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1223 [1222]

K. Henry. 8. Gods punishment vpon Persecuters. Adam Damlip, Martyr,

Farewel sirs.

MarginaliaCalice men dismissed. So geuyng God most hartie thankes for his mightye and mercyful deliueryng of them, they departed dismissed, as you haue heard, being in deede in very poore estate: but not in so miserable state as all those eight Counsailours of Calice were within one yere and a halfe after. For wheras the other three Counsailers which seemed more fauourable to them: MarginaliaExample how God prospereth the fauourers and frendes to hys Gospel. to wit, the Lord Gray, sir George Carow, and sir Rich. Grinefielde, which purged the towne of those sclaūders that vntruely were raysed vpon it, and therfore for a time were in their Princes high displeasure: wtin þt yeare were al three in greater fauour then euer they were before, and that not without the reward of. xx. pound by yeare to hym & to his heyres, who had least: the other eight Counsailours, vniustly charging them and the towne of sedition and heresie: to say, MarginaliaExample how God turneth the malice of the enemies vpon their owne heades the Lord Lisle, the Lord Sandes, Sir Iohn Wallop, sir Edward Rinsley, Rob. Fowler Esquier vicetreasurer, sir Tho. Palmer knight, called long Palmer, W. Simpson Esquier vndermarshal, and Ioh. Rockwod, were either greatly out of their Princes fauour, and in the Tower or els where prisoners, either els by very desperate deathes in outward appearaunce, taken out of this world: MarginaliaExample of Gods iudgment vpon a cruell persecuter. For tediousnes I wyl rehearse but onely the horrible end of the said Rockwood, the chief stirrer vp of all the afflictions afore spoken of: who euen to the last breath staring and raging cryed, he was vtterly damned: and being wylled to aske god mercy, who was ready to forgeue al þt asked mercy of hym, he braied & cryed out, Al too late for I haue sought maliciously the deathes of a number of the honestest men in the towne, and though I so thought them in my hart, yet I dyd that lay in me to bryng them to an euyll death: all too late therfore, al to late. Which same wordes he answeared to one that at the departure of the. xiij. in yrons towardes England said: Sir, I neuer sawe men of such honestie, so sharpely corrected, and taking it so paciently and ioyfully. Rockwode thē fetching a friske or two, scoffingly answered: All too late. The vndermarshall sodenly fell downe in the Counsaile chamber, and neuer spake woorde after, nor shewed any token of remembraunce. The plageus of the other also, as I am credibly infourmed, were litle better.

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The second apprehension and martyrdome of Adam Damlip.

MarginaliaAdam Damlip agayne apprehended. COncernyng Adam Damlip, otherwise called George Bucker, ye heard before declared, pag. 1194. howe he being conuented before the Bishops at Lambeth, and afterward secretly admonished, and hanyng money geuen hym by his frendes, to avoyde, and not to appeare againe before the Bishops: after he had sent his allegations in writyng vnto them, departed into the West countrey, and there continued teaching a schole a certaine space, about a yeare or two. 

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Damplip disappeared in April 1540, so if this statement is accurate he was apprehended in 1541 or 1542. Foxe states at the end of the next sentence that Damplip remained in prison for two years or so; since Damplip was executed in May 1543, that would seem (although chronology is not Foxe's strong suit), to place his arrest in 1541.

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After that, the good man was againe apprehended by the miserable inquisition of the sixe articles, and brought vp to Londō, wher he was by Ste. Gardiner cōmaunded into the Marshalsey, and there lay the space of other two yeares or therabout.

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During the imprisonment of this George in the Marshalsey, Io. Marbecke (as partly ye heard before) also was cōmitted into the same prison, which was the morow after Palme sonday. The maner of that tyme so required, that at Easter euery person must nedes come to cōfession. Wherupon Marbecke with the rest of the prisoners there, was enforced to come vpon Easter day to MarginaliaGeorge Bucker confessour to the prisoners in the Marshalsey. sir George aforesaid, to be confessed, who was then cōnfessor to the whole house. MarginaliaAcquaintāce betwene Iohn Marbecke and George Bucker, otherwise called Adam Daplip. By this occasion Io. Marbecke, which had neuer seene him before, entring into cōference wt hym, perceiued what he was, what he had bene, what troubles he susteined, how long he had lyen there in prison, by whō, and wherfore: who declared moreouer his mynd to Marbecke, to the effect as foloweth: And now because, said he, I thinke they haue forgottē me, I am fully mynded to make my humble sute to the bish. of Winchester, in an Epistle, declaring therin mine obedience, humble submission and earnest desire to come to examination. I knowe the woorst. I can but leese my lyfe present, which I had leuer doo, then here to remaine, and not be suffered to vse my talent to Gods glorye. Wherefore (God willing) I wyl surely put it in proofe.

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MarginaliaAdam Damlip well beloued among the prisoners, specially of the keeper. This Damlip, for his honest and godly behauiour was beloued of al the whole house, but specially of the keper him selfe, whose name was Massy, whō he alwayes called master: and being suffered to go at libertie within þe house whether he would, he dyd much good among the cōmon & rascal sort of prisoners in rebuking vice & sinne, and kept them in such good order & awe, that the keeper thought hym selfe to haue a great treasure of hym. And no lesse also Marbecke him selfe confesseth, to haue found great cōfort by him. For notwithstanding the strayt precept geuen by the Bishop of MarginaliaMassy keeper of the Marshalsey. Winchester, that no mā should come to hym, nor he to speak with any man: yet the said Adam many tymes would find the meanes to come and comfort hym.

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MarginaliaAdam Damlip writeth to the Byshop of Winchester. Now when he had made and drawen out his Epistle, he deliuered the same to his master the keper, vpon Saterday in the mornyng, which was about the secōd weeke before Whytsonday folowing, 

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Whitsunday is seven weeks after Easter, so this would have been the Saturday 5 weeks after Easter or, in 1543, 15 May. But here Foxe is incorrect, for the Privy Council ordered Damplip's execution on 22 April 1543 (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18).

desiring hym to deliuer it at the Court to the B. of Winchester. The keeper said, he would, and so dyd. The bishop, what quicke speede he made for his dispatch, I know not, but thus it fel out, as ye shall heare. 
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Damplip's timing was disastrous. He brought his case to Stephen Gardiner's attention just as Gardiner's efforts to dislodge Cranmer (the so-called 'Prebendaries' Plot) were reaching full throttle. In fact, Damplip's maladroit intervention may well have triggered John Butler's re-arrest. In any case, Foxe is certainly correct in saying that events moved quickly, as Damplip contacted Gardiner after Easter (10 April in 1543) but the Privy Council ordered his execution on 22 April (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18).

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The keper came home at night very late, and when the prisoners (which had taryed supper for his comming) saw hym so sad and heauy, they deemed something to be amysse. At last the keeper casting vp hys eyes vppon Syr George sayd: O George I can tell thee tydyngs. What is that maister, quoth he? Vppon Monday next thou and I must goe to Calice. To Calice maister? What to doe? I know not, quoth the keeper, MarginaliaSteuen Gardiner sendeth out a precept for the execution of Adam Damlip. and pulled out of his purse a peece of waxe with a litle label of parchment hangyng out thereat, whiche seemed to be a precept. And when Syr George sawe it, hee sayde: Well well Maister, nowe I knowe what the matter is. What, quoth the keeper? Truely maister I shall dye in Calice. Nay, quoth the keeper, I trust it be not so. Yes, yes maister, it is most true, and I prayse God for his goodnes therin. And so the keeper and they went together to supper with heauy cheare for Syr George as they there called him. MarginaliaThe cherefull constancie of Adam Damlip. Who notwithstandyng was mery himselfe, and dyd eate his meate as well as euer he did in all his life: In so much that some at the boorde sayd vnto hym, that they merueyled how he coulde eate his meate so well, knowyng hee was so neare hys death. Ah maisters quoth he, do you thinke that I haue ben Gods prisoner so long in the Marshalsey, and haue not yet learned to dye? Yes, yes, and I doubt not but God will strengthen me therin. Ex litteris Ioa. Marbecki.

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MarginaliaAdam Damlip brought to Calice to suffer. And so vpon Monday early in the mornyng before day, the keeper with iij. other of the Knight Marshalles seruauntes, settyng out of London, conueyed the sayde Adam Damlyp vnto Calice vpon the Ascension euen, and there committed him to the Maiors prison. 

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Damplip and Butler were ordered to be sent to Calais on 22 April 1543 (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18). In 1543, the eve of Ascension Day would have been 19 May.

Vpon whiche daye
The cruel death & martyrdome of Damlip.

woodcut [View a larger version]

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Adam Damplip, alias George Bucker, sometime 'great papist' and chaplain to Bishop Fisher, became a well received evangelical preacher, favoured by Lord Lisle in Calais. The authorities, however, caught up with him and he fetched up in the Marshalsea prison (thanks to Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester) and there met John Marbeck. Having been helped to escape, he was caught again a few years later (Bishop Gardiner being 'diligent' in pursuit), and condemned for treason. Foxe's woodcut portrays Damplip beneath the gallows on which he was hung. The man shown cutting his heart out , Sir Ralph Ellerker, later suffered this awful fate himself -- 'a terrible example to all bloody and merciless men'. CUL copy has blood detail plus additional flames and foliage added, as well as some metallic paint detail at the bottom, which may once have been silver.

Iohn Butler the Commissary aforesayd, and Syr Daniell his Curate of S. Peters, were also committed to the same prison and commaundement geuen no man to speake with Butler.

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Vpon Saterday next 

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I.e., 22 May 1543.

was the day of execution for Damlyp. The cause whiche fyrst they layde to hys charge, was for heresie. But because by an acte of Parlament, all such offences done before a certaine daye, were pardoned (through whiche Acte he could not bee burdened with any

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OOO.iiij.
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