Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anthony Brown

(1528 - 1592)

Viscount Montague (cr. 1554). Of Sussex. MP Guildford (1545, 1554), Petersfield (1553), Surrey (1554). JP Surrey and Sussex (1554 -1592). Master of the horse to King Philip (1554). (Bindoff)

Sir Anthony Browne was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was sent as an ambassador to the pope on 19 February 1555. Foxe speculates that this embassy concerned the restoration of monastic lands to the church. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1559.

John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 naming Brown as one of the commissioners who had used their commission to seize lands and goods of protestant fugitives. Brown had indicted several people under the charges of treason, as fugitives or for disobedience. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

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In his letter to Bonner, John Kingston said that Brown had commanded him to receive his prisoners on 30 August 1557. Kingston related their conversation. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

John Kingston stated that he had requested Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale and Anthony Brown to expose unlawful writings and books. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Brown was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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[Not to be confused with Anthony Brown of Essex.]

Foxe occasionally refers to him as 'Lord Montacute'.

 
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Edmund Tyrrel

(1513 - 1576) [SP11/5, no. 6]; Bindoff, Commons]

Justice of the Peace, Essex (1554 - 1558/59). Bailiff, St Osyth, Essex (1553), MP Maldon (1554, 1558). (Bindoff)

Edmond Tyrrel was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. These commissioners sent Wattes to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

Edward Tyrrel met with John Denley and John Newman prior to their deaths. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Edmond Tyrrel wrote to one of the queen's commissioners stating that he had received a letter from that [unnamed] commissioner and Sir Nicholas Hare via John Failes on 12 June 1555. 1563, p. 1245, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

He found articles of religion on Denley, Newman and Pattingham. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Two sermons were preached in Plumborough and Beaches Woods in Essex, to the great annoyance of Edmund Tyrrel. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Tyrrel went to Hockley in Essex to see who was at the preaching in the woods. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He tried unsucessfully to force John Gye to seek out Tyms, whom Tyrrel believed to be behind the sermons against him. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

When Tyms was brought before Tyrrel, he spoke to him for over three hours without witness, although his words were overheard and so reported to Foxe. 1570, p. 2075, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1896.

Sir John Mordant wrote a letter to Bonner with Edward Tyrrel about women prisoners in the county of Essex. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Margaret Ellis was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel, by means of a letter written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Joan Potter was delivered to Bonner by Mordant and Tyrrel for examination. She was named in a letter by the two justices written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Elizabeth Thackvel was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel, by means of letter written to Bonner. 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

James Harris was delivered by Mordant and Tyrrel to Bonner for examination, as evidenced by a letter to Bonner written by the two justices. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Joan Horns was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1910.

Katherine Hut was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel, through a letter written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Tyrrel was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

On 7 March 1557 at two o'clock in the morning, Edmund Tyrrel took William Simuel, the bailiff of Colchester, and two constables of Great Bentley, John Baker and William Harris, to the house of William Mount and his family in order to arrest them. 1570, p. 2199, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2006.

Rose Allin challenged Edmund Tyrrel over his accusations of heresy, for which he took her candle from her and burned the back of her hand until the sinews cracked. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Edmund Tyrrel called Rose Allin a whore on several occasions while he burned her hand and became frustrated when she would not cry. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Rose Allin told Edmund Tyrrel that the Lord might give him repentance, if it were his will. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Edmund Tyrrel found John Thurston and Margaret, his wife, at William Mount's house and so sent them to prison at Colchester castle, along with the Mounts and their daughter. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

In prison, Rose Allin told a friend that she could have smashed Edmund Tyrrel in the face with a pot she held in her free hand whilst he was burning her other hand, but she was glad she had not. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

After a list of clerics who died around the time of Mary's death, Foxe refers to Tyrrel's survival. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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John de Vere

(d. 1562)

16th earl of Oxford. (DNB)

John de Vere accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Routh was convented before the earl of Oxford. He was sent to Colchester castle by Lord Rich and then on to Bonner. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2096., 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1916.

Thomas Hawkes was a member of his household. The earl reported to Bishop Bonner that Hawkes refused to have his son baptized in a catholic service and delivered Hawkes to Bonner�s custody (1563, pp. 1161-62; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

He denounced six residents of Coggeshall, Essex (William Bamford, Nicholas Chamberlain, Thomas Brodehill, Thomas Osborne and Richard Webbe) to Bishop Bonner on 1 May 1555 (1563, p. 1166;1570, p. 1777; 1576, p. 1518; 1583, pp. 1601-02).

In a letter to Bishop Bonner, John Kingston said that the 'lord of Oxford' was one of the commissioners who confiscated the lands and goods of 22 accused heretics. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. De Vere was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

John Cornet was sent before the earl of Oxford, who ordered that he be held in chains and finger irons that made the tips of his fingers burst. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Cornet was sent to Bonner but later ordered by the earl of Oxford to return to Rough-hedge to be whipped and then banished from the town forever. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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John Kingston

Commissary to bishop of London and bachelor of law.

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer, and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 about the taking of 22 people charged with heresy to London. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576], 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Rose Allin was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

William Goodwin and Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

In his letter to Bonner, Kingston said that Alsey was to deliver 22 people to Bonner for examination. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kinstone and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Kingston complained to Bonner that he had not been able so far to carry out a visitation on many foundations in Colchester, such as the masters and lazars of Mary Magdalen, the proctor of St Katherine's chapel, the hospital and beadmen of the foundation of Lord H. Marney in Layer-Marney, and the hospital and beadmen of Little Horksley. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

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On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Kingston was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

A supplication was made against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Kingston took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
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Lord Thomas Darcy of Chiche

(1506 - 1558)

MP for Essex (1539, 1545, 1547), JP for Essex (1538 - 1558). Keeper of Colchester Castle (1541 - 1553), gentleman of the privy chamber (by 1544). Steward, Bury St Edmunds (1547 - 1553). Privy councillor; Lord Chamberlain (1551 - 1553) (Bindoff)

Sir Thomas Darcy was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

After examination by Lord Darcy of Chiche, Ralph Allerton was sent to Bonner, who forced him to recant at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2208, 1576, p. 1905, 1583, p. 2013.

Allerton wrote a letter to Lord Darcy of Chiche. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

Allerton was apprehended, examined before Lord Darcy of Chiche, and condemned over a year before his death. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

A supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, was given to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kingston and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Lord Darcy of Chiche was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

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John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 naming Lord Darcy of Chiche as one of the commissioners who had used their commission to seize lands and goods of protestant fugitives. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

 
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Richard Weston

JP, MP (1553, 1554, 1555). Justice of the Common Pleas (1559 - 1572) [Bindoff, (Commons].

Richard Weston was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. These commissioners sent him to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Richard Weston was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

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In a letter to Bishop Bonner, John Kingston said that Richard Weston was one of the commissioners who confiscated the lands and goods of 22 accused heretics. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

 
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Roger Appleton

(by 1520 - 1558)

JP Essex and Kent (1554 - 1558); MP (1558). Of Dartford, Kent and South Benfleet, Essex. [Bindoff]

Roger Appleton was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. He sent him to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

In a letter to Bishop Bonner, John Kingston said that Roger Appleton was one of the commissioners who confiscated the lands and goods of 22 accused heretics. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

Lord Russell received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, p. 1816, 1576, p. 1552, 1583, p. 1634.

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Appleton was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

[Married Agnes, daughter of Walter Clerk of Hadleigh, Suffolk (1 July 1545). (Bindoff)]

[He is described by Bindoff as 'a zealous Catholic'. He appointed Edmund Tyrell to be supervisor of his will (Bindoff, Commons)].

 
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Sir Henry Tyrell

JP in Essex. (1555) [PRO, SP11/5, no. 6]

The privy council sent a letter to Sir Henry Tyrell, Anthony Browne and Edmond Browne, instructing that they imprison all those who 'contemne' the queen's religious order on (according to Foxe) 19 August 1553 (1583, p. 1465). [Foxe took this material from the privy council register but he misdated it. APC V, p. 63, shows that the date of the letter was 19 August 1554].

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Tyrell was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. These commissioners sent Wattes to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Tyrell was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

 
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William Bendelows

(1514/15 - 1584)

Of Great Bardfield. Justice of Assize; JP for Middlesex and Surrey (1555) [Bindoff, Commons; PRO, SP11/5, no. 6]

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kingston and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Bendelows was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

In a letter to Bishop Bonner, John Kingston said that Bendlowes was one of the commissioners who confiscated the lands and goods of 22 accused heretics. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

 
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Colchester
Colchester, Colchestre
NGR: TM 000 250

A borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 22 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. James, St. Martin, St. Mary at the Walls, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Rumwald and Holy Trinity within the walls; and St. Botolph, St. Giles, St. Leonard and St. Mary Magdalene without the walls; all in the archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1995 [1971]

Queene Mary. The apprehension of 22. Prisoners.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Aprill.places, according to your discretions.

And also to enquire, heare, and determine all and singular MarginaliaEnormities or misbehauiours.enormities, disturbances, misbehauiours, and negligences committed in any Church, Chappell, or other halowed place within this Realme, and also for and concerning the taking away or withholding any landes, tenementes, goodes, ornamentes, stockes of money, or other thinges belonging to euery of the same Churches & Chapels, and all accountes and reckoninges concernyng the same.

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And also to enquyre and search out all such persons as obstinately do refuse to receiue the blessed sacrament of the aultar, to heare masse, or MarginaliaNot comming to the Church seruice.come to their parish Churches,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 302, line 5

In conformity with the tenor of this edict, we may presume, was issued the following reproof to the Mayor and Corporation of Bristol, being an extract from Queen Mary's Privy Council Book, now kept at the Privy Council Office, Whitehall: -
"At Westminster the xxiiiith of August, 1557.
"A lre to the Maior and Aldermen of Bristoll requyring them to conforme themselfs in frequenting the Sermons processions and other publique ceremonye at the Cathedrall churche there to the doings of all other Cities and like corporations wth in the Realme and not to absent themselfs as they have doon of late; nor loke from hensforthe that the Deane and Chapitre shulde waite uppon them or fetche them out of the Cittie wth their crosse and procession, being the same very unsemely and farre out of ordre."

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or other conuenient places appoynted for diuine seruice, and all such as refuse to go on Procession, to take holy bread, or holy water, or otherwise doe misuse themselues in any church or other halowed place, whersoeuer any of the same offences haue bene, or hereafter shalbe committed within this our sayd Realme.

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Neuertheles our will and pleasure is, that when, and as oftē as any person or persons, hereafter being called or conuented before you, do obstinatly persist or stand in any maner of heresy, or hereticall opinion, that then ye or three of you do immediately take order, MarginaliaHeretickes to be committed to their Ordinary.that the same person or persons, so standing or persisting, be deliuered & committed to his Ordinary, there to be vsed according to the spirituall and ecclesiasticall lawes.

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And also we geue vnto you, or three of you, full power and authority, to enquyre and search out all MarginaliaVacaboundes or maisterles men.vacabondes, and maysterles men, Barettours,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 302, line 18

In "The Charge of the Quest of Warmot in every Warde," given by Arnold in the "Customs of London," p. 90, inquiry is ordered to be made, "yf there by ony comon ryator, barratur, &c, dwelling wythin the warde." The term is taken from the French, barateur, in low Latin, baraterius, which have the same meaning. (See Mr. Way's note on Promptorium Parv. p. 115, where it is Latinized (p. 23) by pugnax.)

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quarrellers, and suspect persons, abiding within our City of London, & ten myles compasse of the same, and all assaultes and affrayes done & committed within the same city and compasse.

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MarginaliaDecay of Churches and Chapells.And further to search out all waste, decayes, and ruins of Churches, Chauncelles, Chappelles, Parsonages and Vicarages in the Dioces of the same, being within thys Realme, geuing you and euery of you full power and authority by vertue hereof to heare and determine the same, and all other offences and matters aboue specifyed and rehearsed, according to your wisedomes, consciences, and discretions, willing and commaūding you or three of you, from time to time, to vse and deuise all such politick waies and meanes, for the triall & searching out of the premises, as by you or three of you shal be thought most expedient & necessary: and vpon inquyry and due proofe had, knowne, perceiued and tried out, by the confession of the parties, or by sufficient witnesses before you, or three of you, concerning þe premises or any part thereof, or by any other waies or meanes requisite, to geue and award such punishment to the offenders, by fine, imprisonment, or otherwise, & to take such order for redresse and reformatiō of the premises, as to your wisedomes, or three of you shalbe thought meet and conuenient.

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Further willing and commaundyng you and euerye three of you, in case you shall finde any person or persons, obstinate or disobedient, either in theyr appearance before you or three of you, at your calling or assignment, or els in not accomplishing or not obeying your Decrees, Orders, and commaundementes in any thing or thinges, touching the premises or any part thereof, MarginaliaPrisoning of the obstinate.to commit the same person or persons so offending, to Ward, there to remaine, till by you or three of you he be discharged or deliuered. &c. 

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At this point Foxe's reprinting of the document concludes in the 1570, 1576 and 1583 editions. Foxe retained the portion of the document dealing with the execution and imprisonment of religious offenders, but he dropped the section dealing with fines.

And so forth with other such like matter, as foloweth, see in our first edition, pag. 1563.

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The apprehension of two and twenty prisoners sent vp together for Gods word, to London, from Colchester. 
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22 Prisoners from Colchester

Much of this account - Kingston's letter to Bonner, the indenture on the delivery of the prisoners and the formal confession of the prisoners - was printed in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition, Foxe added Bonner's letter to Pole, an informal confession of some of the prisoners and the petition of the prisoners. Foxe's sources for the 1563 edition are clearly London diocesan records; for the 1570 edition, he has apparently drawn from the Canterbury records.

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Foxe credits Pole with saving the prisoners, but there are other possible readings of these documents. What is clear is that the Colchester magistrates and Bonner's commissioners had arrested these prisoners and sent them to Bonner in London. Their arrival in the capital created a commotion which greatly worried Bonner. His solution was to have the prisoners taken to Fulham and tried there, but he sought to obtain Pole's permission for this. In the event, the prisoners were released upon making a deliberately vague submission of belief in the eucharist.

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AFter this bloudye Proclamation or Commission thus geuen out at London, which was Februarye 8. the thyrde and fourth yeares of the Kynge and Queenes raigne, these new Inquisitours, especially some of them beganne to ruffle and to take vpon them not a little: so that all quarters were full of persecution and prisons almost full of prisoners, namely in the Dioces of Canterbury, wherof (by the leaue of Christ) we will say more anon.

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MarginaliaPersecution about Colchester.In the meane time, about the Towne of Colchester, the wind of persecution beganne fiercely to rise: insomuch that three and twenty together, men and women were apprehended at one clap, of the which xxiij. one escaped. Marginalia22. For Gods word apprehended.The other xxij. were driuen vp like a flock of Christen lambes, to London, with two or three leaders with them at most, ready to geue theyr skinnes to be pluckt of for the Gospels sake. Notwithstanding the Bishops, afrayd belike of the nūber, to put so many at once to death, sought meanes to

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deliuer them, and so they did, drawing out a very easy submission for them, or rather suffring them to draw it out thēselues: notwithstanding diuers of thē afterward were takē againe & suffered, as hereafter ye shall heare (God willing) declared. Such as met them by the way cōming vp, saw them in the fieldes scattering in such sort, as that they might haue easily escaped away. And when they entred in to the townes, their keepers called them againe into aray, MarginaliaThe aray & order of these 22. prisoners comming vp to London.to go two & two together, hauing a band or line going betweene them, they holding the same in theyr handes, hauing another corde euery one about his arme, as though they were tied. And so were these fourteene men & eight women caried vp to London, the people by the way praying to God for them, to geue them strength. At the entring into London, they were pinioned, & so came into the city, as the Picture here shortly after folowing wt their names also subscribed, doth describe. But first let vs declare concerning their taking and their attachers, conteined in the Commissaryes letter, written to Boner: then, the Indenture made betwene the commissioners and the popish cōmissary. The letter of the Commissary is this.

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¶ The Letter of the Commissary, called Iohn Kingston, written to Bishop Boner.

AFter my duety done in receiuing and accōplishing your honorable and most louing letters, dated the 7. of August: Be it knowne vnto your Lordship, that the 28. of August, MarginaliaLorde of Oxford, L. Darcy, H. Tyrrell, Anthony. Browne, William Bendelowes, Edmund Tyrrell, Richard Weston, Roger Appleton, Iohn Kingstone Commissarye, persecutors.the Lorde of Oxenford, Lord Darcy, H. Tyril, A. Brown, W. Bendlowes, E. Tyrill, Ric. Weston, Roger Apleton, published their cōmissiō to seise landes and tenements & goodes of the fugitiues, so that the owners should haue neither vse nor commodity thereof, but by Inuētory remaine in safe keeping, vntill the cause were determined.

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And also there was likewise proclaimed the queenes graces warrant, for the restitution of the Church goods within Colchester, & the hundredes thereabout, to the vse of Gods seruice. And then were called the parishes particularly, & the hereticks partly cōmitted to my examination. And that diuers persons should certify me of theyr ornamentes of theyr Churches, betwixt this and the Iustices next appearaunce, which shalbe on Michaelmas euen nexte. And that parish which had presented at two seuerall times, to haue all ornaments, with other thinges in good order, were exonerated for euer, til 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 304, line 31

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'til' to 'to' in the text.} The preposition "to" is taken for "until," both here and a few lines lower; "yea to the lord legates commissioners." It is the reading of the first three editions of Foxe, altered in those subsequent into "till." Mr. Halliwell quotes an instance of this use from a Lincoln MS.:-
"Theys knyghtis never stynte ne blane
To thay unto the cetè wanne."
Warton's "History of English Poetry" (i. 67, Edit. 1840) furnishes from Robert de Brunne another:-
"Of that gift no thing ne wist
To he was cast oute with Hengist."
The same author (iii. 99) gives another instance of this idiom from Minot's poems on the wars of Edward III:-
"And in that land, trewly to tell,
Ordains he still for to dwell
To time he think to fyght."

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they were warned againe, & others to make theyr appearaunce from time to time. And those names blotted in the Indenture, were indited for treason, fugitiues, or disobedients, and were put foorth by M. Brownes commaundement. And before the sealing, my Lord Darcy said vnto me apart, and M. Bendlowes, that I should haue sufficient time to send vnto you Lordship, yea, if need were, the heretickes to remayne in durance till I had an answere from you: yea to the Lord Legates graces Commissioners come into the Country.

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And mayster Browne 

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This is Robert Brown, a Colchester alderman and not Sir Anthony Browne, the Essex magistrate who frequently appears in Foxe's pages.

came into my Lord Darcyes house & parlour belonging vnto M. Barnaby, before my sayd Lord and all the Iustices, and laid his hand of my shoulder, with a smiling coūtenaunce, and desired me to make his harty commēdations vnto your good Lordship, and asked me if I would, and I said. Yea, with a good will. Wherefore I was glad, and thought that I should not haue bene charged with so sodeine carriage. But after dinner, the Iustices councelled with the Bayliffes, and with the Gaolers, and then after tooke me vnto them, and made collation of the Indentures, and sealed: and then Mayster Browne commaunded me this after noone, being the 30. of August, to go and receyue my prisoners by and by. And then I sayd, it is an vnreasonable commaundemēt, for that I haue attended of you here these three dayes, and this Sonday early I haue sent home my men. Wherefore I desire you to haue a conuenient time appoynted, wherein I may know whether it will please my Lord my maister to sende his Commissioners hither, or that I shall make carriage of them vnto his Lordship. Then MarginaliaMaister Browne a hoate and hasty Iustice in persecuting Gods people.M. Browne: We are certified, that the Councell hath written vnto your mayster, to make speed, and to rid these prisoners out of hand: therefore go receiue your prisoners in haste. Then I: Sir, I shall receiue them within these tenne dayes. Then M. Browne: The limitation lyeth in vs, and not in you, wherfore get you hence.

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Syr, ye haue indited and deliuered me by this Indenture, whose fayth or opinions I know not, trusting that ye will graūt me a time to examine them, least I should punish the Catholicks. Well sayd Maister Browne, for that cause ye shall haue time betwixt this and Wednesday. And I say vnto you maister Bailiffes, if he do not receiue them at your handes on Wednesday, set open your doore, and let them go.

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Then I: My Lord and maisters all, I promise to discharge the towne and countrey of these heretickes, within ten dayes. Then my Lord Darcy sayd: Cōmissary, we do and must all agree in one. Wherfore do you receiue them on, or before Wednesday.

Then I: My Lord, the last I carryed, I was goyng betwixte the Castell and Sayncte Katherines Chappell, two howres and an halfe, and in greate preasse and daunger: Wherefore thys

may
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