Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Charles, Count of Lalaing

Imperial ambassador; arrived on 2 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

[NB: Foxe calls him 'Countie de Lalen'. His name is taken from CSP Com. Mary I, p. 31].

 
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Culpeper

This is Thomas Culpepper, a participant in Wyatt's Rebellion (see APC IV, pp. 306, 307 and 416).

Foxe records his being sent to the Tower, (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; and 1583, p. 1467).

 
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David Pole

(d. 1568)

DCL (1527 - 1528). Bishop of Peterborough (1557 ' 1559) (DNB)

Foxe states that Pole was made bishop of St Asaph (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467). This is an error; Thomas Goldwell was made bishop of St Asaph. Pole would be made bishop of Peterborough.

Foxe was not sure whether Pole was imprisoned in the Tower or elsewhere after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Treated kindly by Elizabeth and allowed to live on in London or the surrounding suburbs. Died on one of his farms. (DNB)]

[Not related to Reginald Pole.]

 
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Earl of Wormewood

Not in Complete Peerage

A captain of the soldiers sent into Kent against the Commons, late January 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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Edward Crome

(d. 1562)

Rector of St Mary, Aldermary, London. [DNB]

Edward Crome was sent to the Fleet on 13 January 1554 by the privy council for preaching without a licence (1583, p. 1418; APC IV, p.384).

Another notice that Crome was committed to the Fleet on 13 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; and 1583, p. 1467).

Ridley reported to Cranmer, in a letter written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that Crome, Rogers and Bradford would be taken to Cambridge for a disputation on similar lines to that held in Oxford (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

Crome was a signatory to the letter of 8 May 1554 protesting the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71.

Ridley praised the piety, integrity and constancy of 'D.C.' in a letter he wrote to Hooper, probably in 1554. 1563, pp. 1051-52; 1570, p. 1677; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5. [NB: Only the initials 'D.C.' are given in Foxe's version of the letter, but the name 'Doctor Crome' is given in the version of the letter printed in Letters of the Martyrs, p. 46.]

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Crome was brought before Stephen Gardiner at St Mary Overy's on 30 January 1555. He asked for two months to consider whether he would or would not recant and this was granted to him (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483). [Taken from BL Harley MS 421, fols. 43r and 45r].

A copy of one of Crome's recantations was given to George Marsh in an attempt to persuade Marsh to recant. 1570, p. 1733; 1576, p. 1480; 1583, p. 1563.

Bradford was asked by Heath and Day to read a book that had done Dr Crome good. 1563, p. 1208, 1570, p. 1797, 1576, 1524, 1583, p. 1617.

A letter from Ridley and his fellow prisoners to Bradford and his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench in 1554 stated that Ridley longed to hear of Father Crome, Doctor Sandys, Masters Saunders, Veron, Beacon and Rogers. 1563, p. 1294, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1724.

Foxe refers to Edward Crome's first recantation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Master Tracy secretly took a letter to William Plane and asked him to take it to Crome. Someone read the letter while Plane was out of the house and believed Plane to be the author of its defamatory contents. Plane was sent to the Tower. 1583, p. 2128.

[Also referred to as 'D. C.']

 
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George Brooke

Son of the 9th Lord Cobham

Arraigned on 19 February 1554 but never tried (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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George Cotes

Bishop of Chester (1554 - 1555) (DNB)

George Cotes was presented to the bishopric, January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; and 1583, p. 1467).

He re-established catholic services and ceremonies. 1570, pp. 1735-36; 1576, p. 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, p. 1565.

He imprisoned George Marsh in the episcopal palace. 1563, p. 1119; 1570, pp. 1731 and 1735-36; 1576, pp. 1478 and 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, pp. 1561 and 1565.

He examined Marsh several times and worked earnestly, through both coercion and persuasion, to force him to recant. 1563, pp. 1119-20; 1570, pp. 1736-37; 1576, pp. 1470 [recte 1482]-77 [recte 1483]; 1583, pp. 1565-66.

Cotes condemned Marsh but he delayed reading the sentence in order to give him a last chance to recant. When Marsh refused, Cotes read the sentence and said that he would no longer pray for him. 1563, pp. 1120-21; 1570, pp. 1737-38; 1576, p. 1477 [recte 1483], 1583, p. 1566.

After Marsh's execution, Cotes preached a sermon denouncing Marsh as a heretic. He was subsequently stricken with a fatal venereal disease as divine retribution. 1563, p. 1122; 1570, p. 1738; 1576, p. 1484; 1583, p. 1567.

George Cotes died before Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Foxe calls him 'Coates' and calls the diocese of Chester, 'Westchester'.]

 
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Henry Morgan

(d. 1559)

Bishop of St David's (1554 - 1559). (DNB)

Henry Morgan was appointed to support Thomas Watson in the disputes in the 1553 convocation. He debated with James Haddon, Richard Cheney and debated very extensively with John Philpot (1563, pp. 912-16; 1570, pp. 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1344-47; 1583, pp. 1415-17).

He was appointed Bishop of St David's c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1369; 1583, p. 1467).

Together with Edmund Bonner and Gilbert Bourne, Morgan condemned Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1563, p. 1103; 1570, p. 1712; 1576, pp. 1461-62; 1583, p. 1535.

He interrogated and tried Robert Ferrar in Carmarthen 26 February - 11 March 1555. Morgan condemned Ferrar on 13 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1098-1100; 1570, pp. 1723-24; 1576, pp. 1471-72; 1583, pp. 1554-55.

Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

John Rough, in the presence of the bishop of London, the bishop of St David's and John Feckenham, was degraded and condemned. 1563, p. 1648, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

After his condemnation of Ferrar, Henry Morgan fell ill and suffered greatly until his death. 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

[1563, p. 1704, incorrectly lists him among those who died before Queen Mary.]

 
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Hugh Weston

(1505? - 1558)

Dean of Westminster (1553 - 1556). Archdeacon of Colchester (1554 - 1558). Dean of Windsor (1556 - 1557) [Fasti]. Prolocutor of the Lower House [Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer: A Life (Yale, 1996), pp. 563-68].

Hugh Weston was appointed Prolocutor of the 1553 Convocation, over which he presided and during which he disputed with Philpot and Aylmer (1563, pp. 906-16; 1570, pp. 1571-78; 1576, pp. 1340-47; and 1583, p. 1410-17).

According to a story related to Sir Thomas White (and printed by Foxe), Sir Thomas Wyatt declared from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Edward Courtenay were innocent of any involvement in his treason. Weston, who was on the scaffold, cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise before the Privy Council. Allegedly White, on hearing a report of the incident, denounced Weston as a knave (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Weston was prolocutor (technically Weston was prolocutor of the lower house of convocation) and head of a delegation sent to dispute with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (see MacColloch, Cranmer, p. 563) at the Oxford Disputations (1563, pp. 932 and 936; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1428).

He received the doctors sent from Cambridge to the disputation (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

He presided over the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-85; 1570, pp. 1592-1627; 1576, pp. 1358-88; 1583, pp. 1429-59).

[NB: A brief account of the entire disputations, which mentions Weston throughout, is given on 1563, pp. 933-35; part of this brief account listing the disputants with Ridley was reprinted in 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; and 1583, p. 1441).

Weston presided over John Harpsfield's disputation for his D.D. on 19 April 1554. Weston debated with both Cranmer and Harpsfield (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

Weston presided over the commissioners at the condemnation of Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer on 20 April 1554 (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

Weston received a letter from Ridley of 23 April 1554, protesting that he had broken his promise to allow Ridley to examine a copy of the record of his disputation and also protesting the conduct of the disputation and demanding that Weston show Ridley's written answers to the propositions disputed to the Upper House of Convocation. Weston refused to deliver the letter and also a letter of protest which Cranmer had written to the Privy Council over the Disputations (Ridley's letter - included as part of Ridley's account of the disputation - is printed in 1563, p. 977, but Cranmer's letter and Weston's refusal to deliver the letters are not in this edition (see 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

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Weston received Mary at Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He preached at Paul's Cross on 20 October 1553, exhorting his auditors to pray for souls in purgatory, denouncing the communion table as an oyster board and denouncing Cranmer's recent catechism (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

He attended the execution of Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, (according to Foxe) against the Duke's wishes. Also (according to Foxe) Weston was heckled by the crowd (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, pp. 1467-68).

He participated, together with Gilbert Bourne and Frances Mallet, in an effort to persuade Walter Mantell to recant (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1398; 1583, p. 1468).

When Sir Thomas Wyatt at his execution cleared Elizabeth and the Earl of Devon of involvement in his rebellion, Weston declared that this contradicted what Wyatt had earlier told the Privy Council. Wyatt retorted that what he said now was true (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

A prayer Weston made for the safe delivery of a child by Queen Mary is printed in 1563, p. 1015 (Latin and English versions); 1570, p. 1653; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, pp. 1480-81 (English only).

Foxe calls Weston a man whom 'all good and godly men worthily despise' and prints Laurence Saunders' account of Weston's attempting to persuade Nicholas Grimald and Saunders to recant. 1563, pp. 1041-42; 1570, p. 1667; 1576, p. 1422; 1583, p. 1496.

Weston was reported by Hooper to have obtained a commission in May 1554 to establish a disputation, despite its illegality. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

On 21 March 1555 Bradford talked with Dr Weston, after being told of Weston's intention to visit via the earl of Derby's servant (when master Collier, Warden of Manchester had come to dinner at the Counter). 1576, p.1536. Bradford and Westo spoke to each other in the presence of Master Collier, the earl of Derby's servant, the subdean of Westminster, the keeper (Master Clayden), and others. 1570, 1799-80, 1576, pp.1536-7, 1583, pp.1619-20.

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On 25 February, at about 5pm, Master Weston visited Bradford and asked to speak with him in private. When the two men were alone, Weston thanked Bradford for his writings to him and then produced the work that Bradford had sent him. It was entitled, 'Certayne reasons againste Transubstantiation gathered by John Bradforde, and geuen to Doctour weston and others'. 1563, p. 1212. They discussed transubstantiation. 1563, pp. 1211-12, 1570, pp. 1801-2. [In 1570 this meeting is dated as the afternoon of 28 March].

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On 25 February (1563) or 28 March (1570 onwards) Weston told John Bradford of Grimald's recantation. 1563, p. 1212, 1570, p. 1801, 1576, p. 1538., 1583, p. 1621.

Bradford's reasons against transubstantiation were given to Weston and others. 1563, pp. 1211-12, 1570, pp. 1800-1, 1576, pp. 1537-38, 1583, pp. 1620-21.

On 5 April, at 2pm, Weston went to visit Bradford in the Counter. Weston had not visited him earlier due to ill health and also because he had been busy withstanding monks from entering Westminster. He also thought that Pendleton would be coming to see him. Weston told Bradford that the pope was dead and that Weston had petitioned the queen and so thought that death would not come to Bradford soon. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, pp. 1538-39, 1583, pp. 1621-22.

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As Weston left Bradford on 5 April, he set for Master Weale. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, p. 1539, 1583, p. 1622.

After Weston left Bradford on 5 April, the keeper, Master Claydon, and Steven Bech came to Bradford and spoke unkindly to Bradford even though they had hitherto appeared to be friendly to him. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, pp. 1538-39, 1583, pp. 1621-22.

Weston was one of the audience at the re-examination of Ridley and Latimer and interjected a question. 1563, p. 1363; 1570, p. 1926, 1576, p. 1652, 1583, p. 1761.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayors and sherriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Hugh Weston displeased Pole for being willing to give up his deanery.

Weston was caught committing adultery and appealed to Rome for clemency.

He died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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James Brooks

(1512-60)

Bishop of Gloucester, 1554-58 [DNB, Fasti)

Made bishop of Gloucester, c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Deprived under Elizabeth.

 
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Jehan de Montmorency, Monsieur de Courrieres.

(CSP Dom Mary I, p. 31)

Imperial Ambassador

His arrival 2 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Foxe spells him 'Monsieur Corire'.

 
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John Feckenham

(1518? - 1585)

Dean of St Paul's. Last abbot of Westminster. [DNB]

Feckenham was made dean of St Paul's on Midsummer's Day, 1554. 1563, p. 1151; 1570, pp. 1636 and 1760; 1576, pp. 1396 and 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1467 and 1587

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554 trying to persuade him to recant. 1563, pp. 1153-54; 1570, p. 1762; 1576, p. 1505; 1583, pp. 1588-89

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference was made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Feckenham traveled to Colchester with Bishop Bonner to try to win Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed back to catholicism. 1563, p. 1104; 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He tried to persuade Hooper to recant after he was condemned on 29 January 1555. The effort was unsuccessful but false rumors spread that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

Feckenham was one of those who presided over an examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535.

He was one of those who examined first Thomas Causton, and then Thomas Higbed, in Bonner's palace on 8 March 1555. 1563, p. 1105; 1570, p. 1718; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

He wrote a ballad, Caveat emptor , on the subject of the restoration of monastic lands. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1497; 1583, p. 1559.

Feckenham received a letter from William Paulet. 1563, p. 1239, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

He discussed eucharistic doctrine with Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

Feckenham claimed that Green was converted by Peter Martyr's lectures and that Zwingli, Luther, Oecolampadius and Carolostadius could never agree doctrine. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26,, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Bartlett Green told John Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A letter by the thirteen prisoners reproaching Feckenham for his slander dated Feckenham's sermon as 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

Feckenham spoke up in defence of John Cheke. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

 
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John Grey

(d. 1569)

2nd Marquis of Dorset; uncle of Lady Jane Grey

Captured with his brother, the Duke of Suffolk, on 11 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

Arraigned and convicted of treason on 20 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

Released from the Tower on 30 October 1554 (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473).

 
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John Holyman

(1495 - 1558)

BD (1526). Bishop of Bristol (1553 - 1558). Formerly a monk of Reading. (Fasti; DNB)

Foxe mentions John Holyman's receipt of the bishopric of Bristol in January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583 p. 1467).

An examination of Ridley and Latimer was conducted by White (Lincoln), Brookes (Gloucester) and Holyman (Bristol) on 30 September 1555. White, Brookes and Holyman received their commission from Cardinal Pole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

John Holyman died before Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
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John Moreman

(1490? - 1554)

D.D., vicar of Menheniot, Cornwall; nominated to the deanery of Exeter but he died before presentation. He was a major figure in the diocese of Exeter (see DNB)

John Moreman was one of the champions of catholic doctrine in the disputes in the 1553 convocation; he debated with John Aylmer, John Philpot and Walter Phillips there (1563, pp. 907-09, 912 and 915-16; 1570, pp. 1572-74, 1576 and 1578; 1576, pp. 1341-42, 1344 and 1346-47; 1583, pp. 1411-12, 1414 and 1417).

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Ridley reported, in a letter to Cranmer written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that Moreman had persuaded Sir James Hales to recant (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

Foxe describes Moreman as coadjutor to John Veysey, the bishop of Exeter and then Veysey?s successor (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467). The last is inaccurate but the DNB suggests that Moreman was nominated dean of Exeter but died before he could take up the post.

 
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John Rogers

(1500? - 1555) (DNB)

Martyr.

Foxe describes Rogers' life and career. 1563, pp. 1022-23; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484.

John Rogers preached a sermon at Paul's Cross on 6 August 1553 denouncing 'popery', for which he was placed under arrest. 1563, p. 1023; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484. [NB: This contradicts the next two entries].

On 13 August 1553 Gilbert Bourne (Marian bishop of Bath and Wells) preached a sermon at Paul's Cross, praising Bonner and criticising Edward VI. This sermon incited a fanatic to throw a dagger at him and enraged the mob. John Rogers and John Bradford escorted Bourne to safety (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1570; 1576, p. 1339; and 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]. The story is in Rerum, pp. 464-65, but Rogers is not mentioned in that version).

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On 16 August 1553, Rogers was placed under house arrest by the privy council (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

He was committed to Newgate on 26 January 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Ridley reported to Cranmer, in a letter written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that Crome, Rogers and Bradford would be taken to Cambridge for a disputation on similar lines to that held in Oxford (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

It was rumoured in May 1554 that Rogers, together with Bradford and Saunders, would take part in a disputation to be held in Cambridge (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Rogers was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

He was summoned before Stephen Gardiner at St Mary Overies on 28 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483).

Rogers' examination took place on 29 January 1555. [BL Harley 421, fos.40r-41r. Not printed in Acts and Monuments or Letters of the Martyrs but mentioned in 1563, p. 1029 et seq.]

Bradford's second examination took place on 29 January 1555, directly after the excommunication of John Rogers. 1563, pp. 1188-92, 1570, p. 1784, 1576, p. 1524, 1583, p. 1607.

He was excommunicated and condemned to death by Stephen Gardiner on 29 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483).

His examination and condemnation: 1563, pp. 1026-31; 1570, pp. 1656-62; 1576, pp. 1414-19; 1583, pp. 1484-89. He was examined and condemned with John Hooper on. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, pp. 1433-34; 1583, p. 1507.

Rogers was degraded, with John Hooper, on 4 February 1555. 1563, pp. 1057-58; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, pp. 1434-35; 1583, p. 1508.

Rogers' martyrdom is described. 1563, pp. 1036-37; 1570, pp. 1663-64; 1576, pp. 1419-20; 1583, pp. 1492-93.

When examined by Bonner, John Leafe (who was burned with John Bradford) denied transubstantiation and admitted to being a scholar of John Rogers, and that he believed in the doctrine of Rogers, Hooper and Cardmaker. 1563, p. 1214, 1570, p. 1804, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1623.

In a letter to his mother and others, John Bradford asked that Rogers be remembered. 1570, pp. 1805-06,1576, pp. 1541-42, 1583, p. 1624.

John Rogers' martyrdom was referred to in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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His other writings: (1563, pp. 1031-36; 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, pp. 1489-92).

Rogers was involved in the debate over the clerical wearing of caps. 1563, p. 1732.

 
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John Veysey

(1465? - 1554) (DNB)

Bishop of Exeter

John Veysey enjoyed a brief restoration to the see under Mary.

Veysey was the person to whom Foxe supposed (mistakenly) that Moreman was coadjutor. Cited by bishopric, not name. (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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John White

(1510? - 1560)

Bishop of Lincoln (1554 - 1556), bishop of Winchester (1556 - 1559) (Fasti; DNB)

John White was created bishop of Lincoln in 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was the author of commendatory verses for Philip and Mary's marriage, (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

On 14 February 1555 Percival Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. Then at 3 o'clock the same day, Dr Harding, the bishop of Lincoln's chaplain, went to see Bradford in prison. Harding talked of his fear for Bradford's soul, and that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13.

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An examination of Ridley and Latimer was conducted by White (Lincoln), Brookes (Gloucester) and Holyman (Bristol) on 30 September 1555. White, Brookes and Holyman received their commission from Cardinal Pole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

White was present during the second private conference between Philpot and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-13.

Thomas Benbridge was examined by John White, bishop of Winchester. 1563, p. 1667, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

John White would not be swayed by the truth of Gratwick's argument. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Rochester, a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. He was condemned by Winchester and others.1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

White was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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Lamoral Count of Egmont

(CSP Dom. Mary I, p. 31)

Imperial ambassador

Arrived in England with a party of Imperial ambassadors on 2 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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Lord Thomas Grey

(d. 1554) [DNB sub Thomas, 2nd marquis of Dorset (his father>]

Younger brother to Henry Gray, the duke of Suffolk, and uncle to Lady Jane Grey

Thomas Grey was brought to London 21 February 1554 and put in the Tower (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

He was beheaded soon after 21 February in North Wales (1563, p. 923; 1570, p. 1585; 1576, p. 1352; 1583, p. 1423). [NB: This entry is contradicted by the next and is, in fact, in error.]

He was executed 27 April 1554 (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

[David Loades, Two Tudor Conspiracies (Cambridge 1965), p. 104, has 24 April as the date.]

 
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Maurice Griffith

(d. 1558)

BD (1532). Bishop of Rochester (1554 - 1558). [DNB]

Maurice Griffith was created bishop of Rochester (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1487).

Bradford, in a letter to John Treves, referred to a contention between the master of Katherines Hall and the bishop of Rochester, who was master of Pembroke Hall, as to which should have Bradford as a fellow. 1583, p. 1664.

Rochester condemned Christopher Wade and Nicholas Halle 31 June 1555, and they were burned in July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Margaret Polley was accused and brought before Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, pp. 1859-60, 1576, pp. 1591-92, 1583, p. 1679.

Nicholas Hall was condemned by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester, 31 June 1555, and burned about 19 July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, the chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Joan Beach and John Harpole were examined by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

Stephen Gratwick was condemned by the bishop of Winchester and the bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Richard Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Griffith (Rochester), a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 19 May before the bishop of Rochester, Chichester and others. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned and later burned. 1583, p. 2145.

Maurice Griffith died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
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Nailer

One of the three condemned along with John Grey on 20 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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Philip Nigri

Imperial ambassador and Chancellor of the order of the Golden Fleece (CSP Com. Mary I, p. 31)

His arrival on 2 January 1554 is mentioned by Foxe who calls him 'Chancellour Nigre' (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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Robert Winter

'Master Winter' was placed in the Tower on 11 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

'Maister Winter' was brought to the Guildhall on 28 April 1554, but because of lack of time he was not arraigned (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

His name is given as Robert Winter in J. G. Nichols, ed., The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of two years of Queen Mary, (Cambridge, 1850) Camden Society Original series 48, pp. 63, 75, and 76.

[NB: His release is recorded in The Chronicle of Queen Jane, p. 76].

 
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Sir Edward Hastings

(by 1519 - 1573)

Lord Hastings of Loughborough. MP for Leicester (1547, 1552), Leicestshire (1547, 1553), Middlesex (1533, 1554, 1555). Sheriff of Leicestershire and Middlesex (1550), town clerk of Leicester (1553), bailiff (1553 - 1554). JP Middlesex (1554 - 1558/9), Leicestershire (1558/9). (DNB; Bindoff; Cockayne) Master of the Horse (DNB)

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Sir Edward Hastings was sent to bring Princess Elizabeth to London on 11 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

He was sent as an ambassador, 'I knowe not wither', but it was believed to escort Cardinal Pole to England (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, pp. 1473-74).

After Wyatt's rebellion, Hastings went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Sentence against six martyred at Brentford was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

[Confined to Baynard Castle in 1561 and later sent to the Tower for hearing mass. Recanted and took the oath of supremacy and was released. Retired to Buckinghamshire.]

 
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Sir Edward Warner

(1511- 65)(DNB)

Lieutenant of the Tower under Edward VI, he lost the post under Mary and was actually sent to the Tower with Northampton in January 1554.

Sent to the Tower with Northampton, 25 January 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Released from the Tower on 18 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1482).

 
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Sir George Howard

One of the leaders of the troops sent against Sir Thomas Wyatt (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Foxe calls him 'Sir George Haward'.

 
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Sir Henry Isley

(d. 1554)

Of Sundridge, Kent. JP, Sheriff of Kent (1542–43, 1551–52)

A prominent participant in Wyatt's Rebellion. Executed in 1554 (see CSP Dom. Mary I, p. 99, and Loades, Two Tudor Conspiracies, pp. 77-80, 109, 113 and 127).

Foxe records his being put in the Tower (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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Sir Henry Jerningham

(d. 1571)

Vice-chamberlain of the royal household; captain of the guard (1553). (DNB)

Sir Henry Jerningham took Elizabeth's lady-in-waiting Katherine Ashley and imprisoned her in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jerningham (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Master Jerningham and Thomas Mildmay took Sandys to prison. 1583, p. 2087.

Katherine Ashley was arrested by Jerningham and Norris and imprisoned in the Fleet. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987, 1583, p. 2291.

 
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Sir James Croft

(d. 1591) (DNB)

Sent to the Tower on 21 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; and 1583, p. 1467).

Brought to the Guildhall on 17 April 1554 (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; and 1583, p. 1469).

Arraigned and convicted of treason at the Guildhall on 28 April 1554 (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; and 1583, p. 1469).

Released from the Tower on 18 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; and 1583, p. 1482).

 
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Sir James Hales

(d. 1554)

Judge of the Common Pleas (1547 - 1553) (DNB); father-in-law of Joyce Hales

Sir James Hales is mentioned as opposing the Act proclaiming Lady Jane Grey as heir to Edward VI and is characterised as both 'favouringe true religion' and 'as upright a Iudge as any was in this realme' (1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1336; and 1583, p. 1406).

Hales' exemplary character and piety described (1563, pp. 1113-14).

A brief account of how Hales upheld the statutes passed in Edward's reign against the establishing of altars and the Mass, was imprisoned and attempted suicide (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, pp. 1339-40; and 1583, p. 1410; also see 1563, p. 1114).

After Hales had enforced the Edwardian statues in Kent in the summer of 1553, he came to Westminster at the beginning of the legal term in October 1553 to be sworn in as a justice. Lord Chancellor Stephen Gardiner refused to administer the oath to him unless he abjured. Hales refused. He was arrested soon after. While imprisoned, George Day, William Portman and one Foster sought to persuade him to recant (1563, pp. 1114-15; 1570, pp. 1708-9; 1576, p. 1458; 1583, p. 1532).

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A notice that Hales was committed to the Marshalsea appears in 1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Hales attempted to commit suicide in prison. Afterward, in April 1554, he was released (1563, p. 1115; 1570, p. 1709; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533).

Ridley reported, in a letter to Cranmer, written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that John Moreman had persuaded Sir James Hales to recant (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

Hales succeeded in killing himself (1563, p. 1115; 1570, p. 1709; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533).

Foxe defends Hales' character and suicide (1563, pp. 1116-17; 1570, p. 1709; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533).

 
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Sir Nicholas Throckmorton

(1515 - 1571)

[DNB] [Also Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons]

Sir Nicholas Throckmorton was sent to the Tower on 22 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

He was brought to the Guildhall on 17 April 1554 and arraigned for treason. He defended himself so well, challenging the legality of the laws under which he was being prosecuted as well as arguing his innocence of any wrong doing, that the jury cleared him (1563, p. 1001; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1649).

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Eight members of the jury that acquitted Throckmorton refused to admit wrong doing and were sentenced by Star Chamber to pay 1000 marks apiece and were imprisoned (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473).

Three members of the jury that acquitted him, Whetstone, Lucar and Kightely, were ordered to pay fines of £2,000 each, another five were ordered to pay fines of a thousand marks each and four others, who confessed their fault and asked pardon, were exempted from any fines (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1474).

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On 12 December 1554, five of the eight defiant jurors were released from prison after paying fines of £220 each. On 21 December the remaining three jurors were released from prison after declaring that they could not pay the fines and paid £40 each instead (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480).

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Throckmorton was released from the Tower on 18 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1482).

[Also referred to as 'Sir Nicholas Throgmorton' or 'Throgmerton']

 
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Sir Thomas Wyatt

(1521? - 1554) (DNB)

Sir Thomas Wyatt was the king's ambassador to the emperor before Sir Henry Knyvet. Wyatt's servant William Wolfe was taken on by Knyvet as steward of his household. 1583, p. 1786.

In 1554 Sir Thomas Wyatt led a rebellion in Kent against Mary, provoked by fear that Mary's marriage to Philip would 'bring upon this Realme most miserable and establish popish religion'. The duke of Norfolk was sent against Wyatt but Norfolk's followers deserted and he retreated.

Wyatt advanced on London in February 1554. Wyatt could not gain entry into London and was resisted and apprehended at the Temple Bar. Wyatt was executed. Foxe promises to relate a story about the removal of Wyatt's head from the spike on Hay Hill where it was displayed, but he never did (1563, pp. 916-17; 1570, pp. 1579-80; 1576, pp. 1347-48; and 1583, pp. 1418-19).

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In 1570 et seq. Foxe prints an account of Mary's oration - there is an earlier, different version of this speech in 1563, pp. 1730-31 - at the London Guildhall denouncing Wyatt. Foxe's marginal notes to this speech, in 1570 et seq., defend Wyatt against Mary's charge that Wyatt looted Southwark (1570, p. 1580; 1576, p. 1348; and 1583, p. 1418).

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Foxe states that Wyatt, at his own request, spoke with Edward Courtenay on the day of his execution and, before the Lieutenant of the Tower, got down on his knees and begged forgiveness of Courtenay for having falsely accused both him and Elizabeth of involvement in his rebellion (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1425). [It is reported elsewhere that Wyatt did speak with Courtenay on the day of his execution, but what they said is not known; see J. G. Nichols, (ed.), The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of two years of Queen Mary, (London, 1850) Camden Society Original series 48, pp. 72-73].

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Wyatt also allegedly proclaimed from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Courtenay were innocent of any complicity in his crimes, but Hugh Weston who was also standing on the scaffold cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise to the Privy Council (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Sir Martin Bowes informed Sir Thomas White that he had heard a report circulating at Westminster, that Wyatt had urged Courtenay to confess the truth (1570, pp. 1587- 88; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

During the Star Chamber trial of one Cut, who was charged with sedition for claiming that Wyatt (on the scaffold) had cleared Elizabeth and Courtenay of any complicity in his rebellion, Sir John Brydges, who was present at Wyatt's interview with Courtenay, claimed that Wyatt begged Courtenay to confess the truth and seek the Queen's mercy (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, pp. 1425-26).

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Foxe declares that he will pass over Wyatt's rebellion, as it has been dealt with in more detail elsewhere (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

The execution of Wyatt on 11 April, and his statement that neither Elizabeth or Courtenay were involved in his conspiracy (1563, p. 1001; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

Elizabeth was suspected of being involved in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Thomas Addington

Foxe reports that 'one master Addington' was sent to the Tower on 14 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).An entry in the APC, p. 403, reveals that Addington's first name was Thomas and that he was still in the Tower in March 1554.

 
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Thomas Brooke (Cobham)

Son of the 9th Lord Cobham.

Involved in the Wyatt Rebellion; Foxe reports he was condemned to death for his involvement (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

 
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Thomas Rainolds

(d. 1559

Dean of Exeter (1554–59) (Le Neve, Fasti)

According to Foxe, Rainolds was made Dean of Bristol (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467). This is an error. Rainolds was made Dean of Exeter and Henry Joliffe, Dean of Bristol.

 
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William Brooke

(1527-97)

10th Lord Cobham (Complete Peerage)

Foxe identifies 'Syr W. Cobham' as being involved in Wyatt's Rebellion (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p 1397; 1583, p. 1467). [This is probably a confusion of William with his younger brother, Thomas Brooke].

William is one of George Brooke (Lord Cobham's) sons who was arraigned for treason, but only Thomas was condemned, (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

William was released from the Tower on 24 March 1554 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

1491 [1467]

Queene Mary. New Bishops made. Certeine committed to prison. Straunge sightes. The Duke of Suffolke.

lawes and statutes concerning religion and administration of Sacraments decreed vnder king Edwarde the 6. as is partly aboue touched. In the which Parliament moreouer was appoynted the 20. day of December next ensuing the same yeare. 1553. that all the olde forme and manner of Church seruice, vsed in the last yere of king Henry, should now againe be restored.

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On Newyeares euen being the last of December, the Lorde Marques of Northampton was deliuered oute of the Tower.

MarginaliaA priest of Canterbury repenting his saying Masse.About this time a Priest at Caunterbury sayde Masse on the one day, & the next day after he came into the pulpit and desired all the people to forgeue him, for he said he had betraied Christe, but not as Iudas did, but as Peter did, and there made a long Sermon against the Masse.

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The day after Newyeares day, being the seconde daye of Ianuary, in the yeare of our Lord. 1554. foure Ambassadours came into London from the Emperour, and were honorably receiued. Their names were these. Le Countie de Egmont, Le Countie de Lalen, Mounsieur Corire, Le Chauncellour Nigre.

About this time a great number of newe Byshoppes, Deanes. &c. were chosen, more then were made at one time since the Conquest. Theyr names are these. 

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Some egregious inaccuracies come in a list of Mary's episcopal appointments (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1467). Maurice Griffith's name is given only as 'Mores'. David Pole, who later became Bishop of Peterborough, is listed as Bishop of St. Asaph instead of Thomas Goldwell, the true holder of the see. Thomas Rainolds, who was made Dean of Exeter, is stated to have been made Dean of Bristol (Henry Joliffe actually got this post) and John Moreman is mistakenly declared to have been made Bishop of Exeter. What is revealing here is not only that Foxe must have been repeating errors given by his source, but that if he had made even cursory inquiries, he would have readily discovered that they were errors. (It is also revealing of a larger problem in the Acts and Monuments that all of these errors concern clergy in the west, southwest and Wales, areas about which Foxe was always sketchily informed).

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>


MarginaliaNew Bishops made.D. Holyman B. of Bristow.
D. Coates B. of Westche-
ster.
D. Hopton Byshop of Nor-
wiche.
D. Bourne B. of Bathe.
D. White B. of Lyncolne.
D Mores B. of Rochester. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, 542, fn 1

"Mores." Maurice Griffin was consecrated to this see in April 1554. "Poole," bishop of Asaph, also appears to be an error. Parfew and Goldwell are the only names that occur about the period specified. A David Poole was made bishop of Peterborough in 1557. See Godwin. - ED.


D. Morgan Bishop of S. Da-
uies.
D. Poole B. of S. Asse.

D. Brookes Bish. of Gloce-
ster.
D. Moreman, coadiutour to
the Byshop of Exceter, &
after his decease Byshop
of Exceter.
D. Glin B of Bangor.
Maister Fecknam Deane of
Paules.
D. Rainoldes Deane of Bri-
stow, with others.

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The 12. day of Ianuarie, 

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 543, line 3

For "the 12th of January" the edition of 1563, p. 1000, says "the xiij day of January;" and makes no mention of the next entry.

the Vicechancellour of Cambridge called a congregation generall, wherein amongste other things, he shewed that the Quene would haue there a Masse of the Holy Ghost vppon the 18. daye of Februarie then next following, for that it was her birthe day, whyche was fulfilled the day appoynted, and that very solemnely.

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MarginaliaD. Crome committed to the Fleete.Vpon the Saterday being the 13. of Ianuarie Doctour Crome 

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 543, line 8

There is an allusion to Dr. Crome in Ridley's Letter to Hooper, at p. 643. See ... chapter xi. of vol. iii. of Strype's Memorials. See also Dr. Lamb's "Collection of CCCC. MSS.," London 1838, pp. 20, 27.

was committed to the Fleete. Also vpon the Sonday following, one M. Addington was committed to the Tower. Also this same Sonday knowledge was giuen in the Court openly by the B. of Winchester, MarginaliaThe mariage of Q. Mary.that the marryage betweene the Queenes maiestie & the king of Spaine was concluded, and the day following, being monday and the 15. of Ianuary, the Maior, with the Aldermen and certaine Commoners were at the Court, and there they were commanded by the Lord Chauncellor to prepare the Citie ready to receiue the said king of Spaine, who declared vnto them what a Catholicke, mighty, prudent & wise prince the said king is, with many other commendations of him.

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Vpon the Saterday folowing, being the 20. of Ian. the Court of the first fruites and tenthes was dissolued.

Vpon the Thursday at night, following the 25. day of Ianuarie, the Lorde Marques of Northampton was againe committed to the Tower, and sir Edward Warnar with him. Who were brought to the Tower by the Maior.

MarginaliaIustice Hales committed to the Marshalsey. M. Rogers committed to Newgate.Vppon the Saterdaye followinge, being the 26. of Ianuary, Iustice Hales was committed to the Marshalsee, and the same day maister Rogers was cōmitted to Newgate. Vpon this Saterday, Sonday, and Monday folowing the Londiners prepared a number of souldiors (by the Qneenes commaundement) to goe into Kent against the Commons: whereof were chiefe Captaines the Duke of Northfolke, the Earle of Wormewood, sir Harry Iernyngham,, sir George Haward, and 10. other captaines. Which soldiors when they came to Rochester bridge, where they should haue set vpon their enemies, most of them (as it is sayde) left theyr owne Captaines, and came wholy to the Kentishmen, and so the foresaid Captaines returned to the Court, both void of men and victory, leauing behind them both 6. peeces of ordinance, and treasure.

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Aboute the latter ende of Ianuarie, the Duke of Suffolke with his brethren departed from his house at Shene, and tooke hys voyage into Leycester shyre. 

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The value of his sources might have been considerably enhanced were it not for Foxe's rigorous self-censorship on anything connecting protestants to treason or rebellion. This reaches almost farcical lengths in Foxe's account of Suffolk; a reader of Foxe, with no other information, would be unaware that Suffolk led a rebellion. Rather the duke 'tooke hys voyage into Leycester shyre' (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467); Foxe does not mention the rebellion and here he does not mention Suffolk's capture (he had described it earlier). Foxe never states that Suffolk was convicted of treason, only that he was sentenced to death (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

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After whome was sent the Earle of Huntington to take hym and bring hym to London, who proclaimed the said Duke traytor by the way as he roade.

And thus passing to the moneth of Februarie, heere is to be noted by the way of story, that vpon the 15. day of the sayd moneth being Thursday, there was seene wythin the Citie of London, aboute 9. of the clocke in the forenoone, straunge sightes. MarginaliaStraunge sightes seene before the comming in of king Phillip, and subuersion of Religion.There was seene two Sunnes both shi-

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ning at once, the one a good prety way distaunt from the other. At the same time was also seene a Rainebowe turned contrary, and a great deale higher then hath bene accustomed. The common standinge of the Raynebowe is thus ⁀ but thys stoode thus ‿ with the heade downward, and the feete as it were vpwarde. Both these sightes were sene, as wel at Westminster, in Cheapeside, on the Southside of Paules, as in very many other places, and that by a great number of honest men. Also certaine Aldermen went out of the Guild Hall to beholde the sight.

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Commentary  *  Close

After following his chronicle source(s) through the minutiae of events in London in 1553-54, Foxe suddenly passes over Wyatt's rebellion and Suffolk's uprising 'because most of these matters have bene briefly touched before, or els may be founde in other Chronicles' (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1468).

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As touching the rising of master Wyate, with Syr W. Cobham and others in Kent, and there comming to London in the moneth of Februarie: also of the Queenes comming to the Guilde Hall, and her Oration there made: and after of the taking of the said Wyat and his company: likewise of the apprehension of the Duke of Suffolke with his brother Lord Iohn Gray: and the next day 
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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 544, line 9

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'and the next day' to 'and, the second day after' in the text.} It has been necessary to correct two inaccuracies in this passage:

(1.) Foxe here says, "and the next day after;" the effect of which is to place the arrival of the duke of Suffolk and his brother in the Tower to Sunday February 11th; whereas that occurred on the Saturday: for Fabian mentions their arrest by the earl of Huntington as having taken place February 6th; and Stow says:

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"The tenth of Februarie the earle of Huntington and other gentlemen, and to the number of 300 horsemen, brought into the Towre as prisoners the duke of Suffolke, and the lord John Grey his brother, from Coventry, where the D. had remained three dayes after his taking in the house and custody of Christopher Warren, Alderman there:" all which is confirmed by Robert Swifte, writing thus to the earl of Shrewsbury on Monday, February 12th. - (Lodge's Illustrations, vol. i. p. 190.) - "The erle of Huntyngton, furnyshed wt. IIC horsemen wt. staves and bowes, browght thowrow London upon Saturdaye at afternone the Dewke of Suffolke and the Lord Iohn his brother, and so conducted them to the Towre."

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after of beheading of Lord Gildford and Lady Iane, which was the 12. day of February, MarginaliaThe Lady Elizabeth sent for.and how the day before, which was 11. of the sayd moneth, Lord William Haward and sir Edwarde Hastings, were sent for the Ladie Elizabeth: 
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Cattley/Pratt, VI, 544: Appendix: ref page 544, line 9

{Cattley/Pratt alters '11.' to '10' in the text.} (2.) ... Foxe says, "how the day before, which was the 11th of the said month, Lord William Howard and Sir Edward Hastings were sent for the Lady Elizabeth;" whereas Mr. Tytler, in his "Reigns of Edward VI. and Mary" (vol. ii. p. 426), prints a letter from the State Paper Office, which, as curious and bearing on the point, is here reprinted:

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"The Lord Admiral, Sir Edward Hastings, and Sir Thomas Cornwaleys, to the Queen.

"Orig. St. Paper Off. Domestic, 11th Feb. 1553-4.

"In our humble wise. It may please your Highness to be advertized, that yesterday, immediately upon our arrival at Ashridge, we required to have access unto my Lady Elizabeth's Grace; which obtained, we delivered unto her your Highness's letter; and I, the Lord Admiral, declared the effect of your Highness's pleasure, according to the credence given to us, being before advertized of her estate by your Highness's physicians, by whom we did perceive the estate of her body to be such, that, without danger of her person, we might well proceed to require her in your Majesty's name (all excuses set apart) to repair to your Highness with all convenient speed and diligence.

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"Whereunto we found her Grace very willing and conformable; save only that she much feared her weakness to be so great that she should not be able to travel and to endure the journey without peril of life, and therefore desired some longer respite until she had better recovered her strength; but in conclusion, upon the persuasion as well of us as of her own council and servants, whom we assure your Highness we have found very ready and forward to the accomplishment of your Highness's pleasure in this behalf, she is resolved to remove her hence to-morrow towards your Highness, with such journeys as by a paper herein enclosed your Highness shall perceive: further, declaring to your Highness that her grace much desireth, if it might stand with your Highness's pleasure, that she may have a lodging at her coming to the court, somewhat further from the water than she had at her last being there; which your physicians, considering the state of her body, thinketh very meet, who have travailed very earnestly with her Grace, both before our coming and after, in this matter.

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"And after her first day's journey one of us shall await upon your Highness to declare more at large the whole estate of our proceedings here. And, even so, we shall most humbly beseech Christ, long to preserve your Highness in honour, health, and the contentation of your godly heart's desire.

"From Ashridge, the 11th of February, at four of the clock in the afternoon.

"Your Highness's most humble and bounden Servants and subjects,


W. Howard.
Edward Hastings.
T. Cornwaleys."
Enclosure.
"The order of my lady Elizabeth's Grace voyage to the court:-
"Monday. - Imprimis, to Mr. Cooke's, vi. miles.
Tuesday. - Item, to Mr. Pope's, viii. miles.
Wednesday. - To Mr. Stamford's, vii. miles.
Thursday. - To Highgate, Mr. Cholmeley's house, vii. miles.
Friday. - To Westminster, v. miles."

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Swifte's letter also to the earl of Shrewsbury, above referred to, under date of Monday, Feb. 12, says: - "Three days ago [or Saturday, Feb. 10], the lady Elizabeth was sent for, but as yet she is not come, whatever the let is." He also says, "This day lady Jane was beheaded. Also this day, the earl of Devonshire was sent to the Tower."

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It is pretty plain that Elizabeth was too ill for the above plan to be adhered to, for she did not arrive in town till February 22 or 23 (see Appendix to vol. viii. note on p. 606), and probably it is to the Lord Admiral's considerate conduct on this occasion that we are to ascribe the good opinion of him which Elizabeth expressed to the count de Feria, November 10, 1558, just before Mary's death. (See Memorias de la Real Acadamia de la Historia, vol. vi. p. 255. Madrid, 1832.)

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(3.) That Sir H. Iseley and the others mentioned by Foxe were brought to the Tower on Sunday the 11th, is confirmed thus by Stow:

"The 11 day Sir Henry Isley, who had fled, was brought into the Tower prisoner in an old friese coat, and an old paire of hosen, all his apparell not worth 4s. The same day came in two of the Culpeppers, one Cromer, and Thomas Rampton, the duke of Suffolkes secretary."

and how the same Sonday, Syr Harrye Iseley, M. Culpeper, and M. Winter were committed to the Tower, MarginaliaThe byshop of Winchester preacheth.the B. of Winchester, the same daye being the 11. of Februarie, preaching before the Queene, and perswading her to vse no mercy towarde these Kentishmen, but seuere execution, all whyche was in the moneth of February: because most of these matters haue bene briefly touched before, or els may be founde in other Chronicles, I wil cease to make any further story of them: hauing somwhat notwithstanding to declare touching the rainment and death of the Duke of Suffolke.

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MarginaliaThe Duke of Suffolke arraigned.Vppon Saterday, beinge the 17. day of Februarye, the Duke of Suffolke was arraigned at Westminster, and the same day condemned to die by his Peres, the Earle Arundel was chiefe Iudge for this day.

Vppon the Sonday following, which was the 18. day of the sayd moneth, Sessions was kept in London, whych hath not before bene sene to be kept vpon the Sonday.

Vpon the monday the 19. of Februarie, the Lord Cobhams 3. sonnes, and 4. other men were arraigned at Westminster: of whiche sonnes the youngest was condemned, whose name is Thomas, and the other two came not at the barre, and the other 4. were condemned.

MarginaliaThe Lord Iohn Gray arraygned.Vpon the Tuesday being the 20. of February, the Lord Iohn Gray was araigned at Westminster, and there condemned the same day, and other 3. men, whereof one was named Nailer.

Vpon the Wedensday the 21. of Februarie, the L. Thomas Gray, and sir Iames Croft were broughte throughe London to the Tower with a number of horsemen.

MarginaliaSir Nicholas Throgmorton committed to the Tower.Vpon the Thursday being the 22. of Februarie, syr Nicholas Throgmorton was committed to the Tower.

Vppon the Friday being the 23. of Februarie. 1554. the Duke of Suffolke was beheaded at the Tower hil, the order of whose death heere followeth. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 544, line 10 from the bottom

This date is correct: see the note above on p. 425. The Cotton MS. Vittell. F. 5, most unaccountably dates the beheading of the duke of Suffolk "the xxiij day of March."

The godly ende and death of the Duke of Suffolke beheaded at Tower hil. An. 1554. Febr. 23. 
Commentary  *  Close
Block 25: Mantel's apology

The account of Suffolk's death and the printing of the 'apology' of Walter Mantel (the elder) are both in the Acts and Monuments for one reason: to exorcise the spectre of Northumberland and his recantation. Without explicitly mentioning Northumberland, Foxe could use the constancy of these high-profile protestants to counteract the charge (made decades earlier by Thomas More) that the protestants were unwilling to die for their faith.

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MarginaliaThe order and maner of the Duke of Suffolkes death.ON Friday the 23. of February. 1554. about 9. of þe clocke in the fore noone, the Lorde Henrie Gray duke of Suffolke, was broughte foorth of the Tower of London vnto the Scaffolde on the Tower hill, wyth a greate company, &c. and in his comming thither, there accompanied him Doctor Weston as his Ghostly father, MarginaliaD. Weston the Dukes Ghostly father, against the Dukes will.notwythstanding, as it should seeme, against the will of the sayde Duke. For when the Duke went vp to the Scaffolde, the sayd Weston being on his left hand, preased to goe vp wyth hym. MarginaliaWeston put back by the Dukes hād.The Duke with his hand put him downe againe of the staires: and Weston taking holde of the Duke, forced hym downe likewise. And as they ascended the second time, the Duke againe put him downe.

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Then Weston sayde that it was the Queenes pleasure he shoulde so doe. Wherewyth the Duke casting hys handes abroade, ascended vppe the Scaffolde, and paused a pretie while after. And then he sayde: MarginaliaThe wordes of the Duke to the people.Maisters I haue offended the Queene, and her lawes, and thereby am iustly condemned to die, and am willing to die, desiring all men to be obedient, and I praye God that thys my death may be an ensample to all men, MarginaliaThe godly fayth and confession of the Duke at his death.beseeching you all to beare mee witnesse, that I die in the faithe of Christe, trusting to bee saued by his bloude onely, and by no other trumperie, the whych died for me, and for all them that truely repent, and stedfastly trust in him. And I do repent, desiring you all to pray to God for me, that when you see my breathe departe frō me, you wil pray to God that he may receiue my soule. And then he desired all men to forgeue him, saying that the Queene had forgeuen him.

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Then
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