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992 [992]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in the dioces of Lincolne.

MarginaliaAnno. 1521.
Ex Regist. Io. Longland. Lincol.

Accusers.Parties accused.Crimes obiected.

there is betwene them Purgatorie.
Againe, when Elizabeth came from the rode
of rest, said Isabell, that if she knew so much as
she hath heard, she would go no more on pilgry-
mage while she lyued: for all saintes, sayd shee,
be in heauen. Then asked Elizabeth wherfore
pilgrimage was ordeyned of Doctoures and
Priestes. Sayd the other, for gayne and profite.
Who hath taught you this ф Elizab? man or
woman? Your curate, I dare say, neuer learned
you so. My curate sayd she, will neuer knowe so
much: and moreouer sayd to Elizab. her sister,
that if she would kepe counsaile, and not tell her
husband, she would say more. And when Elisa.
aunswered, that she would not tell: but saith
the other, I will haue you to sweare: and be-
cause she would not sweare, the other would not
procede any further.

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Alyce
Browne
forced by
her othe
to detecte

Iohn
Tracher
of Ches-
sham.

The cause why this Ioh. Tracher
was denounced, was this, for that
he taught her in the gospell thys
saying of Iesus: blessed bee they
that heare the worde of God and
keepeth it. Also because he
taught her the viij. beatitudes in
Englishe.


¶ Emme Tylseworth, 
Commentary  *  Close

She was the sister of William Tilsworth.

because she refused to detect other by ver-
tue of her othe, and denyed such matter as by witnes and by the
Byshops actes were proued agaynst her, in paine of a relaps the
B. enioyned her to make certayne fagots of cloth & to weare the
same, both before her vpper gardement, and behynde, so long as
she liued. Ex Regist. Longland.

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W. Phip-
pes for-
ced by
his othe
to detecte

Thomas
Afryke.

For asking how his cosine Wyd-
more Clerke, the elder, and Iohn
Fippe 
Commentary  *  Close

A John Phipp appeared on the list of those in the Amersham area who abjured in 1511. It probably was not the same person, since Phipp was not executed for relapse in 1521, but it could well have been a close relative.

did at Hychenden: Whe-
ther they kept the lawes of God as
they were wont.
Roger Parker deceaßed.

Iohn
Phyppe. 
Commentary  *  Close

A John Phipp appeared on the list of those in the Amersham area who abjured in 1511. It probably was not the same person, since Phipp was not executed for relapse in 1521, but it could well have been a close relative.


For saying that Jmages are not
to bee worshipped, because they
are made and carued with mans
hande, and that suche ought not
to be worshipped.

Iohn
Gardi-
ner.

For that the said William sayd
to this Gardiner, that all whiche
are burned for this secte, are true
Martyrs.
Iohn Stilman. 
Commentary  *  Close

This may be John Stillman. The full record for Stillman's trial does not survive, but there are references to it in Archbishop Ussher's notes, taken from the London courtbook before it disappeared. These notes corroborate Stillman's claiming that Wiclif was a saint in heaven and that Wiclif's Wicket was a good and holy work (Trinity College, Dublin, MS 775, fos. 124r and 125r). Moreover, Stillman had indeed been tried for heresy by Bishop Edmund Audley of Salisbury (J. A. F. Thomson, The Later Lollards, 1414-1520 (Oxford. 1965), pp. 83-84).

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Iohn But
ler, by his
othe was
forced
to detect

Th. Gef-
fray firste
of Vx-
brige, thē
of Ipswich
Tailor.

For reading and teachyng him in
the actes & preachings of the apo
stles. Item, for hauing a Scripture
booke in Englishe: whiche booke
the sayd Geffray gaue to the Bish.
of London when he was accused.
Item, that the said Geffray sayd,
that true pilgrimage was, bare-
foote to goo and visite the poore,
weake, and sicke, for they are the
true Jmages of God.

Richard
Vulford.

This Vulford, and Thomas Gef-
fray tolde the saide Iohn Butler,
that the host consecrated was not
the very true body of Christ. In
profe whereof they said, that let a
mouse be put in the pixe with the
hoste, and the mouse would eate
it vp.
And for more profe, they decla-
red vnto the said Ioh. Butler, that
there were two Priestes in Essex.

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Accusers.Parties accused.Crimes obiected.

The fore
said Iohn
Butler dyd de-
tecte.

whiche put a mouse in the pixe, to MarginaliaA storye of a mouse put into the pyxe.
a consecrated host, and the mouse
did eate it. Afterward the facte
of these Priestes being knowen &
brought to the Bishop, one of
the Priestes was burned for the
same.

Iohn
Clerke
of Den-
ham.

Also the same Vulford and Gef-
frey told him & Iohn Clerke, that
holy bread, and holy water were
but a vaine glory of the world: for
God neuer made them, but were
mens inuentiōs: and that God nei
ther made Priestes: for in Christs
time there were no Priestes.
Moreouer that Thomas Geffrey
caused this Iohn Butler diuerse
Sondayes to go to London to here
Doctour Colet. MarginaliaDoctour Colet cōmended.

Andrew
Fuller
of Vx-
brydge.

Because this Iohn Butler had an
olde booke of Richards Vulford.
Also an other great booke of An
drewe fuller, for whiche he payde
vi. . iiij. đ,  
Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is interested in demonstrating the zeal of the Lollards in acquiring godly literature, but this is also an indication of the affluence of many of these Lollards. On the importance of books to the Lollards see Margaret Aston, 'Lollardy and Literacy' in Lollards and Reformers: Images and and literacy in late medieval England (London, 1984), pp. 1-47.

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and an other litle
booke of Thomas Man, 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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which he
brought to the Bishop.

Thomas
Man.

Moreouer this Thomas Man
was appeached, because he redde
to this deponent x. yeares agoe,
how Adam & Eue were expel-
led out of Paradyse: and for
speaking agaynst pilgrimage, and
worshipping of Images, and a-
gainst the singing seruice vsed
then in churches. This Thomas
Man was burnt & died a mar-
tyr, of whom mention is made be-
fore. 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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pag. 943. MarginaliaVid. supr. pag. 943.
W. King
This W. Kyng was appeached
because he lodged Thomas Man 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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in his house vppon a certaine holy
day at diuine seruice: vnto whom
resorted Richard Wulford, and
Iohn Clerke, and this Iohn But-
ler: to whom the sayd Tho. Man 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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declared, that pilgrimage was
nought, and that Images were
not to be worshipped.

Robert
Carder.
Durdāt.
Richard
Butler.
his owne
brother.
VVilliam
Kyng.

To these was layd that Tho-
mas Carder brought this Iohn
Butler to Durdantes house at I-
uencourt by Stanys, where was
Richard Butler his brother, and
W. Kyng reading in a certayue
Englishe booke: At which tyme
Durdant desired them not to tell,
that he had any such Englishe
booke in his house, lest he shoulde
be burned for the same.

Richard
Nasshe or
Asheford

Also an other tyme, that this
Iohn Butler, with Richard But-
ler his brother, and Robert Car-
der went to the house of Richard
Ashforde or Nashe, to here
the same Asheford read in a cer
teine litle booke, but whiche con-
teined many good thinges.

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This
CCc.iiij.
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