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Dob

Native of Wymonndham, Norfolk, and a gentleman

Dob was placed in the pillory at the beginning of Mary?s reign for reminding Queen Mary of her promise not to alter the religion established by Edward VI (1563, p. 902; 1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; and 1583, p. 1407).

[Also referred to as 'Dobbe']

 
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Francis Hastings

(1514? - 1561)

2nd earl of Huntingdon (DNB)

Francis Hastings supported Northumberland against Mary; he was arrested at Cambridge together with Northumberland (1563, p. 902; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; 1583, p. 1407).

He was committed to the Tower with Northumberland (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower on 10 October 1553 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

Francis Hastings was sent to apprehend the duke of Suffolk who had fled into Warwickshire. Hastings reached Coventry before Suffolk and thwarted Suffolk?s rising. Suffolk was betrayed by a servant and captured (1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; 1583, p. 1418).

Francis Hastings was sent to Leicestershire in late January 1554 to apprehend Henry Grey, the duke of Suffolk; he proclaimed Suffolk a traitor (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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George Brooke

(Lord Cobham) (1527 - 1597)

9th Lord Cobham (Complete Peerage)

Signatory to a letter from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He accompanied Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He was committed to the Tower in February 1554 (1570, p. 1580; 1576, p. 1348; 1583, p. 1419).

He was released from the Tower on 24 March 1554 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Henry Fitzalan

(1512 - 1580)

Earl of Arundel (DNB)

Henry Fitzalan was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-07).

Fitzalan escorted Henry Dudley, the duke of Northumberland, to the Tower (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Fitzalan was one of the leaders of the troops sent against Sir Thomas Wyatt (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1398; 1583, p. 1467).

He was chief judge at the condemnation of Henry Grey, duke of Suffolk (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

He greeted Philip on his arrival at Southampton on 20 July 1554 (1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

He was present at Stephen Gardiner?s Paul?s Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

Fitzalan bore a cap of maintenance before Queen Mary at the opening of parliament on 12 November 1554 (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475).

He was signatory to a letter, dated 27 November 1554, from the privy council to Bonner, informing him that Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout his diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76).

Henry Fitzalan was patron of Lexden parish. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

He was involved in the questioning of Elizabeth after her removal from Ashridge. He apologized to her for the questioning she had been subjected to. 1563, p. 1712.

He was humble before Elizabeth at Hampton Court. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2294, 1576, p. 1986, 1583, p. 2291.

 
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John Dudley

Earl of Warwick; eldest son of the Duke of Northumberland (Complete Peerage)

Committed to the Tower with his father (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

Arraigned and condemned for treason on 18 August 1553 along with his father and the Marques of Northampton (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

 
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Lord Edward North

(1496? - 1564)

1st baron North of Kirtling (DNB ; Bindoff, Commons) Brother of Joan Wilkinson.

North was a supporter of Lady Jane Grey who gained Mary's favor.

He was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1658; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

North was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was ordered by the privy council to examine Cary, John Dee, John Field and Sir Thomas Benger. 1583, p. 1581

Isabel Malt claimed that Lord North and another nobleman offered her money in exchange for her infant son, hoping to pass the baby off as Mary?s son. 1570, p. 1772; 1576, p. 1513; 1583, p. 1597

Lord Edward North was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

 
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Lord Richard Rich

(1496? - 1567)

1st Baron Rich (DNB)

Richard Rich was one of the signatories to a letter, dated 9 July 1553, from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1658; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was present at Thomas Watson's Paul's cross sermon, 20 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey, 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Rich was one of the signatories to a letter, dated 27 November 1554, sent from the Privy Council to Bonner, informing the bishop that Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout the diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76).

 
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Lord Thomas Darcy of Chiche

(1506 - 1558)

MP for Essex (1539, 1545, 1547), JP for Essex (1538 - 1558). Keeper of Colchester Castle (1541 - 1553), gentleman of the privy chamber (by 1544). Steward, Bury St Edmunds (1547 - 1553). Privy councillor; Lord Chamberlain (1551 - 1553) (Bindoff)

Sir Thomas Darcy was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

After examination by Lord Darcy of Chiche, Ralph Allerton was sent to Bonner, who forced him to recant at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2208, 1576, p. 1905, 1583, p. 2013.

Allerton wrote a letter to Lord Darcy of Chiche. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

Allerton was apprehended, examined before Lord Darcy of Chiche, and condemned over a year before his death. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

A supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, was given to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kingston and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Lord Darcy of Chiche was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

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John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 naming Lord Darcy of Chiche as one of the commissioners who had used their commission to seize lands and goods of protestant fugitives. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

 
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Sir John Cheke

(1514 - 1557)

Tutor to Edward VI, privy councillor under Edward VI. [DNB]

Sir John Cheke was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

Cheke was placed in the Tower on 28 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

Actions were taken by Stephen Gardiner against Cheke. 1563, p. 1382, 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

When Cheke was in Germany he was greatly esteemed by the Germans. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

He travelled with Sir Peter Carew from High Germany to Brussels, having checked his route by the stars. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

He was famous for his knowledge of astronomy. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Cheke had safe passage from King Philip, with Lord Paget and Sir John Mas securing their safety. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

He arrived in Brussels to see the queen's ambassadors. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Having seen Paget safely off to England, Carew and Cheke were taken en route between Brussels and Antwerp. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Cheke was shipped to the Tower of London in dreadful conditions. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Feckenham spoke up in defence of Cheke. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Cheke recanted but was so remorseful that he became sick and died. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Nicholas Carre wrote a letter to John Cheke about Martin Bucer which was then passed on to Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1957.

[Also referred to as 'Sir John Cheeke']

 
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Sir John Gates

(1504? - 1553) (DNB)

Sheriff of Essex; Captain of the Guard

He is described as Northumberland?s right-hand man (Bindoff, Commons).

Sir John Gates was a signatory of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary , dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-07).

John Gates was imprisoned in the Tower with Northumberland, 25 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He heard mass in the Tower 21 August 1553, and was beheaded 22 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

 
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Sir John Mason

(1503 - 1560)

Ambassador; Dean of Winchester (1549 - 1553); Clerk of the Privy Council

Sir John Mason was appointed, together with Nicholas Wotton, to adjudicate the charges made against Robert Ferrar by Hugh Rawlins and Thomas Lee (1563, p. 1088; 1583, p. 1546).

He was one of the signatories to a letter from the Privy Council to Mary, dated 9 July 1553, telling Mary that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was the heir to the throne (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

 
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Sir Richard Cotton

(by 1497 - 1556)

Privy Councillor (Bindoff, Commons)

Sir Richard Cotton was one of the signatories of a letter from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

 
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Sir Robert Bowes

(1495? - 1554)

Privy Councillor, 1551 - 1554 (DNB; Bindoff, Commons)

One of the signatories to a letter from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

 
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Sir Roger Cholmley

(d. 1565)

Lord chief justice of King's and Queen's Bench (1552 - 1553), privy councillor (under Mary) and MP [Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons; DNB]. Judge, lieutenant of the Tower. Son of Sir Richard Cholmley [DNB]

Sir Roger Cholmley persuaded the royal guard to support Northumberland against Mary (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, p. 1407).

He was sent to the Tower, with Sir Edward Montagu, on 27 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower together with Sir Edward Montagu on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Sir Roger Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Cholmley participated in a debate/dinner conversation between Nicholas Ridley and John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, on the nature of the eucharist, held while Ridley was a prisoner in the Tower (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, pp. 1357-58; and 1583, p. 1428).

Cholmley came to William Flower at the stake and urged Flower, on pain of damnation, to recant his heretical beliefs. 1563, p. 1733; 1570, p. 1749; 1576, p. 1493; 1583, p. 1577.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Cholmley was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was made to Cholmley. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857. [Foxe erroneously calls him 'Sir Richard Cholmley'.]

Cuthbert Symson was brought before Cholmley, examined and racked. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Cholmley sent to Newgate 27 prisoners who were members of an illegal conventicle in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Thomas Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley, who sent him to Newgate. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

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The lord mayor of London and Chomley examined Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Tingle was a prisoner in Newgate. His keeper realised that Edward Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley, who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[Also referred to as 'Lorde Chiefe Baron' or 'Chomley']

 
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Sir Thomas Cheyney

(1482/87 - 1558)

Treasurer of the Household (1539 - 1558) (DNB)

One of the signatories of a letter of the Privy Council to Princess Mary dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

One of the signatories of a letter of the Privy Council to Bishop Bonner, dated 28 April 1555, ordering the bishop to initiate posthumous proceedings against John Tooley in ecclesiastical court (1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584).

Also referred to as 'Cheney'

 
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Sir William Petre

(1505? - 1572)

Mary's principal secretary until 1557 (DNB).

Sir William Petre was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1658; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554. Foxe spells his name 'Peter', (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

On 28 March 1555, Mary announced to Petre and three other privy councillors that she was restoring the monastic lands in the crown's possession to the church (1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1476; 1583, p. 1559).

William Peter was one of the privy councillors who signed a letter to Bishop Bonner, dated 28 April 1555, ordering the bishop to proceed posthumously against John Tooley in ecclesiastical court. 1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. He mentioned two letters: one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsbury, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

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Sir William Petre was humble before Elizabeth at Hampton court. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2294, 1576, p. 1986, 1583, p. 2291.

[Also referred to as 'Secretary Peter']

 
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Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 1553) [Fasti; DNB; MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer, 1996]. Martyr

Foxe records the life, condemnation and death of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1470-1503, 1570, pp. 2032-71, 1576, pp. 1752-82, 1583, pp. 1859-90.

Foxe records Cranmer's formative years and early career. His mother was Agnes Hatfield. Cranmer read the works of Faber, Erasmus and Luther. 1563, pp. 1470-71, 1570, pp. 2032-33, 1576, pp. 1752-53, 1583, pp. 1859-60.

Cranmer was asked by Dr Capon to be a founding fellow of Wolsey's college. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Alexander Seton and Edward Foxe lodged with Cressey while Thomas Cranmer was there and dined with him. The following day Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was sent as Henry VIII's ambassador to the emperor. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

He was made archbishop of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was asked by Henry VIII to search the scriptures for a case for his divorce from Catherine of Arragon. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII asked the earl of Wiltshire to allow Cranmer to stay at his house in Durham. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861.

Cranmer went to Mr Cressey's house at Waltham Abbey during the summer plague season. Cranmer's wife was a relative of Cressey. 1570, p. 2033 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

The pope's authority was discussed at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford, where it was concluded that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Arragon was not legal, and the pope's authority was denounced. Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Carne and Benet were then sent before the pope to deliver these conclusions. 1563, p. 1472, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861. [1563 has the commission as consisting of: Bonner, Winchester, Sampson, Repps, Goodricke, Latimer, Shaxton, and Barlow.]

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Cranmer met with Cornelius Agrippa. 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1861.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Chersey, a grocer in the city of London, had a kinsman who was a priest and who spent more time in the alehouse than his church. This priest spoke against Cranmer in the alehouse one day. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1863.

The priest was sent to the Fleet. Cromwell forgot about him and eventually sent him to Cranmer. Cranmer in time spoke to the priest and set him free. 1570, pp. 2036-38, 1576, pp. 1756-57, 1583, pp. 1863-64.

Cranmer investigated the case of a woman accused of committing adultery. 1563, pp. 1477-78, 1576, pp. 1570-71.

Cranmer sent a token via W. P. [William Porrege] to a woman falsely accused of adultery, asking for forgiveness for the treatment she received while in custody. 1563, p. 1478, 1576, p. 1751.

Lord Wryosley wept at the bedside of King Henry VIII and saved the life of Mary, Henry and Catherine's daughter. 1563, p. 1478.

Thomas Seymour spoke against Cranmer to the king, which he later regretted. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

Richard Neville, noting that Sir Thomas Seymour was hoping to see Cranmer, brought him to the archbishop at dinner. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

After Cromwell was apprehended, bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Winchester and others tried to take Cranmer out of the king's favour. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

The king sent Sir Anthony Denny to commit Cranmer to the Tower. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Cranmer spoke with the king. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Buttes, the king's physician, spoke to the king about the fact that Cranmer was being forced to wait like a lackey to come into council. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1866.

The king and the council made their peace with Cranmer. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Sir John Gostwicke accused Cranmer of heresy before parliament, citing his sermons at Sandwich and his lectures at Canterbury as evidence. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Prebendaries and justices of Kent accused Cranmer of heresy. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Articles were put to Henry VIII against Cranmer. Henry VIII told Cranmer what these articles were. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

Cranmer's secretary wrote to Buttes and Denny asking for Dr Lee to join the commission, lest nothing be learned by the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

A conspiracy against Cranmer was discovered through some letters that were found, including one by the suffragen of Dover and one by Barbar, a civilian maintained in Cranmer's household as a counsellor in matters of law. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer spoke with Dover and Barber. Barber said that hanging was too good for villains. They asked for Cranmer's forgiveness. 1570, pp. 2042-43, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after a conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer's wife is mentioned as a niece to the wife of Osiander. Cranmer was married while acting as the king's ambassador to Charles the emperor. 1563, p. 1478, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was opposed to the writings of Gardiner. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Rowland Taylor left Cranmer's household to become rector of Hadleigh (1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1495; 1583, p. 1519). [Actually Taylor was Cranmer's chaplain.]

Cranmer commanded Rowland Taylor to make Robert Drakes a deacon. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

In the third year of Edward's reign Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Foxe states that at his death Edward VI bequeathed the throne to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer refused to swear allegience to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, pp. 2045-46, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

The dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk were executed for their support of Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Lady Jane and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe states that those who were blinded with ignorance or malice thought Peter Martyr not a learned man. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472].

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Scory, bishop of Rochester, visited Cranmer. He took a copy of Cranmer's writings about the rumour that he had said the mass (when Thornden had in fact said it) and had it published. Cranmer was commanded to appear before the council and bring an inventory of his goods. 1563, p. 1479, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

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Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martyn and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was accused of conspiring with John Dudley, duke of Northumberland. 1563, p. 1483, 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Thomas Cranmer met with Peter Martyr, about 5 September 1553, in London, to discuss a projected disputation where they would defend the Book of Common Prayer. Cranmer was then arrested (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; and 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 13 September Cranmer was ordered to appear before the privy council. On 14 September he was charged by the privy council with treason and spreading seditious libels and was committed to the Tower (1583, p. 1410).

He was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was cited to appear before the queen's commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Rumoured to have celebrated a mass at Canterbury, Cranmer issued a denial or 'purgation' of the rumours on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1553 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was committed to the Tower on 14 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

A rumor spread that Cranmer had recanted his protestant conviction and allowed a mass to be celebrated at Canterbury; he issued a printed denial of this. In the denial, he offered to defend his religious beliefs in open debate together with Peter Martyr. Cranmer was imprisoned and arraigned for treason but ultimately pardoned. He was still charged with heresy (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418).

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He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 932 and 937; 1570, pp. 1592-93; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; and 1583, p. 1429).

[NB: There is a summary of Cranmer's disputation on Monday 16 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 933.]

Cranmer disputed with the catholic doctors on 16 April 1554 (1563, pp. 938-56; 1570, pp. 1593-1606; 1576, pp. 1360-70; and 1583, pp. 1430-41).

He disputed with John Harpsfield on the nature of the eucharist as part of Harpsfield's obtaining his D.D. on 19 April 1554 (1563, pp 987-90; 1570, pp. 1629-31; 1576, pp. 1390-91; and 1583, pp. 1460-62).

Cranmer wrote to the privy council on 23 April 1554, protesting at the way in which the Oxford disputations were conducted. Weston opened the letter and refused to deliver it (1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Cranmer to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was summoned, together with Ridley and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant his opinions and denied Weston's claim that he had been defeated in the disputation, claiming that the questions and challenges flew at him without order or giving him time to answer. He was condemned and taken to Bocardo (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

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Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer. 1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Ridley was converted through reading Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, p. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he made reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Ridley hoped to see Cranmer before his death, but Cranmer was with Friar Soto. 1570, p. 1936, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayor and sheriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

On 21 April 1554, Cranmer was compelled to observe, from Bocardo, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried the canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

A ten-foot high scaffold was set up in St Mary's church at the east end for Brookes to represent the pope, from which Cranmer was condemned. 1563, p. , 1570, p. 2047 , 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

Cranmer's profession of his faith was spoken in St Mary's church before those who condemned him. 1570, pp. 2050-52, 1576, pp. 1768-69, 1583, pp. 1874-75.

Foxe records Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Foxe records Brookes' oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2054-56, 1576, pp. 1772-73, 1583, pp. 1878-79.

There was a talk between Martyn and Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2052-53, 1576, pp. 1770-72, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Foxe records interrogatories and answers. 1570, p. 2054, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, pp. 1877-78.

The witnesses against Cranmer were Dr Marshall, commissary and dean of Christ's Church; Dr Smith, under commissary; Dr Tresham; Dr Crooke, London; Mr Curtop; Mr Warde; Mr Serles. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, p. 1879.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Foxe records Cranmer's full answer to Brookes' oration against him. 1570, pp. 2057-58., 1576, pp. 1774-75, 1583, pp. 1880-81.

Cranmer stated that he was ambassador in Germany when Warham died. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1774, 1583, p. 1880.

Cranmer met with Dr Oliver and other civil lawyers to discuss the pope's authority. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

A commission was sent from the pope regarding the sentencing of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1490-91.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 177576, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Cranmer appealed. 1570, pp. 2059-61, 1576, pp. 1776-77, 1583, pp. 1882-83.

Cranmer's appeal was put to the bishop of Ely. 1570, p. 2062, 1576, p. 1777, 1583, p. 1883.

Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Cranmer received a letter from Ridley, together with copies of Ridley's account of the disputation, and news about recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, pp. 1464-65; not in LM).

Foxe mentions Cranmer's condemnation and disputation in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Cranmer was degraded. 1563, p. 1493.

Cranmer recanted. 1563, pp. 1497-98, 1570, p. 2062, 1576, pp. 1778-80, 1583, p. 1884.

Witnesses to Cranmer's recantation were Henry Sydall and Friar John de villa Garcina. 1570, pp. 2062-63, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1884.

Lord Williams, Thomas Bridges and Sir John Bourne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

The deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More are referred to in the description of the death of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

Foxe records Cranmer's prayer. 1570, pp. 2064-65, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1886.

Cranmer was pulled from the pulpit. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1887.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

Thomas Cranmer was burned. 1570, p. 2066, 1576, p. 1782, 1583, pp. 1887-88.

Cranmer's letters. 1563, pp. 1483-84, 1489, 1492-93, 1570, pp. 2067-72, 1576, pp. 1782-86, 1583, pp. 1889-93.

Henry VIII directed Cranmer and Cromwell (and others, including Stokesly) to examine John Frith. 1583, pp. 2126-27.

Buswell, a priest, spoke to Edward Benet whilst they were imprisoned together and gave him a copy of Cranmer's recantation. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe includes a copy of the Pope's commission to proceed against Cranmer. 1583, p. 2132.

During his examination Weston and Smith challenged Cranmer over his book of the sacrament. 1583, p. 2135.

William Holcroft was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Goodrich

(d. 1554)

Bishop of Ely (1534 - 1554) [Fasti] and Lord High Chancellor of England (1552 - 1553) [DNB]. Chaplain to Anne Boleyn. [Fasti]

As a member of the privy council, he signed a letter from the privy council to Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

Foxe prints two letters which he claims that Robert Ferrar wrote to Goodrich 1563, pp. 1091-98; 1570, pp. 1725-26; 1576, pp. 1472[recte 1474] -80; 1583, pp. 1552-53 and 1555-56. [NB: See Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), pp. 166-67, for a persuasive argument that these letters were not written to Ferrar.]

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Pygot and Wolsey were visited in prison by a chaplain of Bishop Goodrich, Peter Valentius, who was of French birth and who was almoner there for twenty years prior to his meeting with them. Valentius questioned them on their beliefs. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely (Goodrich), William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (bishop of Chichester), William Repps (bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

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Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

[Foxe also refers to him as 'Goodricke'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Framlingham, Suffolk
NGR: TM 285 635

Parish in the Hundred of Loes, Suffolk; 18 miles north-east by east from Ipswich. A rectory in the archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich.

Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

1431 [1407]

Queene Mary. Suffolke mē take part with Q. Mary. Her promise. D. of Northūberland sent forth agaynst her.

MarginaliaAnno 1553 ned Vniuersities of Christendome, and confirmed also by the sundry actes of Parliamentes remaining yet in theyr force, MarginaliaLady Mary recounted illegitimate. and therby you iustly made illegitimate and vnheritable to the crown Imperiall of this realme, and the rules and dominions, and possessions of the same: you will vpon iust consideration hereof, and of diuers other causes lawfull to be alledged for the same, & for the iust inheritaunce of the right line and godlye order taken by the late king our souereigne Lord king Edward the sixt, and agreed vpon by the nobles and greatest personages aforesayd, surcease by any pretence to vexe and molest any of our soueraigne Ladye Queene Iane her subiectes from theyr true fayth and allegeance due vnto her grace: assuring you, that if you will for respect shew your selfe quiet and obedient (as you oughte) you shall finde vs all and seuerall ready to doe you any seruice that we with duety may, and be glad with your quietnes to preserue the cōmon state of this realme: wherin you may be otherwise greuous vnto vs, to your selfe, and to them. And thus we bid you most hartily well to fare, from the Tower of London, this 9. of Iuly. 1553.

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Your Ladyships frendes, shewing
your selfe an obedient subiect.


Thomas Caunterbury.
The Marques of Winche-
ster.
Iohn Bedford.
Wil. Morthhampton.
Thom. Ely Chauncellour
Northumberland.
Henry Suffolke.
Henry Arundell.
Shrewesbury.
Pembrooke.
Cobham.

R. Riche.
Huntington.
Darcy.
Cheyney.
R. Cotton.
Iohn Gates.
W. Peter.
W. Cicelle.
Iohn Cheeke.
Iohn Mason.
Edward North.
R. Bowes.

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All these aforesayd, except onely the Duke of Northūberland and syr Iohn Gates, afterward were either by especiall fauor or speciall or generall pardon discharged.

After this aunswere receiued, and the mindes of the Lordes perceiued, MarginaliaLady Mary keepeth her selfe from the Citty of London.Lady Mary speedeth her selfe secretlye away farre of from the City, hoping chiefly vpon the good will of the Commons, and yet perchaunce not destitute altogether of the secret aduertisementes of some of the Nobles. When the Counsell heard of her sodiene departure, and perceiued her stoutnesse, & that all came not to passe as they supposed, they gathered speedily a power of mē together, appointing an army, and first assigned that the Duke of Suffolke shoulde take that enterprise in hand, & so haue the leading of the Bande. MarginaliaThe Duke of Northumberland sent forth agaynst Lady Mary.But afterwarde alterynge their mindes, they thought it best to sēd forth the Duke of Northumberland, with certaine other Lords and Gentlemen, and that the Duke of Suffolke shoulde keepe the Tower, where the Lord Gilford and the Lady Iane the same time were lodged.

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In the which expedition þe Gard also, albeit they were much vnwilling at the first therunto, yet notwithstanding through the vehemēt perswasions of the Lord Treasurer, M. Chomley, & other, they were induced to assist the duke, and to set forward with him.  

Commentary  *  Close

One instance where Foxe did obtain new information was concerning the Duke of Suffolk's holding the Tower and the reluctance of Northumberland's soldiers to take the field against Mary (see textual variant 3). Probably this came to Foxe from an oral source.

These thinges thus agreed vpon, and the Duke nowe being set forwarde after the best array out of London, hauing notwithstanding his times prescribed, and hys iourneys appoynted by the Counsell, to the entent he woulde not seeme to do any thing but vpon warrant, MarginaliaPollicie of the Lady Mary.Mary in the meane while tossed with muche trauell vp and downe, to worke the surest way for her best aduauntage, withdrewe her selfe into the quarters of Northfolke and Suffolke, where she vnderstood the Dukes name to be had in muche hatred, for the seruice that had ben done there of late vnder king Edward, in subduing the rebels: and there gathering to her such aid of the commons in euery side as she might, MarginaliaThe Lady Mary taketh Fremingham castle.keepeth her selfe close for a space within Fremingham Castle. MarginaliaThe Suffolk mē gather to the Lady Maryes side.To whom first of all resorted the suffolke men: who being alwayes forward in promoting the procedinges of the Gospell, promised her theyr ayd & helpe, so that she would not attempt the alteration of the religion which her Brother king Edward had before established by lawes and orders publickely enacted and receiued by the consent of the whole Realme in that behalfe.

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MarginaliaThe Lady Mary promiseth faithfully that she would not alter religion.To make the matter short, vnto this condition she eftsoones agreed, with suche promise made vnto them, that no innouatiō should be made of religiō, as that no mā would or could then haue misdoubted her. MarginaliaBreach of promise in Queene Mary.Whiche promise, if shee had as constantly kepte, as they did willingly preserue her with theyr bodyes and weapons, she had done a deed both worthy her bloud, & had also made her raygne more stable to her selfe through former 

Commentary  *  Close

The word 'former' was 'firmer' in 1563 (p. 902) and 1570 (p. 1568). The word was changed in 1576 (p. 1337); undoubtedly this was a typographical error. It is worth noting as one of a number of errors arising from careless typesetting in the 1576 edition which were perpetuated in subsequent editions.

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tranquility. For though a man be never so puissant of power, yet brech of promise is an e-

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uill vpholder of quietnes, feare is worser, but cruelty is þe worst of all.

Thus Mary being garded with the power of þe Gospellers, did vanquish the Duke, and all those that came agaynst her. In consideration wherof, it was (me thinks) an heauy word that she aunswered to the suffolke men afterwardes, which did make supplication vnto her grace to performe her promise: MarginaliaQ Maries aunswere to the Suffolke men, and one M. Dobbe punished.For so muche (sayth she) as you being but mēbers, desire to rule your head you shall one day well perceiue that members must obey theyr head, and not looke to beare rule ouer the same. And not onely that, but also to cause the more terror vnto other, a certaine Gentleman named M. Dobbe, dwelling about Wyndam side, for the same cause, that is, for aduertising her by humble request, of her promise, was punished, beyng three sundrye times set on the pillory to be a gasing stocke vnto all men. Diuers other deliuered her books and supplications made out of the Scripture, to exhorte her to continue in the true doctrine then stablished, and for theyr good wils were sent to prison. But such is the cōditiō of mans nature (as here you see) that we are for the most part more ready alway to seeke frendship whē we stand in need of helpe, thē ready to requite a benefit once past & receiued. Howbeit against all this, one shooteanker we haue, which may be a sure cōfort to all miserable creatures, þt equity & MarginaliaPerfite fidelitie shut out of the dores, yet is to be found in heauen.fidelity are euer perfect and certeinely found with the Lord aboue, though the same being shut out of the doores in this world, be not to be founde here among menne. But seeing our intent is to write a story, not to treat of office, let vs lay Suffolke men aside for a while, whose desertes for theyr redines and diligence with the Queene, I will not here stand vpon. What she performed on her part, the thing it selfe, and the whole storye of this persecution doth testifye, as hereafter more playnely will appeare.

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, 387, fn 1

{Cattley/Pratt inserts the following into the text: * In the mean time, queen Mary keeping at Fremingham (as is said), God so turned the hearts of the people to her, and against the council, that she overcame them without bloodshed, notwithstanding there was made great expedition against her both by sea and land.*} See Edition 1563, page 902. - ED.

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On the contrary side, the Duke of Northumberlande, hauing his warrant vnder the broade Seale, with all furniture in readines, as he tooke his voyage and was nowe forward in his way, what ado ther was, what stirring on euery side, what sending, what riding and posting, what letters, messages, and instructions went to and fro, what talking among the souldiers, what hartburning among þe people, what fayre pretēses outwardly, inwardly what priuy practises there were, what speeding of Ordinance dayly and hourely out of the Tower, what rumors and comming downe of soulders from all quarters there was, a world it was to see, & a processe to declare, enough to make a whole Ilias. The greatest helpe that made for the Ladye Mary, was the short iourneis of the Duke, which by commission were assigned to him before, as is aboue mentioned. For the longer the Duke lingered in his voyage, the Lady Marye the more encreased in puisssaunce,  
Commentary  *  Close

On one occasion - see textual variant 4 and textual variant 5 - Foxe replaced a shorter passage in the 1563 edition with a longer and superficially more detailed account. But actually there was no new information here; Foxe was simply polishing his rhetoric.

the hartes of the people being mightily bent vnto her. Which after the Counsell at London perceiued, and vnderstoode howe the common multitude did withdraw theyr hartes from them to stand with her, and that certaine Noble men begā to go the other way, they turned theyr song, MarginaliaQueene Mary proclaymed at London.and proclaymed for Queene the Lady Mary, eldest daughter to kyng Henrye the eight, and appoynted by Parliament to succeed K. Edward dying without issue.

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MarginaliaThe Duke of Northumberland ouerthrown.And so the Duke of Northumberland, being by counsell and aduise sent forth agaynst her, was left destitute and forsaken alone at Cambridge, with some of his sonnes, & a few other, among whome the Earle of Huntington was one: MarginaliaThe Duke of Northūberland brought to the Tower as a Traytour.who there were arrested and brought to the Tower of London, as traytors to the Crowne, notwithstandinge that he had there proclaymed her Queene before.  

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe added a passage to the 1570 edition - see textual variant 6 - which diluted the charge of treason against Northumberland.

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Thus haue you Mary nowe made a Queene, and the sword of authority put into her hād, which, how she afterward did vse, we may see in sequele of this booke. Therefore (as I say) when she had bene thus aduaūced by þe gospellers, & saw all in quiet by meanes þt her enemies were conquered, sending the Duke captiue to the Tower before (which was the xxv. of Iuly) MarginaliaQueene Mary commeth vp to London.she folowed not long after, being brought vp the third day of August to Londō, with the great reioysing of many men, but with a greater feare of moe, and yet with flatterye peraduenture most great, of fayned hartes.

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Thus comming vp to London, her first lodgyng shee took at the Tower, MarginaliaThe Lady Iane and the Lord Gilford prisoners in the Tower.where as the foresaid Lady Iane with her husband the Lord Gilford, a litle before her commyng, were imprisoned: where they remained waiting her pleasure almost fiue monethes. But the Duke within a moneth after his comming to the Tower, MarginaliaThe Duke of Northumberlād condemned to dye.being adiudged to death, was brought forth to the scaffolde, and there beheaded. Albeit he hauing a promise, and being put in hope of pardon (yea though his head were vpon the blocke) if he would recant and heare masse, consented therto, and denied in wordes that true religion, which before time, as well

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