Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Fairebank

Once a married priest of Warbleton.

Woodman was apprehended for challenging Fairebank [once a married priest, of Warbleton] for preaching differently under Mary from what he had preached under Edward VI. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, pp. 1983-84.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Christopherson

(d. 1558)

Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1553 ? 1558); bishop of Chichester (1557 - 1558). Master of Trinity College (1553 - 1558). Dean of Norwich (1554 - 1557). Chaplain and confessor to Queen Mary. (DNB)

Christopherson was sent to Cambridge University by Stephen Gardiner with articles ordering that every scholar wear the proper vestments, pronounce Greek in the traditional pronounciation and declare the whole style of the king and queen in their sermons (1563, p. 1007; 1570, pp. 1646-47; 1576, p 1405; and 1583, p. 1475).

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John Christopherson condemned Robert Pygot and William Wolsey on 9 October 1555. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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John Christopherson was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Christopherson attempted to sprinkle scholars of Trinity College with holy water at the gatehouse to the college, but they refused it. Nicholas Carre wrote a letter to John Cheke about Martin Bucer, which was then passed on to Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. . 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Christopherson did not attend King's College on 14 January 1557 with the other commissioners. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

He was taken sick during Watson's Candlemas sermon and began babbling. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

Some present at Watson's sermon said that Christopherson had become sick because he had been accused of false accounting at the college and that he had witnessed his brother-in-law's lease being cancelled on the manor of the college because the covenants seemed unreasonable. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Woodman's second examination before Christopherson and two of his chaplains, as well as Story, took place on 27 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1582-87, 1570, pp. 2178-82, 1576, pp. 1881-84, 1583, pp. 2089-92.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

He accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

He died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Philpot

(1516 - 1555)

Archdeacon of Winchester and martyr. [DNB]

Foxe records Philpot's formative years and character. 1563, p. 1388, 1570, p. 1961, 1576, p. 1688 , 1583, p. 1795.

Philpot was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

Philpot was also one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for an opportunity to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Philpot's account of the debate over transubstantiation was reprinted by Foxe [cf. John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XXVIII daye of Octobre MDLIIII (Emden, 1554). STC 19890, with 1563, pp. 906-16; 1570, pp. 1571-78; 1576, pp. 1340-47; 1583, pp. 1410-17). In Philpot's version of events, he plays the lead role among the six clerics - the others were Walter Phillips, James Haddon, Richard Cheyney, John Aylmer and Thomas Young - in refuting the catholic arguments.

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John Philpot was made archdeacon of Winchester under Ponet. 1563, p. 1388, 1570, p. 1961, 1576, p. 1688, 1583, p. 1795.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Bonner sent Johnson the registrar to speak to Philpot when he was imprisoned in the coal house. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

Thomas Whittle was imprisoned in the coal house with Philpot. Bonner was so violent with Whittle's beard that he plucked much of it away and made his face black and blue. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

Philpot met with Bonner the second night of his imprisonment in the coal house (his third examination). 1563, pp. 1392-93, 1570, pp. 1964-65, 1576, pp. 1691-92, 1583, pp. 1798-99.

Philpot spoke briefly with Cosin, Bonner's chaplain, before returning to his imprisonment in Bonner's coal house. 1563, p. 1393, 1570, p. 1965, 1576, p. 1692, 1583, p. 1799.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

During Philpot's fourth examination, John Harpsfield brought a book by Irenaeus to Philpot's examiners, who then discussed the Roman church with Philpot. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

During his fifth examination, Philpot asked his examiners which of them could answer Calvin's Institutions, to which Saverson replied that the Genevan church had fragmented and that Calvin had fled. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot's sixth examination was before the lord chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

During his sixth examination, Philpot stated that Joan of Kent was a heretic. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Chamberlain was present during Philpot's sixth examination and questioned him on the real presence. 1563, pp. 1405-1412, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

In Philpot's seventh examination, John Dee is referred to as Master Dee in 1563 and 1570 and then as Doctor Dee in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Johnson the registrar was present during Philpot's seventh examination. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Three private conferences took place between Philpot and Bonner. (The first involved his keeper; the second, his fellow prisoners and his keeper; and the third only Bonner and Philpot.) 1563, pp. 1416-19, 1570, pp. 1980-82, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-14.

Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

Johnson the registrar was present at Philpot's eighth examination. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Philpot's ninth examintion was before Bonner and his chaplains, including Cosin. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had, however, left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's tenth examination was before Bonner, Johnson and others. 1563, pp. 1424-25, 1570, pp. 1985-86, 1576, pp. 1709-10, 1583, pp. 1816-17.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In Philpot's eleventh examination, John Dee is referred to as a 'great conjurer' in 1563 and 1570. The reference is removed in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

The bishop of Coventry and Lichfield spoke with Philpot about the nature of the true church. 1563, p. 1444, 1583, p. 1818.

Philpot's twelfth examination on 4 December 1555 was before Bonner, Worcester and Bangor. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

One of Bonner's chaplains (probably Cosin) was present during Philpot's twelfth examination. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, pp. 1717, 1583, p. 1823-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York, Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, p. 1824-26.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The judgement of Philpot took place in the consistory court of St Paul's on 13 and 14 of December, at which Bonner and others were present. 1570, p. 1997, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1826.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield.. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

Foxe includes Bonner's exhortation to Philpot. 1563, p. 1443, 1570, p. 1998, 1576, p. 1710, 1583, pp. 1827-28.

A letter was exhibited by Bonner, concerning the handling of Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference is made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Philpot was mentioned in letter sent by John Bradford to Lady Fane. 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

Lady Fane wrote a letter to Bonner. 1563, p. 1445, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1828-29.

John Hooper sent Philpot and his fellow prisoners, Robert Ferrar, John Bradford and Rowland Taylor, a letter dated 6 May 1554 discussing a proposed disputation in Cambridge in which they would represent the protestants. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Philpot and his fellow prisoners, John Bradford, Robert Ferrar and Rowland Taylor. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

In a letter William Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

Green wrote a letter to John Philpot which was not delivered. According to Foxe it was either not delivered because Philpot died or because the jailor prevented its delivery. 1563, pp. 1459-60, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

Stokesley said a Latin prayer before the condemnation of Philpot. 1570, p. 2000, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, pp. 1827, 1829.

Philpot had a talk with his keeper, Alexander, during which Philpot refused to recant. 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 1829.

The mayor (Macham) heard of the treatment of Philpot in prison and ordered Philpot's irons to be removed. 1563, p. 1443, 1570, p. 2001, 1576, p. 1998, 1583, p. 1830.

Wittrence, the steward of the house, carried the manacled Philpot. 1570, p. 2001, 1576, p. 1998, 1583, p. 1830.

Foxe records Philpot's behaviour prior to his death, when the sheriffs came to collect him. 1563, p. 1447, 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1722-23, 1583, p. 1830.

A prayer was said by Philpot at the stake. He was burned on 18 December 1555. 1563, pp. 1448-49, 1570, p. 2002, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1830-31.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1444-50, 1570, pp. 2002-14,1576, pp. 1721-35, 1583, pp. 1829-43.

Philpot wrote a letter to John Careless. 1563, pp. 1535-38.

Careless replied to the letter from John Philpot. 1563, pp. 1536-37, 1570, pp. 2103-04,1576, pp. 1814-15, 1583, p. 1921.

Whittle sent a letter to John Careless in prison, in which he says he has heard reports of Philpot's stoutness in going to his death and asking for a copy of Philpot's nine examinations for a friend. 1570, p. 1457, 1570, pp. 2018-19, 1576, pp. 1739-40, 1583, pp. 1847-48.

[Also referred to as 'Fylpot'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Gage

(1479 - 1556)

Statesman and military commander. MP Sussex (1529, 1539). Lord Chamberlain (1553 - 1556); privy councillor (DNB; Bindoff)

John Gage was one of the privy councillors who signed a letter to Bishop Bonner, dated 28 April 1555, ordering the bishop to proceed posthumously against John Tooley in ecclesiastical court. 1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

Sir John Gage was an attendant to Elizabeth when she was brought to London under suspicion of involvement in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

He was appointed to go with Elizabeth after her release. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

[Married the daughter of Sir Richard Guildford of Cranbrook. Father of James and Edward Gage.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Warbleton
Warbleton
NGR: TQ 609 181

A parish in the hundred of Hinckesborough, rape of Hastings, county of Sussex. 6.5 miles north by east from Hailsham. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Lewes, Diocese of Chichester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2008 [1984]

Queene Mary. The story, trouble, and persecution of Richard Woodman.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iune.an Ironmaker, dwelling in the Parish of Warbleton, in the Countie of Sussex, & Dioces of Chichester, of the age of 30. yeres, and somewhat more. The occasion of his first apprehension was this.

MarginaliaFayrebanke Preaching contrary to himselfe.There was one Fairebanke, who somtimes had bene a maried priest, and serued the Cure of Warbleton, where he had often perswaded the people not to credite any other doctrine, but that which he then preached, taught, and set forth in K. Edwards dayes. And afterward in the beginnyng of Q. Maries raigne, the sayd Fayrebanke turnyng hed to taile, preached cleane contrary to that which he had before taught.

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Whereupon Richard Woodman hearyng hym in the Church of Warbleton so to preache contrary to hymselfe, admonished hym of hys inconstancie, how before tyme he had taught them one thing, and now another, and desired hym to teach them the truth. For the which words he was apprehended and brought before MarginaliaIustices of Sussex troublers of Richard Woodman, and what were their names.M. Iohn Ashbornham, M. Toston, M. Culpeper, and M. Robertes, Iustices of Peace in the Countie of Sussex, and by them committed to the Kyngs Bench, where he continued from Iune, the space almost of a yeare and a halfe: and from thence was transferred by D. Story into Boners Colehouse, where he remayned the space of a moneth before he came to examination.

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MarginaliaRichard Woodman deliuered out of his first trouble.At length, the same day when M. Philpot was burned, which was the 18. of December, he with 4. other prisoners was deliuered and set at libertie by Boner himself. Notwithstandyng, shortly after he was sought for again, and at last found out and taken MarginaliaRichard Woodman agayne apprehended, and by whose meanes.by meanes of hys father, brother, and certaine other his acquainted friendes, and so was sent vp agayne to London to B. Boner, where he remayned in the Colehouse 8. weekes. He was there sixe tymes examined, and 26. tymes before, so that his examinations in all, Marginalia32. examinations of Richard Woodman.were 32. from his first apprehension, to his condemnation. 

Commentary  *  Close

This is the total number of examinations for both of Woodman's imprisonments.

Touching the whole discourse wherof, for so much as the matter is something strange, and will peraduenture scarce find credit vpon my narration, with thē which deny all thynges, that lyke them not to beleeue, ye shall heare himselfe speake, and testify both of the maner of his troubles, and also his owne examinations by himselfe recorded, in order as followeth.

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A true Certificate written by Richard Woodman, of his taking, & how he was brought to the Shiriffes the xv. of March, 1556. and how long he was in prison, and how he was there vsed, till he was broughte before the Bishoppe of Chichester at blacke Friers in London, with the order of his examinations followyng after the same.

MarginaliaThe certificate of Richard Woodman concerning the truth of his owne story and troubles.GEntle Reader, here you shall perceiue how the sriptures bee partly fulfilled on me, beyng one of the least of his poore Lambes. First, you shall vnderstād that since I was deliuered out of the Bishop of Londons hands, which was in the yeare of our Lord, 1555. and the same day that M. Philpot was burned, (which was the 18. of December) I lay in his Colehouse 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., in the coalhouse of Bonner's palace, which was used as an ad hoc prison for those being examined by Bonner.

8. weeks lacking but one day. And before that, I was a yeare and a halfe almost, in the Kings Bench after MarginaliaThe first apprehension of Richard Woodman.my first apprehension, for reproouyng a Preacher in the pupit, in the parish of Warbleton where I dwelt. Wherfore I was at two Sessions before I was sent to prison, and caried to two more Sessions whyle I was in pryson, twyse before the B. of Chichester, and fiue tymes before the Commissioners, & then sent to Londons Colehouse, & many tymes called before him, as it appeareth by my examinations which I wrote, the which examinations, the B. of Chichester now hath, for they were found in my house when I was takē, wherin is conteined all the talke, which I had before them aforenamed. Also there be in London that had copies of the same of me, when I was in the Colehouse.

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MarginaliaRichard Woodman deliuered out of Boners hands, with 4. moe.And it pleased God to deliuer me, with foure or more, out of the butchers handes, requiring nothing els of vs but that we shuld be honest men, and members of the true Catholike Church that was builded vpon the Prophetes and Apostles, Christ beyng the head of the true Churche, the which all we affirmed that we were members of the true Church, and purposed by Gods helpe therein to dye. 

Commentary  *  Close

Woodman is concerned here to emphasize that he was released on a technicality and that he did not recant.

MarginaliaWhat the Bishop required at their deliuerance.And hereupon we were deliuered, but he willed vs many tymes to speake good of hym. And no doubt he was worthy to be praysed, because he had bene so faithfull an ayd in his maister the deuils businesse. For he had burnt good M. Philpot the same mornyng, MarginaliaB. Boner bloudthirstye.in whose bloud his hart was so drunken (as I supposed) that he could not tell what he

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did, as it appeared to vs, both before & after. For but two dayes before he promised vs that we should bee condemned that same day that we were deliuered: yea & the morow after that he had deliuered vs, hee sought for some of vs agayne, yea and that earnestly. He waxed dry after his great dronkennes, wherfore he is lyke to haue bloude to drink in hel as he is worthy, if he repent it not with speed. The Lord turne all their harts if it be his will.

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MarginaliaWoodmen purgeth himselfe of false sclander.This haue I written, chiefly to certifie all people how we were deliuered, because many carnall Gospellers and Papists haue sayd, that it was prescribed that we should be so deliuered, because they thinke that God is subiect to man, and not man to God. 

Commentary  *  Close

Woodman is concerned here to emphasize that he was released on a technicality and that he did not recant.

For if they did, 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 334, fn 1

"If they did;" that is, if they thought that man was subject to God. - ED.

they would not blaspheme hym as they doe, or if they thought they should geue account for it. Haue not many of them red, how God deliuered Israel out of Egypt? Daniel out of the Lyons denne? Sydrach, Misaach, and Abednago out of the burnyng ouen? with diuers other such like exāples, yea God is the same God that he was then. He is no older, nor lesse in power, as some count hym in wondring at his works. Now to the matter.

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After I was deliuered, the Papists sayd MarginaliaFalse surmises agaynst Richard Woodman.that I hadde consented to them, whereof they made themselues glad: the which was the least part of my thought (I praise God therefore) as they well perceiued, and knew the contrarye within a while. For I went from parish to parish, & talked with them, to the number of 13. or 14. and that of the chiefest in all the Countrey: and I angred them so, MarginaliaWoodman complayned of to Syr Iohn Gage Lord Chamberlayne.þt they with the Commissioners complayned on me to my Lord Chamberlaine that was then to the Queene, Sir Iohn Gage shewyng him that I baptised children, and married folks, with many such lyes, to bryng me into their hands agayne. Then the Commissioners sent out certaine Citations to bring me to the Court. MarginaliaWarrantes sent out to attach Woodman.My L. Chamberlain had directed out 4. or 5. Warrantes for me, that if I had come there, I should haue bene attached and sent to prisō straite way. Which was not Gods will: for I had warnyng of their laying await for me, and came not there, but sent my deputie, & he brought me word that the Bailifs waited for me there, but they mist of their pray for that tyme, wherevpon they were displeased.

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MarginaliaL. Chamberlayne sendeth to take Woodman at his plough.Then within 3. dayes after, my L. sent 3. of his men to take me, whose names were Deane, Ieffrey, and Frāces. I beyng at plough with my folkes, right in the waye as they were commyng to my house, least mistrusting thē of all other, came to them and spake to them, asking thē how they did. And they sayd, MarginaliaWoodman arested.they arested me in the Kyng and Queenes name, and that I must goe with them to their Maister the L. Chamberlaine. MarginaliaFeare comming vpon Woodmā at his first taking.Which wordes made my flesh to tremble and quake because of that sodayne. But I answered them that I would go with them. Yet I desired them that they would go to my house with me, þt I might breake my fast, and put on some other geare, and they said I should. Then I remembred my selfe, saying in my hart: MarginaliaWoodman comforted in his spirite after his feare.Why am I thus afraid? they can lay no euill to my charge. If they kill me for well doyng, I may thinke my self happy. I remembred how I was contented gladly before to dye in that quarell, and so had continued euer since: and should I now feare to dye? God forbid that I should, for then were all my labour in vayne.

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So by and by I was perswaded, I praise God, considering it was but the frailty of my flesh, which was loth to forgo my wife & childrē and goods: for I saw nothing but present death before mine eyes. And as soone as I was perswaded in my mynd to die, I had no regard of nothing in this worlde, but was as mery and glad and ioyfull, I prayse GOD, as euer I was. This battaile lasted not a quarter of an houre, but it was sharper then death it selfe for the tyme, I dare say.

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So when I had my breakfast, I desired them to shew me their warrant, MarginaliaWoodman asketh for their Warrant.thinkyng thereby I should haue seene wherfore I was arested, to the intent I might þe better answer for my self whē I came before their maister. And one of them answered, they had not their warrāt there. Which words made me astonied, and it was put in my mynde by God, MarginaliaHow God worketh for his seruauntes.that I neede not to goe with them, vnlesse they had their warrant. Then said I to them, that is meruaile that you will come to take a man without a warrant. It seemeth to me that you come of your owne mind to get thāke of your maister, for in deed I heard say (sayd I) that there was 4. or 5. warrants out for me, but they were called in agayne, MarginaliaThe vnorderly doinges of the Papistes in attaching men without any warrant.because I had certified my L. and the Commissary by a letter that I sent to the Commissaries court, that I was not faulty in that they layd to my charge, which was for baptising of children, and marying of folks: the which I neuer did, for I was neuer minister appointed to do any such thyng: wherfore set your hartes at rest, I will not

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