Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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397 [396]

K. Edw.2. Peter Ganeston. Guy of Warwike. Warre betwene Englād & Scotlād.

MarginaliaThe Archb. of Cant. excommunicateth the B. of Couentry for holding with Peter Gaueston.therefore afterward did excommunicate. Which Thomas of Lancaster by the publicke assent of the rest sent to the kyng (lying then at Yorke) humble petitions, in the name aswell of the whole Nobilitie, as of the commons: Desiryng his grace to geue the foresaid Gaueston vnto them, or els accordyng to the ordinaunce of the Realme, that the land might be auoyded of him. But the tyrannous kyng, who set more by the amour of one straūger then by his whole Realme beside: neither would harken to their counsayle; nor geue place to their supplications: But in all hasty fury, remoued from Yorke to Newcastell, where hee remained almost till Midsommer.

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In the meane season, the Barons had gathered an host of sufficient and able soldiours, comming toward Newcastell: not entendyng any molestation agaynst the kyng, but onelye the execution of the lawes vpon wicked Gaueston. The kyng not hauyng wherewith to resist their power: remoueth in all speedy manner to Thinmouth, where the Queene lay. And hearyng there that Newcastell was taken: taketh shypping and sayleth from thence (notwithstandyng the Queene there beyng great with child, with weeping teares and all instaunce, desireth him to tary with her, as safely he might) but he nothyng relentyng to her, tooke Peter his cōpere with him, and coasted ouer to the Castell of Scarbrough, where he leauyng Peter Gaueston to the safe keepyng of his men, himselfe iourneth toward the coast beside Warwike. MarginaliaPeter Gauestone taken of the nobles.The Lordes hearyng where Peter was, bendeth thether all their power: so that at length Gaueston seing no remedy but he must needes come into their handes, yeldeth and submitteth himselfe: requiryng none other conditiō, but onely that he might talke but a few wordes with the kyng in his presence. Thus Gaueston beyng apprehended, MarginaliaThe king entreateth for Gaueston.the kyng hearyng therof, sendeth vnto the Lordes, requiryng his lyfe to be spared: and that he might be brought to his speech, and so promised that in so doyng he would satisfie their myndes and requestes, what soeuer. About this, aduisemēt was taken: but then the Earle of Pēbroke hearyng the kynges promise, perswaded the Barons to graūt vnto his petition: promising hymselfe, vpon loosing all his landes to take the charge vpon hym to be brought vnto the kynges speech, and so to be recommitted to them agayne. Which whē he had obtayned, he taketh Peter Gaueston with hym, to bring him where the kyng lay. And so cōming to Dedington not farre from Warwike, leaueth hym in the keepyng of his soldiours, while he that night went to his wife, beyng from thence not farre of. MarginaliaGwy of Warwike.The same night it chaunced, Guido the Earle of Warwike to come to the same place where Gaueston was left: who takyng hym out of the handes of his keepers, MarginaliaPeter Gaueston agayne apprehēded by Gwy of Warwike.caryeth hym to the Castell of Warwike, where incontinent they wold haue put hym to death: but doubtyng and fearyng the kyngs displeasure, a litle they stayed. At what tyme one of the company, (a man of sage and wise counsaile as myne author writeth) standyng vp among them with his graue oration declareth the nature of the man, the wickednes of his condition, the Realme by him to greatly endamaged, the nobles despised and reiected, the pride and ambition of the man intollerable, the ruine of thynges lyke to ensue by him, and the great charges & expenses they had bene at in so long pursuyng and gettyng of him. And now being gotten and in their handes, he exhorted them so to vse and take the occasiō now present: that hereafter beyng out of their handes, they afterward might seeke, and should not finde it.

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Briefly, in such sort he perswaded the hearers, that forthwith he was brought out, MarginaliaPeter Gaueston beheaded.and by commō agreement beheaded in a place called Blakelow, which place in other storyes I find to be called Gaueshed, but that name (as I thinke) was deriued vpon this occasion, afterward. And thus he, that before had called the Earle of Warwike the blacke dog of Ardeyne: was thus by the sayd dogge woorowed, as ye haue heard. &c. His carkas, the Dominicke Friars of Oxford had in their Monastery interred the space of. ij. yeares: MarginaliaThe corpes of Peter Gaueston buried in the kings Maner of Lāgley.but after that, the kyng caused the sayd carkas to be taken vp and buried within his owne Manour of Langley.

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After this, great disturbance began to rise betwene the kyng and the Lords: 

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The Despensers and the death of Edward II

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

who hauyng their power lying about Dunstable, sent stoute message vnto the kyng at London, to haue their former actes cōfirmed. Gilbert Earle of Gloucester the kynges Nephew (who neither did hold agaynst the kyng, nor yet agaynst the Nobles) with the Byshops and Prelates of the Realme: went betwene both parties with great diligence, to make vnitie. At which tyme, also came ij. Cardinals from Rome, with letters sēt vnto them from the Pope. The nobles aūswered to the message of the Cardinals, lying then at S. Albans: that as touchyng themselues they should be at all tymes welcome to them: But as MarginaliaThe nobles of England cared not for the popes letters.touching their letters (for asmuch as they were men vnlettered, and onely brought vp in warre and feates of armes) therfore they cared not for seyng the same. Then message was sent agayne, that they would graunt at least but to speake with the popes legates, which purposely came for þe intent to set quyet & vnitie in the realme. MarginaliaThe popes legates not admitted of the nobles of England.They aunswered agayne, that they had Byshops both godly and learned, by whose counsaile they would be ledde onely: and not by any straungers, who knew not the true cause of their commotion. And therfore they sayd precisely, that they would no foreners or alians to be doers in their busines, and affaires appertainyng to the Realme. Yet notwithstanding, through the mediation of the Archbyshop, and of the Earle of Gloucester: the matter at length was so taken vp, that the Barrons should restore to the kyng, or his attorney of S. Albans, all the treasure, horses, and iewells of the foresayd Gaueston taken at Newcastell, and so their requestes shoulde be graunted. And so was the matter for that tyme composed.

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Shortly vpon the same, Isabell the Queene was deliuered of a fayre child at Windsore, whō Lewes the French kyngs sonne (the Queenes brother, with other Frenchmē there present) would to be called by the name of the French kyng: but the English Lordes were contrary, willyng him to be called by the name of Edward hyis father. At the byrth of which Edward, great reioysing was through all the land, and especially the kyng his father so much ioyed therat: that he began dayly more and more to forget the sorow and remembraunce of Gauestons death, and was after that more agreable to the will of his nobles.

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MarginaliaAn. 1312.Thus peace and concord betwene them began to be in a good towardnes: which more & more might haue bene confirmed in wearyng out of tyme, had not Sathan the author and sower of all discord, styrred vp his instrumentes MarginaliaThe king ruled by forrene counsail.
Makebates about the kyng.
(certain Frenchmen, Titinyllars, and makebates about the kyng) which ceased not in carpyng and deprauyng the nobles, to inflame the kynges hatred & grudge agaynst them. By the excityng of whom, the old quarels beyng renued a fresh, the kyng in his Parliament called vpon the same: began to charge the foresayd Barons and nobles with sedition and rebelliō, and for slaying Peter Gaueston. Neither were the nobles lesse stoute agayne in defēdyng their cause, declaryng that they in so doing had deserued rather thanke and fauour with the kyng then any displeasure, in vanquishing such a publique enmey of the Realme, who not onely had spoyled & wasted the kynges substance, but also raysed much disturbance in the Realme. And for asmuch as they had begon with the matter to their so great labours and expenses: they would procede further, they sayd, not ceasing til they saw an end therof. To be short, great threats there were on both partes, & a foule matter like to haue followed. MarginaliaMediation for making peace.But agayne through the diligent mediatiō of the Queene, the Prelates, and the foresayd Earle of Gloucester: the matter was takē vp and brought to reconcilement vpon these cōditions, MarginaliaThe king reconciled agayne wyth hys nobles.that the Lords and Barons openly in Westmynster hall should humble themselues before the kyng, and aske pardon there of their doynges, and euery man there to receaue a letter of the kynges pardon, for their indemnitie, and assurance. And so passed ouer that yeare, within the which yeare dyed Robert Winchelsey Archb. of Cant. In whose roome, Thomas Cobbhā was elected by the kyng and Church of Cant. to succede: but the pope, cassating that election, placed Walter Reynalde Bishop of Worceter.

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MarginaliaAn. 1313.
What discord doth in a commō wealth.
The Scots rebell against the realm of England.
In the meane tyme, the Scots hearyng this ciuill discord in the Realme, began to be busie and to rebell of new, through the meanes of Robert Bruys: who beyng chased out of Scotlād, by kyng Edward the first, as is aboue premised, into Norway, was now returned agayn into Scotlād: where he demeaned him in such sort to þe Lordes there, that in short processe he was agayne made kyng of the Realme: And warred so strongly vpon them that tooke the kynges part, that he wanne from them many castels and strong holdes, and inuaded the borders of Englād. The k. hearyng this, assembleth a great power, and by water entreth the Realme of Scotland. Agaynst whom, encountred Robert de Bruys with his Scots at Estriualin, where was fought a strong battaile: MarginaliaEnglishmē ouercome by the Scots.in the end wherof, the Englishmē were discomfited, & so egerly pursued by the Scots, that many of the noble men were slayne, as the Earle of Glouceter, Syr Robert Clifford, Syr Edmund Maule with other Lordes to the number of xlij. and knightes and Barons lxvij. beside xxij. men of name, which were taken prisoners: of common souldiours, x. thousand, or after the Scottish story fifty thousand slayne. After which tyme Syr Robert Bruys reigned as kyng of Scotland.

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About which tyme and in which yeare, dyed pope Cle-

ment.
Kk.j.
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