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22 [blank]

Parce gregi paruo, pacem te poscimus omnes.
Sis bonus (ô) Felix tuis, vel parcito Christo,
Cuius membra nimis iam mundus lædit & odit.
Per tibi dilectam sponsam, promissa pacta,
Per paßum Christum, per dulcia pignora paßi,
Per te, te petimus, dentes confringe malorum.

Contra Papistas indendiarios. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Against Papist firebrands.
Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

If anyone is allowed ascend to heaven by killing, the biggest gate of heaven is open to the Papists.

[Note that this epigram also occurs on page 1937 of the 1576 edition in Book XII. The actual text of Cicero is found in the De Republica, Fragments, sect. 6. line 3: Si fas endo plagas caelestum ascendere cuiquam est, Mi soli caeli maxima porta patet. Also cf. Seneca the Younger, Epistlae Morales ad Luc. Letter 108. 34. 5.: Ennium hoc ait Homero [se] subripuisse, Ennio Vergilium; esse enim apud Ciceronem in his ipsis de re publica hoc epigramma Enni: si fas endo plagas caelestum ascendere cuiquam est, mi soli caeli maxima porta patet. Also cf. Lactantius, Divinarum Institutionum lib. I, De Falsa Religione Deorum, Migne P.L., col. 0211B: Apud Ennium sic loquitur Africanus; Si fas endo plagas coelestum ascendere cuiquam est, Mi soli coeli maxima porta patet.]

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SI fas cædendo cœlestia scandere cuique est,
Papicolis Cœli maxima porta patet.

I. F.

In idem argumentum Ægidius Fletcher Cantabrigiensis. 
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On the same subject

Giles Fletcher of Cambridge

Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

Now three times your ship has traversed the seas, having spent much effort in the interim period, and three times Foxe has seen the shores. And while you put to flight swords, dogs and bodies consumed in flames, your own body has been consumed and your pale limbs are weak, but your courage remains tireless, which is advantageous to us but harmful to you alone. No rather you are complaining that soft idleness is lessening your labours, you superhuman person. You cannot, and an enormous passion for God's will drives your mind, and restores new strength to your heart. And so come on, seeing that you are singing to us of the memorable deeds of good men, indulge quickly in your sacred task. Already while posterity, which the long custody of fame holds, thinks about the succession of its great ancestor, and while it reads the monuments of your labour, worshipful sir, the great minded leaders and the stars sought through the midst of the fires, the age to come will at the same time marvel at you and will in rivalry imitate the sacred praises of those of old. Let not other fires, not the very power of Kings, nor any power of steel, neither spears nor swords, subdue breasts burning in the flames of heaven. Like when winged Aurora coming from the mountains carries back the funeral tribute and her father's ashes, and while she prepares the pyre and flames for herself, goes away from the fire greater, and where she fluttered with new wings the native birds follow with happy cry: you blessed ones have fortunate souls above the high stars (and) whatever is oppressed touches mortal breasts, no longer our honour, nor rewards for our concern: nor anything for the hostile land to do for such great virtues. See, however, Posterity will pay such honours as it will be able, while reading of tremendous deeds, it marvels at the strength and with applause will follow victorious faith above the stars. (If in any way they owe this to mortals) they themselves admit that they owe the ashes of the saints to you, Foxe. There will be a time, when, after your death and good works, being about to augment the inhabitants of the upper world, you will happily see the high stars, whose names you are already assigning to fame, the outstanding heroes, and you will yourself be seen by them. And now the offspring, rising high, will follow their fathers as the world goes to ruin, religion, the glory of the human race, an excellent guardian of the Empire, which holy faith accompanies as it proceeds, will thrust itself out more clearly than heaven on high and golden peace will increase around the happy lands, then also the monuments of divine labour and the sacred work will flourish everywhere and bless with its fruit both the people and the people's grandchildren throughout long generations.

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IAm tua ter magnum spatijs emensa laborem.
Æquora lustrauit puppis, ter littora vidit,
Foxe.
Dum fugas, enses canis, consumpta flammis
Corpora, consumptum corpus tibi, pallida languent
Membra, sed vtilior nobis tibi noxia soli
Jndefessa manet virtus. Quin otia carpis
Mollia, iam solare tuos (diuine) labores.
Non potes, & semper mentē tibi numinis ingens
Ardor agit, reparat nouas in pectore vires.
Ergo age quandoquidem nobis memoranda piorū
Facta canis sacro properans indulge labori.
Iam veniet magni seriem dum colligit aeui
Posteritas, quam longa tenet custodia famæ,
Dum tui monumenta legit (venerande) laboris,
Magnanimos duces, medios petita per ignes
Sydera, te ventura simul mirabitur ætas,
Et veterum sacras imitabitur æmula laudes.
Scilicet ætbereas ardentia pectora flammas,
Non ignes alij, non ipsa potentia Regum,
Nec vis vlla domat ferri, non tela, nec enses.
Qualis vbi Aurora veniens è montibus Ales
Exequiale refert munus, cineres paternos,
Dumq; rogum, flamimas parat sibi, maior ab igne
Egreditur, quâ illa nouis volitauerit alis,
Indigenæ volucres læto clamore sequūtur:
Fœlices animæ vobis super alta beatis
Sydera calcatur quicquid mortalia tangit
Pectora, nec iam noster honor, nec præmia cura:
Nec quid agat tantis virtutibus inuida tellus.
Ecce tamen, quales poterit, persoluet honores
Posteritas, dum facta legens ingentia, vires
Miratur, plausu fidem super astra sequetur
Victricem. (Hoc siquid debent mortalibus) ipsi
Sanctorum cineres tibi se debere fatentur,
Foxe.
Tempus erit, cum tu post fata, piosque labores,
Aucturus superos fœlix super alta videbis
Sydera, iam quorum transcribis nomina famæ,
Jnsignes heroas, & ipse videberis illis.
Iam patres superans mundo labente sequetur
Progenies, Cœlo se clarior exeret alto
Relligio, humani generis decus, optima custos
Imperij, quam sancta fides comitatur euntem,
Et circum lætis crescet pax aurea terris,
Tum quoque diuini passim monumenta laboris,
Et sacrum florebit opus, frutúque b[illegible text]bit,

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Et populum, & populi per secula longa nepotes.

In idem argumentum Thom. Ridley Cantabrigiensis. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
On the same subject

Thomas Ridley of Cambridge.

Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

The bodies which once lacked a just tomb and the pious bones which were scattered throughout the fields in all directions skilful Foxe has collected with great care and massed together in one work. But when the deceitful and troublesome clan, the Papists, vainly began to take revenge upon so holy a work, the pious man enlarged the same, made two volumes out of the one and built up his words against his enemies. Not satisfied with this, he refined it again, enlarged it and compressed it for the convenience of his people: not at all fearing the abuse of a stupid tongue, while he was making your brave deeds resound, you holy ones. O you lucky souls, who have born witness with your blood as heavenly assistance for us! And you, who have adorned your holy remains by such a death, completing a sad ministry: but outstanding for you, and not without use for us, just as by those examples we can be brave through faith.

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COrpora quæ quōdam iusto caruere sepulchro
Ossa per campos vndique sparsa pia
Collegit magna cum sedulitate peritus
Foxus, & in vnum conglomerauit opus.
At cum gens mendax at importuna Papistæ,
Frustra tam sanctum persequerentur opus.
Auxit, & ex vno, idem bina volumina fecit,
Obstruxit suis hostibus ora pius.
Nec sic contentus, rurus limauit & auctum
Arctauit, populi commoditate sui:
Nequaquam veritus stolidæ conuitia linguæ.
Dum vestra ô sancti fortia facta sonet.
O vos fœlices animæ, quæ sanguine vestro
Cœlestes nobis testificastis opes.
Et tu qui tali decorasti funere sanctas
Relliquias, peragens triste ministerium:
Sed tibi præclarum, nobis nec inutile, vt istis
Exemplis fortes possumus esse fide.

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M. M. S. 
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M. M. S.

[The identity of this M.M.S. remains unknown. He did however translate Brevissima relacion de la destruycion de las Indias by Bartolomé de las Casas (1474-1566) from Spanish, and this was published in London in 1583.]

Translation

John Wade, University of Sheffield

Read through the deeds and burning fates of English men which we have sealed and disclosed in a faithful register: the spectacles of twin gatherings, congregations fighting in their different wars, are there to be admired by you. On this side, are those over whom wild Satan hovers with savage onslaught, and carries forward the torches of Tartarus into his own realms. On that side, Christ the King of Heaven, stretches out a way to the stars across flames and a thousand bloody deaths. On this side, arms, prayers, tears, fastings in the churches and the honour and sacrifices ordered by the Father on high. The fury of the Cyclopes wearies this gathering, the Eumenides weary their wild hearts and thorny breasts with grim squalor. The Mass flies in front, drunk with flames rivers of blood, and evil Rome steps back. While Foxe records such struggles extended over a long period of time, and gathers together so many monuments in his book, meanwhile the virgin born in the time of truth stands high over trampled Phleethon. After other births, and then after other labours, comes this final anger of the avenging hand, and this third set of arms we hang up to father Quirinus, which before were small but now as great and of such a kind as you see. Just like the miracles of the fateful stone which long ago the royal exile displayed on the soil of Assyria, [so] this stone is small, but it lifts itself up to heaven, ordered to equal the Atlantic bays. Now also (it is one) which has filled the world with its curved fragments and makes haste to climb in might to the heights of heaven. The father himself, thundering with this, has extended his rule over the burning vault, and topples proud kingdoms to the ground. A cruel flint, because it speeds through the flaming foundations of cities and brings destruction with its exalted threats. Bold Semiramis of Rome, look to your brick walls. Already that Babylon of yours is crashing down. How great a ruin will be brought about now by the force of that rocky cliff? What terrible massacre will its fearfulness inflict upon the wretched sons of Rome? This is the last labour of the greedy mountain which carries off the popes who revere the ships and the puppets who revere the popes. But you happy spirits, whose hearts are concerned with the age of gold, are pouring out pious prayers with pure lips: and you, winged battle-lines, citizens of starry Olympus, applaud: the Babel of Rome is dead, dead the pope.

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PErlege, quæ fastis signata fidelibus acta
Pādimus Angligeûm et feruida fata virûm.
Admiranda tibi gemini spectacula cœtus,
Pugnantes suo dispare marte greges.
Hinc quibus incumbus sæuo ferus impete Sathan
Tartareas præfert in sua regna faces:
Illinc Rex superûm, trans flāas, trans cruentas
Mille neces, Christus sternit ad astra viam.
Illinc arma, preces, lachrymæ, ieiunia templis
Iussus honos summi iussa sacra patris.
Concilium hoc Cyclopū rabies, fera corda fatigant
Eumenides, tristi pectora senta situ.
Missa volat flammis, & sanguinis ebria riuis
Ante, gradum retro Roma maligna premit.
Talia dum memorat Foxus certamina longi
Temporis, & libro tot monumenta legit.
Interea veri vis stat sata tempore virgo
Ardua calcato iam Phlegetonte super.
Post alios fœtus, alios post deinde labores
Hæc extrema subit vindicis ira manus,
Tertia ista patri suspendimus arma Quirino
Parua prius iam nunc qualia, quanta, vides.
Qualia fatalis iam tum miracula saxi
Prodidit Aßyria regius exul humo.
Exiguus lapis hic, sed qui se attollere in auras
Jussus Atlantæos æquiparare sinus.
Nunc quoq; qui impleuit sinuoso fragmine mundū
Ætherio ingens occupat ire polo.
Hac pater ipse tonans flagranti distulit axe
Imperia, & vertit Regna superba solo.
Saeua Silex quiànam flammantibus incita fundis
Vrbium & elatis perniciosa minis.
Coctilibus muris Romana Semiramis audax
Prospice, iam Babylon iam ruit illa tua.
Saxea iam rupes quantas dabit acta ruinas?
Quas strages miseris horrida Romulidis
Vltimus hic labor est montis rapientis auari
Puppicolas Papas papicolas Popas.

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