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1434 [1409]

Q. Mary. A Summarie of the B. of Winchesters Sermon at Paules Crosse.

Marginalia1554.dreamed of beastlines, but we haue done it in deede. For in this our sleepe, hath not one brother destroyed an other? Hath not halfe our money bene wyped away at one tyme? And agayn those that would defend theyr conscience, were slayne: and others also otherwyse troubled, besides infinite other thinges: which you al know as well as I: wherof I report me to your owne consciences.

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Father, in a mās sleepe al his senses are stopped, so that he can nether see, smell nor heare, euen so where as the ceremonies of the church were instituted to moue and styrre vp our senses, they beyng taken away, were not our senses (as ye would say) stopped, and we fast a sleepe? MarginaliaWho putteth out the candell but they which extincte gods word and forbid the Scriptures that should giue vs light?Moreouer, when a man would gladly sleepe, he will put forth the candell least peraduēture it may let his sleepe, and awake hym. So of late all such wryters as dyd hold any thing with the Apostolike Sea, were condemned, and forbidden to be read, and Images (which were * Marginalia* They forbid lay mēs bookes, but you forbid the booke of God. lay mens bookes) were cast downe and broken.

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The sleepe hath continued with vs these xx. yeares, and we all that while without a head. For when Kyng Henry dyd first take vpon him to be head of the Churche, it was then no Churche at all. After whose death, Kyng Edwarde (hauing ouer him Gouernours and Protectours which ruled as them lysted) could not be head of the church but was onely a shadowe or signe of a head: and at length it came to passe, that wee had no head at all, no, not so much as our ij. Archbyshops. For on the one side, the Queene beyng a woman could not be head of the Church, and on the other side they both were conuicted of one crime and so deposed. Thus, while wee desired to haue a supreme head among vs, it came to passe that we had no head at all. MarginaliaThen belike Christ is no head at all to geue life to hys Church, vnlesse the Popes head also be clapt on the Churches shoulders. When the tumult was in the North, in the tyme of kyng Henry þe viij. (I am sure) the kyng was determined to haue geuen ouer the supremacy agayne to the Pope: but the houre was not then come, and therfore it went not forward, lest some would haue sayd, that he dyd it fore feare.

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After this M. Keneuete and I were sent Ambassadours vnto the Emperour, to desire hym that he would be a meane betwene the Popes holynes and the kyng, to bryng the kyng to the obedience of the Sea of Rome: but þe time was neither yet come. For it might haue bene sayd, that it had bene done for a ciuill policie. Agayne, in the beginnyng of kyng Edwards riagne, the matter was moued, but þe time was not yet: for it would haue bene sayd that the Kyng (beyng but a childe) had bene bought and solde. Neither in the begynnyng of the Queenes raigne was the houre come. For it would haue ben sayd that it was done in a tyme of weakenes, Likewise when the kyng first came, if it had ben done, they might haue sayde it had ben by force and violence But now, euen now, * Marginalia* Imo potestas tenebrarum hora est. the houre is come, when no thyng can be obiected, but that it is the mere mercy and prouidence of God. Now hath the Popes holynes, Pope Iulius the iij. sent vnto vs this most reuerend father, Cardinall Poole, MarginaliaSte. Gardiner claweth the Cardinall. an Ambassadour from his side. What to do? not to reuenge the iniuries done by vs agaynst his holynes: sed benedicere maledicentibus, to giue his benediction to those which defamed and persecuted him.

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And that wee may be the more meete to receaue the sayd benediction, I shall desire you that we may alway acknowledge our selues offenders agaynst his holynes. I do not exclude my selfe forth of the number. I will MarginaliaNote how the meaning of S. Paules wordes is here applyed. flere cum flentibus, & gaudere cum gaudentibus, that is: weepe with them that weepe, and reioyce with them which reioyce. And I shall desire you that we may differre the matter no longer, for nowe hora est: the houre is come. The Kynge and the Queens maiesties haue already restored our holy father the pope to his supremacy: and þe three estates assembled in the Parlament, representng the whole body of the Realme haue also submitted themselues to his holynes, and his successors * Marginalia* For euer Winchester a false prophet. for euer. Wherfore let not vs any lenger stay. And euen as S. Paul sayd to þe Corinthians, that he was their father, MarginaliaS. Paul though he was the father of many Churches in Christ Iesu: yet was he neuer so arrogant to take vpon hym to be supreme head of any Church, but left that soly to Christ, and laboured to bryng all vnder hym. so may the Pope say that he is our father: for we receyued our doctrine first from Rome, therfore may he chalenge vs as his owne. We haue all cause to reioyce, for his holynes hath sent hether, & preuented vs before we sought hym: such care hath hee for vs. Therfore let vs say Hæc est dies quam fecit Dominus, exultemus & lætemur in ea. Reioyce in this day which is of the Lordes workyng: that such a noble man of byrth is come, yea such a holye father (I meane my Lord Cardinall Poole) which can speak vnto vs, as vnto brethren, and not as vnto straungers: who hath a long tyme ben absēt. And let vs now awake, whiche so long haue slept, and in our slepe haue done so much naughtynes agaynst the Sacramentes of Christ, denying þe blessed Sacrament of the Altar, and pulled downe the * Marginalia* So Ezechias pulled downe the hill altars, which Manasses afterward did set vp: and yet we commend the doings of Ezechias and disproue the facte of the other. altars which thing Luther him selfe would not do, but rather reproued them that dyd, examinyng them of their beliefe in Christ.

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This was the summe of his Sermon before his prayers, wherein he prayed, first for the Pope, Pope Iulius the iij. withall his Colledge of Cardinals, the B. of London with the rest of that order: then for the kyng & Quene and the Nobilitie of this Realme, and last for the commōs of the same, with the soules departed, lying in the paines of Purgatory. This ended (the tyme beyng late) they began in Paules to ryng to theyr Euenyng song, wherby the preacher could not be well heard, which caused him to make a short end of this clerkly Sermon.

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Commentary  *  Close

No other events for the year 1554 are described in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition, accounts were added of events in London and at court during December 1554 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, pp. 4179 [recte 1479]-1480. These events seem to have come from Foxe's lost chronicle source(s).

About this very time a Post or Messenger was sent from the whole Parlament to the Pope, to desire him to cōfirme and establish the sale of Abbey landes and Chauntry landes: For the Lordes and the Parlament woulde graūt nothyng in the Popes behalfe before their purchase were fully confirmed.  
Commentary  *  Close

When Foxe states that parliament asked the pope 'to Confirme and establish the sale of Abbey landes and Chantry landes,' he means that Parliament asked the pope to confirm the purchasers of such lands in their ownership and not to reclaim them.

MarginaliaDecemb. 6.Vpon the Thursday following, beyng the, vi. day of December, and S. Nicolas daye, all the whole Conuocation both Byshops and other, were sent for to Lambeth to the Cardinall, MarginaliaThe Chapter of Paules absolued by the Cardinall.who the same day forgaue them all their periurations, schismes, and heresies, and they all there kneeled downe and receiued his absolution, and after an exhortation and gratulation for their conuersion to the catholyke church made by the Cardinall, they departed.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 12.Vpon the Wedensday beyng the. xij. of December, fiue of the viij. men (which lay in the Fleete, that were of M. Throgmortons quest) were discharged and set at libertye vpon their fine payed, MarginaliaThe Quest men of M. Throgmorton put to their fine, and deliuered. which was. cc.xx. li. a peece, and the other foure put vp a Supplication, therin declaryng, that theyr goodes dyd not amount to the summe that they were appointed to pay, and so vppon that declaration paying. lx. li. a peece, they were deliuered out of prison vpon s. Thomas day before Christmas, beyng the. xxi. of December.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 22.Vpon the Saterday folowing, beyng the. xxij. of December, all the whole Parliament had straite commaundement, that none of them shoulde depart into their countrey thys Christmas, nor before the Parliament were ended. Which commaundement was wonderfull contrary to their expectations. For as well many of the Lordes, as also many of the inferiour sort had sent for theyr horse, and hadde them brought hyther.

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MarginaliaDecemb. 28.Vpon the Friday following, beyng the. xxviij. of December and Childermas day, the Prince of Piedmont came to the court at Westminster.

AN. 1555.

 

Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter

The glosses help to hammer home the point that Providence cheated the ungodly of their wish for a child for Mary, on occasion in quite harsh, mocking terms. The glosses also seek to reverse the charge of heresy. There is a marked stridency in the tone, demonstrating Foxe's sensitivity to the charge of heresy being levelled at protestants. There is a reference only to be found in 1570 and an example of the 1583 compositors being more alert in detecting a mistake than they appear usually to have been.

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Marginalia
An. 1555.
Ianuary. 1.
 
Commentary  *  Close
Block 36: From the arrest of Rose to Hooper's letter

In the 1570 edition Foxe continues with an account of the arrest of the Bow Church congregation on 1 January 1555 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480). This account also probably came from Foxe's lost chronicle source(s) and it replaced an account of the same event in the 1563 edition, on p. 1020. The reason for this replacement probably was that it was simpler for Foxe, in 1570, to print the new version along with other material, which preceded and followed it, from the same source.

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In any case, the 1570 narrative, based on these chronicle source(s), continued through parliament passing a new act of supremacy and a tumult between the English and the Spanish at Westminster (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480.

Vpon Newyeares day at night followyng, certaine honest men and wemen of the Citie, to the number of xxx. and a Minister MarginaliaM. Rose with 30. persons taken at a Communion in Bow Churcheyard. wyth them named M. Rose, were takē as they were in a house in Bow churchyard at the Communion, and the same night they were all cōmytted to prison. And on the MarginaliaIanuary. 3.Thursday followyng, beyng the third day of Ianuary, Maister Rose was before the bishop of Winchester being Lord Chauncelour, and from thence the same day he was cōmitted to the Tower, after certayne communication had betwene the Bishop and hym.

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MarginaliaThe Acte of supremacie passed in the Parlamēt.The same day the Acte for the supremacie past in þe parlament. Also the same day at night was a great tumult betwene Spanyardes & Englishe men at Westminster, whereof was lyke to haue ensued great mischiefe through a Spanish Frier, which got into the churche and rong Alarum. MarginaliaA styrre betwene the Spanyardes and English men at Westminster.The occasion was about. ij. Whores whch were in the Cloyster of Westminster with a sorte of Spaniardes, whereof whilest some playde the knaues with them, other some dyd keepe the entrey of the Cloyster wyth Dagges in harneys. In the meane tyme certayne of the Deanes men came into the cloyster and the Spaniardes discharged their Dagges at them, and hurt some of them. By & by the noyse of thys doyng came into the streetes, so that the whole towne was vp almost but neuer a stroke was stricken. Notwithstandyng the noyse of this doyng with the Deanes mē, and also the ringing of the Alarum made much ado, and a great number also to be sore afrayd.

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Ye heard a lytle before the Councels letter sent to B. Boner, signifiyng the good newes of Queene Mary to be not onely conceaued, but also quicke with chylde whiche was in the moneth of Nouember. the xxviij. day. Of thys childe great talke began at thys tyme to ryse in euery mans mouth, with busy preparation, and much adoe, especially amongest such as seemed in England to cary spanish hartes in Englishe bodyes. In number of whom here is not to bee forgotten, nor defrauded of hys condigne commendation for his worthy affection toward his Prince and her issue, one Syr Rich. Southwell: who being the same tyme in the parlament house when as the Lordes were occupyed in other affaires and matters of importāce, sodenly startyng vp, for fulnes of ioy, brast out in these wordes following: Tush my

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