Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
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Alice Benden

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Staplehurst [or possibly Cranbrook], Kent.

Alice Benden was brought before Roberts of Cranbrook on 14 October 1556 for not attending church. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

She remained in prison for fourteen days before she was called before the bishop of Dover. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Alice Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

The Saturday after her release her husband willed her to go to church but she refused. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

On Sunday two weeks later, Alice Benden's husband talked with others of the parish and then had his wife sent to Sir John Guildford, who sent her to prison again. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

The constable's boy escorted Alice to Canterbury castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

While in prison, Alice Benden and another prisoner, the wife of Potkin, devised to live on only 2 1/2 pence a day, to see how well they could sustain penury and hunger before they were forced to endure it. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She lay in prison for nine weeks, sustained by only three farthings a day, which she spent on bread alone, drinking only water. She remained in the same clothes during these nine weeks. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

At the stake Alice Benden gave her handkerchief to John Banks, asking him to remember her by it. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

She gave the lace from about her waist to her jailor, asking him to deliver it to her brother. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

She asked that the shilling her father had sent her when she first went to prison be returned to him. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

She was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-56.]

 
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Barbara Final

(d. 1557)

Widow. Martyr. Of Headcorn, Kent.

Barbara Final was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

[Possibly related to Nicholas Final.]

 
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Edward Benden

Of unknown occupation. Of Staplehurst, Kent.

Benden's wife was burned at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

The Saturday after his wife's release he willed her to go to church but she refused. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Edward Benden talked with others of the parish of Staplehurst and then had his wife sent to Sir John Guildford, who sent her to prison again. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

He took money from the constable to have his wife sent to prison. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

He went to the bishop of Dover on 22 January 1556 to petition for his wife's release. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Edward Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-56.]

 
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John Fishcock

(d. 1557)

Of unknown occupation. Martyr. Of Headcorn, Kent.

John Fishcock was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

[Denied the Real Presence under examination but had difficulty in explaining his beliefs and asked for guidance and instruction from his examiners. See BL, Harley 421, dos.101r-103r.]

 
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John Roberts

(1531 - 1573)

Justice of Cranbrook. MP for Steyning (1554) (Bindoff)

Alice Benden was brought before Roberts of Cranbrook on 14 October 1556 for not attending church. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Alice Potkins was imprisoned by Master Roberts. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2140, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

 
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Mrs Wilson

(d. 1557)

Married woman. Martyr. Of Kent.

Mrs Wilson was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

[Possibly the Christiana Wilson forced to flee Colchester.]

 
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Nicholas Pardue

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Nicholas Pardue was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

 
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Nicholas White

(d. 1557)

Of unknown occupation. Martyr. Of Kent.

Nicholas White was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1563, p. 1571, 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

 
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Richard Thornden

(d. 1558)

Suffragan Bishop of Dover (1545-1558) [ODNB]

Richard Thornden is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 13 June 1555 John Bland was brought before Thornden. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Bland asked that the bishop of Dover and Master Collins be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 20 June, Bland was reexamined, his articles read by the bishop of Dover and Bland's answers made. 1563, p. 1229.

Bland referred to Thornden's library as a source for texts for any discussion of scripture. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Thornden stated that Bland had preached many heresies. Faucet wais present during this discussion. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Cyriac Pettit was present during the disputation between Bland and Nicholas Harpsfield on 21 May 1555. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring Bland and Master Collins (comissary) before him, in Thornden's house. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 13 June [1555] Bland was brought before Richard Thornden, Robert Collins and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Thornden asked Bland if he knew of Oecolompadius and Zwingli, to which Bland responded that he had seen 'parte of their doinges'. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

On 20 June Bland was reexamined and his articles read by Richard Thornden. Bland's answers were made and condemnation given. 1563, pp. 1229-30, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland was condemned by Dover. 1563, p. 1230, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland, Sheterden and Middleton were condemned on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned John Frankesh. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned Humphrey Middleton. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He took part in the last examination of Nicholas Sheterden and condemned him on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

Thornden examined and condemned William Cokar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He examined Richard Colliar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Colliar on either 26 June, 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or16 August 1555 (1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Hopper. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Hopper on 26 June or 26 July 1555 (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 16 July 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned Henry Laurence. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Laurence on 26 June or 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 2 August 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Sterne. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden was referred to by William Sterne as 'Dick of Dover'. 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden examined and condemned Richard Wright. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

George Catmer, Robert Streater, George Brodbridge, Anthony Burwarde and James Tutty, martyrs, were examined by the bishop of Dover. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

John Web was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

Newman was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thornden is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thornden condemned John Philpot of Tenterden, William Hay of Hythe, Thomas Hudson of Selling, Matthew Bradbridge of Tenterden, Thomas Stephens of Biddenden, Nicholas Final of Tenterden, William Lowick of Cranbrooke, and William Prowting of Thornham. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].]

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Joan Bradbridge, Walter Apelbye of Maidstone, Petronyll, his wife, Edmund Allin of Frittenden, Katherine,his wife, Joan Mannings, wife of Maidstone, Elizabeth, a blind maiden were all examined by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak, that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the Castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Joan Bradbridge had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden was taken with a palsy whilst watching a game of bowls at Bourne. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Thornden died in the pulpit after giving pardon and remission of sins to his congregation. 1563, p. 1705.

[Referred to as 'Thorton' and 'Dick of Dover'.]

 
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Widow Bradbridge

(d. 1557)

Martyr.

Bradbridge was burned with six others at Canterbury on 19 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

She had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

[Probably the widow of Martin Bradbridge.]

 
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Canterbury
Cant., Canterb., Canterbury, Caunterbury, Caunterburye,
NGR: TR 150 580

An ancient city and county of itself, having separate jurisdiction. Locally in the hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, eastern division of the county of Kent. 26 miles south-east by east from Rochester. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Alphege, St. Andrew, St. George, The Holy Cross, St. Margaret, St. Martin, St. Mary Bredman, St. Mary Bredin, St. Mary Magdalene, St. Mary Northgate, St. Mildred, St. Peter and St. Paul, all in the Diocese of Canterbury, and with the exception of St. Alphege and St. Martin within the Archdeaconry of Canterbury. The living of All Saints is a rectory with St. Mary in the Castle and St. Mildred attached; St. Alphege is a rectory exempt, united with the vicarage of St. Mary Northgate; St. Andrew is a rectory with St. Mary Bredman annexed; St. George is a rectory with St. Mary Magdalene annexed; St. Martin's is a rectory exempt with St. Paul's annexed; St. Peter's is a rectory with Holy Cross annexed; St. Mary Bredin is a vicarage; and St. Margaret's is a donative in the patronage of the Archdeacon

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Staplehurst
NGR: TQ 785 430

A parish partly in the hundred of Cranbrook, and partly in that of Marden, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 4 miles north by east from Cranbrook. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2004 [1980]

Queene Mary. The story of Ed. Allin. The story of seuen Martyrs burnt at Canterbury.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iune.Allin. MarginaliaSinne bindeth: Repentance loseth, God forgeueth: Man exhorteth.No, my sinne bindeth me, and my repētance loseth. God forgiueth sin only, and no priest. For euery Christian when he sinneth, bindeth himselfe, and when he repēteth, loseth him self. And if any other be losed from his sinne by my exhortation, I am saide to lose him: and if he perseuere in sin, notwtstanding my exhortation, I am saide to binde him, althoughe it is God that bindeth and loseth, and geueth the increase: Therefore saith Christ. Mat. 18. MarginaliaMath. 18. How man remitteth sinne or reteyneth.Wheresoeuer 2. or 3. are gathered togither in my name, there am I in the middest of them, & whosoeuer sinnes they forgeue, they are forgeuen: and whosoeuer they retaine, they are retained. Neither hath the Pope any keies, saue the keies of error: MarginaliaThe Popes keyes be the keyes of errour. for þe key that openeth the locke to Gods mysteries and to saluation, is the key of faith and repentāce. And as I haue heard learned men reason, S. Austine and Origen, with others are of this opinion. Then they reuiled him and laide hym in the stockes all the night. Wherewith certaine that were better minded, being offended with such extremity, willed Allin to keepe his cōscience to him selfe, and to folow Baruckes counsel in the 6. chap. MarginaliaBaruc. 6.Wherfore when ye see the multitude of people worshipping thē, behinde and before, say ye in your harts, O Lord it is thou that ought only to be worshipped.

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Wherewith he was perswaded to goe to heare Masse the next day, and sodenly before the sacring went out, and considered in the Churchyard with him selfe, that suche a litle cake betwene the priests fingers could not be Christ, nor a materiall body, neither to haue soule, life, sinnewes, bones, flesh, legs, head, armes nor brest, and lamēted that he was seduced by the place of Barucke, which his conscience gaue him to be no Scripture, or els to haue an other meaning, and after this MarginaliaAllen brought agayne before Syr Ioh. Baker.he was brought againe before syr Iohn Baker, who asked why he did refuse to worship the blessed Sacrament of the aultar.

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MarginaliaTalke of the Sacrament.Allin. It is an Idol. Collins. It is Gods body. Allin. It is not. Collins. By the Masse it is. Allin. It is bread. Collins. How proouest thou that? Allin. When Christ sate at his last supper, and gaue them bread to eate. Col. Bread knaue? Allin. Yea bread, which you cal Christes body. Sate he stil at the table, or was he both in their mouthes, & at the table? If he were both in their mouthes & at the table, then had he two bodies, or els had a fantasticall body: which is an absurditie to say it. Sir Iohn Baker. MarginaliaThis Papist graunteth that Christ had a glorified body at his Supper.Christes body was glorified, and might be in mo places then one. Allin. Then had he more bodies thē one, by your own placing of him. Collins. Thou ignorāt Asse, the schoole men say, that a glorified body may be euery where. Allin. If his body was not glorified til it rose againe, then was it not glorified at his last supper, and therefore was not at the table, and in their mouthes, by your owne reason. Collins. A glorified body occupieth no place. Allin. That which occupieth no place, is neither God, nor any thing els: but Christes body say you, occupieth no place: therefore it is neither God nor any thing els. If it be nothing, then is your religion nothing. If it be God, MarginaliaThe Papists make 4. persons in one Trinity.then haue we iiij. in one Trinitie, which is the persone of the father, the person of the sonne, the person of the holy ghost, the humane nature of Christ. If Christ be nothing, which you must needes confesse if he occupie no place, then is our study in vaine, our faith prostrate, and our hope without reward. Collins. This rebel wil beleue nothing but scripture. How knowest thou that it is the scripture but by the church? and so sayeth S. Austin. Allin. I cannot tell what Austine sayth, but I am perswaded, that it is Scripture, by diuers arguments.

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MarginaliaHow the Scripture is knowen to be Scripture.First, þt the law worketh in me my condemnation. The law telleth me þt of my selfe I am dāned: and this damnatiō, M. Collins, you must find in your self, or els you shal neuer come to repētance. For as this grief & sorow of cōscience, wtout faith, is desperation, so is a glorious & Romish faith wtout the lamentatiōs of a mās sins presūption.

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The second is the gospel, which is the power & spirit of God. This spirite (sayth S. Paule) certifieth my spirite that I am the sonne of God, and that these are the Scriptures.

The thirde, are the wonderfull woorkes of God, which cause me to beleue that there is a God though we glorifie him not as God. Rom. 1. The sunne, the moone, þe starres and other his workes (as Dauid discourseth in the xix. Psalme MarginaliaPsal. 12.) declareth that there is a God, and that these are þe scriptures, because that they teach nothing els but God and his power, maiestie and might: and because the scripture teacheth nothing dissonant from this prescription of nature. And fourthly, because that the woord of God gaue authoritye to þe church in paradise, saying that the seede of the woman should brast down the Serpents head. This sede is the gospel: this is al the scriptures, and by this we are assured of eternall life, and these words: The seede of the woman shall braste the serpentes heade, gaue authoritie to the church, and not the church to the worde. Baker. I hearde say that you spake against priests and bishops. Allin. I

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spake for thē, for now they haue MarginaliaThe reuenewes of Bishops and Prelates in England.so much liuing, & especially bishops, archdeacons, and deanes, that they neyther can nor wil teach Gods woord. If they had a 100. pounds a peece, then would they apply their studie: now they can not for other affaires. Col. Who wil then set his children to schoole. Allin. Where there is now one set to schoole for that end, there would be 40. because that one Bishops liuing deuided into 30. or 40. partes, would finde so manye as wel learned men as the bishops be now, who haue all this liuing, neither had Peter or Paul any such reuenew. Baker. Let vs dispatch him: he wil mar all. Collins. If euery man had a 100. pounds, as he saith it wold make mo learned men. Baker. But our bishops would be angrye if that they knew it. Allin. It were for a common wealth to haue such bishoppricks deuided for the further increase of learning. Baker. What sayest thou to the Sacrament? Allin. As I sayde before. Baker. Away wt him. And thus was he caried to prison, and afterward burned. 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1570 and 1576 editions, an account follows here of Allin's escape from Sir John Baker's custody - see Thomas S. Freeman, 'Notes on a Source for John Foxe's Account of the Marian Persecution in Kent and Sussex' Historical Research67 (1994), pp. 203-11.

And thus much touching the particular storie of Edm. Allin and his wife. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome ot 5. women and 2. men at Cant. Anno. 1557. Iune. 18.Who with the v. other martyrs aboue named, being vij. to wit, v. women, and ij. men were altogether burned at Maidstone, the yere and moneth afore mentioned, and the 18. day of the same moneth.

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An other storie of like crueltie, shewed vpon other 7. Martyrs burnt at Cant. 3 men and 4. women. 
Commentary  *  Close
Alice Benden and Other Kentish Martyrs

In the 1563 edition, Foxe had an account of these martyrs which was based on trial documents. (In one case Foxe clearly had the confession of one of these martyrs but did not print it because the martyr admitted that he was unsure of his beliefs about the eucharist). In the 1570 edition, Foxe added a narrative of Alice Benden's imprisonment and martyrdom, which was contributed, as Foxe states, by her brothers John and Roger Hall. (On the Hall brothers and Foxe, see Thomas S. Freeman, 'Notes on a Source for John Foxe's Account of the Marian Persecution in Kent and Sussex' Historical Research 67 (1994), pp. 203-11). This account remained unchanged in subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaIune 19. MarginaliaThe story of 7. other Martyrs.AMong suche infinite seas of troubles in these most dāgerous daies, who can withhold himselfe from bitter teares, to see the madding rage of these pretensed Catholickes, 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1563 edition, this phrase is 'cruel papists'. This is another example of Foxe moderating his language in the second edition of the Acts and Monuments.

who being neuer satisfied with bloud to maintaine their carnall kingdome, presume so highly to violate the precise law of Gods commandements in slaying the simple pore Lambes of the glorious congregation of Iesus Christ, and that for the true testimonie of a good cōscience, in confessing the immulate gospell of their saluatiō. What heart wil not lamēt the murdering mischief of these men, MarginaliaVnmercifull cruelty of the Catholickes agaynst poore women.who for wāt of worke, do so wreke their tine  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 326, fn 1

"Wreck their tyme," Edit. 1563, p. 1571: the subsequent Editions read "wrecke" or "wreake their tine," i. e. vent their spleen: "tine" means vexation. See Todd's Johnson. - ED.

on seely pore women, whose weake imbecillitie the more strēgth it lacketh by natural imperfection, the more it ought to be helped, or at least pitied, and not oppressed of men þt be stronger, and especially of Priests that should be charitable.

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But blessed be the Lord omnipotent, who supernaturally, hath indued from aboue such weake creatures with such manly stomacke and fortitude, so constantly to withstād the vttermost extremitie of these pitilesse persecutors: as he did before strengthen the mother of the 7. sonnes in the Machabees, & as he hath done since with diuers & sondry other godly womē in these our later daies, partly before mentioned, & partly to be mētioned hereafter, & heere presently may appeare by the martyrdome of these 7. here vnder folowing, of the which were 4. women and 3. men, burnt together at Canterb. the 31. day of the sayde moneth of Iune, in the yere aforesaid, whose names are these.

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Iohn Fishcocke. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 326, fn 2

In the Harleian MSS. No. 421, art. 52, is the original Confession of John Fishcock, signed by Harpsfield. - ED.

Nicolas White. 
Commentary  *  Close

John Fishcock's examinations survive among Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 421, fos 101r-103v. Foxe never revealed that Fishcock confessed that he was uncertain what he believed about the eucharist and that he was ready to accept what Pole believed as the truth.


Nicolas Pardue.
Barbara Final, 
Commentary  *  Close

Among Foxe's papers is the confession of one Adriana Vynall of Tenterden (BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 100r). Very likely this is the same person as 'Barbara Final'.

Widow.
* Marginalia* This Bradbridges wyfe was thought to be with childe.Bradbreges widow 
Commentary  *  Close

Joan Bradbridge was burned at Maidstone the day before widow Bradbridge was burned at Canterbury. Presumably they were relatives.


Wilsons Wife.
Bendens Wife.

As it were too tedious exactly and particularly to prosecute the seuerall storie of euery one of these godly Martyrs: so I can not passe ouer vntouched the cruel and vnchristian handling of Alice Benden during her imprisonment, according as I haue receiued by the faithfull relacion of them which best were acquainted with her, & partly also some doers in the matter, beinge MarginaliaRoger and Tho. Hall two godly brethren of Alice Benden.her owne naturall brethren. 

Commentary  *  Close

These were Alice Benden's brothers John and Roger Hall; see Thomas S. Freeman, 'Notes on a Source for John Foxe's Account of the Marian Persecution in Kent and Sussex' Historical Research 67 (1994), pp. 203-11.

The storie is thus.

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¶ The order of the imprisonment and tragicall handling of Alice Benden, wife of Edw. Benden of the parish of Stapleherst in the Countie of Kent, for the testimonye of Christes Gospell.

MarginaliaThe imprisonment of Alice Benden, and maner of her handling.FIrst Alice Bēden was broght before one MarginaliaM. Robertes of Crambroke persecutor.M. Roberts of Crābroke in the said Countie, the 14. day of Oct. in the yere of our lord 1556. of whom she was demāded, why she wold not go to the church. And she answered, that she could not so do wt a good and cleare cōscience, because there was much idolatrie committed against the glory of God. For the which, with many mocks and taūts she was sent to prison, MarginaliaAlice Benden imprisoned for not comming to the Church. where she lay 14. daies. For on þe 20. day of October her husband required his neigbors the welthy mē of Stapleherst to wryte to the Bishop of Douer, who had the chiefe gouernment of the tyrannical sword in Kent for those daies, which they did, desiring him to sēd her home. MarginaliaAlice Benden deliuered by sute of her neighbours.

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Wherfore the B. called her before him, & asked her if she would go home & go to the church. Wherunto she answered: If I would haue so done I nede not to haue come hither. Then wilt thou go home, and be shriuen of þe parish Priest? And she sayd, no, that would she not.

Well, said he, go thy waies home, and go to the Church when thou wilt. Wherunto she answered nothing. But a

priest
OOOOo.ij.
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