Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Allin [or Alen]

(d. 1557)

Miller. Martyr. Of Frittenden, Kent.

Allin sold his corn cheaply to the poor and also read scripture to them. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Baker allowed Allin and his wife to spend a night together, during which they decided not to go to chapel and to die together. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Goods seized from the Allins' home were delivered to Thomas Henden, from whom they were later recovered during Elizabeth's reign. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Sir John Baker committed Allin and his wife to ward but for some reason they were later released. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Allin fled to Calais with his wife after their release. 1570, p. 2165, 1679 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

In Calais Edmund Allin's conscience began to trouble him. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Whilst in Calais Edmund Allin met with John Webbe, who suggested that God had plans for Allin in England. Allin then returned to Frittenden. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor was informed by the sexton that Edmund Allin and his wife had returned to Frittenden but were not attending mass. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor sent the Allins before Sir John Baker for a second time. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

The Allins were sent to Maidstone prison by Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Testimony of the Allins' imprisonment was given to Foxe by Richard Fletcher and John Webbe 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins (his chaplain) and Edmund Allin. 1570, p. 2165-66, 1576, p. 1870-71, 1583, p. 1979-80.

Edmund Allin was burned with his wife and five others at Maidstone, 18 June 1557. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1871, 1583, p. 1980.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Notes on a source for John Foxe's account of the Marian persecution in Kent and Sussex', Historical Research 67 [1994], pp. 203-11.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Elizabeth

(d. 1557)

Martyr. A blind maiden.

Elizabeth was burned with six others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Joan Bradbridge

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Staplehurst

Joan Bradbridge was burned with six others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Joan Mannings

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Wife, of Maidstone

Joan Mannings was burned with six others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Dove

Possibly a constable. OF Frittenden, Kent.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Tailor

Parson of Frittenden, Kent.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin, and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor was informed by the sexton that Edmund Allin and his wife had returned to Frittenden but were not attending mass. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor sent the Allins before Sir John Baker for a second time. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Webbe

Probably a merchant. Of Frittenden, Kent.

Edmund Allin met with John Webbe whilst in Calais, and Webbe suggested that God had plans for Allin in England. Allin then returned to Frittenden. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Testimony of the Allins' imprisonment was given to Foxe by Richard Fletcher and John Webbe 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

   
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Petronil Appleby

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Wife of Walter Appleby. Of Maidstone

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned. 1583, p. 2145.

Petronil Appleby was burned with her husband and five others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Fletcher

(d. 1596)

Fellow of Corpus Christ College, Cambridge (1569); DD (1581). (DNB;Venn). Vicar of Cranbrook. Bishop of Bristol (1589 - 1593), Worcester (1593 - 1595), London (1595 -1596). See Patrick Collinson, Godly People: Essays on English Protestantism and Puritanism (London, 1983), pp. 11, 112, 130, 399, 400 n.30, 405, 417-22.]

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Testimony of the Allins' imprisonment was given to Foxe by Richard Fletcher and John Webbe 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Collins

Commissary of Canterbury diocese. [BCL 1522 Foster

Foxe states that Collins was the cardinal's factor before coming to England 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Robert Collins demanded that Bland return the following day but Bland did not appear, due to urgent business. Bland wrote a letter regarding this. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Robert Collins, in Thornden's house. Foxe reports the talk between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

Around 28 June Bland returned to Collins, where he proceeded against Bland before Master Cockes of Sturray and Markes the apparitor. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland remained in the castle of Canterbury until 2 March, when he was taken to the chapter house of Christ Church (Canterbury), to the suffragen of Canterbury, Master Collins, Master Mylles and others, then to Master Oxenden, Master Petit, Master Webbe and Master Hardes (these were all justices). 1563, p. 1224, 1570, p. 1848, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

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Bland and Collins argued over abiding by the laws of the realm and of the sacrament. 1563, pp. 1224-25, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, pp. 1582-83, 1583, pp. 1669-70.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden, 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

John Newman was examined before Thornden, Collins and others. 1583, pp. 1686-87.

Richard Wright was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, bishop of Dover, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Collins took part in the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

John Newman was examined by Thornden and others, among whom was Robert Collins. 1570, pp. 2134-35, 1576, pp. 1856-57, 1583, pp. 1950-51.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Baker

(1490? - 1558)

Chancellor of the Exchequer, privy councillor, undersheriff and sheriff of the court of London. MP for Bedford and the City of London. [DNB; Bindoff)]

Sir John Baker believed Bland to be Scottish, but Bland told him he was English, from Sedbar and brought up by Dr Lupton, the provost of Eton.1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Sir John Baker and Bland held a conversation over Bland's beliefs 1563, pp. 1223-24, 1570, pp. 1847-48, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, pp. 1668-69.

Bland was taken before Sir John Baker, Master Petit, Master Webbe, and two others whose identity was unknown to Bland. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Complaints about Richard Turner's sermons were made to Sir John Baker, Sir Christopher Hales, Sir Thomas Moyles. 1570, p. 2043, 1576, p. 1762, 1583, p. 1869.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Baker allowed Allin and his wife to spend a night together, during which they decided not to go to chapel and to die together. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Sir John Baker committed Allin and his wife to ward but for some reason they were later released. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor sent the Allins before Sir John Baker for a second time. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

The Allins were sent to Maidstone prison by Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins (his chaplain) and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Sir John Baker called Mrs Allin a whore for persuading her husband not to go to chapel. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Thomas Brice was in the house of John Seal, in Horting, when the bailiff and others, at the commandment of Sir John Baker, were sent to search for him. They knew his stature and the colour of his garments yet somehow did not recognise him and so he escaped. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Henden

Parson of Staplehurst, Kent.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin, and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Goods seized from the Allins' home were delivered to Thomas Henden, from whom they were later recovered during Elizabeth's reign. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Linley

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Walter Appleby

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Maidstone

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned. 1583, p. 2145.

Walter Appleby was burned with his wife and five others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cranbrook
Crambroke, Cranbroke
NGR: TQ 775 363

A parish in the hundred of Cranbrook, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 14 miles south by east from Maidstone. 40 miles south-east by east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Fritenden
Fritenden, Frytenden
NGR: TQ 815 410

A parish in the hundred of Cranbrook, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 4.25miles north-east by north from Cranbrook. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Staplehurst
NGR: TQ 785 430

A parish partly in the hundred of Cranbrook, and partly in that of Marden, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 4 miles north by east from Cranbrook. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2003 [1979]

Queene Mary. The examination, apprehension, and answers of Edm. Allen.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iune.And now to returne to the said dioces of Cant. againe, in the next moneth following, 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., the month following the execution of Gratwick - June, 1557.

being þe month of Iune, the 18. day of the same, were 7. Christian & true faithfull martirs of christ burned at Maidst. whose names here folow.

MarginaliaThe names of the Martyrs.Ioane Bradbridge 

Commentary  *  Close

'Bradbridge's widow', also of Staplehurst, was burned at Canterbury the day after Joan Bradbridge was burned at Maidstone; presumably they were relatives. For an account of Bradbridge's death which Foxe did not print see Freeman, 'Notes on a Source', pp. 203-11).

of Stapleherst. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 321, fn 1

In the Harleian MSS. No. 416, art. 75, is Roger Hall's original information to Mr. Foxe, relating to circumstances touching Joan Bradbridge, Edmund Allin, and Thomas Rede [or Reade]. - ED.

Walter Appelbie of Maidstone. Petronil his wife. Edmund Alen of Fritenden. Katherine his wife. Ioane Mannings wyfe of Maidstone. Elizabeth a blinde Maiden.

As concerning the generall Articles commonly obiected to them in the publicke Consistory, & the order of theyr cōdemnation, it differeth not much from the vsuall maner expressed before, pag. 1585. neither did their aunsweares in effect much differre from the other that suffered vnder the same Ordinarie in the foresaid dioces of Canterburie.

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Now as touching their accusers, and maner of apprehension, and their priuate cōflicts with the aduersaries, I finde no great matter comming to my hands, saue only of Edmund Alen some intimation is geuē me, how his troubles came, what was his cause and aunsweres before the Iustices, as here consequently ye shall vnderstand.

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The examination of Edmund Alen.

MarginaliaThe story of Edmund Alen, with his trouble and examination before Syr Iohn Baker.THis Allen was a milner of the parish of Frytenden in Kent, and in a deare yere, when as many poore people were like to starue, he fed them, and solde his corne better cheape by halfe then others did: and did not that only, but also fedde them with the foode of life, reading to them the scriptures, and interpreting them. This being known to the popish priests there abouts dwelling, by the procurement of them, namely of Iohn Tailor parson of Fritenden, and Thomas Henden parson of Stapleherst, he was eftsones cōplained off to the Iustices, and brought before syr Iohn Baker Knight, who first sending for them, committed both him and his wife to Ward: but not long after they were let out, I know not how, & so went ouer vnto Calice. MarginaliaEdmund Allen went to Calice. Whereafter that he had continued a certaine space, he began to be troubled in conscience, & there meeting wt one Iohn Web of the same parish of Fritēden, (who was likewise fled from the tirāny of sir Iohn Baker, and parson Tailor) said vnto him, þt he could not be in quiet there, what soeuer the cause was: for God (saide he) hadde some thing to do for him in Englād: MarginaliaEdmund Allen returneth againe from Calice, and is apprehended.& thus shortly he returned home again to the parish of Fritenden. Where was a cruel Priest, there Parson, called Iohn Tailor.

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This parson Tailor being infourmed by his brother Sextan, that Edmund Allen the Milner & his wife, were returned, and were not at masse time in the churche: as he was the same time in the midst of his masse, vpon a Sonday, a little before the eleuation (as they terme it) euen almost at þe lifting vp of his Romish God, he turned him to the people in a great rage, and commanded them with all spede, MarginaliaMarke what a holy Masse saying was here & what a charitable religion is this.to go vnto their house, and apprehend them, and he wold come to them wt as much hast as might be possible. Which promise he well performed. For he had not so soone made an end of Ite missa est 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative.
Foxe text Latin

Ite missa est.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

Go, this is the dismissal


[This is sung by the priest celebrating the Mass,

, and the vestments of his back, but by and by he was at the house, and there laying hande of the said Alen, caused him againe to be brought to sir Ih. Baker, with a greuous complaint of his exhorting & reading the scriptures to the people, and so was he & his wife sent to Maidstone prison. Witnessed by Richard Fletcher Vicare of Crambroke, 
Commentary  *  Close

For the background on Fletcher and a discussion of his reasons for providing Foxe with this account see Patrick Collinson, 'Cranbrook and the Fletchers: Popular and Unpopular Religion in the Kentish Weald' in Godly People: Essays on English Protestantism and Puritanism (London: 1983), pp. 399-428.

and Iohn Webbe of Fritenden. MarginaliaWitnesses to the story.

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They were not so soone in prisone, but maister Baker immediately sent vnto their house, certaine of his mē, MarginaliaIohn Doue, Tho. Best, Tho. Linsey, Perciual Barbel, persecutors.Ih. Doue, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Perciuall Barbel, with the foresaide Iohn Tailor parson of Fritenden, and Thomas Henden Parson of Sapleherst, to take an inuentorie of all the goodes that were in the house. Where they found in þe bedstraw a casket locked with a padlocke, & so cutting the wist therof, opened it, and founde therein a sackecloth bagge of money, containing the summe of 13. or 14. pound, partly in gold, & partly in siluer. Which money after they had told and putte in the bagge againe, like good caruers for themselues, they caried away with them.

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Besides also they found there certaine bookes, as Psalters, Bibles, and other wrytings. All which bookes, with the money, were deliuered to the foresaid Priest MarginaliaTho. Henden Priest persecutor.Thomas Henden, parson of Stapleherst, and after in the raigne of this Queene, an. 5. Reg. Elisab. was by right law recouered  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 322, middle

See more in Strype's Annals, I. i. 558, or, in folio, 374.

from him againe, as in Recordes remaineth to be seene.

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Thus good Edmund Allen and his wife, being maliciously accused, wrōgfully imprisoned, & cruelly spoiled and robbed of al their goods, were brought (as is aforesaid) before sir Iohn Baker the iustice, to be examined: who taūting and reuiling him wtout all mercy and pity, asked him if those were þe fruits of his gospell, to haue cōuenticles to gather people together, to make conspiracies, to sow sedition and rebellion: and thus he began wt him to reason.

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The talke or reasoning betwene Sir Iohn Baker, Colins his chaplaine, and Edmund Allen.

MarginaliaThe examination of Edmund Allen before Syr Iohn Baker.BAker Who gaue thee authority to preache & interprete? Art thou a priest? art thou admitted thereunto? Let me see thy licence. Mart. Collins, sir Ihon Bakers scholemaster said, surely he is an arrāt heretike & worthy to be burned.Alen. And it may plese your honor to geue me leaue to answer in the cause of my faith, I am persuaded þt God hath geuē me this autority as he hath geuē to al other christiās. Why are we called christians if we do not folow Christ, MarginaliaPriuate reading or expounding of the scriptures forbidden to no man.if we do not read his law, if we do not interpret it to others þt haue not so much vnderstāding? Is not Christ our Father? shal not þe son folowe the fathers steps? is not Christ our master? and shal þe scholer be inhibited to lern & preach his precepts? Is not Christ our redemer? and shal not we praise his name, & serue him þt hath redemed vs from sin & dānation? Did not christ being but 12. yeres of age dispute wt the doctors, & interprete þe prophet Esay, MarginaliaLuke. 4. and notwtstāding hee was neither of the tribe of Leuie, whiche were Priestes, but of the royal tribe of Iuda, neither had taken any outward priesthode? wherfore if we be christians, we must do the same. Col. And it shal like your honor, what a knaue is this, þt cōpareth himself wt Christ. Baker. Let him alone, he wil pump out anon an infinite heap of heresies. Hast thou any more to say for thy self? Alen. Yea þt I haue. Adam was licēced of God, & Abraham was cōmanded to teach his children & posteritye, & so Dauid teacheth in diuers psalmes: and Salomon also preached to þe people, as þe boke of the precher proueth very wel, where he teacheth þt there is no immortal felicity in this life, but in the next. And Noe taught them þt were disobediēt in his daies, and therfore is called the 8. Preacher of righteousnes in the 2. epistle of Peter. Also in þe 11. of Numb. where Moses had chosen 52. elders to helpe him to teach & rule the rest, Eldad & Medad preached in þe tents wherfore Iosua being offended, cōplained to Moses þt Eldad & Medad did preach wtout licēce. MarginaliaPreaching without licence in the olde Testament.To whō Moses answered & wished þt al þe people could do þe like. What shuld I be long? most of þe priests were not of the tribe of Leuy and Aaron. Col. These are authorities of þe olde testament, & therefore abrogated, but þu art a foole, & knowest no schoole poynts. Is not þe law deuided into the lawe ceremonial, moral, & iudicial? Allen. I graunt þt the ceremonies ceased when Christ came, as S. Paul proueth to the Heb. & to the Col. where he saith: MarginaliaColoss. 1.Let no man iudge you in any part of a sabboth day, new moone, or other ceremonies which are figures of things to come, for Christ is the body. Collins. And are not the iudicials abrogated by Christ? Allin. They are confirmed both by Christ in the 5. of Mathew, and by Paule in the 1. Epistle to Timothe 4. The law saith he is not set foorth for the vertuous & godly, but for men slayers, periured, aduouterers & such like. Collins. Marginalia* Albeit the positiue law of Moses Iudicials do not binde the Gentiles with the same necessity absolutely in euery condition, as it did the Iewes, to whom it was peculiarly geuen: yet may the Gentiles borow out of the same law, such thinges that shallbe expedient for theyr regiment. Neyther can they borow any lawes better then out of Moses.* Thou art an hereticke. Wilt thou call the Iudicials of Moses againe? wilt thou haue adultery punished with death? disobedient children to their parēts to be stoned? wilt thou haue Legem talionis? 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative.
Foxe text Latin

Legem talionis

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

Law of retaliation.

[cf. Tertullian, adv. Marc. xiv. in Migne PL vol. 2, col. 0508B

ergo et legalis talio non retributionem injuriae permittebat.]

But thou arte an Asse. Why shoulde I speake Latine to thee thou erroneous rebell? shall we now smite out eye for eye, toothe for toothe? thou art worthy to haue thy teeth and tonge plucked out. Allin. If we had that law, we should neither haue disobedient children, neither adulterers, neither false witnesse bearers, neither ruffians. Baker. Master Collins, lette vs returne to our first matter. Why diddest thou teach þe people, whom thou saidst thou didst fede both bodely and spiritually, being no Priest? Allin. Because þt we are al kings to rule our affections, preests to preach out the vertues & woorde of God, as Peter wryteth: & liuely stones, to geue light to other. For as out of flint stones commeth foorthe that, that is able to set al the world on fire, so out of Christians shoulde springe the beames of the Gospell, whiche should inflame al the world. If we must geue a reckening of our faith to euery man, and now to you demanding it, then must we study the Scriptures & practise them? What auaileth it a man to haue meate and will eate none, and apparell and will weare none, or to haue an occupation, and to teach none, or to be a lawyer and vtter none? Shall euery artificer be suffered, yea and commended to practise his facultie and science, and the Christian forbidden to exercise his: Doth not euery lawyer practise his law? Is not euery christiā a folower of Christ? Shall ignorance which is condēned in al sciences be practised of christians? Doth not s. Paul forbid any mās spirit to be quenched? MarginaliaIn tyme of publicke corruption, & in want of true teachers, it is not forbidden to any man to teach.Doth he prohibite any man þt hath any of these giftes, which he repeateth. 1. Cor. 14. to practise the same? Only he forbiddeth womē, but no man. The Iewes neuer forbad any. Read the Acts of þe apostles. And þe restraint was made by MarginaliaPope Gregory the 9. first restrayned lay men to teach or instruct others in Scriptures.Gre. þe 9. pope of that name,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 323, line 2 from the bottom

This refers probably to the edict of the council held at Toulouse A. D. 1229 (cap. 14), at which Romanus Bonaventura, Cardinal Deacon of St. Angelo, presided; and which is generally quoted as having been the first instance of Scripture, translated into a vulgar tongue, being publicly prohibited. See Labbe, tom. xi. 430; Basnage's Hist. Eccles. Ref. i. 309; and Horne's "Popery the enemy of Scripture," p. 10.

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as I hard one, a learned mā preach in K. Ed. daies. Col. This villen (& it like your honor) is madde. By my Priesthoode, I beleeue that her wil saye, a Priest hath no more authoritye then an other man. Doth not a Priest binde and loose? 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 324, line 3

The faculty of teaching with authority, pronouncing judgment ex officio, or propounding doctrine ex cathedrá, is indicated by the same emblem [of keys]. It was mentioned by Christ when reproving the Jewish teachers: "Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in, ye hindered." (Luke xi. 52.)

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Allen.
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