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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Abraham Waters

Dutchman of St Botolph's, Colchester; abjured in 1527 [Fines]

Abraham Waters, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Wily

Young girl of Horkesley, Essex; charged in 1532 [Fines]

Agnes Wily, with others, abjured in 1532. She was charged, along with Lucy Wily and the wives of John and William Wily, with eating meat broth on St Peter's Eve. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alice Gardiner

Old woman of the White Hart, against the Savoy, later of Colchester. Charged in 1528 [Fines]

Alice Gardiner, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Catherine Wily

of Horkesley, Essex; wife of John, senior [Fines]; charged in 1532 with her husband, sons and their wives; in prison at Fulham 1534

John Wily, his wife, sons and daughters-in-law abjured in 1532. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

John Wily and his wife and son were imprisoned at Fulham with Edward Freese. 1563, p. 494; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1026.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Christian Wily

of Horkesley, Essex; wife of John, jr.; charged in 1532 with her husband and his family; in prison in Fulham in 1534 [Fines]

Christian Wily, her husband and his family abjured in 1532. She was charged, along with her sister-in-law, with eating meat broth on St Peter's Eve. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dorothy Long

of St Giles, Colchester. Denounced in 1528 [Fines]

Dorothy Long, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Peerson

Priest who betrayed Richard Bayfield in 1531

Edmund Peerson presented a list of charges against Richard Bayfield, especially concerning Bayfield's praise for Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Cooper

of London; charged in 1528 [Fines]

George Cooper, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Raylond

of Colchester. Son of William; called to answer in 1528 [Fines]

Henry Raylond, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Smith

Edmund Peerson reported meeting James Smith, Miles Garnet and Richard Bayfield outside the parsonage at St Edmund in Lombard Street, at which time Bayfield said that the others were Pharisees, not Christians. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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John Bradley

Blacksmith of Colchester He and his wife were charged in 1528 [Fines]

John Bradley and his wife, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Hubert (Hubbard)

of East Donyland, Essex He and his wife were charged in 1528 [Fines]

John Hubert and his wife, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Thompson (Tonson)

Flesher/fletcher of Colchester; son-in-law to Thomas Parker; charged in 1528 [Fines]

John Thompson, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Toy

of St Faith; prosecuted in 1528 [Fines]

John Toy, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Turke

Charged 1528; brought before the privy council in 1543 for publishing a postilla on the gospels; committed to the Fleet [Fines]

John Turke, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Wily junior

of Horkesley, Essex [Fines]; charged in 1532 with his parents, wife, brother and his wife; in prison at Fulham in 1534

John Wily junior, his wife, parents, brother and sister-in-law abjured in 1532. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

John Wily junior and his parents were imprisoned at Fulham with Edward Freese. 1563, p. 494; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1026.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Wily senior

Weaver of Horkesley, Essex [Fines]; charged in 1532 with his wife, sons and their wives; in prison at Fulham in 1534

John Wily, his wife, sons and daughters-in-law abjured in 1532. He was charged with eating meat during forbidden periods, teaching his young daughter scripture and of possessing illicit books. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

John Wily and his wife and son were imprisoned at Fulham with Edward Freese. 1563, p. 494; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1026.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Katherine Swane

of Colchester; charged 1528. Possibly the same as widow Swaine of Ipswich who fled in 1556 [Fines]

Katherine Swane, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lucy Wily

Young girl of Horkesley, Essex; charged in 1532 [Fines]

Lucy Wily, with others, abjured in 1532. She was charged, along with Agnes Wily and the wives of John and William Wily, with eating meat broth on St Peter's Eve. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Margaret Wily

of Horkesley, Essex; wife of William; charged in 1532 with her husband and his family; in prison in Fulham in 1534 [Fines]

Margaret Wily, her husband and his family abjured in 1532. She was charged, along with her sister-in-law, with eating meat broth on St Peter's Eve. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Marion Matthew (or Westden)

of St James', Colchester. Wife of Thomas; knew substantial portions of scripture by heart [Fines]

Marion Matthew, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Miles Garnet

Edmund Peerson reported meeting James Smith, Miles Garnet and Richard Bayfield outside the parsonage at St Edmund in Lombard Street, at which time Bayfield said that the others were Pharisees, not Christians. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Peter Fenne

Priest; troubled c. 1530 [Fines]

Peter Fenne, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Richard Bayfield (alias Somersam)

(d. 1531) [ODNB]

born Hadleigh; Benedictine monk of Bury St Edmund's and protestant martyr

Robert Barnes, Lawrence Maxwell and John Stacy visited Bury Abbey and during the course of their visit converted Richard Bayfield. Bayfield was imprisoned in the abbey, whipped and stocked. Barnes and Edmund eventually secured his release, and he went with Barnes to Cambridge. When Barnes was arrested, Bayfield went to London, where Maxwell and Stacy kept him secretly and helped him leave the country. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1161; 1576, p. 993; 1583, p. 1021.

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While abroad, Bayfield met William Tyndale and John Frith and sold their books and those of the German reformers in France and in England. He returned to England, was arrested, tried by Cuthbert Tunstall and abjured. He was told to return to Bury and wear his monk's habit, but fled abroad again. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1161; 1576, p. 993; 1583, p. 1021.

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Upon his return to England, he stayed at the house of Mr Smith, where he was betrayed and arrested. He was imprisoned in Lollards' Tower, but was moved to the Coalhouse to keep him away from another imprisoned suspect, Thomas Patmore. He was severely shackled in an attempt to make him reveal the buyers of his books, but he refused. He was tried before John Stokesley, assisted by Stephen Gardiner and others. 1563, pp. 484-88; 1570, pp. 1161-64; 1576, pp. 993-995; 1583, pp. 1021-1023.

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Edmund Peerson presented a list of charges against Richard Bayfield, especially concerning Bayfield's praise for Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

William Smith was charged in London in 1531 with harbouring Richard Bayfield and other good men in his house and reading illicit books. 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

About four days before Bayfield was arrested, a boy of Colchester was charged in London with bringing books to him. The boy was imprisoned by Sir Thomas More and died there. 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

Bayfield was condemned as a heretic and suffered a lengthy burning. 1563, pp. 488-89; 1570, pp. 1164-65; 1576, pp. 995-96; 1583, pp. 1023-24.

The example of Bayfield inspired John Tewkesbury after he had abjured. 1570, p. 1167; 1576, p. 998; 1583, p. 1026.

 
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Richard Foster

Yeoman usher of the Crown; accused with Bilney and Arthur; abjured in 1527; ate flesh on Sundays, denied the real presence [Brigden, London, pp. 126-27; Fines]

Richard Foster, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 418; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Richard Hedil (Hedley)

of Colchester; then Ipswich. Troubled in 1528; fled Ipswich in 1556 having sold heretical books there [Fines]

Richard Hedil, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Robert Best

Weaver of St Botolph, Colchester. Charged in 1528 [Fines]

Robert Best, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Robert Necton

Book agent from Norwich; [S. Brigden, London and the Reformation (Oxford, 1989) pp. 115, 122, 196; Fines] of St Katherine's; bought Lutheran books; arrested in 1528; named to More in 1530

Robert Necton, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

More said that Necton had been betrayed by George Constantine. He was imprisoned in Newgate and was thought to have died in prison. 1570, p. 1159; 1576, p. 991; 1583, p. 1019.

 
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Robert Wigge

of London; John Barret's apprentice in Goldsmiths' Company; in trouble 1528 [Brigden, London, pp. 97-8; Fines]

Robert Wigge, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Sebastian Harris

Curate of Kensington; charged in 1528; confessed he possessed Tyndale's New Testament; charged with adultery and neglect of his cure [Fines]

Sebastian Harris, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 418; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Thomas (Robert/Stephen) Forman (Farman, Farmer, Ferman)

(d. 1528) BTh Cambridge 1512; rector of All Hallows, Honey Lane 1524; president of Queens' College, Cambridge; charged in 1528 [Fines]

Thomas Forman, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Thomas Arthur

(d. 1532) [ODNB]

Religious radical; BA Cambridge 1513; MA 1516; fellow of St John's, Cambridge 1517; abjured 1527

While at Cambridge, Thomas Bilney converted to a reformed religion and convinced others there, including Thomas Arthur and Hugh Latimer. Bilney and Arthur left the university, going about teaching and preaching. Cardinal Wolsey had them imprisoned in 1527. 1563, p. 461; 1570, pp. 1134-35; 1576, p. 972; 1583, p. 998.

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Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

Wolsey forced Thomas Arthur, Thomas Bilney, Geoffrey Lome and Thomas Garrard to abjure for speaking against the authority of the pope. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

Edmund Peerson presented a list of charges against Richard Bayfield in 1531, especially concerning Bayfield's praise for Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Thomas Bilney

(c. 1495 - 1531) [Fines; ODNB]

Proctor of Cambridge; evangelical reformer; martyr burnt at Norwich

While at Cambridge, Bilney converted to a reformed religion and convinced others there, including Thomas Arthur and Hugh Latimer. Bilney and Arthur left the university, going about teaching and preaching. Cardinal Wolsey had them imprisoned in 1527. 1563, pp. 461, 481; 1570, pp. 1134-35; 1576, p. 972; 1583, p. 998.

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John Lambert was converted at Cambridge by Thomas Bilney. 1563, pp. 482, 527; 1570, p. 1255; 1576, p. 1075; 1583, p. 1101.

Bilney was well acquainted with Thomas Benet. 1570, p. 1180; 1576, p. 1009; 1583, p. 1037.

Bilney preached repentance and had his books burned. 1570, p. 39; 1576, p. 32; 1583, p. 32.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

Thomas Bilney wrote five letters to Tunstall. 1563, pp. 465-73; 1570, pp. 1140-47; 1576, pp. 977-81; 1583, pp. 1003-08.

Thomas Bilney and John Brusyerd entered into a dialogue on images in Ipswich around the time of Bilney's examination. 1563, pp. 474-79; 1570, pp. 1138-40; 1576, pp. 975-76; 1583, pp. 1001-03.

Bilney initially refused to recant and asked to introduce witnesses; this request was refused by the bishop of London because it was too late in the proceedings. Bilney was given two nights to consult with his friends, and they persuaded him to abjure. 1563, p. 479; 1570, p. 1140; 1576, p. 977; 1583, p. 1003.

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Thomas Wolsey forced Thomas Arthur, Thomas Bilney, Geoffrey Lome and Thomas Garrard to abjure for speaking against the authority of the pope. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

Bilney was sentenced to bear a faggot at Paul's Cross and to imprisonment at the pleasure of Cardinal Wolsey. 1563, p. 479; 1570, p. 1140; 1576, p. 977; 1583, p. 1003.

For two years Bilney repented of his abjuration. He moved to Norfolk and preached openly. He was arrested when he gave books to an anchoress he had converted in Norwich. Richard Nix obtained a writ for his burning. 1570, p. 1146; 1576, p. 981; 1583, p. 1008.

Lawrence Staple was charged in London in 1531 for, among other things, receiving four copies of Tyndale's New Testament from Bilney. 1570, p. 1187; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1043.

Edmund Peerson presented a list of charges against Richard Bayfield in 1531, especially concerning Bayfield's praise for Thomas Arthur and Thomas Bilney. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1020; 1583, p. 1048.

Bilney was arrested by the sheriff, Thomas Necton, his good friend. He was examined and condemned by Thomas Pelles. The night before his burning, his friends found him cheerful and enjoying his dinner. He put his finger into the candle flame several times to test the heat. He was burnt the next day at Lollards' Pit in Norwich. 1563, pp. 482-83; 1570, pp. 1150-51; 1576, pp. 984-85; 1583, p. 1012.

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Michael Lobley was charged in London in 1531 for, among other things, saying that Bilney was a good man. 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

 
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Thomas Parker

Father-in-law to John Thompson; abjured in the London diocese c. 1504; charged in 1528 [Fines]

Thomas Parker, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Thomas Wolsey

(1470/71 - 1530) [ODNB]

BA Oxford 1486; MA 1497; dean of divinity 1500

Dean of York 1513; bishop of Lincoln 1514

Lord chancellor (1515 - 29); archbishop of York (1514 - 30); cardinal (1515 - 30); arrested and died on his way to the Tower

Thomas Wolsey sent delegates to greet Cardinal Campeggi, the newly appointed legate to England, in Calais, hoping to get himself appointed fellow legate. Campeggi complied, and within 30 days a papal bull had arrived in Calais with Wolsey's commission. Wolsey set up a special legate's court in England, richly furnished. 1563, p. 418; 1570, pp. 1120-21; 1576, pp. 959-60; 1583, pp. 986-87.

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Wolsey was sent as ambassador to the emperor at Brussels, taking with him the great seal of England, and behaved like a prince. He enriched himself at the expense of the religious houses and commons. 1570, p. 1121; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

In England, Wolsey lived in great luxury. He leased Hampton Court, and then gave the lease to the king. He lodged at times at the king's manor at Richmond. 1570, pp. 1121-22; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

Wolsey suspected that his failure to be selected pope after the death of Adrian VI was due to Richard Pace's lack of effort on his behalf. He turned the king against Pace, causing Pace to go mad. Pace recovered, but Wolsey brought charges against him and he was imprisoned in the Tower for nearly two years, leaving him in a worse mental state than before. 1570, pp. 1124-25; 1576, p. 963; 1583, pp. 989-90.

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Wolsey founded Cardinal College at Oxford, and began to build in sumptuous style. He invited the best scholars to join, many of them from Cambridge. He did not live long enough to see it completed. 1563, p. 497; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

Wolsey opposed the emperor because the emperor refused to support his desire to be made pope. 1563, p. 440; 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

Having fallen out with the emperor, Wolsey encouraged Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon. 1570, p. 1192; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

Wolsey attempted to confiscate all copies of Supplication for the Beggars and discovered that the king had a copy. He was determined to forbid the reading of English books, specifically this book and Tyndale's translation of scripture. 1563, p. 449; 1570, p. 1157; 1576, p. 990; 1583, p. 1017.

After Clement VII had been taken prisoner by imperial forces, Wolsey urged Henry VIII to go to the pope's assistance. The king refused to send troops, but allowed Wolsey to take money out of the treasury to help. Wolsey then went to the French court to contribute to the ransom of Clement VII, hiring soldiers and furnishing the French army.1563, p. 439; 1570, pp. 1123; 1576, pp. 961-62; 1583, p. 988.

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Stephen Gardiner was sent as ambassador to Rome by Henry VIII during the time of Clement VII to deal with the matter of the king's divorce and to promote Thomas Wolsey as pope. Both the king and Wolsey wrote letters to him. 1570, pp. 1125-29; 1576, pp. 963-67; 1583, pp. 990-93.

Wolsey and Cardinal Campeggi had a legatine commission to consider the matter of the king's divorce. Henry began to suspect that Wolsey was not fully supportive. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

When Queen Catherine learned from the legates that they had been deputed to determine the matter of a divorce between the king and her, she composed an answer to them. She blamed Wolsey as the cause of the proposed divorce. 1563, pp. 456-57; 1570, pp. 1193-94; 1576, p. 1022; 1583, p. 1050.

Wolsey became aware that King Henry favoured Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1195; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Articles against Wolsey were introduced to the House of Commons from the Lords. He confessed to the charges. He departed for Southwell in his diocese of York, but many of his household left him to enter the king's service. 1570, p. 1132; 1576, p. 969; 1583, p. 996.

Wolsey planned a grand enthronement at York without informing the king. The earl of Northumberland was given a commission by the king to arrest Thomas Wolsey at Cawood Castle and turn him over to the earl of Shrewsbury. Although Wolsey protested, he submitted to the arrest. He was taken to Sheffield Castle and placed in the keeping of Shrewsbury. 1570, pp. 1132-33; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 996.

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Sir William Kingston was sent to Sheffield Castle to take Wolsey to the Tower. Wolsey was ill, and Sir William treated him gently and made the journey in easy stages. Wolsey died at Leicester Abbey. 1570, p. 1133; 1576, p. 970; 1583, p. 996.

 
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Widow Denby

Widow of Colchester; absolved in 1528 [Fines]

Widow Denby, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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William (Mark) Cowbridge

(d. 1538); of Colchester [Fines]

William Cowbridge, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

Cowbridge went mad, was condemned by John Longland and burnt in Oxford. 1563, pp. 574-75; 1570, p. 1292; 1576, p. 1105; 1583, p. 1131.

 
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William Bull

of London; troubled in 1527-28

William Bull, along with many others, abjured. 1563, p. 419; 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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William Raylond

Tailor of St Botolph's, Colchester; then Ardleigh; then Holy Trinity, Colchester. Called to answer in 1528; as he had already abjured, he had to detect others before being absolved [Fines]

William Raylond, along with many others, abjured. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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William Wily

of Horkesley, Essex [Fines]; charged in 1532 with his parents, wife, brother and his wife; in prison at Fulham in 1534

William Wily, his wife, parents, brother and sister-in-law abjured in 1532. 1570, p. 1191; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1048.

 
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Bury St Edmunds

[St Edmundsbury; Berry; Bery]

West Suffolk

OS grid ref: TL 855 645

Contains a ruined abbey, the shrine of St Edmund

 
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Colchester
Colchester, Colchestre
NGR: TM 000 250

A borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 22 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. James, St. Martin, St. Mary at the Walls, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Rumwald and Holy Trinity within the walls; and St. Botolph, St. Giles, St. Leonard and St. Mary Magdalene without the walls; all in the archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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East Donyland Hall

Essex

OS grid ref: TM 025 205

 
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Kensington

London

OS grid ref: TQ 255 795

 
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Willesden

[Wilsdone; Wilsedon]

Middlesex, London

OS grid ref: TQ 225 845

1072 [1048]

K. Henry 8. A table of certaine persons abiured with their articles. Bayfilde accused.
Peter Fenne, Priest.
Iohn Turke.
Robert Best.
William Raylond of Colchester 
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William was a tailor of Colchester and one of the leaders of the local network of Lollards; see BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 19r and Strype, EM I, 1, pp.117-20 and 124-32.

.
Henry Raylond, his sonne.
Marion Mathew, or Westden.
Dorothe Long 
Commentary  *  Close

Of St. Giles, Colchester; see BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 19r and Strype, EM I, I, p. 116.

.
Thomas Parker 
Commentary  *  Close

See BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 19r and Strype, EM, I, I, pp. 121, 129, 132-3 and I, 2, p. 54.

. MarginaliaThis Parker was abiured 24. yeares before this.
Alyce Gardiner.
Iohn Tomson.
Ioh. Bradley, andof Colchester.
his wife.
Iohn Hubert of Estdoneland,
and his wife. 
Commentary  *  Close

Of East Donyland, ESSex. The case against the Huberts wasdismissed and they did not abjure (BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 19r and 30r).

M. Forman, Bacheler of Diui-
tie, Parson of Hony lane. 
Commentary  *  Close

Thomas Forman, the rector of All Hallows Honey Lane was one of the leading evangelicals in London and one of the capital's most popular preachers. He was also the head of a network disseminating heretical books in London and Cambridge (Susan Brigden, London and the Reformation [Oxford, 1982], pp. 112-115).

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Robert Necton 
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Robert Necton disseminated heretical literature throughout East Anglia, under the aegis of Thomas Forman. Necton abjured in 1528, but was re-arrested in 1531 and sent to Newgate (See Strype, EM, I, 2, pp. 62-3 and ThomasMore, The Confutation of Tyndale's Answer, ed. L. A. Schuster, R. C. Marius,J. P. Lusardi and R. J. Schoeck, CWTM8, 3 vols. [New Haven, CT, 1973], I, p. 18 and III, pp. 813-15).

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.
Katherine Swane 
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Of Colchester. See Strype, EM I, 1, pp. 121, 129 and 133.

.
Master Cowbrige, of Colche-
ster.
Wydow Denby 
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Of Colchester. See Strype, EM, I, 1, p. 129 and BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 30r.

.
Robert Hedill, of Colchester.
William Butcher, whose fathers
graundfather was burned
for the same Religion. 
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Edmund Tyball was John's brother and a churchwarden in Richard Foxe's church (Richard Foxe was the parish minister of Steeple Bumstead, Essex. He was a leading proponent of evangelical views in his parish and later informed on other evangelicals as part of his abjuration (BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 28r)). He would later abjure and denounce a number of Lollards in Colchester and its environs (Bl, Harley MS 421, fo. 28r-v; Strype, EM I, 1,p. 135 and I, 2, p. 56).

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Abraham Water, of Colchester.
Robert Wygge.
William Bull.
George Cooper.of London.
Iohn Toy, of S.
Fayth.
Richard Foster.
Sebastian Harrys, Curate of
Kensington.
Ex Regist. Lond.
¶ All these in this table contei-
ned, were troubled and abiu-
red. an. 1527. and 1528 
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Foxe's presentation of this material makes it appear that the Wilys were accused of all the charges listed and abjured in 1528. However, John Wily, the elder, possessed a copy of the examinations of William Thorpe and John Oldcastle, a work which was not printed until 1530. The date of 1532 is also given by Foxe in his account of the Wilys. The most likely explanation is that the Wilys wereaccused and abjured in 1528 and were charged again in 1532. The articles Foxe lists are from 1532.

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. MarginaliaAll these in this table were troubled & abiured, an. 1527. 1528.
Marginalia

Persōs abiured.

Anno. 1532.

Ioh. Wyly the elder.
Catherine Wyly, his
wife.
Io. Wyly, his sonne.
Christian Wyly, his
wife.
W. Wyly, his sonne.
Margaret Wyly, his
wife.
Lucy Wyly.
Agnes Wyly, two
yong gyrles.
An. 1532.
These eight persons were accu-
sed, an. 1532. for eating potage
and fleshmeate fiue yeares be-
fore, vpon S. Iames euen.
Also another time, vpon S.
Peters euen, as Catherine Wy-
ly dyd lye in childbed, the other
wiues, with the two gyrles,
were found eating altogether of
a brothe made with the fore part
of a racke of Mutton.
Item, the foresayd Iohn Wy-
ly the elder, had a Primmer in
English in his house, and other
bookes.
Also, he had a yong daughter
of tenne yeares olde,
which coulde render
by hart the most part
of the 24. Chapter of
S. Mathewe. Also,
could rehearse with-
out booke, the dispu-
tation betweene the
clarke and the Frier.
Item, the sayde
Iohn Wyly had in
hys house a treatise
of William Thorpe,
and Syr Iohn Old-
castle.
¶ A note of Richard Bayfilde aboue mentioned.

MEntion was made before of Richard Bayfild Monke of Bury, pag 1024. who in these perillous dayes, amongst other good Saincts of God, suffered death, as yee haue heard, but how and by whome he was detected, hath not bene shewed: which nowe in searching out of Registers, as we haue found, so we thought good heere to adioyne þe same with the words & confession of the same Edmund Peerson, which detected him in maner as foloweth. 

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The account of how Richard Bayfield (the articles charged against Bayfield, his answers to them, the sentence of degradation imposed on him and the letter to the mayor and sheriffs of London, are taken from a now lost court book of Bishop John Stokesley) was arrested almost certainly came from the same courtbooks that were Foxe's source for his main account of Bayfield. The fact that this account of Bayfield was not joined to the main narrative of Bayfield's narrative is an indication that Foxe's search through the diocese of London records was being made while the 1563 edition was being printed.

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The accusation of Edmund Peerson agaynst Bayfilde.

MarginaliaThe accusatiou of Edmund Person, agaynst Rich. Bayfilde.THe xiij. day of September at iiij. of the clocke at after noone, the yeare of our Lord. 1527. Sir Richard Bayfilde sayd that my Lord of Londons Commissary was a playne Pharisey, wherfore he would speake with him, and by his wholesome doctrine he trusted in God, hee shoulde make him a perfect Christen man and me also, for I was a Pharisey, as yet, he sayd.

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Also he sayde, that he cared not and if the Commissary and the Chauncellour heard him both, for the Chauncellour he sayd, was also a Pharisey, and trusted to make him a Christen man.

Also he sayd, he was entreated by his frends, and in maner constrayned to abyde in the Citie agaynst hys will, to make the Chauncellour and many moe, perfect Christen men, for as yet many were Phariseis, and knewe not the perfect declaration of the Scripture.

MarginaliaCommendation of Bilney and Arthur.Also he sayde, that M. Arthur and Bilney were and be more pure and more pefecter in their liuing to God, then was or is the Commissary, the Chauncellour, my Lord of London, or my Lord Cardinall.

Also he sayde, that if Arthur and Bilney suffer death in the and opinions that they be in, or hold, they shal be Martyrs before God in heauen.

Also he sayd, after Arthur and Bilney were put cruelly to death, yet should there be hundreths of men, that should preach the same that they haue preached.

Also he sayd, that he would fauour Arthur and Bilney, he knew their liuing to be so good: for they did weare no shyrtes of linnen cloth, but shyrts of heare, and euer were fasting, prayeng, or doing some other good deedes: and as for one of them, whatsoeuer he haue of money in his purse, he will distribute it for the loue of God, to poore people.

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Also he sayde, that no man should geue laud nor prayse in no maner of wise, to no creature, nor to no Saint in heauen, but only to God, Marginalia Tim. 1.Soli Deo honor & gloria, that is. To God alone be all honour and glory.

Also he sayd, ah good Sir Edmund, ye be farre from the knowledge and vnderstanding of the Scripture, for as yet ye be a Pharisey with many other of your company: but I trust in God I shall make you and many other mo, good and perfect Christen men ere I depart from the Citie, MarginaliaThe Godly courage of Rich Bayfilde.for I purpose to reade a common lecture euery day at S. Fosters Church, which lecture shall be to the edifyeng of your soules that be false Phariseys.

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Also he sayde, that Bilney preached nothing at Wilse-done, but that was true.

MarginaliaThe peoples offringes bestowed bestowed vppon harlots.Also he sayd, that Bilney preached true at Wilsedone, if he sayd that our Ladyes crowne of Wilsedone, her rings & beades, that were offered to her, were bestowed amongest harlots, by the Ministers of Christes Churche: for that haue I seene my selfe, he sayd, heere in London, and that will I abide by.

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Also he sayde, he did not feare to commen and argue in Arthur and Bilneys opinions and Articles, and if it were with my Lord Cardinall.

Also he sayd, that he would hold Arthur and Bilneys opinions and Articles, and abyde by them that they were true opinions, to suffer death therfore: I know them (said he) for so noble and excellent men in learning.

Also he sayde, if he were before my Lord Cardinall, hee would not let to speake to him, and to tell hym that he hath done nought in prisoning of Arthur and Bilney, whyche were better disposed in their liuings to God, then my Lord Cardinall, or my Lord of London, as holy as they make themselues.

Also he sayd, my Lord Cardinall is no perfect nor good man to God, for he keepeth not the Commaundements of God: for Christ (he said) neuer taught him to folow riches, nor to seeke for promotions nor dignities of this worlde, nor Christ neuer taught him to weare shoes of siluer and gilt, set with pearle and precious stones, MarginaliaThe Cardinals shooes. nor Christ had neuer ij. crosses of siluer, ij. axes, nor piller of siluer & gilt.

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Also he sayde, that euery Priest might preach the Gospell without licence of the Pope, my Lord Cardinall, my Lord of London, or any other man. And that would he abide by, and thus he verified it as it is written. Marke. 16. Euntes in mundum vniuersum prædicate Euangelium omni creaturæ. 

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Mark 16: 15.

Christ commaunded euery Priest to go foorth thoroughout all the worlde, and preache the word of God, by the authoritie of this Gospel, and not to runne to þe Pope, nor to no other man for licence, and that would hee abyde by, he sayd.

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Also he sayd: Wel Sir Edmund, say you what you will, and euery man, & my Lord Cardinall also, and yet will I say and abide by it, my Lord Cardinall doth punishe Arthur & Bilney vniustly, for there be no truer Christen men in all the world liuing, then they two be, and that punishment that my Lord Cardinall doth to them, he doth it by might and power, as who say, this maye I do, and thys will I do, who shall say nay, but he doth it of no iustice.

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Also, about the xiiij. day of October last past, at iij. of the clocke at after noone, Syr Richarde Bayfilde came to S. Edmunds in Lumbardstreete, where he founde me Syr Edmund Peerson, Sir Iames Smith, and Syr Myles Garnet, standing at the vttermost gate of the personage, & Syr Edmund sayd to Syr Richard Bayfilde: how many Christen men haue yee made since yee came to the Citie? Quoth Sir Richard Bayfilde, I came euen now to make thee a Christen man, and these two other Gentlemen with thee, for well I know ye be all three Phariseis, as yet.

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Also he sayd to Syr Edmund, that Arthur and Bilney were better Christen men then he was, or any of them that did punish Arthur and Bilney.

Per me Edmundum Peerson.
And
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