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Andrew Baynton

(1516? - 1564) [ODNB sub Baynton family]

Scholar; served Cromwell; MP Wiltshire, Sussex

William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

 
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Sir Thomas Chaloner

(1521 - 1565) [ODNB]

Diplomat, administrator, writer; secretary to Sir Henry Knyvet

Clerk to the privy council (1545 - 51); fought at battle of Pinkie 1547; MP Lancaster 1547; MP Knaresborough 1554; ambassador to France, Germany, Flanders, Spain

Edmund Bonner appeared before the king's commissioners for the fourth time on 18 September, at which session new articles were drawn up and new witnesses received: Sir John Mason, Sir Thomas Chaloner, William Cecil, Armagil Wade and William Hunnings. 1563, pp. 704-710; 1570, pp. 1508-12; 1576, pp. 1279-81; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

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William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 806-7, 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

 
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Thomas Argall

(1499/1500 - 1563) [ODNB]

Administrator, registrar of the prerogative court of Canterbury

William Saye and Thomas Argall were actuaries in the case against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

 
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William Paget

(1505/6 - 1563) [ODNB]

Diplomat and administrator; JP Middlesex (1537 - death), MP Buckinghamshire (1547 - death), MP Derbyshire 1547, MP Staffordshire (1547 - death); MP Middlesex 1545, MP Staffordshire 1547; privy councillor (1543 - death); clerk to the privy council 1540; clerk of the parliament (1541 - 49)

1st Lord Paget of Beaudesert (1549 - 63); lord privy seal (1556 - 58)

William Paget was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. He supported Barnes and other protestants at that time, supplying books and helping monks leave their orders. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Paget was present at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

William Paget was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Paget was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Paget was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector had knowledge of the letter before it arrived, possibly through Lord Paget, who was then with the king and Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

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William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

 
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William Saye

Public notary

William Saye was asked to draw up a legal instrument at Bonner's final examination.

William Saye and Thomas Argall were actuaries in the case against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

1383 [1359]

King Edw. 6. Articles ministred and apposed agaynst Gardiner Bishop of Winchester
Articles and positions ministred ioyntly and seuerally obiected to the B. of Winchester.

MarginaliaAnno 1551. MarginaliaArticles ministred agaynst Winchester by the Commissioners.IN primis, that the kings Maiestie iustly and rightfully is, and by the lawes of God ought to be the supreme head in earth of the Church of England and Ireland, and so is by the Clergie of this realme in their conuocation, and by the Act of Parliament iustly and according to þe lawes of God recognised.

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2 Item, that his maiestie as the supreme head of þe saide churches, hath full power and authoritie to make and set suche Lawes, Iniunctions, and ordinances, for and concerning Religion and orders in the said churches for the increase of vertue and repressing of all errours, heresies, and other enormities and abuses.

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3 Item, that all and euery his graces subiectes are bound by the lawes of God to obey all his highnesse saide lawes, Iniunctions, and proceedings concerning religion & orders in the sayd Churches.

MarginaliaWinchester sworne to the kinges supremacy.4 Item, that you Steuen B. of Winchester haue sworne obedience to his Maiestie, as supreme head of this Church of England and also of Ireland.

MarginaliaWinchester after his oth foūd disobedient to the king and his proceedinges.5 Item, that all and euery his graces subiects that disobey any of his sayde Maiesties lawes, Iniunctions, ordinances and proceedings already set forth & published, or hereafter to be set foorth & published, ought worthely to be punished according to his graces Ecclesiasticall lawes, vsed within thys his realme.

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6 Item, that you þe sayd Byshop, as wel in the kings maiesties late visitation wtin your Diocesse, as at sondry other times, haue ben complained vpon, & sundry informations made against you for your doings, sayings & preachings against sundry Iniunctions, orders and other procedings of his maiestie set foorth for reformation of errors, superstitions and other abuses in religion.

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7 Item, that after and vppon the occasion of those & other many complaints and informations, you haue ben sundry times admonished, commanded and enioyned to conforme your selfe, as to your duetie appertaineth.

MarginaliaThe manifold transgressions of Wint. worthy of punishment8 Item, that after the premisses, and for that those former admonitions & commaundements notwythstanding, you did yet still shewe your selfe not conformable, & for that also by your example the people were much animated, & therby occasion of muche vnquietnesse ministred, you were called before the kings maiesties counsell in the moneth of Iune, the 2. yeare of his maiesties raigne, & by them on his highnes behalfe commaunded to preache a Sermon before hys maiestie, and therin to declare the iustnes and godlines of his Maiesties father and his proceedings vppon certaine matters partly mentioned in certaine articles to you deliuered in wryting, and partly otherwise declared vnto you. The effecte whereof, was touching the vsurped authoritye of the B. of Rome, and that his pretensed authoritie was iustly & godly taken away in this realm, & other the kings maiesties dominions: Touching the first suppression and taking away of Monasteries, Religious houses, Pilgrimages, Reliques, Shrines and Images, the superstitious going about of S. Nicholas bishop, S. Edmund, S. Katherin, S. Clement and such like, for taking away of Chātreis, Obites and Colleges, touching hallowing of Candels, water, ashes, palme, holy breade, beades, creeping to the crosse and suche like: touching the setting foorthe of the kings maiesties authoritie in his yōg yeres to be as great, as if his highnesse were of many more yeres, touching auricular confession, touching the procession & common praier in Englishe, and that things done in generall Councels against the woorde of God, may be iustly reuoked in particular Councels.

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MarginaliaWinchesters cōtemptuous disobedience to the king.9 Item, that you receiuing the same, and promising to declare them in a sermone by you made before his Maiestie for that purpose, on the feast of S. Peter in the sayd second yere of his highnesse raigne, did then and there contemptuously and disobediently omit to declare and set foorth many of the sayd matters to the great contempt of his Maiestie, and daungerous example of others.

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10 Item, that you being also commanded, and on his maiesties behalf, for the auoyding of tumult, & for other great considerations inhibited to treate of any matter in controuersie concerning the Masse or the communion (then commonly called the Sacrament of the aultar) did contrary to the sayd commandement & inhibition, declare diuers your iudgements & opinions in the same, in manifest contempt of hys Maiesties sayd inhibition, to the great offence of the hearers, and disturbaunce of the common quiet, and vnity of the realme.

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MarginaliaWinchester stubbernely refused to conforme himselfe to the booke of the kinges proceedinges.11 Item, that after the premisses, videlicet, in the moneths of May or Iune, or one of them, in the thirde yeare of hys highnesse raigne, his Maiestye sent eftsoones vnto you, toknow your conformity towards his said reformation, and specially touching the booke of Common praier then lately set foorth by hys maiestie, whereunto you at the same time refused to shewe your selfe conformable.

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12 Item, that after that, videlicet the 9. day of Iuly, in the fourth yeare of his Maiesties raigne, his highnes sent vnto you hys graces letters, wyth a certaine submission and articles, wherunto hys grace willed and commanded you to subscribe, to the whyche submission you contemptuously refused to subscribe.

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MarginaliaWynchester standeth in iustification of himselfe.13 Item, that you hauing eftsoones certaine of the kyngs most honorable Councell sent vnto you the 12. of Iulye, in the sayd fourth yeare, with the same submission, and beyng in his maiestyes behalfe required and commanded to consider agayne better the sayd submission and to subscribe the same, stoode in iustification of your selfe, and woulde in no wise subscribe thereunto.

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14 Item, that after all thys, the 14. daye of Iulye, in the sayde fourth yeare, the sayd kings Maiestie sent yet againe vnto you certaine of his maiesties most honorable councel with an other submissiō and diuers other articles, willing and commaunding you to subscribe your name thereunto, whych to do you vtterly refused.

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MarginaliaFantastical considerations of wynchestor.15 Item, that after all thys, videlicet the 19. of Iulye in the sayde fourth yeare, you being personally called before the whole counsaile, and hauing the sayde submission and articles openly and distinctly read vnto you, and required to subscribe the same, refused for vniust and fantasticall considerations by you alledged, to subscribe the same.

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16 Item, that for your sundry and manifolde contemptes and disobediences in this behalfe vsed, the fruites of your benefice were then by speciall commission of hys Maiestie iustly and lawfully sequestred.

17 Item, that after this, you had intimation and peremptorie monition, with communication that you shuld within 3. monethes next following the sayde intimation, reconcile and submit your selfe vpon paine of depriuation.

18 Item, that the saide 3. moneths are nowe fully expired and runne.

MarginaliaWynchester sworne to aunswere truely.19 Item that you haue not hetherto, according to the sayd intimation and monition submitted: reconciled, nor reformed your self, but contemptuously yet still remaine in your disobedience. Whereupon they required the B. of Winchester, then and there personally present to be sworne faithfully and truely to make answere.

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After these articles were exhibited vnto him, and he hauing leaue to say for himself, wherin he vsed al the cautels, shiftes and remedies of the law to his most aduantage, by way of protesting, recusing and excepting against the commission, and requiring also the copies as well of the Articles, as of his protestation of the Actuaries (which wer W. Say and Tho. Argall) time and respite was assigned vnto hym to aunswer to the sayd Articles in wryting. MarginaliaTime geuē to Winchester to aunswere by wryting. But he so cauilled and dalied from day to day, to answer directly, although he was sufficiently laboured and perswaded to the same by sondry callinges and Actes, and also aboundantly conuicted by depositions and witnesses, especially by matter induced by the L. Paget, and Andrewe Beynton, & M. Chalenor, pag. 816. MarginaliaFor the depositions of these and other witnesses against Wint. read in the first edition of Actes & Monumēts. pag. 816.(all which I referre to my first booke) that at the last he appealed from them, reputing them not to be competent and indifferent iudges to heare and determine his cause, vnto the kings royal person: notwithstanding by protestation alwaies reseruing to himselfe the benefite of his appellation: And so proceded he to the answering of the foresaid articles, but in such crafty and obstinate maner, as before he had ben accustomed, and as at large to them that be desirous to vnderstand the processe thereof, in the first booke of the Actes and monuments of the Church aforesayd may appeare.

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But briefly to conclude, such exceptions he vsed against the witnesses produced against him, and he himself produced such a number of witnesses in hys defence, and vsed so many delaies and cauillations, that in the end the commissioners seeing his stubbernesse, proceeded to the sentence definitiue against him, as heere vnder followeth.

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¶ Sentence definitiue agaynst Stephen Gardiner B. of Winchester.

MarginaliaThe finall sentence for the depriuation of the Bishop of Winchester.IN the name of God, Amen. By authority of a commission by the high and mighty prince our moste gracious soueraigne Lord Edward the 6. by the grace of God king of England, France, and Ireland, defendour of the faith, and of the Church of England and also of Ireland in earth the supreme head, the tenour whereof hereafter ensueth: Edward the sixt. &c. Wee Thomas by the sufferaunce of God Archbishop of Canterburye, primate of all Englande, and Metropolitane, wyth the right reuerende fathers in God,

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Nicolas
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