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Anne Boleyn

(c. 1500 - 1536) [ODNB]

Queen of England (1533 - 36); 2nd wife of Henry VIII; beheaded

While considering the question of the king's divorce, Cardinal Wolsey became aware that King Henry favoured Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1195; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Anne Boleyn was sent a copy of Simon Fish's Supplication for the Beggars. At the urging of her brother, she showed the book to the king. 1570, p. 448; 1570, p. 1153; 1576, p. 956; 1583, p. 1014.

Parliament approved Thomas Cranmer's separation of Henry and Catherine and his marriage to Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

Henry married Anne Boleyn. She, her father and her brother maintained many learned men at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, pp. 1025-26; 1583, p. 1054.

Anne was crowned and soon after gave birth to a daughter. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Anne had Hugh Latimer placed in the bishopric of Worcester and Nicholas Shaxton in the bishopric of Salisbury. 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

In 1536 parliament declared the marriage of the king and Queen Anne illegitimate and accused the queen of carnal relations with her brother and other men. 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

Anne was imprisoned in the Tower with her brother and others. She was beheaded, delivering a short address before. 1563, p. 526; 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

Catherine of Aragon died in the same year in which Anne Boleyn and William Tyndale were executed. 1570, p. 1232; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

Anne Boleyn is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

 
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Catherine of Aragon

(1485 - 1536) [ODNB]

Queen of England (1509 - 33); 1st consort of Henry VIII

After the death of Prince Arthur, his widow Catherine married his brother Henry. 1563, p. 456; 1570, p. 1192; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

When Catherine learned from the legates that they had been deputed to determine the matter of a divorce between the king and her, she composed an answer to them. She blamed Wolsey as the cause of the proposed divorce. 1563, pp. 456-57; 1570, pp. 1193-94; 1576, p. 1022; 1583, p. 1050.

Henry and Catherine were summoned to appear before the papal legates, Cardinals Wolsey and Campeggi, who had a commission to judge the matter of the divorce. Henry sent two proxies; Catherine arrived in person, accompanied by ladies and counsellors, including four bishops. She appealed from the cardinals to the pope. 1563, pp. 456-57; 1570, p. 1194; 1576, p. 1022; 1583, p. 1050.

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Parliament approved Thomas Cranmer's separation of Henry and Catherine and his marriage to Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

The archbishop of Canterbury (Cranmer), along with the bishops of London (Stokesley), Winchester (Gardiner), Bath and Wells (Clerk) and Lincoln (Longland) and other clergy went to see Queen Catherine. She failed to attend when summoned over 15 days, and they pronounced that she and the king were divorced. She appealed to the pope. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

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The duke of Suffolk was sent to Catherine of Aragon after her divorce from the king to reduce the size of her household, removing those who refused to serve her as princess rather than queen. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

Catherine of Aragon died in the same year in which Anne Boleyn and William Tyndale were executed. 1570, p. 1232; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

 
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John Fisher

(c. 1469 - 1535) [ODNB]

Vice-chancellor of Cambridge University (1501 - 1504); chancellor of Cambridge University (1504); bishop of Rochester (1504 - 34); cardinal; martyr

John Fisher preached a sermon at the penance of Robert Barnes. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1193.

Fisher preached a sermon against Luther in 1526. 1563, p. 436; 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, pp. 993-94.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

John Fisher was one of the chief advocates for Queen Catherine before the papal legates considering the matter of the divorce. 1563, p. 458; 1570, p. 1194; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Fisher protested in parliament in 1530 about the proposed bill relating to the probate of testaments, saying it would mean the ruin of the church. 1570, p. 1131; 1576, p. 968; 1583, p. 995.

Thomas Hitten was imprisoned by Archbishop Warham and Bishop Fisher, tortured and then burnt at Maidstone. 1570, p. 1134; 1576, p. 971; 1583, pp. 997-98.

The bishop of Rochester said that angels were ministers to the souls in purgatory. 1570, p. 1156; 1576, p. 990; 1583, p. 1017.

Fisher wrote against Johann Oecolampadius and Luther. He was a persecutor of John Frith. He and Sir Thomas More had Frith burnt. 1570, p. 1216; 1576, p. 1042; 1583, p. 1068.

Fisher was associated with Elizabeth Barton (Joan of Kent). He was convicted of misprision of treason, had his goods confiscated and was imprisoned. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1055.

John Fisher, Sir Thomas More and Nicholas Wilson refused to swear an oath on the king's supremacy and were imprisoned in the Tower. Fisher and More were executed. 1570, pp. 1200, 1216; 1576, pp. 1028, 1042; 1583, pp. 1056, 1068.

The pope promoted John Fisher to cardinal, but Fisher was executed before he could be elevated. 1570, p. 1216; 1576, p. 1042; 1583, p. 1069.

Fisher is one of the Catholic martyrs written of by Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 1375; 1576, p. 1173; 1583, p. 1201.

 
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Nicholas Wilson

(d. 1548) [ODNB]

Clergyman and religious activist; chaplain and confessor to Henry VIII; archdeacon of Oxford 1528; rector of St Thomas the Apostle, London 1531; active in proceedings against heretics; imprisoned (1534 - 37) until he swore the succession oath; dean of Wimborne Minster (1537 - 47)

Nicholas Wilson was present at the condemnation of James Bainham in 1532 and counselled and admonished him. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1002; 1583, p. 1029.

John Fisher, Sir Thomas More and Nicholas Wilson refused to swear an oath on the king's supremacy and were imprisoned in the Tower. Wilson eventually dissembled. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1028; 1583, p. 1056.

William Jerome preached a sermon in Lent at Paul's Cross. Wilson disputed with him. 1570, p. 1370; 1576, p. 1169; 1583, p. 1197.

 
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Sir Thomas More

(1478 - 1535) [ODNB]

Humanist, author. Studied at Oxford (1492 - 94); Lincoln Inn (1496 - 1501/2); joined king's council 1518; royal secretary (1521 - 26); lord chancellor (1529 - 32); strong opponent of heresy; martyr

Both Sir Thomas More and William Tyndale related the story of how Humphrey of Lancaster proved the miracle of the blind man regaining his sight at St Albans to be fraudulant. 1563, p. 883.

Thomas Cromwell, Thomas More and Stephen Gardiner served together in Thomas Wolsey's household. 1563, p. 592; 1570, p. 1347; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1178.

Thomas Wolsey, having obtained large sums from the king's treasury, went to the French court to contribute to the ransom of Clement VII, hiring soldiers and furnishing the French army. He took with him Cuthbert Tunstall, William Sandys, the earl of Derby, Sir Henry Guildford and Sir Thomas More. 1563, p. 439; 1570, p. 1123; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 988.

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More became chancellor after Thomas Wolsey was deprived of office. 1570, p. 1130; 1576, p. 968; 1583, p. 994.

Thomas Phillips was handed over by Sir Thomas More to Bishop Stokesley in 1530. As well as holding heretical opinions, Phillips was charged with having a copy of William Tracy's will and butter and cheese during Lent. He was examined by More and Stokesley. 1570, p. 1185; 1576, p. 1014; 1583, p. 1042.

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More was prevented from persecuting Simon Fish because the king had given him his signet, but he sent for Fish's wife to appear before him. She was saved from molestation because her daughter was ill with plague. 1570, p. 448; 1570, p. 1153; 1576, p. 987; 1583, p. 1014.

More wrote The Supplication of Purgatory in opposition to Simon Fish's Supplication for the Beggars. 1570, p. 1156; 1576, p. 990; 1583, p. 1017.

More intercepted and confiscated a consignment of protestant books sent to England by Richard Bayfield. 1563, p. 486; 1570, p. 1162; 1576, p. 994; 1583, p. 1022.

About four days before Bayfield was arrested, a boy of Colchester was charged in London with bringing books to him. The boy was imprisoned by Sir Thomas More and died there. 1570, p. 1189; 1576, p. 1017; 1583, p. 1046.

More examined John Tewkesbury, and sentence was pronounced in More's house. 1563, p. 493; 1570, p. 1167; 1576, p. 998; 1583, p. 1026.

More pursued John Frith in England and abroad and promised large rewards for news of him. 1563, p. 498; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

John Fisher and More had Frith burnt. 1570, p. 1216; 1576, p. 1042; 1583, p. 1068.

When the king heard of the exhumation and burning of William Tracy's corpse, he angrily sent for Sir Thomas More. More blamed the now deceased archbishop of Canterbury, but was fined three hundred pounds to have his pardon. 1570, p. 1186; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1042.

Bishop Stokesley complained to More of the behaviour of his clergy in objecting to contributing large sums to the lifting of the praemunire on the higher clergy. More had the mayor of London arrest and imprison a number of clergy and laymen. 1570, p. 1196; 1576, p. 1024; 1583, p. 1052.

The king sent More to speak to parliament, giving the opinion of the universities on the validity of the king's marriage to Catherine. 1563, p. 459.

Because More opposed the king's separation from the pope, he was deprived of the chancellorship. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1054.

William Tyndale mentioned the martyr Thomas Hitten in his Apology against Sir Thomas More and in The Practice of Prelates. 1570, p. 1134; 1576, p. 971; 1583, pp. 997-98.

In the preface to his book against Tyndale, More gave evidence that Thomas Bilney had recanted before his burning. 1570, p. 1146; 1576, p. 981; 1583, p. 1008.

John Fisher, Sir Thomas More and Nicholas Wilson refused to swear an oath on the king's supremacy and were imprisoned in the Tower. Fisher and More were executed. 1570, pp. 1200, 1216; 1576, pp. 1028, 1042; 1583, pp. 1056, 1068.

 
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Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1511; MA 1515; archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 56); burnt in 1556

Cranmer acknowledged the help he received from John Frith's book attacking the doctrine of Sir Thomas More. 1563, p. 500; 1570, p. 1176; 1576, p. 1006; 1583, p. 1033.

Thomas Cranmer, John Stokesley, Edward Carne, William Benet and the earl of Wiltshire were sent as ambassadors to the pope to dispute the matter of the king's marriage. 1570, p. 1280; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

Cranmer's separation of the king and Queen Catherine was authorised by parliament. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

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The archbishop of Canterbury (Cranmer), along with the bishops of London (Stokesley), Winchester (Gardiner), Bath and Wells (Clerk) and Lincoln (Longland) and other clergy went to see Queen Catherine. She failed to attend when summoned over 15 days, and they pronounced that she and the king were divorced. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

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Cranmer was godfather to Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Cranmer was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Cranmer attended a synod in 1537 with other bishops and learned men and with Thomas Cromwell as vicar-general. Cranmer opposed retaining the seven sacraments. He gave an oration to the bishops. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

On the second day of the synod, Thomas Cranmer sent his archdeacon to command Alexander Alesius to cease from disputation. 1570, p. 1353; 1576, p. 1155; 1583, p. 1184.

John Lambert attended a sermon preached by John Taylor at St Peter's in London in 1538. Lambert put ten articles to him questioning transubstantiation. Taylor conferred with Robert Barnes, who persuaded Taylor to put the matter to Archbishop Cranmer. Cranmer called Lambert into open court, where he was made to defend his cause. 1563, pp. 532-33; 1570, pp. 1280-81; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

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Cranmer disputed with Lambert at his trial before the king. 1563, pp. 534-35; 1570, p. 1282; 1576, pp. 1096-97; 1583, p. 1122.

Thomas Cranmer alone disputed the Six Articles in parliament. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1110; 1583, p. 1136.

The king sent Thomas Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

Henry asked for a summary of Cranmer's objections to the Six Articles. Cranmer asked his secretary to write up a copy of his arguments against the Six Articles to give to the king.1570, p. 1355; 1576, p. 1157; 1583, p. 1185.

Adam Damplip was brought before Thomas Cranmer, Stephen Gardiner, Richard Sampson and others and examined. The next day, warned by Cranmer that he was likely to be imprisoned and burnt, he fled to the West Country. 1563, p. 657; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1224.

Thomas Broke, Ralph Hare, James Cocke and James Barber were sent from Calais with their accusers to England to be examined by Cranmer, Gardiner, Sampson and other bishops. 1563, p. 661; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1195; 1583, p. 1224.

King Henry wrote to Archbishop Cranmer, ordering that idolatrous images be removed from churches. 1563, p. 625; 1570, p. 1385; 1576, p. 1181; 1583, p. 1210.

For a long period, Henry VIII denied his daughter Mary the title of princess. Thomas Cranmer urged a reconciliation. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1396.

When Claude d'Annebault, the French ambassador, went to see Henry VIII at Hampton Court, lavish entertainment was laid on for him, but he was recalled before he had received half of it. During the course of the banquet, he had private conversation with the king and Archbishop Cranmer about the reform of religion in the two countries. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

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Cranmer had sent letters for Henry VIII to sign relating to reform in the church. Gardiner convinced the king that these reforms would jeopardise a league with the king of France and the emperor, so the letters were never signed. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

The young Prince Edward wrote letters in Latin to Thomas Cranmer, his godfather. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

Cranmer praised the learning and wisdom of Prince Edward to his tutor, Richard Coxe. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Richard Coxe wrote to Thomas Cranmer, praising the young Prince Edward. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

When King Henry was on his deathbed, Anthony Denny asked him if he wished a spiritual adviser, and he asked for Thomas Cranmer. Before Cranmer could arrive, however, the king had lost the power of speech. He clasped Cranmer's hand, and shortly after died. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

After the death of Henry VIII, the duke of Suffolk related to Thomas Cranmer how Stephen Gardiner had nearly been arrested at the time of the execution of Germaine Gardiner. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

Cranmer had great difficulty in getting King Edward to sign Joan Bocher's death warrant. 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Charles V requested of Edward VI that his cousin Mary Tudor be allowed to have the mass said in her house. The request was denied, in spite of the strong urgings of Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Thomas Dobbe was brought before Cranmer, who committed him to the Counter, where he died. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to all the other bishops to inform them of the new directive. 1563, pp. 685, 691; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

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The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Cranmer, with other learned bishops and learned men, was appointed to draw up a uniform order of common prayer. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Stephen Gardiner wrote to Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley while imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 732-54; 1570, p. 1522; 1576, p. 1297; 1583, p. 1340.

Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, Nicholas Ridley, bishop of Rochester, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May, dean of St Paul's, were commissioned to examine Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 697; 1570, p. 1504; 1576, p. 1275; 1583, p. 1312.

Bonner was summoned to appear before the commissioners. He behaved haughtily, ridiculing his accusers and the commissioners, and spoke in favour of the mass. He appeared first on 10 September 1549 before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre and William May. Sir Thomas Smith was absent. 1563, pp. 698-99; 1570, pp. 1504-06; 1576, pp. 1275-77; 1583, pp. 1312-14.

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Bonner appeared for the second time on 13 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May and was further examined. 1563, pp. 699-704; 1570, pp. 1506-08; 1576, pp. 1277-79; 1583, pp. 1314-17.

Bonner appeared for the third time on 16 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir Thomas Smith and William May to answer the articles put to him at the previous session. John Hooper and William Latymer also appeared in order to purge themselves against the slanders of Bonner. 1563, pp. 704-709; 1570, pp. 1508-11; 1576, pp. 1279-80; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

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Bonner appeared before the commissioners for the fourth time on 18 September, at which session new articles were drawn up and new witnesses received. 1563, pp. 704-710; 1570, pp. 1508-12; 1576, pp. 1279-81; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

Bonner appeared for the fifth time before the commissioners on 20 September. During an interval, he instructed Gilbert Bourne, his chaplain, Robert Warnington, his commissary, and Robert Johnson, his registrar, to tell the mayor and aldermen of London to avoid reformed preachers. Bonner made his first appellation to the king. As a result of his behaviour during the proceedings, he was committed to the Marshalsea. 1563, pp. 713-717; 1570, pp. 1513-16; 1576, pp. 1282-85; 1583, pp. 1324-26.

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Bonner appeared for the sixth time before the commissioners on 23 September, when he presented a general recusation against all the commissioners and a second appellation to the king. A letter was read from Bonner to the mayor of London, Henry Amcottes, and aldermen. 1563, pp. 717-18; 1570, p. 1516; 1576, p. 1285; 1583, pp. 1326-27.

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Bonner' seventh appearance before the commissioners took place on 1 October. He presented a declaration, an appellation and a supplication to the king. The commissioners pronounced their sentence definitive. Bonner was imprisoned and deprived of his office. 1563, pp. 718-26; 1570, pp. 1516-19; 1576, pp. 1285-88; 1583, pp. 1327-30.

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Cranmer was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

1080 [1056]

K. Henry. The Kinges Proclamation for the abolishing of the Pope out of England.

as Princesse onely, and not as Queene. Of whome some sayd they were once sworne to serue her as Queene, and otherwise would not serue, and so were dismissed. The other which were sworne to serue her as Princesse she vtterly refused for her seruants, and so she remayned wyth the fewer, liuing after this about the space of two yeares. 

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Foxe's timing is a little off here as Catherine was moved on (although not a great distance away) to Kimbolton in May 1534.

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¶ The abolishing of the Pope out of England. 
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Royal Supremacy

Foxe's account of the monumental acts of the Reformation Parliament necessarily focused on the 'aboliyshing of the vsurped power and iurisdiction of the bishop of Rome' rather than the establishment of the royal supremacy. The marginal gloss to the 1563 edition, however, provides the key to later historians' interpretations of these events: 'The kinge proclaimed Supreme head by act of parliament'. By the 1570 edition, however, Foxe's marginal glosses subtly altered the message to meet an anticipated objection about the status of a proclamation: 'The stile of supreme head annexed to the crowne of England' adding, for good measure: 'The popes name and memory abolished'. There were other, even more substantial changes wrought by Foxe in this passage as between the 1563 edition and its successors. In 1563, he had said almost nothing about the other, more detailed but substantial measures that accompanied the famous proclamation and which had been turned into statutes by the Reformation Parliament. In 1570, Foxe was anxious to furnish much more substantive detail on the acts in restraint of appeals, payments to Rome, the forbidden degrees, etc. Wherever possible, Foxe also substantially increased the discussion of the ecclesiastical authorities which had supported these political changes, and their scriptural and other grounds for doing so. In the process, Foxe strengthened the impression in his text that these were changes which overthrew a usurpation, justified by law and scripture.

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Andrew ChibiUniversity of Leicester

MarginaliaAnno. 1534.THese thinges thus finished and dispatched concerning the mariage of Queene Anne, and diuorce of Lady Katherine Dowager, next followeth the yeare 1534. In the which was assembled the hye Court 

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The fourth session of the so-called Reformation parliament assembled on the 4th February 1534. Foxe refers here to what became known as the 'first Act of Succession' (25 Henry VIII, c.22), passed in March, which included a necessary oath.

of Parliamēt againe after many prorogations, vpon the third day of February, wherein was made an Acte of succession, for the more suretie of the crowne, to the which euery person being of lawfull age, should be sworne. MarginaliaPreaching against the Pope.During this Parliament time, euery Sonday preached 
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The sermons at St Paul's Cross (the outdoor pulpit set in St Paul's churchyard) to which Foxe refers must have been those of Stokesley (26 April 1534) and John Hilsey, bishop of Rochester (early December 1534). [See Millar Maclure, The Paul's Cross Sermons, 1534-1642 (Toronto, 1958), pp.184-5].

at Paules crosse a Byshop, which declared the Pope not to be head of the Church.

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MarginaliaEx Edw. Hallo.After this, Commissions were sent ouer all England, to take the othe of all men and women, to the Act of succession. At which, few repined, except D. Iohn Fisher, bishop of Rochester 

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Fisher refused to swear on 26 April 1534 and was sent to the Tower as a result.

, sir Tho. More 
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More refused to swear on 13 April 1534 and was sent to the Tower as a result.

late Lord Chancellor, and D. Nicholas Wilson 
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Wilson refused the oath on 13 April along with some other friars of the Charterhouse.

, parson of S. Thomas Apostles in Lōdon. Wherfore these 3. persons, after long exhortatiō to thē made by þe Byshop of Canterbury at Lambeth, refusing to be sworne, were sent to the Tower, MarginaliaThe Byshop of Rochester, & Sir Tho. More, sent to the tower. where they rrmained, & were oftentimes motioned to be sworne: but the Bishop and sir Tho. More excused thē by their writings, in which they sayd, that they had written before the sayd Lady Katherine to be Queene, & therfore could not well go frō that which they had written. MarginaliaFysher byshop of Rochester, Sir Tho. More, refuse to be sworne. Likewise the Doctor excused, that he in preaching had called her Queene, and therefore now coulde not withsay it againe: Howbeit at length he was well contented to dissemble þe matter, & so escaped: but the other two stoode agaynst all the Realme in their opinion.

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From the moneth of Marche 

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The fifth session of the so-called Reformation parliament was prorogued from 30 March 1534. The sixth session began on 3 November 1534.

this Parliament farthermore was proroged to the iij. day of Nouemb. abouesaid. At what time, amongst other diuers statutes, most graciously and by the blessed wil of God it was enacted, that the Pope, and all his colledge of the Cardinals, with his pardōs, Indulgences, which so long had clogged this Realme of England, to the miserable slaughter of so many good men, & which neuer could be remoued away before, was now abolished 
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Foxe is probably referring here to the Act extinguishing the authority of the bishop of Rome of 1536 (28 Henry VIII, c.10) which may indicate a slight confusion of dates.

, eradicate, & exploded out of this land, & sent home againe to their owne countrey of Rome, from whence they came, God be euerlastingly praysed therefore, Amen.

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¶ An Acte 
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This is the text of the 1534 Act concerning the King's Highness to be Supreme Head of the Church of England (26 Henry VIII, c.1).

concerning the Kings highnes to be the supreme head of the Church of England, and to haue authoritie to reforme and redresse all errours, heresies,and abuses in the same. Cap. I.

ALbeit the Kings Maiesty iustly and rightfully is and ought to be the supreme head of the Church of England, and so is recognised by the Clergy of this Realme in their Conuocations, yet neuerthelesse for corroboration & confirmation thereof, and for encrease of vertue in Christes Religion within this Realme of England, and to represse & extirpe all errours, heresies, and other enormities & abuses heretofore vsed in the same: be it enacted by authoritie of this presēt Parliamēt, þt the king our soueraigne Lord, his heires & successours, Kings of this Realme, shal be taken, accepted, & reputed þe only supreme head in earth of þe Church of England, called Anglicana ecclesia, and shall haue & enioy annexed and vnited to the Imperial crowne of this realme, as wel þe title & style therof, as all honours, dignities, preeminences, iurisdictiōs, priuiledges, authorities, immunites, profites, and commodities to the sayd dignitie of supreme head of the same Church belonging & apperteining: and þt our sayd soueraigne Lord, his heires & successours, Kings of this Realme, shal haue full power and authority from time to time, to visite, represse, redresse, reforme, order, correct, restraine, and amend all suche errours, abuses, offences, contemptes & enormities, whatsoeuer they be, which by any maner of spirituall authoritie or iurisdiction ought or may lawfully be reformed, repressed, ordered, redressed, corrected, restrained, or amended, most to the pleasure of almighty God, the encrease of vertue in Christes religiō, and for the conseruation of þe peace, vnitie, and tranquillity of this realme, any vsage, custome, forreine lawes, forreine authoritie, prescription or any thing or things, to the contrary heereof notwithstanding.

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The Kings Proclamation, for the abolishing of the vsurped power of the Pope. 
Commentary  *  Close

Wilkins (Concilia, iii, pp.772-3) dates this proclamation to 1534 whereas Foxe dates it to 1535. Henry refers to the act of supremacy and other related acts in the proclamation, so Foxe's date is correct.

MarginaliaThe kinges proclamatiō against the Pope.TRustie and welbeloued, we greete you well, and where as not onely vpon good and iust and vertuous groundes and re-spects, edified vpon the lawes of holy Scripture, by due consultation, deliberation, aduisement, and consent, as well of all other our nobles and commons temporall, as also spirituall assembled in our high Court of Parliament, and by authoritie of the same, we haue by good and wholesome lawes and statutes, made for thys purpose, extirped, abolished, separated, and secluded out of this our Realme, the abuses of the Byshop of Rome, his authoritie and iurisdiction of long time vsurped, as well vpon vs and our Realme, as vpon all other Kings and Princes and their Realmes (lyke as they themselues haue confessed and affirmed) but also for as much as our sayde Nobles and Commons both spirituall and temporall, assembled in our high Court of Parliament, haue vpon good, lawfull, and vertuous groundes, and for the publicke weale of this our Realme, by one whole assent, graunted, annexed, knit, and vnited to the Crowne Imperiall 

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The claim to imperial authority was developed as a result of the campaign to abolish papal supremacy from about 1531 although a statutory claim is not made to this effect until the Act in Restraint of Appeals of 1533 (24 Henry VIII, c.12).

of the same, the title, dignitie, MarginaliaThe stile of supreame head annexed to the crowne of England.and style of supreme head or gouernour in earth immediately vnder God of the Church of England, as we be, and vndoubtedly haue hetherto bene, which title and style both the Byshops and Cleargie 
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The clergy of southern convocation (as a corporate entity) agreed to the king's new titles on 22 January 1532 while those of northern convocation agreed on 4 May [for which, see Wilkins, iii, p.744; L&P, iv/iii, no.6047 (iii); Public Records Office, State Papers 1/56, fols.84-7v]. Individual subscriptions began in the aftermath of the passage of the Act of Supremacy in 1534 (26 Henry VIII, c.1).

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of this our Realme, haue not only in conuocation, assembled, consented, recognised, and approoued lawfully and iustly to apperteyne vnto vs, but also by word, othe, profession and writing vnder their signes and seales, haue confessed, ratified, corroborated and confirmed the same, vtterly renouncing all other othes and obedience to any other foreyne Potentates, and all foreine iurisdictions and powers, as well of the sayd Byshop of Rome, as of all other whatsoeuer they be, as by their sayd professions and writings corroborated with the subscription of their names, and apension of their seales, more playnely appeareth: We let you witte, that calling to our remembrance the power, charge, and commission geuen vnto vs of Almighty God, and vpon a vehement loue and affection toward our louing and faithfull subiectes, perceiuing right well what greate rest, quietnes, and tranquilitie of conscience, and manyfold other commodities might insurge and arise vnto them, if that the sayde Byshops and other of the Cleargy of this our Realme, should set foorth, declare and preach to them the true and sincere worde of God, and without all maner colour, dissimulation and hypocrisie, manifest and publish the great and innumerable enormities and abuses which the sayde Byshop of Rome, as well in the title and style, as also in authoritie and iurisdiction of long time vnlawfully and vniustly hath vsurped vpon vs and our progenitours, and also other Christen Princes: haue therefore adressed our letters vnto the Byshop of the dioces, straightly charging and commaunding him in the same, that not onely he in his owne proper person, shall declare, teach, and preach vnto the people forthwith vpon the receat of our sayd letters vnto him directed, euery Sonday and other high feastes through the yeare, the true, meere, and sincere word of God, and that the same title, stile, and iurisdiction of supreme head, apperteineth only to our Crowne and dignitie Royall, likewise as the sayd Byshop and all other the Byshops of our Realme, haue by othe affirmed and confirmed by subscription of their names, and setting to their seales, bnt also geue warning, monition and charge to al maner Abbots, Priours, Deanes, Archdeacons, Prouosts, Parsons, Vicares, Curates, and all other Ecclesiasticall persons, within his sayd diocesse, as well to teache, preach, publish, and declare in all maner Churches, our foresayde iust title, style, and iurisdiction, euery Sonday and high feast thorough the yeare, and fnther to monish and commaund all other Scholemaysters within his sayd diocesse, to instruct and teach the same vnto the children committed vnto them, as also to cause all maner prayers, orizons, rubrickes, Canons of Masse bookes, and all other bookes in the Churches, wherein the sayde Byshop of Rome is named, or his presumptuous and proud pompe and authoritie preferred, vtterly to be abolished, eradicate, and rased out, MarginaliaThe Popes name and memorye abolished.and his name and memory to be neuer more (except to hys contumely and reproch) remembred, but perpetually suppressed and obscured: and finally to desist and leaue out all such Articles as be in the generall sentence, which is vsually accustomed to be read four times in the yeare, and do tende to the glory and aduancemēt of the Bishop of Rome, his name, title, and iurisdiction.

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Whereupon we esteeming and reputing you to be of such singular and vehement zeale and affection toward the glory of Almighty God, and of so faythfull, louing, and obedient harte towards vs, as ye will not only do and accomplish with all power, wisedome, diligence and labour, whatsoeuer should or might be to the preferment and serting forwarde of Gods worde, but also practise, studie, and endeuour your selfe, with all your pollicie, wit, power, and good will, to amplifie, defend, and mayntayne all such interest, right, title, stile, iurisdiction, and authoritie, as is in any wise apertaining vnto vs, our dignity, prerogatiue, & crowne imperiall of this our Realme, haue thought good & expediēt, not only to signifie vnto you by these our letters, the particularities of the charge, monition, and commaundement geuen by vs vnto the sayd Byshop, as before is specified, but also to require, and straightly charge and commaund you, vpon payne of your allegeance, and as ye shall anoyde our high indignation and displeasure at your vttermost perill, laieng apart all vayne affections, respects, or other carnall considerations, and setting onely before

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