Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Julius III
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Julius III

Pope (1550 - 1555)

Born Giovanni Maria Ciocchi del Monte

Received a letter dated 30 November 1554 from King Philip of England announcing the restoration of Catholicism to England (1563, pp. 1011-12; 1570, p. 1650; 1576, pp. 1407-8; 1583, p. 1478).

Received a letter from Cardinal Pole, dated 30 November 1554, announcing the restoration of Catholicism to England (1563, pp. 1012-13 [in Latin, only in this edition]; pp. 1013-14; 1570, pp. 1650-51; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, pp. 1478-79).

Received a message from Parliament asking him to confirm the purchasers of monastic lands and chantry lands in their current ownership (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 4179 [recte 1479]).

Reconciled England to Rome and absolved the English (1563, pp. 1083-84; 1570, p. 1707; 1576, p. 1457;1583, p. 1531).

Issued a bull excommunicating anyone who retained monastic lands or Church property (1570, p. 1729;1576, p. 1477; 1583, pp. 1559-60).

Permitted homosexuality in the papal court (1563, p. 1117; 1570, p. 1730; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1560).

Proclaimed a jubilee, presided over the Council of Trent and sponsored the shrine of Our Lady ofLoretto (1563, p. 1117; 1570, p. 1730; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1560).

Foxe relates anecdotes concerning his gluttony (1563, pp. 1117-18; 1570, p. 1730; 1576, p. 1477; 1583,p. 1560).

Stephen Gardiner issued instructions for Julius's funeral in April 1555 (1563, p. 1118; 1570, p. 1730;1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1560).

A London woman was imprisoned for refusing to pray for Julius III at his funeral ceremonies (1563, p.1118; 1570, p. 1730; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1560).

1502 [1478]

Queene Mary. Absolution by the Cardinall. King Phillips letter, and the Cardinalls to the Pope.
MarginaliaAnno 1554 Nouember¶ An absolution pronounced by Cardinall Poole, to the whole Parliament of England, in the presence of the King and Queene. 
Commentary  *  Close

The description of Pole's absolution of parliament (in response to its submission) does not come from Elder. A copy of the absolution (in an English translation identical to Foxe's) survives in Foxe's papers (cf. Inner Temple Library, Petyt MS 538/47, fol. 39r with 1563, p. 1011; 1570, p. 1649; 1576, p. 1407; 1583, p. 1478). The account of the absolution being read was probably based on notes made by an eyewitness. The text of the absolution itself was probably translated from a contemporary tract, the Copia delle lettere del Serenissimo Re d'Inghilterra et del Reverendissimo Card. Polo Legato della S. Sede Apostolica alla Santita di N. S. Iulio Papa III sopra la reduttione di quel Regno alla unione della Santa Madre chiefa et obedienza della Sede Apostolica (Rome, 1554), sig. A6r-v. As was so often the case, the Latin original of the absolution was printed, along with a translation, in 1563, but was dropped from later editions.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAbsolution from the pope geuen to the realme of England. OVr Lord Iesus Christ which with his most precious bloud hath redemed and washed vs frō all our sinnes and iniquities, that he might purchase vnto himselfe a glorious spouse without spot or wrinckle, & whō the Father hath appoynted head ouer all his church: he by his mercy absolue you. And we by apostolick authority geuen vnto vs by the most holy lord Pope Iulius the 3. his Vicegerent in earth) MarginaliaChristes absolution not sufficiēt, without the Popes be ioyned withall. do absolue & deliuer you, and euery of you with the whole Realme and the Dominions therof, from all Heresy and Schisme, and from all and euerye iudgement, Censures, and paynes, for that cause incurred: MarginaliaEngland brought frō Gods blessing into the warme sunne. & also so we do restore you agayn, vnto the vnity of our Mother the holy Church: as in our Letters more playnely it shall appeare: In the name of the father, of the sonne, and of the holy Ghost.

[Back to Top]

When all this was done they went into the Chappell, and there singing Te Deum, MarginaliaTe deum song but with heauy hartes God knoweth.with great solemnity, declared the ioy and gladnesse that for this reconciliatiou was pretended.

The reporte of thys was with great speede sent vnto Rome, as well by the king and Cardinals Letters, which hereafter folow: as also otherwise. MarginaliaGreat ioy at Rome for the conuersion of England & good cause why.Wherupō the pope caused there at Rome processions to be made, 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 572, line 11 from the bottom

This may be confirmed if necessary from Spondanus: "His interim Romam celeriter perlatis, propter lætissimæ rei nuncium supplicationes publicæ decretæ fuere, non in Urbe solum, sed per Italiam universam, gratiis Deo agendis, ipso summo Pontifice sacra mysteria Romæ celebrante, et Indulgentiam ad modum Jubilæi per Christianum orbem in gratiarum actionem publicante." (Spondan. Annales Eccles. an. 1554, ¶ 3.) Sanders had employed nearly the same language: see Raynaldi, Annales ad an. 1554, ¶ 14.

[Back to Top]
and thankes to be geuē to God with great ioy, for the conuersion of England to his Churche: and therefore praysing the Cardinals diligence, and the deuotion of the king and queen, on Christmas euen, by his Buls he set forth a generall pardō to all such as did truely reioyce for the same.

[Back to Top]
¶ A copy of king Philips Letter, written with his owne hand to Pope Iulius, touching the restoring of the Realme of England. 
Commentary  *  Close

Philip's letter to Julius III, announcing the reconciliation of England to the catholic church, was printed in all four editions (1563, pp. 1011-12; 1570, p. 1650; 1576, pp. 1407-08; 1583, p. 1478). Pole's letter to Julius III, announcing the same reconciliation, was also printed in all four editions (1563, pp. 1012-14; 1570, pp. 1650-51; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, pp. 1478-4179 [recte 1479]), although the original Latin version of the letter was printed only in the 1563 edition. The source of both letters was a contemporary tract, the Copia delle lettre del Serenissimo Re d'Inghilterra et del Reverendissimo Card. Polo Legato della S. Sede Apostolica alla Santita di N. S. Iulio Papa III sopra la reduttione di quel Regno alla unione della Santa Madre chiefa et obedienza della Sede Apostolica (Rome, 1554). Pole's letter is printed on sigs. A3v-A5r and Philip's letter, in its original Spanish, on sig. A2r-v, in an Italian translation on sigs. A2v-A3r. (Foxe states that he had the letter translated from Spanish. His willingness to go to this trouble is an indication of the importance he attached to this letter).

[Back to Top]
 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI Appendix: ref page 572, bottom

The title of Philip's letter runs thus in the first edition: "A copye of a Letter of Philip King of Spain, and at that time of England also, written with his own hand to Pope Julius the third, touching the restoring of the Realm of England to the obedience of the Sea of Rome, translated out of the Spanish tongue, as it was first written, into the English tongue."

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaNouember. 30. MarginaliaK. Phillips letter to the Pope, translated out of Spanish into English. MOst holy Father, I wrote yesterday vnto Don Iohn Maurique,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 572, fn 3

See Raynaldi, Annales ad an. 1554, ¶ 21. "Con este despacho partio don Juan Manrique para Roma." (Seg. parte de la Vida del Emp. Carlos Quinto por Sandoval; book 31, ¶ 9, an. 1551.)

that he shoulde declare by worde of mouth, or els write to your holynes, in what good state the matter of religion stoode in this Realme, and of the submission to your holinesse, as to the chiefe. As this day, which is the feast of S. Andrew, late in the euening, we haue done God that seruice (to whose onely goodnesse we must impute it, and to your holynes, who haue taken so great payne to gayne these soules) that this realme with full & generall consent of all them that represent the state, being very penitēt for that was past and well bent to that they come to doe, submitted themselues to youe holynes, & to that holy Sea, whom at the request of the Queene and me, your Legate did absolue. And forasmuch as the sayd Don Iohn shall signify vnto your holinesse, all that passed in this matter, I will write no more therof, but onely that the Queene & I, as most faythful & deuout children of your holynes, haue receiued the greatest ioy and comfort hereof, that may be expressed with tong: Considering that besides the seruice done to God hereby, it hath chaunced in the time of your holynes, to place as it were in the lappe of the holy Catholicke churche, such a kingdome as this is. And therfore I thinke I cannot be thankefull enough for that is done this day. And I trust in hym, that your holynesse shall alway vnderstand, that the holy sea hath not had a more obedient sonne then I, not more desirous to preserue and encrease the authority of the same. God guid and prosper the most holy personage of your holinesse as I desire. From London the xxx. of Nouember. 1554.

[Back to Top]


Your holines most humble
Sonne the king. &c.

¶ Here foloweth likewise the Cardinals letter to the sayd Pope concerning the same matter. 
Commentary  *  Close

Philip's letter to Julius III, announcing the reconciliation of England to the catholic church, was printed in all four editions (1563, pp. 1011-12; 1570, p. 1650; 1576, pp. 1407-08; 1583, p. 1478). Pole's letter to Julius III, announcing the same reconciliation, was also printed in all four editions (1563, pp. 1012-14; 1570, pp. 1650-51; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, pp. 1478-4179 [recte 1479]), although the original Latin version of the letter was printed only in the 1563 edition. The source of both letters was a contemporary tract, the Copia delle lettre del Serenissimo Re d'Inghilterra et del Reverendissimo Card. Polo Legato della S. Sede Apostolica alla Santita di N. S. Iulio Papa III sopra la reduttione di quel Regno alla unione della Santa Madre chiefa et obedienza della Sede Apostolica (Rome, 1554). Pole's letter is printed on sigs. A3v-A5r and Philip's letter, in its original Spanish, on sig. A2r-v, in an Italian translation on sigs. A2v-A3r. (Foxe states that he had the letter translated from Spanish. His willingness to go to this trouble is an indication of the importance he attached to this letter).

[Back to Top]
 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, 573, fn 1


The Latin copy of this letter is in the First Edition, pp. 1012. 1013 - ED.
Addenda:This and other similar papers were published at the time in the shape of separate tracts, some of them at Milan in 1554 and 1555. There are copies in the Grenville collection (see Biblioth. Grenv. vol. ii. pp. 447, 561).

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Cardinalls letter to the Pope for the reclaming agayne of England to his Sea. THose things which I wrote vnto your holines of late, of that hope, which I trusted would come to passe, that in short space this realme would be reduced to the vnity of the church, & obedience of the Apostolick sea, though I did write them them not without great cause: yet neuerthelesse, I could not be voyd of all feare, not onely for that difficulty, which the mindes of our countreymen did shew, beyng so long alienated from the sea Apostolicke, and for the old hatred which they had borne so many yeares to that name: but much more I feared, least the first entry into the cause it self shuld be put of by some other by matter or conuention comming betwixt.

[Back to Top]

For the auoyding wherof, I made great meanes to the king and Queene, which litle needed, for their own godly forwardnes, and earnest desire to bring the thing to passe, farre surmounted my great and earnest expectation. This day in the euening being S. Andrewes day, (who fyrst brought his brother Peter to Christ) it is come to passe by

[Back to Top]

the prouidence of God, that this Realme is reclaymed to geue due obedience to Peters seat and your holynesse, by whose meanes it may be cōioyned to Christ the head, & his body, which is the Church. The thing was done and concluded in Parliament (the king and queene being present) with such full consent & great reioysing, that incontinently after I had made my Oration, and geuen the Benediction with a great ioy, and shout, there was diuers time sayde, Amen, Amen: which doth euidently declare, that that holy seed, although it hath bene long oppressed, yet was not vtterly quenched in them: which chiefly was declared in the Marginalia* The Popes authority as much welcome to the Nobilitie of England, as water into the shippe.* Nobility. Returning home to my house, these thinges I wrote vnto your holynes vpon the sodaine reioysing that I had of so weighty a matter, so luckely brought to passe by the diuine prouidence, thinking to haue sent my letters by the kings post, who? for (as it was sayd) should haue departed shortly: but afterwardes, chaunging my purpose, when I had determined to send one of mine owne men, I thought good to adde this much to my Letters, for the more ample gratulation and reioysing at that good chaūce: which thing as it was right great gladnes to me, through the euent of the same (being it selfe very great, and so holy, so profitable to the whole Church, so healthsome to this my Countrey, which brought me forth, so honorable to þe same (which receiued me) so likewise I tooke no lesse reioysing of þe Princes themselues, through whose vertue and godlinesse the matter did take successe and perfection. Of how many, and how great things may the Church (which is the spouse of Christ, & our mother) make her accompt through those her children? Oh notable zeale of godlines, Oh auncient fayth MarginaliaOh dissimulatiō of a flattering Cardinall. which vndoubtedly doth so manifestly appeare in thē both that who so seeth them, muste needes (whether he wyll or no) say the same which the Prophette spake of, of the firste children of the Church: Isti sunt semen, cui benedixit Dominus. Hæc plantatio Domini ad gloriandum. That is. These are the seede which the Lord hath blessed. This is the Lordes planting to glory in. How holily did your holines with al your authority and earnest affection fauour this mariage, which truly semeth to expresse a great similitude of þe highest king, MarginaliaWhat similitude is betwixt light and darcknes, 2. Cor. 6.which being heyre of the world, was sēt down by his father from the Regall seat, to be Spouse and Sonne of the Virgine, & by this meanes to comfort all mankind: for euen so this king himselfe, MarginaliaCardinal Poole flattereth the king.the greatest heyre of all men which are in the earth, leauing his fathers kingdoms that are most great, is come into his litle kingdome, and is become both the spouse, and sonne of this Virgine (for he so behaueth himselfe as though he were a sonne, whereas in deed he is an husbande) that he might (as he hath in effect already performed) shew himselfe an ayder & helper to recōcile this people to christ, & his body, which is the church. Which things seing they are so, what may not our mother the Churche her selfe looke for at his handes that hath broughte this to passe, to conuerte the hartes of the Fathers towardes theyr Sonnes, and the vnbeleuers to the wisedome of the righteous, which vertue truely doth wōderfully shine in him. But the Queene, which at that time when your holines sent my Legate vnto her, did rise vp as a rodde of incēce springing out of the trees of mirre, and as Frankincence out in the desert, she I say, whiche a litle before was forsakē of all men, how wonderfully doth she now shine? what a sauour of myrre & frankincēce doth she geue forth vnto her people? which (as þe Prophet saith, of the mother of Christ MarginaliaScripture well applyed.) brought forth before she laboured, before she was deliuered brought forth a man childe, who euer heard of such a thing? and who hath seene the lyke of this? shal þe earth bring forth in one day, or shal a whole natiō be brought forth together? But she hath now brought forth a whole nation before the time of that deliuery, wher of we are in most great hope.

[Back to Top]

How great cause is geuen to vs to reioyce? How great cause haue we to geue thankes to Gods mercy, your holines and the Emperors maiesty, which haue bene causers of so happy and so godlye a mariage, by whiche we beyng reconciled, are ioyned to God the father, to Christ & to the Church? of the which, although I cannot comprehend in wordes the ioy that I haue taken, yet I can not keepe silence of it. And to this my reioysing, this also was ioyned (which whē I had perceiued by the letters of the reuerend Archb. of Consane, 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref 574, line 38


This archibishop of Conza in the kingdom of Naples (not Cosenza in Calabria, as writers sometimes state) was perhaps Thaddeus Gaddi, a Florentine, who was made cardinal of St. Sylvester in 1557, and died 1516{sic}: he had succeeded his uncle, Nicolas Gaddi (also a cardinal, who died 1562,) in the archbishopric of Conza. (Moreri, vv. Cardinal and Gaddi.) But others think Hieronymus Muzzarelli rather to be intended.
Addenda:Hieronymus Muzzarelli seems rather to be the right man: "A Julio III. allectus est [Hieron. Muzzarellus] sacri Palatii magister, et anno 1553 die xi Dec. ab eodem ad sedem Compsanam evectus, ac paulo post ad Carolum V. Imp. de gravissimis negotiis nuntius Apostolicus missus." Quetif. Scripp. Ord. Præd. ii. 179.

[Back to Top]
your holynes Nuncio, with the Emperours maiestye, brought me maruelous great gladnes) þt your said holynes began to restore to þe aūciēt bewty, those thinges which in the Church of Rome through the corruptiō of times were deformed, which truely whē it shalbe finished, thē in deede may we wel cry out with þe Prophet, and speake vnto your holynes with these wordes. MarginaliaThe Scripture speaking of Sion and Ierusalem, vnaptly applyed to the Pope. Exue te stola luctus & vexationis & indue te decore, qui a deo tibi est in gloria sempiterna: nominabitur enim tibi nomen tuum a deo sempiternū, pax iustitiæ, & honor pietatis. Tum autē dicetur, cir-

[Back to Top]
cum-
QQQqiij.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield