Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Banaster (Banestre)

of Paternoster Row, London; brother-in-law of John Butler

Banaster had lent his shirt to John Butler when he was brought to England to answer charges of heresy and was present at his examination. 1570, p. 1403; 1576, p. 1196; 1583, p. 1226.

Banaster solicited the king for the release of John Butler and stood surety for him, along with Sir Leonard Musgrave. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Brian Darley

(d. 1527) [Emden]

BA Cambridge 1490; DTh Turin by 1505; rector of St Mary's church, Calais 1509; commissary for Archbishop Warham

William Button was brought before Brian Darley for having had a confrontation with a friar selling papal indulgences. When Button insulted the Dominicans and made further offensive remarks, Darley made him do public penance and had his wages taken away. 1570, p. 1408; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1230.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Daniel

Curate of St Peter's, Calais

Adam Damplip was sent to the mayor's prison in Calais along with John Butler and the curate Daniel. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1199; 1583, p. 1229.

After the execution of Damplip, Massie returned to England with John Butler and Daniel the curate, who were imprisoned in the Marshalsea. They stayed there nine months until, with Butler's brother-in-law and Sir Leonard Musgrave standing surety, they were released and eventually allowed to return to Calais. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dodde

Scotsman of Calais; scholar; burnt for heresy in Calais

Dobbs came to Calais from Germany and brought books with him. He refused to recant and was burnt. 1570, p. 1408; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Harvey

(d. 1541) Commissary in Calais 1539, replacing John Butler; convicted of treason; hanged, drawn and quartered in Calais

Robert Harvey called a poor labouring man in Calais a heretic and said that he would die a vile death. Harvey himself was executed for treason within six months. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Baker

(c. 1489 - 1558) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Judge, administrator; MP London 1529, 1536; MP Guildford, 1542; MP Lancaster 1545; MP Huntingdonshire 1547; MP Bramber 1553; MP Kent 1554

Attorney-general (1536 - 40); chancellor of the exchequer (1540 - 58); speaker of the House (1545, 1547)

Sir John Baker was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Baker was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

After the execution of Adam Damplip in Calais, John Butler and Daniel the curate were taken to England and imprisoned in the Marshalsea. They stayed there nine months and were accused of having retained Damplip by Sir John Gage, Sir John Baker and Sir Thomas Arundel. [NB: Sir John Gage is named as Sir George Gage in the 1576 and 1583 editions.] 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

[Back to Top]

Before Henry VIII gave his oration to parliament in 1545, the speaker of the House of Commons, Sir John Baker, gave an eloquent oration to the king. 1570, p. 1412; 1576, p. 1203; 1583, p. 1233.

Richard Rich and Sir John Baker went to Anne Askew in the Tower and tried to get her to incriminate others. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Sir John Baker was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

[Back to Top]

Sir John Baker was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 826.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Gage

(1479 - 1556) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Military administrator, courtier; constable of the Tower (1540 - 56); lord chamberlain (1533 - 56); JP Sussex (1514 - 56); JP Surrey (1528 - 56); comptroller of Calais (1524 - 26); MP Sussex (1529, 1539, 1542, 1545)

John Gage was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

Gage beat the shackled Calais prisoners as they boarded the ship for England. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

After the execution of Adam Damplip in Calais, John Butler and Daniel the curate were taken to England and imprisoned in the Marshalsea. They stayed there nine months and were accused of having retained Damplip by Sir John Gage, Sir John Baker and Sir Thomas Arundel. [NB: Sir John Gage is named as Sir George Gage in the 1576 and 1583 editions.] 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

[Back to Top]

Sir John Gage was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Leonard Musgrave

Sir Leonard Musgrave solicited the king for the release of John Butler and stood surety for him, along with Butler's brother-in-law Banaster. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Ralph Ellerker

(in or before 1489 - 1546) [ODNB]

Soldier; marshal of Calais 1542; marshal of Boulogne 1544; killed in a French ambush

At the execution of Adam Damplip, Sir Ralph Ellerker would not allow him to make a declaration, but told the executioner to kill him immediately. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

Ellerker was killed in a skirmish with the French, and his body was afterwards mutilated. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Button (alias Crossbowmaker)

Soldier of Calais, later Herne, Kent; king's servant; charged in 1539; abjured; appealed to the king, reinstated in his position [Fines]

William Button was brought before Brian Darley for having had a confrontation with a friar selling papal indulgences. When Button insulted the Dominicans and made further offensive remarks, Darley made him do public penance and had his wages taken away. Button appealed to the king, who sent him back to Calais with his wages increased. 1563, p. 669; 1570, p. 1408; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1230.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Mote

Parson of Our Lady church, Calais, at time of Damplip's execution 1543

The day before Damplip's execution, William Mote informed him that his four quarters would be hung at four different parts of the town. He preached at the execution, accusing Damplip of treason and of holding seditious doctrine. 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Warham

(c. 1450 - 1532) [ODNB]

Studied at Oxford; lawyer in Oxford and London; diplomat

Bishop of London (1502 - 04); keeper of the great seal (1502 - 04); archbishop of Canterbury (1504 - 32); lord chancellor (1504 - 15); chancellor of the University of Oxford (1506 - 32)

William Carder, Agnes Grebill and Robert Harrison were tried for heresy in 1511 before William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, Gabriel Sylvester, Thomas Wells and Clement Browne. All three were condemned to burn. Warham had brought in witnesses who had already abjured and would therefore tell everything they knew lest they be found guilty of relapse. 1570, pp. 1454-55; 1576, p. 1240; 1583, pp. 1276-77.

[Back to Top]

Thomas Wolsey caused his cardinal's hat, when it arrived, to be taken back to Dover so that the archbishop of Canterbury could greet it. 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

Warham was one of the supporters of Queen Catherine before the papal legates considering the matter of the divorce. 1563, p. 458; 1570, p. 1193; 1576, p. 1022; 1583, p. 1050.

In a letter to Juan de Vergara, Erasmus of Rotterdam described how, after the downfall of Thomas Wolsey, Warham was offered the chancellorship but declined due to his advanced years. 1570, p. 1130; 1576, p. 968; 1583, p. 994.

Thomas Hitten was imprisoned by Archbishop Warham and Bishop Fisher, tortured and then burnt at Maidstone. 1570, p. 1134; 1576, p. 971; 1583, pp. 997-98.

Thomas Wolsey, William Warham, Cuthbert Tunstall, John Fisher, Nicholas West, John Veysey, John Longland, John Clerk and Henry Standish took part in the examination of Thomas Bilney and Thomas Arthur in 1527-28. 1563, pp. 461-78; 1570, pp. 1134-46; 1576, pp. 971-81; 1583, pp. 998-1008.

William Tracy's will was sent to the Archbishop Warham to be proved. It contained reformed sentiments, and Warham brought it to the convocation. Tracy's body was exhumed and burnt. 1570, p. 1185; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1042.

John Lambert was brought from Antwerp to London, where he was examined before Archbishop Warham and others. Forty-five articles were put to him which he answered. Warham then died and Lambert was unbothered for a time. 1563, pp. 528, 533-69; 1570, pp. 1255-80; 1576, pp. 1075-1095; 1583, pp. 1101-21.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Boulogne-sur-Mer (Bonen: Flemish)

[Bullen; Boleyne; Bollayn; Bullenburgh]

Pas-de-Calais, France

Coordinates: 50° 43' 28" N, 1° 36' 43" E

1253 [1229]

K. Hen. 8. The burning of Adam Damlip, Will. Steuens, Dod burned in Callice.

I haue ben Gods prisoner so long in the Marshalsey, and haue not yet learned to dye? Yes, yes, and I doubt not but God will strengthen me therein. Ex litteris Ioa. Marbecki.

MarginaliaAdam Damlip brought to Calice to suffer.And so vpon Monday early in the morning before day, the keeper with iij. other of the Knight Marshalles seruaunts, setting out of London, conueyed the sayde Adam Damlyp vnto Calice vpon the Ascension euen, and there committed him to the Maiors prison. 

Commentary  *  Close

Damplip and Butler were ordered to be sent to Calais on 22 April 1543 (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18). In 1543, the eve of Ascension Day would have been 19 May.

Vpon whiche daye Iohn Butler the Commissary aforesayd, and Syr Daniell his Curate of S. Peters, were also committed to the same prison, and commandement geuen no man to speake with Butler.

[Back to Top]

Vpon Saterday next 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., 22 May 1543.

was the day of execution for Damlyp. The cause whiche firste they layd to his charge, was for heresie. But because by an acte of Parliamente, all suche offences done before a certayne daye, were pardoned (through which Acte he could not be burdened with anye thing that he had preached or taught before) yet for the receiuing of the foresayd French crowne of Cardinall Pole, (as you heard before) he was condemned of treason, and in Calice cruelly put to death, being drawne, hanged, and quartered. 
Commentary  *  Close

The fact that Damplip was executed for treason, instead of heresy, is revealing. It may have been an early indication that the 'Prebendaries' Plot would fail and also that Butler would be released. It is also ironic that Damplip was executed on the same charge that brought down Lord Lisle and Germain Gardiner (although Foxe is unclear about this, the men were executed for alledgedly conspiring with Reginold Pole. In reality, their executions were part of the factional struggles at Court in 1543-44.).

[Back to Top]

[Back to Top]

The death and Martyrdome of Damlyp.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Adam Damplip, alias George Bucker, sometime 'great papist' and chaplain to Bishop Fisher, became a well received evangelical preacher, favoured by Lord Lisle in Calais. The authorities, however, caught up with him and he fetched up in the Marshalsea prison (thanks to Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester) and there met John Marbeck. Having been helped to escape, he was caught again a few years later (Bishop Gardiner being 'diligent' in pursuit), and condemned for treason. Foxe's woodcut portrays Damplip beneath the gallows on which he was hung. The man shown cutting his heart out , Sir Ralph Ellerker, later suffered this awful fate himself -- 'a terrible example to all bloody and merciless men'. CUL copy has blood detail plus additional flames and foliage added, as well as some metallic paint detail at the bottom, which may once have been silver.

The daye before his execution, came vnto hym one M. Mote, then person of our Lady Church of Calice, saying: your foure quarters shall be hanged at four partes of the towne. And where shall my head be, sayd Damlip? Vpon the Lanterne gate, said Mote. MarginaliaThe constant courage of Adam Damlip, not caring for his death.Then Damlip answeared, Then shall I not neede to prouide for my buriall. At hys death, Sir Rafe Ellerker Knight, then knight Marshall there, would not suffer the innocent & godly mā, to declare either his faith, or the cause he died for, but sayd to the executioner, dispatch the knaue, haue done. For sir Wil. Mote appointed there to preache, declared to the people how he had bene a sower of seditious doctrine, and albeit he was for þt pardoned by the generall pardon, yet he was cōdemned for being a traytor against the king. MarginaliaDamlip falsly accused of treason, & innocently put to death. To the which whē Adam Damlip would haue replied & purged himselfe, the foresaid Sir Rafe Ellerker would not suffer him to speake a word, but commanded him to be had away. And so most meekely, patiently, and ioyfully, the blessed and innocent Martyr tooke his death, sir Rafe Elerker saying, that he would not away before he saw the traytors hart out. But shortly after the sayd Sir Rafe Ellerker in a skirmishe or roade betweene the Frenchmen and vs, at Bullayne was among other slayne. MarginaliaAn example of Gods iust reuengment.Whose onely death sufficed not his enemies, but after they had stripped him starke naked, they cut off his priuie members, and cut the hart out of his bodye, and so leaft him a terrible example to all bloudy and mercilesse men. For no cause was knowne, why they shewed such indignation against the saide sir Rafe Ellerker, more then against the rest, but that it is written: Faciens iustitias Dominus & iudicia omnibus iniuria pressis.

[Back to Top]

As touching Ioh. Butler, and sir Daniel his Curate, imprisoned (as ye heard) the same day with Damlip, vponSonday next following, they were cōmitted to Io. Massy aforesayd, keeper of the Marshalsey, MarginaliaAn other trouble of Iohn Butler, and Syr Daniell his Curate.and his company, and brought to the Marshalsey, where he continued and his Curate nine moneths and more. At last being sore laid vnto by Sir George Gage, Sir Iohn Baker, and Sir Thomas Arundell knightes, but especially by Steuen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester, for þe reteining of Adam Damlip, yet by friendes soliciting the Kings highnes for him, (namely sir Leonard Musgraue, and his brother Baunster, who were bounde for his appearance in a thousande pound) he at length by great labour and long time was discharged, and at last by licence permitted to returne to Calice againe. 

Commentary  *  Close

John Butler was released, made a royal chaplain and given additional benefice (he had already held two) in Calais in September 1543. He would become commissary of Calais again under Edward VI (Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven and London, 1996], p. 315).

Ex scripto testimonio Caletiensium. MarginaliaEx scripto testimonio Caletiensiū.

[Back to Top]

Furthermore, as touching William Steuens aboue mentioned, who remained all this while prisoner in the Tower, the same was also condemned with Adam Damlip of treason, which was for note and crime of Popery, MarginaliaW. Steuens an earnest Protestant falsly condemned for Poperye. in lodging Adam Damlip, which came from Cardinal Poole the traytor, in his house, at the Lord Deputies commaundement. Notwithstanding the King afterwarde vnderstanding more of the said William Steuens, how innocent he was from that crime, being knowne to all men to be an earnest and zelous Protestant, gaue him his pardon, MarginaliaW. Steuens with the rest pardoned by the king. and sent him home againe to Calice, and so likewise all the other thirteene aboue mentioned.

[Back to Top]
The story of a poore labouring man in Calyce.

MarginaliaA poore mā burned at Calice for the right faith of the Sacrament.BY the credible information & writing of the said Calyce men, which were then in trouble, it is reported of a certaine poore laboring mā of Calice, who after the preaching of Adam Damlyp, being in certaine company, said, that he would neuer beleeue, that a priest coulde make the Lordes body at his pleasure. Wherupon he was then accused, and also condemned by one Haruey Commissary there. Which Haruey in time of his iudgement inueying against hym, with opprobrious words, sayd, that he was an heretike, & should die a vile death. The poore man (whose name yet I haue not certainly learned) answering for himselfe againe, saide, that hee was no hereticke, but was in the fayth of Christ. And where as thou sayest (said he) that I shall dye a vile death, thou thy selfe shalt dye a viler death, and that shortly, and so it came to passe: MarginaliaA notable example of Gods iudgement vpon a bloudy persecuter.for within halfe a yeare after, the said Haruey was hanged, drawne, and quartered for treason in the sayd towne of Calice. 

Commentary  *  Close

Robert Harvey, Butler's replacement as commissary of Calais, was executed for treason in the spring of 1541.

[Back to Top]
An other history of one Dodde a Scottish man, burned in Calice.

AFter the burning of this poore man, there was also an other certaine scholer, counted to be a Scottish man, named Dodde, MarginaliaOne Dodde burned in Calice. who cōming out of Germany, was there taken with certaine Germane bookes about him, and being examined thereupon, and standing constantly to the truth that hee had learned, was therefore condemned to death, and there burned in the sayd towne of Calice, within the space of a yeare, or thereabout, after the other godly Martyr aboue mentioned.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe story of W. Crosbowmaker, bearing a billet in Calice.And for so much as I am presently in hand wyth matters of Calice, I can not passe from thence without memorie of an other certayne honest man of the same township, named William Button, aliâs Crosbowmaker, although the time of this story is a litle more anciēt in yeares 

Commentary  *  Close

This incident must have happened before William Warham's death in August 1532.

: which story is this.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaW. Crosbowmakers questions.William Crosbowmaker, a souldier of Calice, and the kings seruant, being a man as some natures be, somwhat pleasantly disposed, vsed when he met with Priests, to demaund of them certayne merry questions of pastyme, as these: Whether if a man were sodenly taken, and wanted an other thing, he might not without offence occupy one of the Popes pardons, in steede of a broken paper?Another question was, whether in the world might better be wanting, dogs or priests. And if it were answered, that dogs might rather be spared: to that he woulde replie againe and inferre, that if there were no dogs, wee coulde make no moe, but if there lacked ignoraunt Priestes, we might soone, and too soone, make too many of them.

[Back to Top]

It happened that in the time of D. Darley, Parson of our Ladies Church in Calice, being Commissary there for Archbishop Warham, there came a blacke Frier to Calice with the Popes pardons: who for iiij. d. would deliuer a soule out of Purgatory. The frier was full of romish vertues, for what money came for pardons by day, he bought no land with it at night. This foresayd William Button, aliâs Crosbowmaker, comming to the pardons, and pretending that he would deliuer his father & frends soules,

[Back to Top]
asked
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield