Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Francis Englefield

(1521/22 - 1596)

Catholic exile. High sheriff of Berkshire and Oxfordshire at the death of Henry VIII. Privy councillor, Master of the Rolls and Master of the Court of Wards and Liveries under Mary [DNB; Bindoff, Commons]

Englefield was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Sir Francis Englefield was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

Learning of the madness of John Bolton, Sir Francis ordered him released from Reading goal (1563, pp. 1017-18). [NB: Englefield was also the keeper of Reading goal; see Bindoff, Commons.]

On 28 March 1555, Mary announced to Englefield and three other privy councillors that she was restoring the monastic lands in the crown's possession to the church. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1467; 1583, p. 1559.

On 29 May 1555, the privy council ordered that Englefield apprehend John Dee and that he search the papers of Dee and Thomas Benger. 1583, pp. 1577-78.

On 5 June 1555, the privy council ordered Englefield to examine Cary, Dee, John Field and Sir Thomas Benger about their having practiced conjuring and witchcraft. 1583, p. 1581.

[Went into exile under Elizabeth and retired to Valladolid. (DNB)]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Cole

(1500? - 1580)

LL.D. (1556 - 1557) Archdeacon of Ely (1553). Provost of Eton (1554). Dean of St Paul's (1556). Vicar general to Cardinal Pole. Judge of the archiepiscopal court. Dean of the Arches (1557). (DNB)

Henry Cole was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. During the debates, Cole had short acrimonious exchanges with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 932, 938, 944-46, 951, 955, 969 and 972; 1570, pp. 1591, 1593, 1581[recte 1597]-99, 1602 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362-64, 1367 and 1371; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430, 1433-35, 1438 and 1440-41).

[Back to Top]

Later in the disputation, he interrupted the debate and called Latimer a liar (1563, p. 984; 1570, p. 1627; 1576, p 1388; and 1583, p. 1458).

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon for Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

[Back to Top]

Henry Cole was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Cole was sent to King's College, Cambridge, to examine certain scholars on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He was awarded a doctorate at Cambridge. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

William Holcot was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

Cole was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

He was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Her ninth examination took place before the dean. 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

Cole was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Mordaunt

(1490? - 1562)

First baron Mordaunt of Turrey. Privy councillor and a member of several county commissions.(DNB)

John Mordaunt was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

[Back to Top]

John Fetty was taken by Richard Tanner and his fellow constables to Sir John Mordaunt who then sent him to Cluney, Bonner's summoner. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1949, 1583, p. 2056.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Philpot

(1516 - 1555)

Archdeacon of Winchester and martyr. [DNB]

Foxe records Philpot's formative years and character. 1563, p. 1388, 1570, p. 1961, 1576, p. 1688 , 1583, p. 1795.

Philpot was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

Philpot was also one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for an opportunity to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Philpot's account of the debate over transubstantiation was reprinted by Foxe [cf. John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XXVIII daye of Octobre MDLIIII (Emden, 1554). STC 19890, with 1563, pp. 906-16; 1570, pp. 1571-78; 1576, pp. 1340-47; 1583, pp. 1410-17). In Philpot's version of events, he plays the lead role among the six clerics - the others were Walter Phillips, James Haddon, Richard Cheyney, John Aylmer and Thomas Young - in refuting the catholic arguments.

[Back to Top]

John Philpot was made archdeacon of Winchester under Ponet. 1563, p. 1388, 1570, p. 1961, 1576, p. 1688, 1583, p. 1795.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Bonner sent Johnson the registrar to speak to Philpot when he was imprisoned in the coal house. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

Thomas Whittle was imprisoned in the coal house with Philpot. Bonner was so violent with Whittle's beard that he plucked much of it away and made his face black and blue. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

Philpot met with Bonner the second night of his imprisonment in the coal house (his third examination). 1563, pp. 1392-93, 1570, pp. 1964-65, 1576, pp. 1691-92, 1583, pp. 1798-99.

Philpot spoke briefly with Cosin, Bonner's chaplain, before returning to his imprisonment in Bonner's coal house. 1563, p. 1393, 1570, p. 1965, 1576, p. 1692, 1583, p. 1799.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

During Philpot's fourth examination, John Harpsfield brought a book by Irenaeus to Philpot's examiners, who then discussed the Roman church with Philpot. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

During his fifth examination, Philpot asked his examiners which of them could answer Calvin's Institutions, to which Saverson replied that the Genevan church had fragmented and that Calvin had fled. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot's sixth examination was before the lord chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

During his sixth examination, Philpot stated that Joan of Kent was a heretic. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Chamberlain was present during Philpot's sixth examination and questioned him on the real presence. 1563, pp. 1405-1412, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

In Philpot's seventh examination, John Dee is referred to as Master Dee in 1563 and 1570 and then as Doctor Dee in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Johnson the registrar was present during Philpot's seventh examination. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Three private conferences took place between Philpot and Bonner. (The first involved his keeper; the second, his fellow prisoners and his keeper; and the third only Bonner and Philpot.) 1563, pp. 1416-19, 1570, pp. 1980-82, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-14.

Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

Johnson the registrar was present at Philpot's eighth examination. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Philpot's ninth examintion was before Bonner and his chaplains, including Cosin. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had, however, left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's tenth examination was before Bonner, Johnson and others. 1563, pp. 1424-25, 1570, pp. 1985-86, 1576, pp. 1709-10, 1583, pp. 1816-17.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In Philpot's eleventh examination, John Dee is referred to as a 'great conjurer' in 1563 and 1570. The reference is removed in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

The bishop of Coventry and Lichfield spoke with Philpot about the nature of the true church. 1563, p. 1444, 1583, p. 1818.

Philpot's twelfth examination on 4 December 1555 was before Bonner, Worcester and Bangor. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

One of Bonner's chaplains (probably Cosin) was present during Philpot's twelfth examination. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, pp. 1717, 1583, p. 1823-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York, Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, p. 1824-26.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The judgement of Philpot took place in the consistory court of St Paul's on 13 and 14 of December, at which Bonner and others were present. 1570, p. 1997, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1826.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield.. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

Foxe includes Bonner's exhortation to Philpot. 1563, p. 1443, 1570, p. 1998, 1576, p. 1710, 1583, pp. 1827-28.

A letter was exhibited by Bonner, concerning the handling of Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference is made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Philpot was mentioned in letter sent by John Bradford to Lady Fane. 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

Lady Fane wrote a letter to Bonner. 1563, p. 1445, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1828-29.

John Hooper sent Philpot and his fellow prisoners, Robert Ferrar, John Bradford and Rowland Taylor, a letter dated 6 May 1554 discussing a proposed disputation in Cambridge in which they would represent the protestants. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Philpot and his fellow prisoners, John Bradford, Robert Ferrar and Rowland Taylor. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

In a letter William Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

Green wrote a letter to John Philpot which was not delivered. According to Foxe it was either not delivered because Philpot died or because the jailor prevented its delivery. 1563, pp. 1459-60, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

Stokesley said a Latin prayer before the condemnation of Philpot. 1570, p. 2000, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, pp. 1827, 1829.

Philpot had a talk with his keeper, Alexander, during which Philpot refused to recant. 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 1829.

The mayor (Macham) heard of the treatment of Philpot in prison and ordered Philpot's irons to be removed. 1563, p. 1443, 1570, p. 2001, 1576, p. 1998, 1583, p. 1830.

Wittrence, the steward of the house, carried the manacled Philpot. 1570, p. 2001, 1576, p. 1998, 1583, p. 1830.

Foxe records Philpot's behaviour prior to his death, when the sheriffs came to collect him. 1563, p. 1447, 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1722-23, 1583, p. 1830.

A prayer was said by Philpot at the stake. He was burned on 18 December 1555. 1563, pp. 1448-49, 1570, p. 2002, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1830-31.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1444-50, 1570, pp. 2002-14,1576, pp. 1721-35, 1583, pp. 1829-43.

Philpot wrote a letter to John Careless. 1563, pp. 1535-38.

Careless replied to the letter from John Philpot. 1563, pp. 1536-37, 1570, pp. 2103-04,1576, pp. 1814-15, 1583, p. 1921.

Whittle sent a letter to John Careless in prison, in which he says he has heard reports of Philpot's stoutness in going to his death and asking for a copy of Philpot's nine examinations for a friend. 1570, p. 1457, 1570, pp. 2018-19, 1576, pp. 1739-40, 1583, pp. 1847-48.

[Also referred to as 'Fylpot'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

[Back to Top]

Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

[Back to Top]

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lord Edward North

(1496? - 1564)

1st baron North of Kirtling (DNB ; Bindoff, Commons) Brother of Joan Wilkinson.

North was a supporter of Lady Jane Grey who gained Mary's favor.

He was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1658; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

North was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was ordered by the privy council to examine Cary, John Dee, John Field and Sir Thomas Benger. 1583, p. 1581

Isabel Malt claimed that Lord North and another nobleman offered her money in exchange for her infant son, hoping to pass the baby off as Mary?s son. 1570, p. 1772; 1576, p. 1513; 1583, p. 1597

Lord Edward North was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Martin Bradbridge

(d. 1557)

Of unknown occupation. Martyr. Of Tenterden, Kent.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Ashford, Kent, 16 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

[Probably the husband of the Widow Bradbridge burned at Canterbury 19 June 1557.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Final

(d .1557)

Martyr. Of Tenterden, Kent.

Nicholas Final was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. He was burned at Ashford on 16 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561 [recte 1573].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Ashford, Kent on 16 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

[Possibly related to Barbara Final.]

[An Adriana Vynall admitted not confessing at Easter or taking the sacrament. See BL, Harley 421, fo.100r. Nicholas Final was possibly related to Adriana Vynall.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Cholmley

(by 1517 - 1563)

Probably from London. MP for Mitchell (1547), Bodmin (1553), Boroughbridge (1554), London (1554, 1555, 1558, 1559, 1563). JP Middlesex (1547 - 1563), Surrey (1554 - 1563), London (1553 - 1554). Sergeant-at-law (1559), justice of assize, southern circuit (1559), commr. ecclesiastical laws (1559). Son of Richard Cholmley of Cholmondeley, Cheshire, and brother of Sir Hugh Cholmley. [Not to be confused with the Yorkshire Cholmleys.] (Bindoff)

[Back to Top]

Ralph Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Thornden

(d. 1558)

Suffragan Bishop of Dover (1545-1558) [ODNB]

Richard Thornden is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 13 June 1555 John Bland was brought before Thornden. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Bland asked that the bishop of Dover and Master Collins be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 20 June, Bland was reexamined, his articles read by the bishop of Dover and Bland's answers made. 1563, p. 1229.

Bland referred to Thornden's library as a source for texts for any discussion of scripture. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Thornden stated that Bland had preached many heresies. Faucet wais present during this discussion. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Cyriac Pettit was present during the disputation between Bland and Nicholas Harpsfield on 21 May 1555. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring Bland and Master Collins (comissary) before him, in Thornden's house. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 13 June [1555] Bland was brought before Richard Thornden, Robert Collins and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Thornden asked Bland if he knew of Oecolompadius and Zwingli, to which Bland responded that he had seen 'parte of their doinges'. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

On 20 June Bland was reexamined and his articles read by Richard Thornden. Bland's answers were made and condemnation given. 1563, pp. 1229-30, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland was condemned by Dover. 1563, p. 1230, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland, Sheterden and Middleton were condemned on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned John Frankesh. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned Humphrey Middleton. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He took part in the last examination of Nicholas Sheterden and condemned him on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

Thornden examined and condemned William Cokar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He examined Richard Colliar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Colliar on either 26 June, 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or16 August 1555 (1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Hopper. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Hopper on 26 June or 26 July 1555 (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 16 July 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned Henry Laurence. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Laurence on 26 June or 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 2 August 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Sterne. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden was referred to by William Sterne as 'Dick of Dover'. 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden examined and condemned Richard Wright. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

George Catmer, Robert Streater, George Brodbridge, Anthony Burwarde and James Tutty, martyrs, were examined by the bishop of Dover. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

John Web was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

Newman was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thornden is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thornden condemned John Philpot of Tenterden, William Hay of Hythe, Thomas Hudson of Selling, Matthew Bradbridge of Tenterden, Thomas Stephens of Biddenden, Nicholas Final of Tenterden, William Lowick of Cranbrooke, and William Prowting of Thornham. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].]

[Back to Top]

Joan Bradbridge, Walter Apelbye of Maidstone, Petronyll, his wife, Edmund Allin of Frittenden, Katherine,his wife, Joan Mannings, wife of Maidstone, Elizabeth, a blind maiden were all examined by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak, that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the Castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Joan Bradbridge had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden was taken with a palsy whilst watching a game of bowls at Bourne. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Thornden died in the pulpit after giving pardon and remission of sins to his congregation. 1563, p. 1705.

[Referred to as 'Thorton' and 'Dick of Dover'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rowland Hill

(1492? - 1561)

Mercer. Sheriff of Middlesex (1541). Lord Mayor of London (1549 - 1550). Member of the Council of the Marches of Wales (1551) (DNB)

Hill was a member of a commission set up by Philip and Mary to seek out heretics. 1563, pp. 1561 [recte 1573]-1563 [recte 1575].

In Ridley's friendly farewell he comments on the mayoral role of Sir Rowland Hill and Sir George Barnes. 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

Rowland Hill was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

[Despite his appointment to the commission against heretics in 1557, Rowland Hill was regarded as a staunch protestant. (DNB)]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Edward Waldegrave

(1517? - 1561) (DNB)

Member of Princess Mary's household from 1551. Master of the Queen's Wardrobe; privy councillor. MP (1553, 1554, 1557 - 1558). Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1557 - 1558). Commissioner for inquiry into heresies. (DNB; Bindoff, Commons)

Sir Edward Waldegrave was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

He was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554. Foxe calls him 'Walgraue'. (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

Walgrave was a member of a commission set up by Philip and Mary to seek out heretics. 1563, pp. 1561 [recte 1573]-1563 [recte 1575].

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

[Imprisoned in the Tower for permitting mass to be said in his house. Died there in 1561. (DNB)]

[Foxe refers to him as Walgrave.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Bourne

(1518 - 1575)

Secretary of State to Mary; uncle to Bishop Gilbert Bourne of Bath and Wells, [DNB, sub Bourne, Gilbert; Bindoff].

Sir John Bourne led a debate, or rather dinner conversation, with John Feckenham, against Nicholas Ridley while the latter was imprisoned in the Tower (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, p 1356-58; and 1583, p. 1426-28).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Rowland Taylor on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1071-73; 1570, pp. 1696-97; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1521-22).

He was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 28 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1026-28; 1570, pp. 1659-60; 1576, pp. 1416-17; 1583, pp. 1486-87).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54).

He was ordered by the privy council to examine Sir Thomas Benger, Cary, John Dee and John Field on 5 and 7 May 1555 (1583, p. 1581).

Bradford was brought to speak to Bonner by the under-marshal of the King's Bench. Talk took place between the lord chancellor, Bonner and John Bradford on 22 January 1555, during which the bishop of Durham, Sir Richard Southwell, Sir Robert Rochester, and Secretary Bourne questioned Bradford's eucharistic doctrine. 1563, pp. 1185-88, 1570, pp. 1782-84, 1576, pp. 1522-23, 1583, pp. 1605-06.

[Back to Top]

Secretary Bourne declared that Bradford had caused much trouble with letters, as had been reported to him by the earl of Derby. 1563, p. 1186, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Bourne asked Bradford if the letters were seditious, but Bradford claimed they were not. 1563, p. 1187, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Sir John Bourne is described by Foxe as the chief stirrer in such cases as that of Bartlett Green's. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1851.

A letter to Bonner by the privy council regarding Green's treason was written on 11 November 1555, but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. , 1583, pp. 1851-52.

Lord Williams, Lord Chandos, Sir Thomas Bridges and Sir John Browne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Sir John Bourne was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

[Back to Top]

His judges were Portman and Marven who, when they witnessed John Davis's sorry state when he was held before them, agreed with John Bourne that the boy had suffered enough. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Bourne and his wife took Davis home and anointed his wounds but put him away when they realised he would not submit to their doctrine. They were afraid he might have an effect on their son Anthony. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Vaughan

(fl. 1525 - 1557)

DCL (1534). Fellow of All Souls (1529). (Foster)

Sir John Vaughan was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Vaughn was a member of a commission set up by Philip and Mary to seek out heretics. 1563, pp. 1561 [recte 1573]-1563 [recte 1575].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Nicholas Hare

(1495 - 1557)

Judge. Eldest son of John Hare of Homersfield, Suffolk, by Elizabeth Fotescue, his wife. [DNB] Master of the Rolls (1553 - 1557) MP for Downton, Wiltshire (1529), Norfolk (1539 - 1540), Lancaster (1544 - 1545). Speaker of the House (1539 - 1540) (DNB; Bindoff)

Sir Nicholas Hare was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

On 15 April 1555, Hare was ordered by the privy council to interrogate William Flower and also to have Bishop Bonner and the Middlesex JPs initiate proceedings against Flower. 1583, p. 1561.

Sir Nicholas Hare wrote a letter to Edmond Tyrrell in June 1555. 1563, p. 1245, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Edmond Tyrrel wrote to one of the queen's commissioners stating that he had received a letter from that [unnamed] commissioner and Sir Nicholas Hare via John Failes on 12 June 1555. 1563, p. 1245, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689. [Hare sent ten Newgate prisoners to be examined by Bonner: Elizabeth Warne, George Tankerfield, Robert Smith, Steven Harwood, Thomas Fust, William Haile, George King, John Wade, Joan Lashford.] 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

[Back to Top]

Thomas Leyes was sent to Newgate by Sir Nicholas Hare. 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

[Hare was not a knight, but both Foxe and the Privy Council Register mistakenly call him 'Sir' (cf. APC V, p. 115). The overseers to Hare's will were the outspoken conservatives Sir Edward Waldegrave and Sir John Baker; his three sons were all Elizabethan recusants (Bindoff, Commons).]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Richard Read

Officer of the Court of Chancery. Alderman of London; JP Essex and Middlesex (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6]

Sir Richard Read was ordered by the privy council to examine Sir Thomas Benger, Cary, John Dee and John Field on 5 and 7 May 1555. 1583, p. 1581.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

George Ambrose was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 21 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Drakes was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Richard Read was told during his examinations of 16 January 1555 that the Spurges, Ambrose and Cavel had been complained of by the parson of the church in Bocking. The priest had complained to Lord Rich who had taken the complaint further. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Cavel was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Richard and Thomas Spurge were examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Tyms was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Commemorations were given to Read at King's College shortly after the exhumation of Bucer, at the commission's command. 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

Read was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Roger Cholmley

(d. 1565)

Lord chief justice of King's and Queen's Bench (1552 - 1553), privy councillor (under Mary) and MP [Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons; DNB]. Judge, lieutenant of the Tower. Son of Sir Richard Cholmley [DNB]

Sir Roger Cholmley persuaded the royal guard to support Northumberland against Mary (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, p. 1407).

He was sent to the Tower, with Sir Edward Montagu, on 27 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower together with Sir Edward Montagu on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Sir Roger Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Cholmley participated in a debate/dinner conversation between Nicholas Ridley and John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, on the nature of the eucharist, held while Ridley was a prisoner in the Tower (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, pp. 1357-58; and 1583, p. 1428).

Cholmley came to William Flower at the stake and urged Flower, on pain of damnation, to recant his heretical beliefs. 1563, p. 1733; 1570, p. 1749; 1576, p. 1493; 1583, p. 1577.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Cholmley was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was made to Cholmley. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857. [Foxe erroneously calls him 'Sir Richard Cholmley'.]

Cuthbert Symson was brought before Cholmley, examined and racked. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Cholmley sent to Newgate 27 prisoners who were members of an illegal conventicle in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Thomas Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley, who sent him to Newgate. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

[Back to Top]

The lord mayor of London and Chomley examined Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Tingle was a prisoner in Newgate. His keeper realised that Edward Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley, who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[Also referred to as 'Lorde Chiefe Baron' or 'Chomley']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Pope

(1507? - 1559)

Founder of Trinity College, Oxford. Privy Councillor (before 1544 -1548 and 1553-59). Sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire (1552 and 1557). (DNB; Bindoff)

Thomas Pope was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

The day before George Tankerfield went to St Albans, a schoolmaster retained by Sir Thomas Pope attempted to persuade Tankerfield on a number of doctrinal points. 1583, p. 1690.

Pope was appointed to go with Elizabeth after her release. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987, 1583, p. 2294.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir William Rastall

(1508? - 1565)

Judge and author. Exile at Louvain (1547 - 1553). Sergeant at Law (1555 - 1558). Commissioner of the inquisition into heresy (1556 - 1557). Puisne judge in the Queen's Bench (1558 - 1563). Exile at Louvain (1563 - 1565). Edited Sir Thomas More's complete works in English. (DNB)

William Rastal was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

[Son of John Rastell and nephew of Sir Thomas More.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stephen Kemp

(d. 1557)

Of unknown occupation. Martyr. Of Norgate, Kent.

Stephen Kemp was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Canterbury 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Hudson

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Selling, Kent.

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Hudson was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. He was burned at Canterbury about 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

[Back to Top]

Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Stephens

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Biddenden, Kent.

Thomas Stephens was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Wye on 16 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) (DNB)

Bishop of Westminster (1540 - 1550). Bishop of Norwich (1550 - 1554). Bishop of Ely (1554 - 1559). [Fasti; DNB]

Thomas Thirlby was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Thirlby was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 22 January 1555. 1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86.

He was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death (1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24).

He was sent as an ambassador to the pope on 19 February 1555. Foxe speculates that this embassy concerned the restoration of monastic lands. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1559.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1563, pp. 1489-92; 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 1775-76, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Thirlby examined and condemned John Hullier. 1563, p. 1515, 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

John Hullier was examined and sent to Cambridge Castle by Thirlby. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Thirlby was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Cooke

DD (1537). Fellow of All Souls (1527 - 1535) (Foster). Prebend of Kilsby (Lincoln) (1554 - 1559). Deprived after September 1559 (Fasti).

William Cooke was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Dr Cook took part in the examination of William Tyms, Robert Drakes, Thomas Spurge, Richard Spurge, John Cavel and George Ambrose. 1570, pp. 2076-77, 1576, p. 1791, 1583, pp. 1896-97.

John Jackson was examined by Dr Cook 11 March 1556. Foxe records his questions and answers. 1563, pp. 1611-12, 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thomas Moore denied transubstantiation when examined by Dr Cook and so was condemned. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, pp. 1855-56, 1583, p. 1949.

Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Hay

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Hythe, Kent.

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Haye was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. He was burned at Canterbury about 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561 [recte 1573], 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Lowick

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Cranbrooke, Kent.

Lowick was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561 [recte 1573], 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Canterbury on 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Prowting

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Thornham, Kent.

William Prowting was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. He was burned at Canterbury about 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561 [recte 1573].

Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Prowting was burned at Canterbury on 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

[Admitted that he did not believe in the Trinity and that there was only God the Father. BL, Harley 421, fo.94r.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Roper

(1495/96 - 1578)

Of Lynsted. JP, MP (1529, 1545, 1547, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1558). Sheriff of Kent (1554 - 1555). Son-in-law to Sir Thomas More and author of a celebrated biographical sketch of More (DNB; Bindoff).

William Roper was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Roper was originally included in the Commission of the Peace for Middlesex in 1555, but his name was deleted. [SP11/5, no. 6]

On 1 April 1555, the Privy Council ordered Roper to arrest Thomas Woodgate and William Maynarde for clandestine preaching. 1583, p. 1561.

On 7 April Roper was ordered to arrest a man from Harwich, who went about with a boy, preaching from place to place. 1583, p. 1561. [NB: Foxe is mistaken in saying that the order was to arrest one Harwich; see APC V, p. 110].

After Master Roper of Lynsted talked with the judges, it was decided that John Bland should be returned to Maidstone until the Greenwich sessions of 18-19 February. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Roper escorted John Wade to his burning in July 1555. 1576, p. 1600, 1583, pp. 1679-80.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

[Back to Top]

Roper took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

The sixth and last examination of Richard Woodman took place before Chichester, William Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Waterman

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Biddenden, Kent.

Waterman was one of ten martyrs imprisoned in Canterbury and condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

He was burned at Canterbury on 15 January 1557. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

[Also referred to as William Waterer.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Windsor

(by 1499 - 1558)

Of Bradenham, Buckinghamshire. MP Chipping Wycombe (1529). Bencher, Middle Temple (1553). Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire (1537 - 1538). (Bindoff) Lord Windsor or Windsor (of Stanwell). Commissioner concerning heresies (1557)(DNB; Complete Peerage)

William Windsor was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Edward Stanley, third earl of Derby, stated that he, Lord Dacres and Windsor had never consented to the religious laws of Edward VI. 1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564.

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Viscount Hereford, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

[NB: There is not much sign of religious conservatism in his official career but, in addition to kinsmen, he named the staunch catholics William Roper and Sir Thomas White as executors and overseers of his will (Bindoff, Commons)].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ashford
Ashford, Ashforde
NGR: TR 010 428

A parish in the hundred of Chart and Longbridge, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 20 miles south-east by east from Maidstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Beddington
Bedingden, Bedingdey, Bedyngdey
NGR: TQ 296 653

A parish in the second division of the hundred of Wallington, county of Surrey. 2 miles west from Croydon. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Surrey, Diocese of Winchester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cranbrook
Crambroke, Cranbroke
NGR: TQ 775 363

A parish in the hundred of Cranbrook, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 14 miles south by east from Maidstone. 40 miles south-east by east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Great Saling
Salenge, Sallenge, Sellenge
NGR: TL 702 258

A parish in the hundred of Hinckford, county of Essex. 5 miles north-west by west from Braintree. The living is a discharged vicarage in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of Essex and Herts., concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hyth
Hythe
NGR: TR 165 350

A borough, one of the Cinq Ports, having separate jurisdiction, but locally in the hundred of Hythe, lathe of Sheppey, county of Kent. 33 miles south-east by east from Maidstone. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to the rectory of Saltwood, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Margate
Norgate
NGR: TR 355 710

Suggest: Margate

Margate is a parish in the Cinq Ports Liberty of Dover, of which it is a member, although locally in the hundred of Ringslow, or Isle of Thanet, lathe of St. Augustine, county of Kent. 44 miles east-north-east from Maidstone. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Tenterden
NGR: TQ 885 335

A parish within the Cinq Ports Liberty, having separate jurisdiction, although locally in the hundred of Tenterden, Lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 18 miles south-east by South from Maidstone, 53 miles south-east by east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thurnham
Thornham
NGR: TQ 806 579

A parish in the hundred of Eyhorne, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 4 miles north-east by east from Maidstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wye
NGR: TR 053 469

A parish and former market town in the hundred of Wye, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 4 miles north-east from Ashford. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
1994 [1970]

Queene Mary. Ten Martyrs condemned and burned. A bloudy Commission of K. Phillip and Q. Mary.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Ianuary.ny other the rites and ceremonies of the church.

32 Itē, whether there be any hospitals within your parishes, & whether the foundations of them be duely & truly obserued and kept. And whether the charitable contributions of the same be done accordingly.

33 Item, whether any goodes, plate, iewels, or possessions be taken away, or withholden from the sayd Hospitals, and by whom.

¶ A History of tenne Martyrs condemned and burned within the Dioces of Caunterbury, for the testimony of Iesus Christ, and trueth of his Gospell. 
Commentary  *  Close
Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury

This entire account first appeared in the 1563 edition and was reprinted in every edition, without change, except that the contents were re-arranged in the 1570 edition. The account is based on official records, now lost, from the diocese of Canterbury.

MarginaliaIanuary. 15. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of 10. burned in the Dioces of Canterbury.MEntion was made a little before of the persecution in Kent, pag. 1860. Where we declared, that fiftene were in the Castle of Canterbury imprisoned and cōdemned for Gods word. Of the which fiftene moreouer we shewed & declared fiue to be famished vnto death within the said castle, and buryed by the high waye, about the beginnng of Nouember. The other tenne, in the first month of the next yeare folowing, which was the yeare of our Lord. 1557. were committed vnto the fire, and there cōsumed to ashes, by Thornton, called Bishop or Suffragane of Douer, otherwise called Dicke of Douer, and by Nicholas Harpsfield the Archdeacon of the sayd Prouince.

[Back to Top]

The names of these tenne godly and Christian Martyrs be these: MarginaliaThe names of the Martyrs.

Iohn Philpot of Tēterden.
W. Waterer of Bedingden.
Stephen Kempe of Nor-
gate.
W. Haye Hythe.
Thomas Hudsonne of Sa-
lenge.
Mat. Bradbridge of Ten-
terden.
Thomas Stephens of Be-
dingden.
Nich. Finall 
Commentary  *  Close

Was Nicholas Final a relative of Barbara Final of Tenterden who was burned at Canterbury on 19 June 1557? (See 1563, p. 1571; 1570, p. 2154; 1576, p. 1861 and 1583, p. 1970). Or was he a relative of Adriana Vynall of Tenterden whose confession of heretical beliefs survives among Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 100r? Were Barbara Final and Adriana Vynall the same person?

[Back to Top]
of Tenterden.
W. Lowicke of Crābroke.
W. Prowting of Thornhā.

What the ordinarye articles were commonly obiected to them of Canterbury Dioces, is before rehearsed, MarginaliaConcerning their articles read before pag. 1672.Pag. 1672. saue onely that to some of these, as to them that folowed after, as the time of theyr persecution did growe, so theyr articles withall did encrease to the number of two & twenty conteining such like matter as serued to the mainteinaunce of the Romish See.

[Back to Top]

To these articles what theyr answeres were, likewise, needed here no great rehearsall, seeing they all agreed together, though not in the same fourme of woordes, yet in much like effecte of purposes: 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is disguising the, by his standards, unorthodox replies of John Philpot and William Prowting, which survive among his papers. Philpot did not know how many sacraments there were, held that saints were to be prayed to and declared that faith did not justify without works (BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 93r). Prowting denied the Trinity (BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 94r).

[Back to Top]
MarginaliaThe cause of their Martyrdome.first graunting the Churche of Christ, and denying the Church of Rome, denying the seuen Sacramentes, refusing the Masse, and the hearing of Latine Seruice, praying to Saynctes, iustification of works. &c, And though they did not al answere vniformely in some smaller thinges, as theyr learning serued them, yet in the most principall and chiefest matters they did not greatly discord. &c.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Waterer, Kempe, W. Hay, Hudson, Lowicke, W. Prowting, at Cāterbury. Anno. 1557. Ianuary. 15. The other 4. were burned at the same tyme 2. at Wye and 2. at Ashford.¶ The burning of sixe Martyrs at Caunterbury.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
A repeat of a block used on various occasions. See 1570, p. 1868.

Of these tenne Godly Martyrs of Christe, sixe were burned at Canterbury, about the fiftene of Ianuary, that is. Kempe, Waterer, Prowting, Lowike, Hudson, and Haye. Other two, that is, Stephēs, and Philpot, at Wye, about the same moneth. Other two, which were Finall & Bradbrige, were burned both together at Ashford, the xvj. of the same.

[Back to Top]

The next moneth folowing, whiche was Februarye, came out an other bloudy Commission from the king and Queene, 

Commentary  *  Close
The 'Bloody Commission'

Foxe printed the entire commission in the 1563 edition. Numerous copies of this commission exist; Foxe probably used the copy in Bonner's register (GL, MS 9531/12, fo. 425r-v). In the 1570 edition, Foxe added a preface comparing the Marian persecution to the persecution of the early Christians. In the same edition, he also deleted the end of the commission which dealt with the fining of offenders.

[Back to Top]
to kindle vp the fire of persecution, as though it were not hoate enough already: the contentes of whiche Commission I thought here not to pretermit: not for lack of matter, whereof I haue too much: MarginaliaExamples how kinges & Princes & the power of the world, bend themselues agaynst Christ and his worde, and yet could neuer preuayle.but that the Reader may vnderstand how kinges & princes of this world, like as in the first persecutions of the primitiue Church vnder Valerianus, Decius, Maximian, Dioclesian, Licinius. &c. so now also in these latter perillous dayes, haue set out all theyr maine force and power, with lawes, policy, & authorit to the vttermost they coulde deuise agaynst Christe and his blessed gospel. And yet notwithstāding al these lawes, constitutions, Iniunctions, and terrible proclamations prouided agaynst Christ and his Gospell, Christ yet styll continueth, his gospel florisheth, & truth preuaileth: kings and Emperors in their owne purposes ouerthrown, their deuises dissolued, theyr counselles confounded: as exāples both of this & of all times & ages do make manifest. But now let vs heare the intent of this Commission, in tenor as foloweth.

[Back to Top]
¶ A bloudy Commmission geuen forth by King Philip and Queene Mary, to persecute the poore members of Christ. MarginaliaA terrible proclamation of K. Phillip and Q. Mary, agaynst the poore seruauntes and members of Christ.

MarginaliaPersecutors.PHilip and Mary by the grace of God king & Queene of England. &c. To the right reuerend Father in God our right trusty & welbeloued Counsellour Thomas B. Elye, and to our right trusty & welbeloued Williā Windsore knight, L. Winsore, Edw. North knight, L. North, and to our trusty & welbeloued Counsellours, Io. Bourn knight, one of our chiefe Secretaryes, Iohn Mordaunt knight, Frances Englefield knight, maister of our Wards and Liueries, Edward Walgraue knight, Mayster of our great Wardrobe, Nicholas Hare knight, master of þe Rolles, and our high Court of Chauncery, & to our trusty and welbeloued Tho. Pope knight, Roger Cholmley knight, Richard Rede knight, Rowlād Hil knight, William Rastall Sergeant at law, Hēry Cole Clerke, Deane of Paules, William Roper, & Rafe Cholmley, Esquiers, Williā Cooke, Thomas Martin, Iohn Story, & Iohn Vaughan Doctours of Law, greeting.

[Back to Top]

For as muche as diuers deuillishe and sclaunderous persons, hauing not onely inuented, bruted, and sette forth diuers false rumors, tales, and sedicious sclaūders against vs, but also haue sowne diuers heresies, and heretical opinions, and sette forth diuers seditious bookes within thys our Realme of England, MarginaliaThe meaning of the Gospellers falsely reported, and sclaūdered.meaning thereby to styrre vp diuision, strife, contention, & sedition, not onely amongst our louing subiectes, but also betwixt vs & our sayd subiectes, wt diuers others outragious misdemeanors, enormityes, contemptes, and offences, dayly committed and done, to þe disquieting of vs and our people, we minding the due punishment of such offenders, & the repressing of such like offences, enormities, and misbehauiours from hencefoorth, hauing speciall truste and confidence in your fidelityes, wisedomes, and discretions, haue authorised appoynted & assigned you to be our Commissioners, and by these presentes do geue full power & authority vnto you, and three of you, to enquire as well by the othes of twelue good and lawfull men, as by witnesses and all other meanes & politick wayes you can deuise, of all & singuler heretical opinions, Lollardies, heretical & seditious bookes cōcealemēts, contemptes, conspiracies, and all false rumors, tales, seditious and sclaunderous wordes or sayinges, raysed, published, bruted, inuented, or set forth against vs, or either of vs or agaynst the quiet gouernance & rule of our peoples, & subiects, MarginaliaWhat watch is here to keepe downe Christ, but yet he will ryse.by bookes, lies, tales, or otherwise, in any Coūtie, Key, bowing, or other place or places, within this our realme of England or els where, in any place or places beyond the Seas, & of the bringing in, vtterers, buyers, sellers, readers, kepers, or cōueyers of any such letter, books, rumor, and tale, and of all and euery theyr coadiutors, coūsellers, comforters, procurers, abettors, and mainteiners, geuing vnto you and three of you, full power & authoritye by vertue hereof, to search out and take into your hands & possessiōs, all maner of hereticall and sedicious bookes, letters & writinges, wheresoeuer they or any of them shalbe foūd, as well in Printers houses and shops, as elsewhere, willing you and euery of you to searche for the same in all

[Back to Top]
places
NNNNn.iij.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield