Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Catherine Martyr

(d. 1552)

Wife of Peter Martyr Vermigli

Brooks (Gloucester), Ormaneto, Robert Morewen (president of Corpus Christi college), Cole and Wright were members of the commission sent to have Peter Martyr's wife's body exhumed. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Matthew Parker, Edmund Grindall and Richard Goodrick requested that the body of Peter Martyr's wife be buried honourably. 1563, p1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

She was reburied in Richard Marshall's dunghill. 1563, p1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Calfside, the sub-dean of the college, saw that she was reburied appropriately. 1563, p1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

 
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Henry Cole

(1500? - 1580)

LL.D. (1556 - 1557) Archdeacon of Ely (1553). Provost of Eton (1554). Dean of St Paul's (1556). Vicar general to Cardinal Pole. Judge of the archiepiscopal court. Dean of the Arches (1557). (DNB)

Henry Cole was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. During the debates, Cole had short acrimonious exchanges with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 932, 938, 944-46, 951, 955, 969 and 972; 1570, pp. 1591, 1593, 1581[recte 1597]-99, 1602 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362-64, 1367 and 1371; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430, 1433-35, 1438 and 1440-41).

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Later in the disputation, he interrupted the debate and called Latimer a liar (1563, p. 984; 1570, p. 1627; 1576, p 1388; and 1583, p. 1458).

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon for Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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Henry Cole was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Cole was sent to King's College, Cambridge, to examine certain scholars on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He was awarded a doctorate at Cambridge. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

William Holcot was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

Cole was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

He was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Her ninth examination took place before the dean. 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

Cole was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Brookes

(1512 - 1560).

DD (1546). Master of Balliol (1547). Vice chancellor of Oxford (1552). Bishop of Gloucester (1554 - 1559). Deprived of his see upon the accession of Elizabeth. Committed to prison where he died. (DNB)

James Brookes was made bishop of Gloucester, c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was deprived under Elizabeth.

James Brookes was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

The examinations of John Hunt and Richard White before the bishops of Salisbury and Gloucester (Brookes and Capon), Dr. Geffre (chancellor) took place on 26 April 1557. 1570, p. 2254, 1576, p. 1947, 1583, p. 2054.

Foxe says that James Brookes died before Queen Mary, but he did not die until 1560. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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James Calfhill [or Calfield]

(1530? - 1570)

DD (1565) Ordained deacon (1559) and then priest (1560). Canon of Christ Church (1560). Canon of St Paul's (1562). Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity at Oxford (1564). Archdeacon of Colchester (1565 - 1570) (DNB)

Foxe prints Latin verses responding to John White's Latin verses in praise of Philip and Mary's marriage. In 1563, Foxe credits these verses to 'James Caufield' (1563, p. 1005). In later editions, they are merely credited to 'I.C.' (1570, pp. 1642-43; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1472).

[The records do not reveal a James Caufield or Caulfield for this period. But Foster (under 'Calfhill, James') states that his name was given in the records as Calfill, Calfield or Calfide. Calfhill would make eminent sense as the author of these verses having the protestant zeal, learning and ties to Foxe.]

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Calfhill is described by Foxe as the sub-dean of Corpus Christi College. 1563, p. 1559, 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

He requested that Peter Martyr's wife's bones be rehoused in their original resting place, along with those of Frideswide. 1563, p. 1559, 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

[Foxe refers to James Calfield as James Calfhill. Also referred to as James 'Caufield']

 
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John Redman

(1499 - 1551)

DD (1537). Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1546 - 1551). Relative of Cuthbert Tunstall. (DNB)

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and Latin of the letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught. Latimer's brief response is also included. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Foxe includes Redman's epitaph or funeral verses on the death of Martn Bucer. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152 [cross reference to 1563 only], 1576, p. 1859 [cross reference to 1563 only], 1583, p. 1968.

Redman was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside Drs Young, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

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Matthew Parker

(1504 - 1575)

DD (1538) Archbishop of Canterbury (1559 - 1575). (DNB)

Matthew Parker preached honourably at the death of Bucer. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Matthew Parker, Edmund Grindall and Richard Goodrick requested that the body of Peter Martyr's wife be buried honourably. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Elizabeth replaced Cardinal Pole with Parker as archbishop of Canterbury. 1583, p. 2124.

 
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Nicholas Ormaneto [or Ormanet]

An Italian. Incorporated LLD from Padua (1556 - 1557). Arch-priest of Bozzola, Verona. The pope's datary [chief officer who dispensed benefices]. Sat on Council of Trent. (Venn)

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. Ormanet was chosen because he had the trust of Pope Julius III. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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Ormanet was one of the cardinal's visitors who had a commission to have the bones of Peter Martyr's wife dug up and burned. 1563, pp. 1558 [recte 1570]-1559 [recte 1571].

Nicholas Ormanet was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

He was held in high esteem by Julius III. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

His actions at mass shocked Swinborne. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

He wrote the fair copy of the sentence of condemnation for the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1959.

On 14 January 1557 Ormaneto had planned to anneal the sick, but the milk was too rank to mix with the oil. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1960.

Ormaneto carefully observed the wearing of a surplice at Cambridge during his visit as part of the queen's commission. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1960.

He was awarded a doctorate at Cambridge. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1960.

He was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

[Foxe calls him Ormanet. Also known as Datary.]

 
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Reginald Pole

(1500 - 1558)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1555 - 1558) and cardinal. [DNB] Papal legate (1554 - 1557) [Hillerbrand, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation; T. F. Mayer, Reginald Pole, Prince and Prophet (2000)]

On 7 November 1554, two ambassadors were sent abroad. The rumour was that they were sent to escort Pole to England (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473).

Pole landed at Dover on 21 November 1554 and on the same day an act was passed in parliament repealing the act of attainder passed against him in Henry VIII's reign (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475; cf. the account of this in 1563, p. 1008). Another notice of the act of attainder against Pole being repealed (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, p. 1481).

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Pole arrived at Lambeth on 24 November 1554 (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475).

He arrived at parliament on 27 November 1554 and made an oration there, praising England's previous catholic fidelity, deploring the reformation and extolling papal power (1563, pp. 1008-10; 1570, pp. 1647-49; 1576, pp. 1405-7; 1583, pp. 1476-78).

He pronounced a papal absolution in parliament on 28 November 1554 (1563, pp. 1010-11; 1570, p. 1649; 1576, p. 1407; 1583, pp. 1477-78).

Reginald Pole sent a letter to Pope Julius III on 30 November 1554 announcing the restoration of catholicism in England. 1563, pp. 1013-14 [in Latin, only in this edition, pp. 1012-13] ; 1570, pp. 1650-51; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, pp. 1478-79; also see 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1476; 1583, p. 1559.

He was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 2 December 1554 (1563, p. 1018; 1570, p. 1651; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, p. 4179 [recte 1479]).

He absolved convocation on 6 December 1554 for their perjuries, heresies and schisms (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 4179 [recte 1479]).

As legate to Julius III, Pole reconciled England to Rome and absolved the English. 1563, pp. 1083-84; 1570, p. 1707; 1576, p. 1457; 1583, p. 1531.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. Ormanet was chosen because he had the trust of Pope Julius III. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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Thomas Causton appealed his conviction to Pole. 1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541.

Robert Ferrar appealed his conviction to Pole. 1563, p. 1099; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

The examination of Ridley and Latimer by White (Lincoln) and Brookes (Gloucester) was held on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from 'Cardinall Poole'. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

William Stannard, Thomas Freeman and William Adams were condemned to be burned 13 June 1556 but Cardinal Pole sent dispensation for their lives. 1563, pp. 1525-26, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1798, 1583, p. 1916.

Pole chose Cuthbert Scot, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole to be a persecutors of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Peter Martyr's wife was reburied in Richard Marshall's dunghill after Cardinal Pole ordered him to oversee the exhumation of her body. 1563, p1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Reginald Pole died the day after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[Not related to David Pole.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Goodrick [or Goodrich]

(d. 1562)

Of Jesus College (Venn). Ecclesiastical commissioner. (DNB)

Matthew Parker, Edmund Grindall and Richard Goodrick requested that the body of Peter Martyr's wife be buried honourably. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

[Nephew of Thomas Goodrich, bishop of Ely.]

 
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Richard Marshall

(1518 - 1563)

DD (1552) [Foster]. Commissary and dean of Christ Church, Oxford (1553 - 1559) [Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer; A Life (Yale, 1996), p. 585] (deprived). Prebend of Winchester (1554 - 1561). Canon of St Paul's. Deprived (1561). (Fasti; Emden)

William Tresham exhorted the students of Christ Church, Oxford, to attend mass while Marshall was dean (1563, p. 1007).

Richard Marshall was a witness against Cranmer. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, p. 1879.

Peter Martyr's wife was reburied in Richard Marshall's dunghill after Cardinal Pole ordered him to oversee the exhumation of her body. 1563, p. 1559, 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

 
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Rogerson

The day after the bones of Peter Martyr's wife had been reburied, Rogerson preached a sermon against those who had dug up her bones and buried them in a dunghill. 1563, p. 1559, 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

1992 [1968]

Queene Mary. The Epitaph vpon the death of Buser. The handling of Peter Martyrs Wife in Oxford.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Aprill.In the meane while that he was speaking these and many other thinges before his audience, many of the vniuersity, to set out and defend Bucer withall, beset the walles of the Church and Church porche on both sides with verses, some in Latine, some in Greeke, and some in English, in the which they made a manifest declaration howe they were minded both toward Bucer and Phagius. Finally, when his Sermon was ended, they made a common Supplication and prayers. After thankes rendred to God for many other thinges, but in especially for restoring of the true and sincere religion, euery man departed his way.

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For as muche as mention hath beene made of the death of the worthy and famous Clerke, Martin Bucer, & of the burning of his boanes after his death, it shall not be vnfruitful, as the place here serueth, to induce the testimony or Epitaph of Doctor Redman which came not yet in print, 

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Numerous Latin verses in honour of Bucer were published in the Historia vera (fos. 167v-194), yet Foxe chose to print one poem which was not published in this collection. The reason was that Redman, who was Cuthbert Tunstall's nephew, was highly admired in Cambridge both for his scholarship and the holiness of his life. He was also highly regarded byboth protestants and catholics, each of whom regarded Redman as essentially of their persuasion. (See Ashley Null, 'John Redman, the Gentle Ambler' in Westminster Abbey Reformed, 1540-1640, ed. C. S. Knighton and Richard Mortimer [Aldershot: 2003], pp. 38-74).

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vpon the decease of that man.

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¶ The Epitaph or funerall verse of D. Redman, vpon the death of Mayster Bucer.

ET tu liuor edax procul hinc abscede maligna,
facessito inuidentia,
Et procul hinc nemesis, procul hinc & Momus abesto,
labes luesʠ mentium,
Dæmonibus similes homines quæ redditis, almam
fœdatis atque imaginem
Quam nostro impressit generi pater ille supremus,
similes sui dum nos creat:
Contemptrix odij & mendacis nescia fuci
Adesto sancta Veritas.
Dicito quis qualisʠ elatum funere nuper
quem vidimus tam flebili?
Est inquam misera hac defunctus luce Bucerus,
lux literati & dux Chori,
Doctrinæ radios qui totum solis ad instar
misit per orbem splendidos.
Hunc diræ nuper sublatum vulnere mortis
lugubre flet Gymnasium,
Et pullata gemit mærens schola Cantabrigensis
orbata claro sydere.
Ergo, quasi obstructo doctrinæ fonte, querelas
precesque nunc fundit.
Agnoscit nunquam se talem habuisse magistrum
ex quo sit olim condita.
Non vnquam Cathedræ gauisa est præside tanto,
tam nobili & claro duce.
Cuius & ingenij & doctrinæ munera, summum
virtutis ornauerat decus,
Integritas morum grauitas prudentia, sermo
semper dei laudem sonans,
Et sale conditus, qualem vult esse piorum
Apostoli sententia.
Accessit zelus feruens & præsule dignus,
peccata semper arguens.
Nunquam disidiæ, aut languori deditus,
vllum indulsit otium sibi.
Credibele est nimio fatum accelerasse labore,
prodesse cunctis dum studet.
Sed frustra laudes auguste carmine nitor
tam copiosas claudere.
Ergo Bucere, scholæ & suggestus gloria sacri,
valeto etiam vel mortuus.
Æternum in superis fœlix iam viuito regnis,
exutus etsi corporis
Terrenis spolijs, huius miseri atque caduci:
Quod est sepulchro conditum
Christus depositum reddet cum fœnore magno,
Iudex breui quum venerit.

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The despightfull handling and madnesse of the papistes toward Peter Martyrs wife at Oxford, taken vp frō her graue at the commaundement of Cardinall Poole, and after buryed in a dunghill. 
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The account of the exhumation of Catherine Martyr is in the Historia vera (pp. 197-203) but it was not included in Golding's translation. Foxe made his own translation of this account from the Historia vera.

MarginaliaThe taking vp of Peter Martyrs wiues bonesANd because the one Vniuersity should not mocke the other, like crueltye was also declared vpon the deade body of Peter Martyrs wife  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 296, fn 1

See "Historia vera," etc. pp. 197-203. - ED.

at Oxford, MarginaliaCommendation of Peter Martyrs wyfe.an honest, graue, and sober matrone, while she liued, and of poore people alwayes a great helper, as many that be dwelling there, can right well testify. In the yeare of our Lord. 1552. she departed this life, wt great sorow of al those needy persōs, whose necessities many times & often she had liberally eased and relieued. Now, when Brokes Bishop of Glocester, Nicholas Ormanet Datary, Robert Morwen President of

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Corpus Christi Colledge, Cole and Wright Doctors of the Ciuill Law, came thither as the Cardinals visitours, they among other thinges had in Commission to take vp this good woman agayne out of her graue, and to consume her carkas with fire, not doubting but that she was of þe same religion that her husband had professed before, whē he read the Kinges lecture there. And to make a shewe that they would do nothing disorderly, they called al those before thē that had any acquayntance with her or her husband. MarginaliaIurates sworne agaynst Peter Martyrs wyfe.They ministred an othe vnto them that they should not conceale whatsoeuer was demaunded. In fine, theyr auswere was that they knewe not what religion she was of, by reason they vnderstood not her language.

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To be shorte, after these visitours had sped theyr busines they came for, they gat them to the Cardinall agayne, certifying him that vpon due inquisition made, they could learne nothing, vpon which by the law they might burne her. MarginaliaCardinal Poole earnest in burning dead mens bodyes.Notwithstanding the cardinall did not leaue the matter so, but wrote downe his Letters a good while after to MarginaliaD. Marshall Deane of Frideswides.Marshall, then Deane of Frideswides that he should dyg her vp, and lay her out of christian buriall, because she was interred nigh vnto S. Frideswides relicks, sometime had in great reuerence in that Colledge. Doct. Marshal like a prety man calling his Spades and mattockes together in the euening, when he was well whitled  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 296, line 5 from the bottom

Elevated; and in the present case with liquor. Richardson quotes (under the word) from Holland's Plutarch, fol. 387: "Certain Chians there were, who being come to see the city of Sparta, chanced to be well whittled, and stark drunk," &c. And in Calfhill's Latin letter, from which this account is taken, it runs: "Is, ubi jam advesperaverat, ab immanibus suis poculis aliquid temporis intermittens."

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caused her to be taken vp, and buryed in a dunghill.

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Howbeit, when it pleased God vnder good Queene Elizabeth, to geue quietnes to his Church, long time persecuted with prison and death, then Doctour Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Grindall Bishop of Lōdon, Richard Goodricke, with diuers other her Maiesties high Commissioners in matters Religion (nothing ignoraunt howe farre the aduersaries of the trueth had transgressed the boūdes of all humanity, in violating the sepulchre or graue of that good and vertuous woman) wylled certayne of that Colledge, in the whiche this vncurteous touch was attempted and done, to take her out of that vncleane & dishonest place where she laye, & solemnely in the face of the whole towne, to bury her agayne in a more decent & honest monumēt. MarginaliaPeter Martyrs Wiues bones agayne reduced out of the Dūghill, aud layd in a decent monument. For though of the body being once dead, no great estimatiō were to be had, how or where the bones were layde: yet was some reuerence to be vsed toward her for sexe and womanhood sake. Besides, to saye the truth, it was a great shame, that he which had trauelled so farre at king Edwardes request, from the place wherin he dwelt quietly, and had takē so earnest paynes, beyng an old man, in reading and setting forth the truth al he could, with learning to teach and instruct, and so wel deserued of that Vniuersity: MarginaliaGreat ingratitude shewed to Peter Martyr.should wish so vngentle a recompence  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 297, line 16

In Edit. 1563, p. 1559, "so ungentle a prank."

of ingratitude be rewarded agayne, as to haue his wife, that was a godly woman, a straūger, good to many, especially to the poore, and hurtfull to none, either in word or deede, without iust deseruing, & beside theyr owne law, not proceeding against her according to the order therof, spitefully to be layd in a stincking dunghill.

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To all good natures the fact seemed odious, & of suche as be indued with humanity, vtterly to be abhorred. Wher fore MarginaliaM. Iames Caldfield.M. Calfield,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 297, middle

The author of "An Answer to Martiall's Treatise of the Cross," republished by the Parker Society, and who would in all probability rank with "the grave men, well learned and wise," alluded to by Foxe as then members of Christ Church. A Latin letter addressed by him to Bishop Grindall in 1561, on the subject of the exhumation and restoration of the remains of Peter Martyrs's wife, is given in the "Historia Vera" (fol. 196, verso).

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then Subdeane of the Colledge, diligētly prouided, that from Marshals dunghill she was restored and translated to her proper place agayne, yea & withall MarginaliaThe bones of Peter Martyrs wyfe coupled with the bones of S. Frideswide.coupled her with Frideswides boanes, that in case any Cardinall wil be so mad hereafter to remoue this womās bones agayne, it shall be hard for thē to discerne the bones of her from the other. And because to the intent the same might be notified to the mindes of men the better, the next day after, which was sonday, M. Rogerson preached vnto the people, in whiche Sermon by the way he declared the rough dealing of the aduersaries, which were not contented to practise their cruelty against the liuing, but that they must also rage agaynst one that was dead, and had lien 2. yeares in her graue. God graunt thē once to see their own wickednes. Amen.

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And thus much touching the noble actes and straungenes of this worthy Cardinal in both þe vniuersities: whervnto it shall not be impertinent, here also consequently to adioyne and set forth to the eyes of the worlde, the blinde and bloudy articles set out by Cardinal Poole, to be inquired vpō within his dioces of Canterbury, whereby it may the better appeare what yokes and snares of fond & fruitles traditions were layd vpon the poore flock of Christ, to entangle and oppresse them with losse of life and libertye. By the which wise mē haue to see what godly fruits proceeded from that catholicke Church and See of Rome In which albeit thou seest (good Reader) some good Articles insparsed withall, let that nothing moue thee: for els how could such poysō be ministred, but it must haue some hony to relish the readers taste. 

Commentary  *  Close
Pole's Visitation Articles for the Diocese of Canterbury

This passage, added in 1570, is a powerful, because grudging, tribute tothe worth of Pole's articles.

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