verely trusteth that almighty God (who hath hetherto preserued the Queenes Maiestie) to gyue this Realme so good an hope of certaine succession in the bloud royall of the same Realme, MarginaliaTrust disapoynted. will assiste her highnes with his graces and benedictiōs, to see the fruite of her body wel brought forth, lyue, and hable to gouerne (wherof neither all this Realme, ne all the world besides, should or could receiue more comfort then his Maiestie should and would) yet if such chaunce should happen his Maiestie at our humble desires is pleased and contented, not onely to accept and take vpon him the cure and charge of the education, rule, order & gouernmēt of such issues as of this most happy Mariage shall bee borne betwene the Queenes highnes and hym: but also during the tyme of such gouernement, would by alwayes and meanes study, trauaile, and employ hym selfe to aduaunce the weale both publicke and priuate of this Realme and dominions therunto belongyng, accordyng to the sayd trust in his Maiestie reposed, with no lesse good will and affection, then if his hyghnes had bene narurally borne amongest vs. In consideration wherof be it enacted by the Kyng and the Queenes most excellent Maiesties, by the assent of the Lordes spirituall and temperall, and the commons in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authoritie of the same. &c. as it is to be seene in þe Acte more ot large ratifyed & cōfyrmed at the same Parlament to the same intent and purpose.

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Thus much out of the Acte and Statute I thought to rehearse, to the entent, the reader may vnderstand not so much how Parlamentes may sometymes be de-

ceaued
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