Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Latin/Greek Translations
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2332 [2292]

Quene Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Q. Maries time.

MarginaliaAn. 1558.Alas poore infāt, quoth the father. It is a crafty knaue, quoth the Lord Chamberlaine: let me see him here no more.

MarginaliaThe Constable of þe Tower discharged of hys office.The fift day of May, the Constable was discharged of his office of the Tower, MarginaliaSyr Henry Benifield with hys company, placed about the Lady Elizabeth.and one Syr Henry Benifield placed in his rowme, a man vnknowen to her grace, and therfore the more feared: which so sodayne mutation was vnto her no litle amase. Hee brought with him an hūdreth souldiours in blew coates, wherwith she was marueilously discomforted, and demaunded of such as were about her, whether the Lady Ianes Scaffold were taken away or no, MarginaliaLady Elizab. in great feare and doubt of life. fearyng by reason of their commyng, lest she should haue played her part. To whom aūswere was made, that the Scaffold was takē away, & that her grace needed not to doubt of any such tyranny: for God would not suffer any such treason against her person. Wherwith beyng cōtented, but not altogether satisifed, she asked what Syr Henry Benifield was, and whether he was of that conscience or no, that if her murderyng were secretly committed to his charge, he would see the execution therof.

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MarginaliaLady Elizab. in doubt of Syr Henry Benifield.She was aunswered, that they were ignorant what maner of man he was. Howbeit they persuaded her that God would not suffer such wickednes to procede. Well, quoth she: God graūt it be so. For thou, O God, canst mollifie all such tyrānous hartes, & disappoint all such cruell purposes: and I besech thee to heare me thy creature, which am thy seruaunt and at thy cōmaundement, trustyng by thy grace euer so to remaine. About which tyme it was spread abroad, that her grace should be caryed from thence by this new iolly captayne and his souldiours: but whether, it could not be learned. Which was vnto her a great grief, especially for that such a company was appointed to her garde, requestyng rather to continue there still, then to bee lead thence with such a sort of rascalls. At last, playne aunswere was made by the Lord Shandoyes, that there was no remedy, but from thence she must needes depart to the manour of Woodstocke, as he thought. Being demaunded of her, for what cause: for that (quoth he) the Tower is like further to be furnished. She being desirous to know what he ment therby, demaūded, wherwith. He aunswered, with such matter as the Queene and Counsaile were determined in that behalfe, wherof he had no knowledge: and so departed.

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In conclusion, on Trinity Sonday beyng the xix. day of May, she was remoued from the Tower, the Lord Treasurer beyng then there for þe lading of her Carts, and dischargyng the place of the same. Where Syr Hēry Benifield (beyng appointed her Gailer) did receiue her with a company of rakehels to garde her, besides the Lord of Darbyes band, waftyng in the Countrey about for the Mooneshine in the water. Vnto whom at length came my Lord of Tame, ioyned in Commission with the sayd Syr Henry, for the safe guidyng of her to prison: MarginaliaLady Elizab. remoued from the Tower to Woodstocke.and they together conueyed her grace to Woodstocke, as hereafter followeth.

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The first day they conducted her to Richmond, where she continued all night, MarginaliaLady. Elizab. secluded from her seruantes.beyng restrained of her owne men, which were lodged in out chambers, and Syr Henry Benifieldes souldiours appointed in their rowmes to geue attendaunce on her person. MarginaliaLady Elizab. in despayre of her life.Whereat she beyng maruelously dismayed, thinking verely some secret mischief to be aworkyng towardes her, called her Gentlemā Vsher, and desired him, with the rest of his company, to pray for her. For this night (quoth she) I thinke to dye. Wherewith he beyng striken to the hart, sayd: God forbid that any such wickednes should be pretended agaynst your grace. So comfortyng her as well as he could, at last he brust out into teares, and went from her down into the court, where were walkyng the Lord of Tame & Syr Henry Benifield. Then hee cōming to the Lord of Tame (who had profered to him much frendship) desired to speake with him a word

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or two. Vnto whom he familiarly sayd, he should with all his hart. Which when Syr Henry, standyng by, heard, he asked what the matter was. To whom the Gentleman Vsher aunswered: no great matter Syr, (sayd he) but to speake with my Lord a word or two.

MarginaliaLady Elizabethes Vsher talketh with the Lorde of Tame.Then, when þe Lord of Tame came to him, he spake on this wise: My Lord (quoth he) you haue bene alwayes my good Lord, and so I besech you to remayne. The cause why I come to you at this tyme, is to desire your honour, vnfainedly to declare vnto me whether any daūger is ment towardes my mistres this night, or no, that I & my poore felowes may take such part as shal please God to appoint: for certeinly we will rather dye, then she should secretly and innocently miscary. Mary (sayd þe Lord of Tame) MarginaliaThe gentle hart of the Lord of Tame to Lady Elizabeth.God forbid that any such wicked purpose should be wrought: and rather then it should be so, I with my men are ready to dye at her foote also: and so (praysed be God) they passed that dolefull night, with no litle heauines of hart.

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The next day, as she should take her iorney frō Richmond toward Woodstocke, the Lord of Tame, with an other Gentleman beyng at Tables, playing, and dropping bye crownes, þe Lady Elizabeth passing by, sayd: she would see the game out. Which Syr Henry Benifield would scarse permit. The game so rūnyng about somethyng long: Come on sayth he, & would not suffer her to tary the game out. Afterwardes passing ouer the water at Richmond, goyng towardes Wyndsore, her grace espied certaine of her poore seruauntes standyng on the other side, which were very desirous to see her. Whom when she behelde, turnyng to one of her men standyng by, she sayd: yonder I see certayne of my men: go to them and say these wordes from me: MarginaliaTanquam ouis. i. like a shepe to the slaughter. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
The Lady Elisabeth, quoting [and Marginal Note]
Foxe text Latin

Tanquam ouis

Foxe text translation

like a shepe [to the slaughter]

Tanquam ouis. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
The Lady Elisabeth, quoting [and Marginal Note]
Foxe text Latin

Tanquam ouis

Foxe text translation

like a shepe [to the slaughter]

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So she passyng forward to Windsore, was lodged there that night in the Deane of Windsores house, a place more meete in deede for a priest, then a Princesse. And from thence her grace was garded & brought the next night to M. Dormers house, MarginaliaLady Elizabeth honourably receaued and beloued of the people.where much people standyng by þe way, some presented to her one gift, and some an other, so that Syr Henry was greatly moued therwith, & troubled þe poore people very sore, for shewing their louyng hartes in such a maner, callyng thē rebells & traitors, with such like vile wordes. Besides, as she passed through þe Villages, the Townsmē rang the bells, as being ioyfull of her cōming, thinking verely it had bene otherwise then it was in deede, as the sequele proued after to the sayd poore mē. For immediatly the sayd Syr Henry hearyng the same, sent his souldiers thether, who apprehended some of the ringers, setting them in the stockes, and otherwise vncurteously misusing other some for their good willes.

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On the morrow her grace passing from M. Dormers (where was for the tyme of her abode there a strait watch kept) came to the Lorde of Tames house, where she lay all the night, MarginaliaThe gentle entertainment of Lady Elizabeth at the Lord of Tames house.beyng very princely entertained, both of Knightes and Ladyes, Gentlemen and Gentlewomē. MarginaliaMaster Benifield grudging at the gentle entertainment of Lady Elizabeth.Wherat Sir Henry Benifield grunted, and was highly offended, saying vnto them, that they could not tell what they did, and were not able to aunswere to their doynges in that behalfe, lettyng them to vnderstand that she was the Queenes Maiesties prisoner, and no otherwise: aduising them therfore to take heede & beware of after clappes. Wherunto the Lord of Tame aunswered in this wise: that he was well aduised of his doyngs, beyng ioyned in Commission as well as he, addyng with warrant, that her grace might and should in his house be mery.

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MarginaliaThe rude and vngentlemanly behauiour of Syr Henry Benifield.After this, Syr Henry went vp into a chamber, where was appointed for her grace a chayre, ij. cushions, and a fote carpet, very fayre and princelike, wherin presumpteously he satte, and called one Barwicke hys mā to pull of hys bootes. Which as soone as it was knowen among the Ladyes and gentles, euery one mused thereat, and laughed him to scorne, obseruing

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