Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John White

(1510? - 1560)

Bishop of Lincoln (1554 - 1556), bishop of Winchester (1556 - 1559) (Fasti; DNB)

John White was created bishop of Lincoln in 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was the author of commendatory verses for Philip and Mary's marriage, (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

On 14 February 1555 Percival Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. Then at 3 o'clock the same day, Dr Harding, the bishop of Lincoln's chaplain, went to see Bradford in prison. Harding talked of his fear for Bradford's soul, and that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13.

[Back to Top]

An examination of Ridley and Latimer was conducted by White (Lincoln), Brookes (Gloucester) and Holyman (Bristol) on 30 September 1555. White, Brookes and Holyman received their commission from Cardinal Pole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

White was present during the second private conference between Philpot and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-13.

Thomas Benbridge was examined by John White, bishop of Winchester. 1563, p. 1667, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

John White would not be swayed by the truth of Gratwick's argument. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Rochester, a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. He was condemned by Winchester and others.1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

White was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
King

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

King was burned at St George's-fields in the latter half of May 1557. 1570, p. 2164, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1978.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Maurice Griffith

(d. 1558)

BD (1532). Bishop of Rochester (1554 - 1558). [DNB]

Maurice Griffith was created bishop of Rochester (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1487).

Bradford, in a letter to John Treves, referred to a contention between the master of Katherines Hall and the bishop of Rochester, who was master of Pembroke Hall, as to which should have Bradford as a fellow. 1583, p. 1664.

Rochester condemned Christopher Wade and Nicholas Halle 31 June 1555, and they were burned in July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Margaret Polley was accused and brought before Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, pp. 1859-60, 1576, pp. 1591-92, 1583, p. 1679.

Nicholas Hall was condemned by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester, 31 June 1555, and burned about 19 July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, the chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Joan Beach and John Harpole were examined by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

Stephen Gratwick was condemned by the bishop of Winchester and the bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Richard Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Griffith (Rochester), a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 19 May before the bishop of Rochester, Chichester and others. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned and later burned. 1583, p. 2145.

Maurice Griffith died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stephen Gratwick

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Brighton, Sussex.

Stephen Gratwick was condemned by the bishop of Winchester and the bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

He appealed to his own bishop without success. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Dr White would not be swayed by the truth of Gratwick's argument. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

False articles were brought against him when Gratwick appeared before the false bishop. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Foxe includes Gratwick's own declaration concerning his condemnation. 1570, pp. 2162-64, 1576, pp. 1867-69, 1583, pp. 1976-78.

Gratwick was burned at St George's-fields in the latter half of May 1557. 1570, p. 2164., 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1978.

[One of a group of freewillers who received a letter from Robert Gibson. In this letter, dated 20 June 1556, Gibson defended the orthodoxy of his trinitarian convictions, as well as his newly discovered predestinarian theology. (ECL 260, fo.72r). In a letter to Mrs Lounford, Gratwick extolled predestinarianism (BL, Add.Ms.19400, fos.82r-83r).]

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Morant

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

William Morant was burned at St George's-fields in the latter half of May 1557. 1570, p. 2164., 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1978.

2000 [1976]

Queene Mary. 5. Martyrs burned in Smithfield. 3. in S. Georges fieldes. Stephen Gratwicke.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Maye.the Bishop continuing in his accustomable perswasions, Loseby agayn sayd vnto him: my Lorde, I trust I haue þt spirite of truth, which you detest and abhorre, for the wisdome of God is foolishnes vnto you. Wherupon the Byshop pronounced the sentence of condemnation agaynst him. And deliuering him vnto the Sheriffe, called for Margaret Hide, wt whō he vsed þe like order of exhortatōs

[Back to Top]

To whom notwithstanding she sayd: MarginaliaThe wordes of Margaret Hyde to the Bishop.I will not depart from my sayinges till I bee burned: and my Lorde (quoth she) I would see you instruct me with some parte of Gods word, & not to geue me instructiōs of holy bread and holy water, for it is no part of the scripture. But he being neither himselfe, nor any of his, able rightly to accomplish her request, to make short worke, vsed his final reason of conuincement, which was MarginaliaSentence geuen agaynst Margaret Hyde.of the sentence of condēnation. And therfore leauing her off, called for an other, videl. Agnes Stanley, who vpon the Bishoppes like perswasions made this aunswere.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe wordes of Agnes Stanley to the Bishop.My Lord, wher you say I am an heretick, I am none: neither yet will I beleue you, nor any man þt is wyse will beleue as you do. And as for these that ye say bee burnt for heresie, I beleue are true martyrs before God: therefore I will not go from my opinion and fayth, as long as I liue.

[Back to Top]

Her talk thus ended, she receaued the like reward that the other had. And the bishop then turning his tale & maner of inticement vnto Thomas Thyrtel, receiued of him likewise this finall aunswere: MarginaliaThe wordes of Thomas Thirtell to the BishopMy Lord, I will not holde with youre Idolatrous wayes, as you do: for I saye the Masse is Idolatry, and will sticke to my fayth and beliefe so long as the breath is in my body. MarginaliaThomas Thirtell condemned.Vpon which wordes he was also condemned as an hereticke.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe aunswere and condemnation of Hēry Ramsey.Last of all, was Henry Rāsey demanded if he would (as the rest) stand vnto his aunsweres, or els recanting þe same, come home agayn, and be a member of their church. Whereunto he aunswered: I will not go from my religiō and belief as long as I liue: and my Lord (quoth he) your doctrine is naught, for it is not agreable to Gods worde.

[Back to Top]

After these wordes, the Bishop (to conclude) pronoūcing the sentence of condemnation 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 315, line 6

The condemnation of these five is recorded by Machyn (p. 130) on the day given by Foxe; but he has placed their martyrdom under the vi: one, he says, "was a barber dwellyng in Lym-strett; and on woman was the wyff of the Crane at the Crussyd-frers besyd the Towre-hylle, kepyng of a in ther" (p. 131).

[Back to Top]
agaynst him and þe rest: (as ye haue heard) charged þe Sherriffes of London wt thē: who being therunto commaunded, the xii. day of the same

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Thomas Loseby, Henry Ramsey, Thomas Thirtell, Margaret Hyde, Agnes Stanley, in Smithfield. Anno. 1557. Aprill. 12. The cruell burning of 5. Martyrs in Smithfield.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Having been used for the five martyrs of Canterbury (which it fitted) the block was here reused inappropriately for the martyrdom of three men and two women, whose names are given in the margin.

month of Aprill, brought them into Smithfield, where altogether in one fire, most ioyfully & constantly they ended their temporall liues, reciuing therefore the life eternal.

Three burned in Sainct Georges field in Southwarke. 
Commentary  *  Close
Stephen Gratwick and Two Other Martyrs

There is only a note about these martyrs in the 1563 edition; this complete account first appears in the 1570 edition. The entire account is based on Gratwick's account of his examinations.

MarginaliaMaye. W. Morant, Stephen Gratwicke, One King, Martyrs.AFter these, moreouer in the month of May followed 3. other that suffered in S. Georges field in Southwark William Morant, Stephen Gratwicke, with one one king. 

Commentary  *  Close

The mentions of King in this account - and it is significant that Foxe does not know his first name - is all that we know of King.

Among other histories after the persecuted and condemned saintes of God, I find the condemnation of none more straunge nor vnlawfull, thē of this Stephen Grat-

[Back to Top]

wicke. MarginaliaThe straunge dealing of the Byshops with Stephen Gratwicke, Martyr.Who first was condemned by the byshopp of Wynchester and the byshop of Rochester, which where not hys Ordinaryes. 

Commentary  *  Close

As a resident of the diocese of Chichester, Gratwick's ordinary - who alone had jurisdiction over him for spiritual offences - was the bishop of Chichester. The problem for the Marian authorities was that George Day, the bishop of Chichester, died on 2 August 1555, while the proceedings against Gratwick were underway. Day's successer, John Christopherson, would not be installed until 25 November 1557. The attempt to trick Gratwick by pretending that a servant was the bishop wasshabby, but in defence of those responsible, the effort was made in an attempt to intimidate Gratwick into recanting and thus saving his life.

[Back to Top]

Secondly when he did appeale from those imcompetēt Iudges to hys right Ordinary, his appeale coulde not be admitted.

Thirdly, when they had no other shifte to colour theyr inordinate proceedings with all, they suborned one of the priestes to come in for a counterfayt and a false Ordinary and sit vpon him.

Fourthly being openly conuinced and ouerturned in his own argumentes, yet the sayd Byshop of Winchester D. White, neyther would yeald to the force of trueth, nor suffer any of the audience assistant, once to say, God strengthen him.

Fiftly, as they brought in a false Ordinarye to sit vpon him: so they pretended false articles agaynst him, whiche were no part of his examinations, but of their deuising, to haue his bloud.

Sixtly and lastly, hauing no other groūd nor iust matters agaynst him, but onely for saying these wordes: that which I sayd, I haue sayde, they red the sentence of death vpon him.

And this was the dealing of these men, whiche needes will be reputed for Catholicke fathers of þe spirituality succeders of the Apostles, disciples of Christ, pillers of the holy Churche, and leaders of the people. Of whose doynges and proceedinges, howe agreable they are to the example of Christ and his Apostles, I leaue to discusse, referryng þe iudgement hereof to them, which know the institution of Christes religion and doctrine.

[Back to Top]

Now least peraduēture the disordered misrule of these Christmas Lordes, will not be credited vppon the simple narration of the story, yee shall heare the whole discourse of this processe registred by the hand of the Martyr hymselfe, MarginaliaThe vnordinate handling of Stephen Gratwicke written and testified by his owne recorde.who as he could tell best what was done: so I am sure would not testifie otherwise, then trueth was, according as you shall heare by his owne declaration here following.

[Back to Top]
¶ The declaration of Steuen Gratwicke concerning his owne story and condemnation.

MarginaliaThe story and examination of Stephen Gratwicke Martyr, vnder the B. of Winchester & Rochester. &c.VPon the xxv. day of May, in þe yeare of our Lord, 1557. I. Stephen Gratwick came before þe Bishop of Winchester, D. White, into S. Georges Churche in Southwarke at eight of the clocke in the morning and then hee called me before him, and sayd vnto me.

[Back to Top]

B. Winchester. Stephen Gradwick, how standeth the matter with thee now? Art thou contented to reuoke thy heresies, the which thou hast mayntayned and defended here within my Dioces, oftentimes before me and also vppon Sonday last, ye stoode vp in the face of the whole Churche 

Commentary  *  Close

St Mary Overy's in Southwark.

mayntayning your heresies, so that you haue offended wtin the libertie of my Dioces, and now I being your Ordinary you must aunswere to me directly, whether you will reuoke them or not: the which I haue here in writing, and if so be, that you wil not reuoke them, then I will excommunicate you: and therefore note well what you doe, for now I read here the Articles agaynst you.

[Back to Top]

And so whē he had ended, he bad me answer vnto them.

Grat. My Lord, these articles whiche you haue here obiected agaynst me, are not mine but of your owne making. For I neuer had any of mine examinations written at any time, and therefore these be the obiections that you laye agaynst me as a snare to get my bloud.

MarginaliaStephen Gratwicke appealeth from the B. of Winchester to his owne Ordinary.Wherefore I desyer your lawfull fauour, to allow my lawfull appeale vnto myne Ordinary, for I haue nothing to do with you. And whereas you do burden me, that I haue offended within your Dioces, it is nothing so, for I haue not interprised neyther to preache nor teache within your Dioces, but was apprehended by mine own Bishop & sent prisoner into your Dioces, by the consent of þe Coūsell & mine own Ordinary, & therefore I so being in your Dioces, you haue no cause to let my lawfull appeale.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Byshop of Rochester commeth in.And with that there came the Bishop of Rochester, & was receaued at the B. of Winchesters hands with much gladnes, according to their determinate purpose, before inuented. MarginaliaCatholicke conueyance among these Bishops.And so followed the Archdeacon of Canterbury And then the Bishop agayne start vp as a man halfe rauished of his wittes for ioye, embracing him with many gētle wordes, and sayd, þt he was very glad of his comming, making himselfe ignorant thereof, as he thought it should appeare to me. Then sayd Winchester.

[Back to Top]

B. Win. Syr I am very glad of your cōming. For here I haue one before me, who hath appealed vnto you being his Ordinary. MarginaliaStephen Gratwicke not of Rochester Dioces.Then sayd the Archdeacon of Canterbury.

Arch. Cant. I know this man very well. He hath bene di

uer-
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield