Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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262 [261]

K. Rich. I. crowned. Strife betwene the Archb. of Yorke and the Deane.

the kyng so ignominiously to lye, threw hys cloke vpon hys neather partes, wherein (sayth the author) was verified the surname, which from his youth he bare, beyng called Henry court Mantil.

¶ King Richard. 
Commentary  *  Close
First year of Richard I's reign

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

MarginaliaAn. 1189.
K. Richard crouned.
IN this yere of the Lord aboue recited, which was. 1189. kyng Richard the eldest sonne of Henry, succedyng hys father, entred hys crowne: at which tyme pope Clemē: sate at Rome, sucedyng after Gregory which died a little before with sorrow for the losse of the holy crosse.

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During the tyme of whose coronation it befell, MarginaliaThe Kynges restraint that no Iew should enter the palace nor Church duryng hys coronation.that notwithstandyng the kyng the day before hys coronation, & by publique edict cōmaunded bothe the Iewes and their wiues not to presume eyther to enter the church or els his palace, duryng the solemnizatiō of hys coronation amongst his nobles and Barons: yet (whilest the kyng was at dinner) the chieftain of the Iewes with dyuers other of his Iewish affinitie and superstitious sect, agaynst the kynges prohibition together wyth other prease entred the court gates. Wherat a christian man beyng offended, stroke one of them with hys hand or fist, and bad hym stand further from the courte gate, as the kyng had geuen in commaundement: whose example others also followyng beyng displeased agaynst the Iewes, offred them the like contumely. Other also, supposing that the kyng had so commaunded in deede (as vsing the autoritie of the kyng) fell vpon all þe Iewes that stode by without the court gate. And first they bet thē but with their fistes: but afterwardes they toke vp stones and such other things, as they could get, & threw at them, & bet them therwith. And thus driuyng them from the court gates, some of them they wounded, some they slew, & some they left for dead.

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MarginaliaA Iew through feare was baptisedThere was amongst this number of the Iewes, one which was called the blessed Iew of Yorke: which was so sore beaten and wounded with the rest, that for feare of hys lyfe he sayd he would become a christian: and was in deede of William the Prior of the Church of S. Mary of Yorke baptized: wherby he escaped the great peril of death he was in, and the persecutors handes. In the meane while, there was a great rumor spred throughout al the city of Londō, that the kyng had commaunded to destroy all the Iewes. Wherupon as well the citizens as innumerable people more beyng assembled to see the kings coronation: armed themselues and came together. MarginaliaThe Iewes in London slayne and their houses set on fire.The Iewes thus being (for the most part) slayne, the rest fled into their houses: where, for a tyme through the strong and sure buildyng of them, they were defended. But at lēgth, theyr houses were set on fire, and they destroyed therin.

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These things beyng declared to þe kyng, whilest he with hys nobles & Barōs were yet at dinner: he sēdeth immediately Ranulph de Glanuile, the lord hygh Stuard of England, with dyuers other noble men to accompany him: that they might stay and restrayne these so bold enterprises of þe Londoners, but all was in vayne. MarginaliaThe small regard of nobilitie had in tumultes and insurrections.For in this so great a tumult, none there was that regarded eyther what þe nobilitie sayd, or els any whit reuerenced their personages: but rather with stearne lookes and threatnyng wordes aduised them and that quickly to depart. Wherupon, they with good deliberation thinkyng it the best so for to do, departed: the tumult and insurrection continuyng till the next day. At which time also the kyng sendyng certayne of hys officers into the city, gaue them in commaundement to apprehende and present some such as were the chiefest of the malefactours: of the which, three were condemned to be hanged, and so were. The one, for that he had robbed a christiās house in this tumult: and the other two, for that they fired the houses, to the great daunger of the citie. After this, þe king sent for hym, that from a Iew was conuerted to Christianitie: and in the presence of those that saw where he was baptised, the kyng asked him whether he was become a Christian or not. MarginaliaA new christian reuolteth to an olde Iewe.He aunswering the kyng, sayd no: but to the entent he myght escape death, he promised to do whatsoeuer the Chrsitians would haue hym. Then the kyng asked the Archbishop of Caunterbury (other Archbishops and bishops beyng present) what were best to be done with him: MarginaliaAn vnaduised answere of an Archb.Vnaduisedly answeryng sayd: If he wyll not be a mā of God, let hym be a man of the deuil: and so reuolted he agayne to Iudaisme.

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Then, the king sent hys writs to the Shiriffes of euery coūtrey to enquire for the authors and stirrers of this outrage. Of whom 3. were hanged, dyuers were imprisoned. So great was then the hatred of Englishmen against the Iewes, that as sone as they began to be repulsed in þe court, the Londiners takyng example therof, fell vpon them, set theyr houses on fire, and spoyled theyr goodes. The countrey agayne followyng the example of the Londiners semblably did the lyke. MarginaliaEx Chron. Westm. cui ini tium Anæas cum Ascanio. &.And thus the yere, which the Iewes tooke to be theyr Iubilie, was to them a yeare of confusion. In so much as in the citie of Yorke the Iewes obteinyng the occupying of a certaine Castle for their preseruation, and afterward not willyng to restore it to the Christians agayne, when they sawe no other remedy but by force to be vanquished, first they offred much money for their liues: when that would not be taken, by the counsaile of an olde Iew among them, MarginaliaA miserable and deserued destructiō of the Iewes.euery one wyth a sharpe razer cut an others throte, wherby a thousand and fiue hūdreth of them were at that present destroyed. Neither was this plague of theirs vndeserued. For euery yeare commonly their custome was to get some Christen mans childe from the parentes, and on good Friday to crucifie hym in despite of our religion. Ex Chron. Westm.

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Marginalia1189.Kyng Richard after the death of hys father, commyng to remembraunce of hymselfe, and of hys rebellion agaynst hys father, sought for absolution of hys trespasse, & in part of satisfaction for the same agreed with Philip the French kyng about Easter next ensuyng to take his voyage with hym for the recouery of Christes patrimony, which they called the holy land. Wherupon the sayd king Richard immediatly after hys coronation, to prepare hymselfe the better toward hys iourney, set to sale diuers of hys maners. MarginaliaThe couetous gredines of Byshops noted in bying great Lordships.Wherof Godfrey Lucy then B. of Wint. bought a couple for ij. M. markes, to witte, Wergraue, and Melenge. The Abbot of Bury bought another for a M. Markes, called Middlesale: Hugh Pusaz B. of Durham, bought the lordship of Seggesfield, or Sadberga with the Wapintake, & all the appartenaunce therto belongyng. He bought also the Erledome of Northumberlād. Whom when þe king should solēnize after þe maner of secular Erles, merily wyth a mocking iest, lo (sayd he) of an old byshop I haue made a young Erle. And because the sayd Bishop had professed a solemne vow to visite the holy land, to be released of hys vow, he compounded with the Pope for a great summe of mony therfore, and moreouer gaue to the kyng a thousād Markes to remayne at home as chiefe Iustice of Englād. MarginaliaSleightes to get money.Ouer and besides, the kyng set out all that he had to sale, woodes, castles, townships, Lordshyps, Earledomes, Baronages, &c. ordeinyng also dyuers new Bishops, & not wtout some aduauntage (as appeared) to hys purse, faynyng moreouer hys olde seale to be lost, that they whiche had landes to hold myght be driuen to renew their writynges agayne by the new seale, wherby great substaunce of money was gayned.

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MarginaliaA tenth gathered through all England.Aboue all this, by the commaundement of Pope Clement 3. a tenth also was exacted of the whole Realme, in such sort as the christians should make to the king 70000 pound, the Iewes 60000. Ex Geruas. fol. 134. Kyng Richard after hys coronation sent certayne Erles and Barōs to Philip the French kyng in the tyme of hys Parlament at S. Denis, desiryng hym to remember his promise made for the recouery of Christes holy patrimony out of þe Saracens handes. MarginaliaK. Philip & K. Richard cōcluding to trauell to the holy land.Vnto whom he sent worde agayne in the month of December, certifying hym how he had bound him self by solemne othe, deposing vpon the Euangelistes, that he the yere next followyng about the tyme of Easter, had certainly prefixed to addresse hymselfe toward that iourney, requiring hym likewise not to fayle but to be ready at the terme aboue limited, appoynting also the place where both the kinges should mete together.

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Marginalia1190.The next yere then ensued, which was. 1190. in the beginnyng of which yere, vpon Twelfe euen fell MarginaliaA Northren braule in the Cathedrall Chruch of Yorke, betwen the new Archbyshop and the Deane.a foule northren brawle, which turned welnere to afray, betwene the Archbishop new elected of the Church of Yorke & his company on the one side, and Henry Deane of the sayd church with hys Catholicke partakers on the other side, vpō occasion as followeth. Gaufridus or Geffray, sonne to king Hēry 2. and brother to kyng Richard, whom the kyng had elected a little before to the Archbishoprike of Yorke, vpon the euen of the Epiphanie, which we call Twelfe day, was disposed to heare Euensong with all solenitie in the Cathedrall church, hauyng with hym Hamon the Chaunter, with diuers other Canons of the church. Who tarying somthing long, belyke in adournyng and attyring himself: MarginaliaHenry Deane of Yorke and Bucarde begyn seruice not tarying for their Archb.in the meane whyle Henry the Deane, and Bucardus the treasurer disdaynyng to tary his commyng, with a bold courage lustily began their holy euensong, with singing their Psalmes, rufflyng of descant, and mery pipypng of Organs. Thus this Catholicke Euensong with as much deuotion begon, as to gods high seruice procedyng, was now almost halfe complete, whē as at length (they beyng in the middest of their mirth) commeth in the new elect, with his trayne &

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