Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageNone
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Francis Harward

Public notary of diocese of Worcester

Francis Harward was the scribe for Edmund Bonner's first appellation to the king in September 1549. 1563, p. 722; 1570, p. 1515; 1576, p. 1284; 1583, p. 1326.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Gilbert Bourne

(c. 1510 - 1569) [ODNB]

BA Oxford 1528; MA 1533; BTh 1543; archdeacon of Bedford 1549

Bonner's chaplain c. 1543; bishop of Bath and Wells (1554 - 59/60); sent to the Tower 1560

The king's commissioners in 1547 gave the injunctions and homilies addressed to Bishop Bonner, who had submitted a protestation, to Anthony Belassis and Gilbert Bourne to execute. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1309.

John Harpsfield and Gilbert Bourne were shown Bishop Bonner's notes before his sermon at Paul's Cross and were asked to find the names of those becoming king in their minority. [The chaplains are not named in the 1570 and 1576 editions.] 1563, p. 704; 1570, p. 1509; 1576, p. 1279; 1583, p. 1319.

Bonner appeared for the fifth time before the commissioners on 20 September. During an interval, he instructed Gilbert Bourne, his chaplain, Robert Warnington, his commissary, and Robert Johnson, his registrar, to tell the mayor and aldermen of London to avoid reformed preachers. 1563, p. 716; 1570, p. 1514; 1576, p. 1283; 1583, p. 1325.

[Back to Top]

Gilbert Bourne, John Harpsfield, Robert Cousyn, John Wakelyng and Richard Rogers witnessed Edmund Bonner's first appellation to the king in September 1549. 1563, p. 722; 1570, p. 1515; 1576, p. 1284; 1583, pp. 1325-26.

Bourne was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 855.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Harpsfield

(1516 - 1578) [ODNB; Fasti]

Archdeacon of London (1554 - 59); dean of Norwich (1558 - 59); brother of Nicholas

John Harpsfield and Gilbert Bourne were shown Bishop Bonner's notes before his sermon at Paul's Cross and were asked to find the names of those becoming king in their minority. [The chaplains are not named in the 1570 and 1576 editions.] 1563, p. 704; 1570, p. 1509; 1576, p. 1279; 1583, p. 1319.

Gilbert Bourne, John Harpsfield, Robert Cousyn, John Wakelyng and Richard Rogers witnessed Edmund Bonner's first appellation to the king in September 1549. 1563, p. 722; 1570, p. 1515; 1576, p. 1284; 1583, pp. 1325-26.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Wakelyng

'Learned man'

Gilbert Bourne, John Harpsfield, Robert Cousyn, John Wakelyng and Richard Rogers witnessed Edmund Bonner's first appellation to the king in September 1549. 1563, p. 722; 1570, p. 1515; 1576, p. 1284; 1583, pp. 1325-26.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Philip Andrew

Under-marshal of the Marshalsea

After his fifth examination in 1549, Edmund Bonner was committed to the Marshalsea, and Andrew Philip was put in charge of his keeping. 1563, p. 719; 1570, p. 1515; 1576, p. 1284; 1583, p. 1326.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Cousyn

MA; prebendary of Holbourn (1545 - 54) prebendary of Mora (1554, deprived 1559); treasurer of St Paul's, London (1558, deprived 1559) [Fasti]

Gilbert Bourne, John Harpsfield, Robert Cousyn, John Wakelyng and Richard Rogers witnessed Edmund Bonner's first appellation to the king in September 1549. 1563, p. 722; 1570, p. 1515; 1576, p. 1284; 1583, pp. 1325-26.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lambeth

London

OS grid ref: TQ 305 785

1350 [1326]

K. Edward 6. Boner committed to the Marshalsey. The 6. seßion agaynst Boner.

MarginaliaAnno 1559.to tyme and place and the order of the law, and still shall require, Vpon all the which premisses, the foresayd Edmund B. of London did require the Notary publike here vnder written, to make vnto hym, and the witnesses hereafter named, one, two, or more copies of this protestation.

These thynges were done the yeare, day, and tyme abouewritten, there beyng present Gilbert Bourne Bacheler of Diuinitie, Iohn Harpesfield, and Robert Colen, Maisters of Arte, Iohn Wakelyng, and Richard Rogers learned men, beyng of the Diocesse of Worcester, Westminster, Couentrie, Lichfield, and Glocester, and specially requested to be witnesse of the same. And I Fraunces Harward of the Diocesse of Worcester, and publicke Notary by the Kings regall authoritie, forsomuch as I was present when the foresayd Protestation, Appellation, and other the premisses were done, the yeare of our Lord, the yere of the raign of the kyng, the day of the moneth and place aforesayde, the witnesses abouenamed beyng present, and for so much as I did enact the same, therefore to this present publicke instrument, written faithfully with myne owne hand, I haue put to my marke, beyng specially requested vnto the same.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBoner requireth his appeale, recusation, & protestation to be entred in Register.Which thyng after he had read, he dyd vnder his protestation first intimate vnto the Archbishop, the Byshop of Rochester, and Doctor May, and then protestyng also not to receede frō hys recusation, dyd likewyse intimate the same vnto Maister Secretarye Smyth, requiryng the Register to make an Instrument as well thereupon, as also vppon hys recusation, wyth witnesse to testifie the same.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe last answer of Boner to the articles examined, and found vnperfect.Then the Delegates did agayne proceede to the examination of the last aunswers, and findyng the same imperfect, they demanded of hym (according to the first Article) what speciall day of August, he was sent for by the L. Protector? To whom he obstinately aunswered, that hee was not bound to make other aunswere, then he had already made, vnlesse they did put theyr Articles more certayne: neyther would he otherwyse aunswer as long as Maister Secretary Smith was there present, whome he had before recused, and therefore would not receede from his recusation.

[Back to Top]

The Secretary seeyng him so wilful and peruerse, said sharply vnto hym. My L. come of and make a full & perfect answer vnto these Articles, or els we will take other order with you to your payne.

In fayth Sir, then sayd the Bishop agayne, I haue thought ye had bene learned, but now before God, I perceiue well that eyther ye be not learned in deede, or els ye haue forgotten it: for I haue so oftē answered lawfully & sufficiently, and haue so oft shewed causes sufficient & reasonable, why thereunto I ought not by lawe to be compelled (you shewyng nothyng to the contrary but sensualitie and will) that I must needes iudge that you are ignorant herein.

[Back to Top]

Well sayd M. Secretary, ye wyll not then otherwyse aunswer?

No, sayd the B. except the law compell me.

Then sayd the Secretary, call for the knight Marshal, that he may be had to Ward.

With that all the rest of the Commissioners charged the B. that he had at that tyme sundry wayes very outragiously and irreuerently behaued hymselfe towards them sitting on the Kings Maiesties Commission, and specially towards Sir Thomas Smith his graces Secretary, & therefore and for diuers other contumelious words which he had spoken, they declared they would commit hym to the Marshalsey.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBoner commaunded to the Marshalsey.By this time the Marshals deputy came before them, whom M. Secretary commanded to take the B. as prisoner, and so to keepe hym that no man might come vnto hym, for if he dyd, he should sit by hym hymselfe.

When the Secretary had ended his talke, the B. sayd vnto him: Well sir, it might haue becōmed you right well that my Lordes grace here present, beyng first in commission, and your better, should haue done it.

Then the Commissioners assigning hym to be brought before them on monday next before noone, betwene 7. and 9. of the clocke in the Hall of that place, there to make full answer to these last Articles, or els to shew cause why he should not be declared pro confesso, did for that presēt break vp that Session.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBoners great hart could not choose, but he must needes vtter his stomacke.Nowe as the Bishop was departing with the vndermarshall, he in a great fury turned himself again towards the Commissioners, and sayde to Sir Thomas Smyth: Sir, where ye haue committed me to pryson, ye shall vnderstand that I will require no fauour at your handes, but shall willingly suffer what shall be put vnto mee, as boltes on my heeles, yea, and if ye wyll, irons about mymiddle, or where ye will.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBoner threatneth to accuse the Archbishop before God.Then departing againe, he yet returned once more, & fomyng out his poison, said vnto the Archbishop: Wel my Lord, I am sory that I beyng a Bishop am thus handled at your graces hand: but more sory that you suffer abhominable heretickes to practise as they doe in London and els where, infecting and disquieting the Kings liege people: and therfore I do require you, as you will answer to God and to the king, that ye will from henceforth abstaine thus to do: for if ye do not, I will accuse you before God & the Kings Maiestie: answer to it as well as ye can. And so he departed, vsing many reprochful words against sundry of the common people, which stoode and spake to hym by the way as he went.

[Back to Top]
¶ The sixt Action or processe vpon Monday, the 23. of September, had agaynst Boner Byshop of London, before the Commissioners, in the great hall at Lambeth.

MarginaliaThe 6. Sessiō or appearaunce of Boner.IT was assigned as ye heard in the 4. Acte prosecuted the 18. of September, that vpon Monday then next followyng, beyng the 23. of the same moneth, the B. should again appeare before the Commissioners, within the great Hall at Lambeth, then to shew a finall cause why he should not be declared pro confesso, vpon all the Articles wherunto he had not fully answered.

[Back to Top]

According to which assignement, the same 23. day of September, the B. was brought before them by the Vndermarshall (to whome for his disobedient and obstinate behauiour he was before that tyme committed) and there dyd first declare vnto them, that hys appearaunce at that tyme and place was not voluntary, but coacted, for that he was agaynst his will brought thether by the keeper of the Marshalsey, and therewithall also vnder hys former protestation, recusation and appeale, did then again intimate a generall recusation of all the Commissioners, MarginaliaA generall recusation of Boner agaynst all the Commissioners. alledging in the same, that because the Archbishop with all his Colleagues had neither obserued the order of their Commission, neyther yet proceeded agaynst hym after any laudable or good fashion of iudgement, but contrarywise, had sundry tymes as well in his absence, as in his presence, attempted many things vnlawfully against his person, dignity, and estate, especially, in committing him to strait prison, and yet commaunding him to make aunswere: & further, because that he with the rest had proceeded in Commission with Sir Thomas Smith Knight, supportyng and maintainyng all his euill doings (notwithstandyng that he the same Bishop had before iustly recused and declined from him) he therfore did also there refuse & declyne from the iudgement of the sayd Archbishop and hys Colleagues, and dyd except agaynst their iurisdiction as suspect, and they therby vnmeete persons to proceed against hym, and therefore accordyng to his former appeale, he intended to submit himselfe vnder the tuition, protection, & defence of the Kings Maiestie, for whose honour and reuerence sake (he sayd) they ought not to proceed any further against hym, MarginaliaBoner still sticketh to his former protestatiōs & prouocations.but quietly suffer hym to vse the benefite of all his recusations, prouocations, and other lawfull remedies before alledged, wyth other superfluous words at large, to be read and seen as followeth.

[Back to Top]
The second recusation made by Edmund Boner Bishop of London.

IN the name of God, Amen. For as much as both naturall reason and all good pollicies of lawes, especially of this Realme of England do admit and suffer hym that is conuented before an vncompetent and suspect Iudge, to refuse hym and to decline hys iurisdiction, in as much as the lawe and reason on the one side, willeth processe to run vprightly and iustly, and that in corruption and malice, and the other side earnestly laboureth to the contrary, and needeth therefore to bee brideled. And for because ye my Lord of Caunterbury with your Colleagues in this behalfe (deputed as ye say Commissioners agaynst me) neither haue obserued your sayde Commission, neyther yet proceeded hetherto agaynst me, after any laudable, lawful, or any good fashion of iudgement, but contrarywise, contrary to your Commission, and agaynst the law, good reason, and order, haue at sundry tymes, and in sundry actes attempted and done many things agaynst me, vnlawfully, vnseemly, and vniustly, and suffer the like to be attempted and done by other not reformyng and amendyng the same, as appeareth in diuers and sondry thinges remayning in your actes.

[Back to Top]

And moreouer because you my sayd Lord, wyth your

sayd
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield