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911 [911]

K. Henry. 7. The historye and tyrannye of the Turkes.

tentes, & so came it to passe that þe strēgth of the enemyes dayly more & more decreasing, they had lesse hope euery day more then other, of obteining the Citie. MarginaliaThe Turkes slayne.For besides þe innumerable slaughter of Turkes vpon the walles, the townsmen also watching þe foragers & purueiers of the Turkes, as they raūged about for vitaile for the campe, euer, as occasiõ serued them, did cõpasse them about, & so encountered wt them by the waye, that of a whole legion, scarsely the tenth parte returned agayne to theyr felowes alyue: by meanes wherof the courage of the enemyes beganne greatly to faynt. Whereby such a meruelous alteration happened that as our men began to receyue more hope and courage, so the Turkes began still more to droupe and to languishe with dispayre, so that at length scarse durst they appeare without the boundes, where they were entrenched, but onely in lyght skyrmishes, when they were prouoked by our men to come out, and to shewe them selues.

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MarginaliaThe Turke begynneth to take counsaile to retire.Solymannus perceyuyng his souldiers thus dayly to go to wracke, of whom he had lost already more thē 80. thousãd, and that with lõg taryeng he could do no good, being also in lacke of forrage, for that the countrey about him was wasted: begynneth to consulte with his Captaines and coūsailours, what remayned best to be done. Of whom the most part aduised him to raise his siege, & betyme to prouide for him selfe. Whiche to do, many causes there were that moued him. First the losse of his mē, whiche dayly were cut from him by great numbers, besides them which lay in his cãpe woūded, or sicke, or famished. Secõdly lacke of purueiãce. Thirdly þe approching nere of wynter. But the chiefest cause was for that he heard Fridericke Palatine aboue mencioned, to be commyng with a greate armye at Ratisbone, towardes Vienna, & there had done great molestation to a great number of the Turkes forragers, whom by the way he preuēted & so enclosed in þe woodes, that he slue them. MarginaliaSolyman remoueth & raiseth his siege from Vienna.Wherof when Solyman had intelligence, thinkyng it not best to abyde the commyng of þe Palatine, made hast with bagge & baggage to remoue hys campe and to retire: and first sendyng away his carriage before him, made spede hym selfe with his armye, to folowe shortly after. The Viennians, when they hearde of the remouyng awaye of the Turkes, although at the first they scarsely beleued it to be true, beyng afterwarde certified out of doubte, both of their remouing, and also of the order therof, how it was in maner of a flight or chase, were greatly desirous to make out of þe Citie after thē. Wherin, albeit þe presence of the Palatine with his armye, if he had bene there present, might haue stand them in great stede, MarginaliaThe Turkes camp pursued in their flyght.yet notwithstãdyng they tooke the oportunitie of þe tyme present, and issuing out of the Citie, in most speady wyse, set after thē with their horsemen: and first ouerpassyng the tentes (where the Turkes had pytched their stations or pauilions) for hast of þe way, they made such pursute after thē, þt within litle tyme, they ouertooke þe rereward or latter end of the armye, whereof they made such hauocke & destruction, that (as the author reporteth) there was neuer a shot of þe pursuers, nor weapõ drawē, nor stroke stroocken, which light in vayne. Which was no hard thyng for our men to doo: For as the Turkes in their flight went scattered out of order and aray, neither woulde they in the forerancke (being so farre of from ieoperdy) returne backe to helpe their felowes, it was easy for our men, wtout resistance, to come vpõ their backes, as they would.

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Yet notwithstandyng in long pursute, when our men could not see the cariage of the Turkes, whiche was wõt in armyes to come alway behynd after the hoast, and suspectyng (as truth was) some ambushe to be left in priuie wayt behind them, to come betwixt them and home: called thē selues to retraite and consulted vpon the matter, thinking good, first to sent out certaine scoutes, to espye and bryng them worde, where the enemies lay, and what was the number of them. MarginaliaThe pryuey purpose of the Turkes preuented.Whereof when intelligence was giuen thē, that the remnant of the Turkes armye was remainyng in the tentes behynde, worde wassent to their felowes in Viēna, to issue out, and to ioyne also wt them, agaynst the tayle of the Turkes, which had entrēched them selues within the cãpe. Other were appointed to folowe the chase, lest peraduenture þe Turkes seyng our men to recule backe, might returne againe vpon them, and helpe their felowes. Which things beyng thus ordered and appoynted, in the meane tyme, while parte of the Viennians were houeryng after the mayne armye, the rest encountred with them þt were left in the campe. Who seyng thē selues ouermatched, first defēsed their campe with a deepe ditche and bulwarke, to delay þe tyme, vntill some helpe might come to them from the armye. Secondly they directed messēgers to the Christiãs, to entreate for peace. Thirdly they conueid their priuie letters vnto Solyman for spedy ayde and rescue. But all the wayes and passages beyng stopped by the Christiãs, their letters were intercepted, & so the miserable Turkes being desititute of all hope and succour, seing no other remedy, made out of their campe, to hassard and proue the vttermost for their defence: MarginaliaThe rest of the Turkes slayne in the campe.but in conclusiõ, in their desperate venture they were inclosed about by our mē, on euery side, and there put to the sword and slayne, a fewe onely excepted, who escapyng out very hardly by secrete passages, shifted after þe rest of their felowes, as well as they could. Their carriage and other furniture left behynde them in their tentes, was destributed amongst the souldiers, onely suche thynges reserued as might serue for the publicke vse and commoditie of the Citie.

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MarginaliaThe mercyfull protection of God ouer Christendome.Thus through the merciful protection 

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The following passages, declaring that the Ottoman failure at Viennawas due to God's favour and protection of the Protestants, are Foxe's interpolations into the text.

& benefit of almighty God, Austria was deliuered from the fierce and barbarous hostilitie of the cruell Turkes: notwithstandyng that neither Ferdinandus the kyng, nor þe Emperour his brother were there presēt, but onely the power of God, throughe the valiauntnes of the worthye Germaines, defēded that Citie: in defence wherof consisted the safetie and deliuerãce (no doubt) of all these Weast partes of Christendome. For the whiche, immortall prayse & thãkes be vnto our immortall God in Christ our Lord, according as he hath of vs most graciously & worthly deserued. MarginaliaGods blessyng goeth with the maīteyners of hys true worshyp & Religion.Wherin by þe way take this for a note (gētle reader) howe & after what maner, Gods blessing goeth with þe true reformers of his religion, & so much þe more is it to be noted, for that þe Turkes, in so many battails & sieges here tofore, were neuer so repulsed & foyled, as at this present tyme in encoūtryng with þe protestants & defenders of syncere religiõ. This Citie of Viēna was besieged and delyuered the yeare of our Lord. 1529. The assaultes of the Turke 
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The number of assaults on Vienna and the size of the Ottoman army are taken from Giovann Battisto Ramusio's history as excerpted in LaonicusChalkokondylas, De origine et rebus gestis Turcorum (Basel, 1556), pp. 207-8.

agaynst the Citie, are numbred to be. 20. and his repulses as many. The number of his armye whiche hee firste brought, was. 250. M. wherof were reckened to be slayne. 80. thousand and aboue. Duryng the tyme of his siege, he ledde away out of the countrey about, many captiues: 
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This passage, relating purported cruelty of the Turks, was taken from the German historian Wolfgang Dreschler's De Saracenorum et Turcorum orgine etrebus gestis, as excerpted in Laonicus Chalkokondylas, De orgine etr rebus gestisTurcorum (Basel, 1556), p. 233. This is a good example of Foxe seizing uponstories of Turkish atrocities.

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virgines and matrones he quelled and cast them out naked: the children he stoocke vpon stakes.

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Solymannus thus put from the hope and victorie of Vienna, after he had breathed him self a while at home, the second yeare after, whiche was. an. 1531. repayryng hys hoast, returned agayne into Hungarye, with no lesse multitude, then before: where first he got þe towne called Gunza, 

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This brief account of Süleyman's conquest of Guns (Koeszegh), afortress (not a town as Foxe states) comes from Giovann Battisto Ramusio's historyas excerpted in Laonicus Chalkokondylas, De origine et rebus gestis Turcorum(Basel, 1556), pp. 207-8. In fact, as other accounts cited by Foxe indicate, Süleyman had to raise the siege of Guns.

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beyng but slenderly kept with a small garison. By reason wherof the townesmen and souldiours yeldyng them selues vnto the Turke, were cõstrained to agree vnto vnreasonable conditions. Ex Ioan. Ramo.

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Melchior Soiterus in his second booke 

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Foxe draws on Melchior Soiterus's history of Süleyman's wars in Hungary and the Balkans, De bello Pannonico, as excerpted in Laonicus Chalkokondylas, De orgine et rebus gestis Turcorum (Basel, 1556), pp. 519-20,for this account of the siege of Guns. Foxe also consulted Wolfgang Dreschler's history. Dreschler also relates that the Ottoman army numbered 200,000and that they besieged Guns for 30 days (see Laonicus Chalkokondylas, Deorigine et et rebus gestis Turcorum [Basel, 1556], p. 233).

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writyng De Bello Pannonico, MarginaliaEx Melchiore Soitero. lib. 2. de Bello Pãnonico. touchyng þe foresayd town of Gunza, or Gunzium, differeth herein somthyng from Ramus, declaryng how this Gunza being a small towne in Hungary, and hauyng in it, but onely. 100. souldiours (or as Volfgangus Drechsterus in his chronicle 
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Dreschler also relates that the Ottoman army numbered 200,000and that they besieged Guns for 30 days (see Laonicus Chalkokondylas, Deorigine et et rebus gestis Turcorum [Basel, 1556], p. 233).

reporteth, at þe most, but. 200. souldiours) MarginaliaNicolaus Iureschitz a valiaunt captaine.vnder the valiant captaine Nicolaus Iureschitz, defended them selues so manfully and wonderfully, through the notable power of God, agaynst the whole puisance of. 200. thousand Turkes, that they beyng notwithstandyng distressed with lacke

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