Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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303 [286]

K. Henry.3. Inquisition made against the spoylers of the popes corne.

MarginaliaThe copy of the letter writtē vnder the kinges authoritie to restraine the benefices of the Romans, within the realme.AFter diuers and sondry griefes and oppressions whiche this Realme, as you know, hath sustayned by the Romanistes & yet doth: as well to the preiudice of the kyng hym selfe as also of the nobilitie of the same, concernyng the aduowsons of their churches and about their tythes: who also goe about to take frō the clerkes & spirituall men their benefices, and to bestow them vpō their owne nation and coūtreymen, to the spoyle and confusion both of vs and our realme: we therfore by our common consentes haue thought good (although very late) now yet rather, then any longer to suffer their intolerable oppressions and extortions, to resiste and withstand the same. And by the takyng from them their benefices through all England, in like maner to cut short and bridle thē, as they had thought to haue kept vnder and bridled others: wherby they may desiste any lenger to molest the Realme. Wherfore, we straitly charge and commaunde you, that as touching the fermyng of their churches or els the rentes belonging to them, which either you haue presently in your handes or els do owe vnto the sayd Romanists: that from hence forth you be no more acoumptable vnto them or els pay vnto them from hence forth the same. But that you haue the sayd your rentes & reuenewes ready, by such a day, to pay and deliuer vnto our procuratours therunto by our letters assigned. And that all Abbates and Priors haue the same in a readynes at the day appointed, in their owne Monasteries: and all other Priests, Clerkes, and laymen, at the Churches of the Romanistes there ready to pay. And farther know ye for certeintie that if ye refuse thus to do: that all that you haue besides shalbe by vs brent and spoyled. And besides looke what daunger we purpose shall fall vpon them, the same shall light vpon your neckes, if you refuse thus to do. Farewell.

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When this was done, they sent these letters abroad by certeine souldiours therunto appointed: to the which letters they had deuised a new seale with two swordes ingraued, and betwene the swordes was written. Ecce gladij duo, &c. Behold these two swordes ready to take vengeaunce of all those that shall withstand the forme and order in these letters contayned. Marginalia1232.At that tyme the 16. day before the Kalendes of Ianuary, about the begynning of the yeare. 1232. there was kept at S. Albons a great consistory of Abbots, Priors, Archdeacons, with diuers other both of the nobilitie and clergy by the Popes commaundement: for the celebration of a diuorse betwene the Countes of Essex and her husband. At the breaking vp of which Consistory, when euery man was about to depart thence. MarginaliaA Romayne priest, chanō of Paules taken & robbed by souldiours.There was a certaine clerke whose name was Cincius a Romane, & was also a Chanon of Paules in London: taken by some of the sayd Uniuersitie not farre of from S. Albons, & was caryed away from his company by the souldiours. But master Ihon Archdeacon of Norwich a Florentine hardly escapyng from that company gat to London, where he hyd himselfe and durst not be sene. Cintius after fiue weekes, when they had well emptied his bagges, was safly sent agayne without any more hurt to London.

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MarginaliaThe barnes of a Romane person broke vp and the corne distributed to the poore.Not long after this, about the beginnyng of Ianuary: the barnes of a certaine beneficed mā, a Romane, and person of Wingham, being ful of corne: were broke vp by a like company of armed souldiours. And the corne brought out to be sold and geuen away to the poore people. The fermer seyng this and not able to resiste, complayneth to the Shirife of the shyre, of this iniurie done to his master, and of breakyng the kynges peace: wherupon, the Shyrife sent certain of his men to see what was done. MarginaliaThe Romaines and Italian persons in Englād robbed of their rentes and corne.Who cōmyng to the emptie barnes, and there findyng the foresayd souldiours to thē vnknowen, who had sold away the most part of the corne vpon easy price, and some for charitie had geuen to the pouertie of the countrey about: required of them what they were, that so durst presume to breake the kynges peace. Whom the other thē called secretly a part, and shewed them the kynges letters patentes (pretendyng at least the kyngs name and seale) wherin was forbidden, that no man should presume to stoppe or let them in that purpose. Wherof the Shyriffes seruauntes beyng certified, quietly returned frō whence they came.

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This commyng to the knowledge of Roger byshop of London, he (with the assistance of other Byshops) procedeth in solēne excommunicatiō, first agaynst them that robbed Cintius the Romane: then of them which spoyled the barnes of the Parsō of Winghā, an other Romane. Thirdly he excōommunicated them that forged the letters and seale of the kyng aboue specified.

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Neither yet for all that, this did so cease, but the same yeare, about Easter next folowyng, all the barnes in England, whiche were in the handes of any Romane or Ita-lian, were likewise wasted: and the corne solde to the best commoditie of the poore commons. Of the whiche, great almose was distributed: and many tymes, money also with corne together was sparsed, for the needy people to gather vp. Neither was there any, that would or durst stand agaynst them. MarginaliaA generall spoyle of the Romayne parsons in England.As for the Romanes and Italians themselues, were stricken in such feare: that they hyd themselues in Monasteries and celles, not daryng to complayne of their iniuries receaued: but held it better, to lose rather theyr goodes, then to lose their liues. The authors and workers of this feate were to the number of 80. armed souldiours, of whom the principall Captaine was one namyng himselfe W. Wytherse, surnamed Twyng.

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MarginaliaThe Popes cholar styrred vp against England.This commyng to the Popes knowledge, he was not a litle styrred therewith, and sendeth his letters immediatly to the kyng vpon the same: with sharpe threatnynges, and imperious commaundementes, chargyng him for sufferyng of such vilany within his Realme: MarginaliaA fumishe vicare of milde Christ.straitly inioynyng hym vnder paine of excōmunicatiō, to search out the doers hereof with all diligence, and so to punish them that all other by them may take exāple. Likewise, he sendeth the same charge to Peter Byshop of Winchester and to the Abbot of S. Edmūd, to inquire in the South partes. Also to the archbyshop of Yorke, and to the Byshop of Durham, and to master Ihon Chanon of Yorke a Romane, to inquire in the north partes for the sayd malefactors: and after diligēt inquisition made, to send vp the same to Rome, there needes to appeare before him. &c.

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MarginaliaInquisitiō made for the spoyling of the popes corne.Thus after earnestly inquisitiō made of all parties, and witnesses sworne and examined: many were found culpable in the matter, some that were factours, some that were cōsenters, of whom some were Byshops, and Chaplaines to the kyng: some Archdeacons, & Deanes, with other souldiours and lay men. Among whom certaine Shiriffes and vndershyriffes with their seruitures vnder them, were apprhended and cast into prison by the kyng. Many for feare fled and escaped away, who beyng sought for could not be founde: but the principall of this number (as is aforesayd) was supposed to be MarginaliaHubert de BurgoHubertus Lord chief iustice: who both with the kyngs letters & his owne, fortified the doers therof, that no man durst interrupt them. Moreouer in the same societie of thē, which were noted in these doynges, was MarginaliaRobert Twinge, spoyled of his benefice by the Romaynes.the same Robert Twyng, aboue mētioned, a comely young mā & a talle souldiour: who of his owne voluntary accorde, with fiue other seruitures, whō he tooke with him abroad to worke that feate, came to the kyng: opēly protesting himselfe to be the author of that deede doyng and sayd, he dyd it for hatred of the Pope and the Romaines: because that by the sentence of the Byshop of Rome, and fraudulent circūuention of the Italiās, he was bereued of the patronage of his benefice, hauyng no more to geue but that one. Wherfore to be reuenged of that iniurie, he enterprised that which was done: preferryng rather vniustly to be excommunicate for a season, then to be spoyled of his benefice for euer. Then the kyng, & other executors of the Popes commaundement gaue him counsaile, that seyng he had so incurred the daunger of the Popes sentence, would offer himselfe to the pope to be absolued of him agayne, and there to make his declaration vnto him, that he iustly and canonically was possessed in that Church. The kyng moreouer with him sent his letters testimoniall vnto the Pope, witnessing with the sayd souldiour, & instantly desiryng the Pope in his behalfe, that he might with fauour be heard. At the request wherof, pope Gregory afterward, both released hym of the sentence, & restored him to his patronage: writing to the archb. of Yorke, that he might agayne inioye the right of his benefice in as ample maner, as he did before it was taken from him.

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MarginaliaThe Byshops goe about to bring Hubert out of the kinges fauour.Hubert de Burgo Lord chiefe Iustice, 

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Hubert de Burgh

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

beyng one of them which held agaynst the Romish Priestes, as is afore signified: was therfore not a litle noted of the byshops, who to requite him with like despite agayne (after their accustomed maner of practise) went about by subtile workyng, to shake him out of the kings fauour. And first commeth Peter Byshop of Winchester, to the kyng greuously complaynyng of certaine about the kyng, but especially of the foresayd Hubert the kynges iustice: in somuch, that he caused him to be remoued from his office, notwithstandyng he had the kyngs seale and writyng for the perpetuitie of the same, & procured Stephen Segraue to be placed in his function. MarginaliaObiections layd agaynst Hubert, by the kyng.And after a fewe dayes, the kyng more and more incensed agaynst him, called him to a count of all the treasure which he was countable for by his excheker office: also of all such debtes by him due frō the tyme of his father, vnto his time. Also of all the Lordshyps, which were in the possession of William Earle of Penbroke, chief iustice before him. Item, of the liberties which he did hold at that tyme, in forestes,

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waren-
Bb.ij.
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