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1428 [1403]

Q. Mary. Thinges done the 2. yeare of Queene Mary.

Marginalia1554. Aprill.hym whylest we had him, and so shoulde we also winne all such as he hath brought with him, and so made an end.

Vppon the Tuesday following, beyng the second day of October, 

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The treasure carts passing through London (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473) are mentioned in a number of contemporary chronicles, although Foxe included details in no other surviving source. The incident was probably taken from Foxe's lost chronicle source(s).

xx. cartes came from Westminster laden (as it was noysed) with gold and siluer, and certayn of the Gard with them through the Citie to the Tower, and there it was receiued in by a Spanyard, who was the kynges Treasurer and had custody of it within the Tower. It was matted about with mattes and mayled in little bundels about ij. foote long and almost halfe a foote thicke, and euery cart were vj. of these bundels. What it was in deede God knoweth, for it is to vs vncertayne.

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About the same tyme, or a litle before, vppon Corpus Christi day, 

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Foxe's narrative of John Street's desecration of a Corpus Christi procession in 1554 (1563, p. 1005; 1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473) is of extraordinary interest. Foxe states at the conclusion of the narrative that 'the briefe Chronicle of London in this poynt is not to be credited, which untruely reported that he [Streat] fayned himselfe in Newgate to be mad: which thing, we in writing of this history by due inquisition of that partie [Streat], have found to be contrary'. Obviously this 'brief chronicle' was Foxe's initial source for this incident, but can this chronicle be identified? Only two of the surviving London chronicles, histories or diaries which preceded the 1563 edition contained this story. One is Machyn's diary, which clearly was not Foxe's source (see J. G. Nichols (ed.), The Diary of Henry Machyn, Camden Society Original Series 42 (London, 1848), pp. 63-64).

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The other version of the story is in what is called the Grey Friars' chronicle and this was very probably Foxe's source. It has the essential details of the incident, including Streat's name, that Streate was 'put in Newgatte and then fayned him selffe madde' (J. G. Nichols (ed.), Chronicle of the Grey Friars of London, Camden Society Original Series 53 (London, 1856), p. 89). This is particularly interesting since the Grey Friars' chronicle is known to have passed through the hands of John Stow. Foxe and Stow are known to have exchanged materials but not until after the 1563 edition, under the auspices of Matthew Parker. (There seems to have been a certain amount of personal tension between Foxe and Stow, and their cooperation was not entirely voluntary). Thus it appears that it was Foxe who originally acquired a copy of the Grey Friars' chronicle and passed it to Stow.

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That said, Foxe made very little use of the Grey Friars' chronicle, probably because he disliked and distrusted its anti-protestant bias. This distrust can be seen in his taking the trouble to find Streat and interview him about the incident, after he learned of it from the chronicle. (This is also an example of Foxe hunting down oral sources to confirm or deny written reports).

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the processiō beyng made in Smithfield, where after the maner the Priest with hys boxe went vnder the Canapy, by chaunce there came by the way a certayne simple man, named Iohn Streate, MarginaliaIoh. Streat. a ioyner of Colemā streete, who hauing some hast in his busines, and findyng no other way to passe through, by chaunce went vnder the Canapy by the Priest. The Priest seyng the man so to presume to come vnto the Canapy, beyng belyke afrayd, MarginaliaThe Priest worse feared then hurt.and worse feared then hurt, for feare let his Pixe fall downe. MarginaliaThe priest let the Pix fall for feare. The poore man beyng straight wayes apprehended, was hadde to the Counter, the Priest accusing hym vnto the Counsayle, as though he had come to slay him, when as the poore man (as he him self hath since declared vnto vs) had no such thought euer in his minde. Then from the Counter he was had vnto Newgate, MarginaliaIoh. Streat innocently cast in the Dungeon.where he was cast into the Dongeon, there cheyned to a post, where he was cruelly & miserably handled, and so extremely dealt withall, that beyng but simple beefore, he was now feared out of his witte altogether, and so vpon the same, had to Bedlem. Whereupon the briefe MarginaliaIoh. Streat falsely reported of.Chronicle of Lōdon in this poynt is not to be credited, which vntruely reporteth that hee fayned himselfe in Newgate to be mad: which thinge we in writing of this history by due inquisition of the partie, haue found to be contrary.

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MarginaliaOctober. 5. 

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After relating Streat's misfortunes, Foxe added a recital of the events of October and the first third of November 1554, all drawn from lost chronicle sources (1570, pp. 1644-45; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, 1473-74).

About the v. day of October and within a fortnight folowing, were diuers as wel housholders as seruauntes & prentises apprehended and taken, and committed to sondry prisons, for the hauing and sellyng of certayne bokes which were sent into England by the Preachers that fledde into Germany and other countryes, which bookes nipped a great number so neare, MarginaliaMen prisoned for bookes.that wtin one fortnight there were litle lesse then 60. imprisoned for this matter: among whom was M. Browne a Goldsmith, M. Sparke a Draper, Randall Tirer a Stationer, M. Beston a Marchaunt, with many other.

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MarginaliaOctob. 14.Vpon the Sondaye being the xiiij. day of October, the old byshop of Duresme preached in the shroudes.

Vpon S. Lukes day folowing, being the xviij. of October, the kyngs maiestie came from Westminster to paules Churche alonge the Streetes accompanied with a great number of Noble men, and there hee was receiued vnder a Canapy at the west doore, and so came into the Chauncell, where hee heard Masse (whiche a Spanish Byshop & his owne Chappell song) and that done hee returned to Westminster to dyner agayne.

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MarginaliaOctob. 26.Vpon the Friday beyng the xxvi. day of October, certeine men, whereof I spake before, MarginaliaThe trouble of the the good men whch were of M. Thogmortons quest. which were of Maister Throgmortons quest, beyng in number viij. for the other 4. were deliuered out of prison, for that they submitted them selues and sayd they had offended, lyke weakelynges not consideryng truth to be truth but of force for feare sayd so: these viij. men I say (wherof Maister Emanuell Lucas, and M. Whetstone were chiefe) were called before the Counsaile in the Starre chamber: where they all affirmed that they had done all thynges in that matter accordyng to their knowledge and with good consciences, euen as they should aunswere before God at the daye of Iudgement. Where maister Lucas sayde openly before all the Lordes, that they had done in the matter lyke honest men and true and faythfull subiectes, and therfore they humbly besought the Lord Chauncellor and the other Lordes, to be meanes to the Kyng and Queenes maiesties that they might bee discharged and set at libertie, and sayd that they were all contented humbly to submit them selues to their maiesties, sauyng and reseruyng their truth, consciences and honesty. Some of the Lordes sayd that they were worthy to pay a thousand poundes a peece, and other some sayd that Maister Lucas and Maister Whetstone were worthy to pay a thousand Markes a peece and the rest fiue hundreth poūds a peece. In conclusion, sentence was geuen by the Lorde Chauncellour, that they should pay a thousand Markes a peece, and that they should go to prisō agayne and there remayne till further order were taken for their punishment.

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MarginaliaOctober. 30.Vpon the Tuesday beyng the xxx. of October, the L. Iohn Gray was deliuered out of the Tower, and set at libertie.

MarginaliaNouem. 4.Vpon Sonday the iiij. of Nouember, v. priestes 

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The incident of five priests doing penance at Paul's Cross on 4 November 1554 is in the chronicle extracts in Foxe's papers (Harley MS 419, fol. 132r).

did penaunce at Paules Crosse, which were content to put away their wiues and take vppon them agayne to minister. Euery of them had a Taper in his hand and a rod wherewith the preacher did disple them.

MarginaliaNouember. 7.Vpon Wedensday the vij. of Nouember, the Lord Paget & Syr Edward Hastynges Master of the horse were sent as Ambassadours, I knowe not whether, but as it was iudged, to Cardinall Poole, who lay all the sommer before at Bruxelles, and as it was thought: they were sent to accompany and Conduct him into Englād, MarginaliaCardinall Poole nominated Archbishop of Cant.where at that tyme he was nominated and appointed Byshop of Canterbury.

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>Vpon the Friday folowyng the ix. of Nouember Maister Barlow late Byshop of Bath and M. Cardmaker were brought before the Counsell in the Starre chamber, where after communication they were commaunded to the Fleete.

MarginaliaNouember. 10.Vpon the Saterday beyng the x. of Nouember, the Shriues of London had commaundement to take an inuentory of euery one of there goods which were of M. Throgmortons quest, and to seale vp their doores, which was done the same day. M. Whetstone, maister Lucas, and Maister Kyteley, were adiudged to pay ij. thousand pound a peece and the rest a thousand Markes a peece, to be payde within one fortnight after. From thys payment were exempted those iiij. which confessed a fault and submitted thē selues whose names are these, M. Loe, M. Pointer, M. Beswicke, and M. Cater.

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MarginaliaB. Boner goeth in his visitation.Mention was made a little before of the visitation of Ed. Boner byshop of London, 

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Foxe continues with anecdotes of Bonner's 1554 visitation of his diocese, also added in the 1570 edition (1570, pp. 1645-46; 1576, pp. 1403-1440 [recte 1404]; 1583, p. 1474). The purpose of these anecdotes was the assassination of Bonner's character. Foxe unsubtly implied that Bonner lusted after his nephew"s wife and behaved improperly with her (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474). Most of the narrative, however, is devoted to describing Bonner's choleric temper; this is the first of a number of anecdotes scattered throughout the Acts and Monuments relating Bonner's rages. As is often the case, however, in Foxe's anecdotes about Bonner, if one reads between the lines, one sees that Bonner's anger was not groundless. The bishop clearly suspected the religious allegiance of the parson of Hadham (probably rightly so, since the rood was not erected and there was no sacrament above the altar) and this, combined with the lack of greeting for Bonner, would have looked like open defiance. It should also be remembered that Bonner was in prison when Foxe heard this story and it probably lost nothing in the telling.

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That Foxe was drawing on oral sources for his narrative of Bonner's visitation is indicated by his statement that the incidents were: 'Testified by such as there and then were present, Rich. K. etc' (1570, p. 1646; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474). Who 'Rich. K.' and the others were may be impossible to determine, but the Sir Thomas Joscelyn who derided Bonner's temper was the father of John Joscelyn, Matthew Parker's secretary. I suspect that Foxe learned of the incident, and the names of witnesses to it, from John Joscelyn. In Foxe's papers (Harley 421, fol. 1r-v) is an incomplete, eyewitness account of a disastrous sermon given by Dr. Henry Bird (Bonner's suffragan and vicar of Dunmow, Essex), preached before Bonner during the same visitation. (In fact, the records of Bonner's visitation show that he visited Dunmow on Friday 12 October immediately before visiting Hadham (Guildhall MS 9537/1, fol. 46v)). It therefore seems probable that the story of Bird's sermon came from the same informant(s) as the story of Bonner striking Joscelyn; Foxe printed the latter but did not print the former which remained in his papers.

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which began (as is sayd) about the moneth of September: for the better preparation whereof were set forth certayne articles to the number of 37. Whiche articles partly for the tediousnes of them, partly for that maister Bale in a certayne treatise hath sufficiently paynted out the same in their coulours, partly also, beecause I wyll not infecte this booke with them, I slip them ouer, proceedyng in the progresse of thys byshop in his visitation in the County of Essex. Who passing through the said County of Essex beyng attended with diuers worshipfull of the shiere (for so they were commaunded) arriued at Starford in Hertfordshiere, where he rested certayn dayes, MarginaliaB. Boners behauiour at Sterford.solacyng him selfe after that painefull peregrination with no small feasting and banquettyng wyth his attendantes aforesaid, at the house of one Persons hys Nephew whose wife he commonly called his fayre Niece (and fayre she was in deede,) he tooke there great pleasure to heare her play vpon the Virginals (wherein she excelled) in so much þt euery dynner (sittyng by hys sweete side) she rose and played three seuerall tymes at his request of his good and spirituall deuotion towardes her. Thse certayn dayes thus passed in thys byshoplike fashion, hee proceded in his popish visitation towardes Hadham his owne house and parish, not past two myles from Sterford, beyng there most solemnly roong out, as in all other places wheras he passed. MarginaliaBoners behauiour at Hadham.At lēgth drawyng neare vnto Hadham, when he heard no bells there styrryng in honor of his holynes, he grew into some coler, & the nearer he approched, the hotter was his fit, and the quieter the Bels were, the vnquieter was his moode. MarginaliaBoner in a pelting chafe.Thus rode he on chafyng and fumyng with him selfe. What meaneth (sayth he) that knaue the Clarke, that he ryngeth not and the person that he meeteth me not? with sondry other furious wordes of fiery element. There thys pacient prelate commyng to the towne, alighted, callyng for the key of the Church, which was then all vnready, for that (as they thē pretended) he had preuented hys tyme by tow houres: wher upon he grewe from coler to plaine melancholy, so as no man willyngly would deale with him to qualifie the ragyng humor so farre incorporated in hys brest. At last the Churche doore beyng opened, the Byshop entred, and findyng no sacrament hanged vp, nor roode loft decked after the Popishe precept (whiche had commaunded about the same tyme a well fauoured Roode, and of hable stature vniuersally in all Churches to be set vp) curtalled, his small deuotions, and fell from all coler and melancholy to flat madnes in the vppermost degree, swearyng and ragyng wyth an huntyng othe or two, and by no beggers, that in hys owne Churche where he hoped to haue seene best order, he found most disorder (to hys honours most heauy discomfort, as he sayd) callyng the Parson (whose name was Doctour Bricket) knaue and hereticke. MarginaliaD. Bricket parsō of Hadhā called knaue of Boner. Who there humbled him selfe and yelded, as it were, to his fault, saying he was sory his Lordship was come before that he and his parish looked for him: and therfore coulde not do their dueties to receiue him accordyngly: & as for those things lackyng, he trusted a short time hereafter should cōpasse that, which hetherto he could not bryng about. Therefore if it pleased his Lordship to come to hys

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poore
NNNn.ij.
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