Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alice Mount

(1516 - 1557)

Wife of William Mount. Invalid. Martyr. Of Great Bentley.

Alice Mount asked that her daughter, Rose, fetch a drink for her. On her way back through the house Tyrrel stopped Rose and advised her to encourage her parents to become better catholics. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

She was condemned. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

She was burned in the castle yard in Colchester 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

John Roth's letter to certain brethren condemned in Colchester mentions the Mounts. 1563, p. 1631, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

 
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Edmund Tyrrel

(1513 - 1576) [SP11/5, no. 6]; Bindoff, Commons]

Justice of the Peace, Essex (1554 - 1558/59). Bailiff, St Osyth, Essex (1553), MP Maldon (1554, 1558). (Bindoff)

Edmond Tyrrel was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. These commissioners sent Wattes to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

Edward Tyrrel met with John Denley and John Newman prior to their deaths. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Edmond Tyrrel wrote to one of the queen's commissioners stating that he had received a letter from that [unnamed] commissioner and Sir Nicholas Hare via John Failes on 12 June 1555. 1563, p. 1245, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

He found articles of religion on Denley, Newman and Pattingham. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Two sermons were preached in Plumborough and Beaches Woods in Essex, to the great annoyance of Edmund Tyrrel. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Tyrrel went to Hockley in Essex to see who was at the preaching in the woods. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He tried unsucessfully to force John Gye to seek out Tyms, whom Tyrrel believed to be behind the sermons against him. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

When Tyms was brought before Tyrrel, he spoke to him for over three hours without witness, although his words were overheard and so reported to Foxe. 1570, p. 2075, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1896.

Sir John Mordant wrote a letter to Bonner with Edward Tyrrel about women prisoners in the county of Essex. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Margaret Ellis was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel, by means of a letter written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Joan Potter was delivered to Bonner by Mordant and Tyrrel for examination. She was named in a letter by the two justices written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Elizabeth Thackvel was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel, by means of letter written to Bonner. 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

James Harris was delivered by Mordant and Tyrrel to Bonner for examination, as evidenced by a letter to Bonner written by the two justices. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

Joan Horns was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1910.

Katherine Hut was delivered up for examination by Sir John Mordant and Edmund Tyrrel, through a letter written to Bonner. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Tyrrel was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

On 7 March 1557 at two o'clock in the morning, Edmund Tyrrel took William Simuel, the bailiff of Colchester, and two constables of Great Bentley, John Baker and William Harris, to the house of William Mount and his family in order to arrest them. 1570, p. 2199, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2006.

Rose Allin challenged Edmund Tyrrel over his accusations of heresy, for which he took her candle from her and burned the back of her hand until the sinews cracked. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Edmund Tyrrel called Rose Allin a whore on several occasions while he burned her hand and became frustrated when she would not cry. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Rose Allin told Edmund Tyrrel that the Lord might give him repentance, if it were his will. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Edmund Tyrrel found John Thurston and Margaret, his wife, at William Mount's house and so sent them to prison at Colchester castle, along with the Mounts and their daughter. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

In prison, Rose Allin told a friend that she could have smashed Edmund Tyrrel in the face with a pot she held in her free hand whilst he was burning her other hand, but she was glad she had not. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

After a list of clerics who died around the time of Mary's death, Foxe refers to Tyrrel's survival. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Elizabeth Cooper

(d. 1557)

Wife of a pewterer, John Cooper. Martyr. Of Norwich.

Elizabeth Cooper had recanted in St Andrew's parish, Norwich. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Having been troubled by her recantation, she stood up in the midst of the mass and revoked her recantation. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

A man named Bacon urged the sheriff, Thomas Sotherton, to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

In the 1563 edition (only), 'master Marsham' is described as having denounced Cooper along with Bacon to the sheriff. [This was almost certainly Thomas Marsham, an alderman of Norwich.] 1563, p. 1603.

Cooper was taken to prison. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Sotherton was reluctant to take Cooper into custody, as he had been a servant in the same house as Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Elizabeth Cooper was frightened by the flames at the stake but Simon Miller, who was being martyred with her, took her hand and persuaded her not to be frightened. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

She was burned at Norwich on 13 July 1557. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

 
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Felow

Jailor. Of Norwich.

Felow was keeper of the prisoners at Bishop Hopton's house. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Felow may have allowed Simon Miller to return home to set his house in order prior to his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Cicely Ormes was sent to Felow to be kept in the bishop's prison. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

 
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John Barker

Of unknown occupation. Of Great Bentley, Essex.

John Barker was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Much Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

 
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John Carter

Of Much Bentley.

John Carter was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Much Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

 
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John de Vere

(d. 1562)

16th earl of Oxford. (DNB)

John de Vere accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Routh was convented before the earl of Oxford. He was sent to Colchester castle by Lord Rich and then on to Bonner. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2096., 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1916.

Thomas Hawkes was a member of his household. The earl reported to Bishop Bonner that Hawkes refused to have his son baptized in a catholic service and delivered Hawkes to Bonner�s custody (1563, pp. 1161-62; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

He denounced six residents of Coggeshall, Essex (William Bamford, Nicholas Chamberlain, Thomas Brodehill, Thomas Osborne and Richard Webbe) to Bishop Bonner on 1 May 1555 (1563, p. 1166;1570, p. 1777; 1576, p. 1518; 1583, pp. 1601-02).

In a letter to Bishop Bonner, John Kingston said that the 'lord of Oxford' was one of the commissioners who confiscated the lands and goods of 22 accused heretics. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. De Vere was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

John Cornet was sent before the earl of Oxford, who ordered that he be held in chains and finger irons that made the tips of his fingers burst. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Cornet was sent to Bonner but later ordered by the earl of Oxford to return to Rough-hedge to be whipped and then banished from the town forever. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Kingston

Commissary to bishop of London and bachelor of law.

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer, and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 about the taking of 22 people charged with heresy to London. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576], 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Rose Allin was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

William Goodwin and Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

In his letter to Bonner, Kingston said that Alsey was to deliver 22 people to Bonner for examination. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kinstone and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Kingston complained to Bonner that he had not been able so far to carry out a visitation on many foundations in Colchester, such as the masters and lazars of Mary Magdalen, the proctor of St Katherine's chapel, the hospital and beadmen of the foundation of Lord H. Marney in Layer-Marney, and the hospital and beadmen of Little Horksley. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

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On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Kingston was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

A supplication was made against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Kingston took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Painter

Of unknown occupation. Of Great Bentley.

John Painter was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Richard

Of Great Bentley.

John Richard was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

 
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Lord Thomas Darcy of Chiche

(1506 - 1558)

MP for Essex (1539, 1545, 1547), JP for Essex (1538 - 1558). Keeper of Colchester Castle (1541 - 1553), gentleman of the privy chamber (by 1544). Steward, Bury St Edmunds (1547 - 1553). Privy councillor; Lord Chamberlain (1551 - 1553) (Bindoff)

Sir Thomas Darcy was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

After examination by Lord Darcy of Chiche, Ralph Allerton was sent to Bonner, who forced him to recant at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2208, 1576, p. 1905, 1583, p. 2013.

Allerton wrote a letter to Lord Darcy of Chiche. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

Allerton was apprehended, examined before Lord Darcy of Chiche, and condemned over a year before his death. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

A supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, was given to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kingston and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Lord Darcy of Chiche was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

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John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 naming Lord Darcy of Chiche as one of the commissioners who had used their commission to seize lands and goods of protestant fugitives. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

 
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Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mr Bacon

Of Norwich.

A man named Bacon urged sheriff Thomas Sutton to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Mere

Of Great Bentley.

Richard Mere was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rose Allin

(1537? - 1557)

Martyr. Daughter of William and Alice Mount. Spinster. Of Great Bentley, Essex.

Allin was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Rose Allin was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Alice Mount asked that her daughter, Rose, fetch a drink for her. On her way back through the house Edmund Tyrrel stopped Rose and advised her to encourage her parents to become better catholics. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Rose Allin challenged Edmund Tyrrel over his accusations of heresy. for which he took her candle from her and burned the back of her hand until the sinews cracked. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

William Candler, of Great Bentley, witnessed the burning of Rose Allin's hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Rose Allin told Mistress Bright of Romford and her maid, Ann Starkey, of the burning of her hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Mistress Bright tended Rose Allin's wound in her house in Romford, when she and other prisoners stayed in Bright's house on the way to London. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Edmund Tyrrel called Rose Allin a whore on several occasions while he burned her hand and became frustrated when she would not cry. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Rose Allin told Edmund Tyrrel that the Lord might give him repentance, if it were his will. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Edmund Tyrrel found John Thurston and Margaret, his wife, at William Mount's house and so sent them to prison at Colchester castle, along with the Mounts and their daughter. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

In prison, Rose Allin told a friend that she could have smashed Edmund Tyrrel in the face with a pot she held in her free hand whilst he was burning her other hand, but she was glad she had not. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Rose Allin told friends in prison that the longer her hand was burned, the less painful it became. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

She was burned in the castle yard in Colchester 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

[No relation to Edmund Allin or his wife.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Simon Miller

(d. 1557)

Merchant. Martyr. Of King's Lynn, Norfolk.

Simon Miller went to Norwich and asked people coming out of church where he might take communion. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

A papist brought him before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward in the bishop's house. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

His keeper, Felow, may have allowed him to return home to set his house in order before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Having returned to Lynn briefly, Miller returned to Hopton and Felow and was subsequently burned with Elizabeth Cooper in Norwich on 13 July 1557. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

He held Elizabeth Cooper's hand at the stake and convinced her not to be frightened. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Candler

Thomas Candler was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Much Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

[Possibly the same as, or related to, William Candler.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Sotherton [or Sutterton or Sutton]

(fl. 1553 - 1564)

Lord mayor and sheriff of Norwich. See Muriel McClendon, The Quiet Reformation (Stanford, California, 1999), p. 211. Brother of Leonard.

A man named Bacon urged the sheriff, Thomas Sotherton, to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Sotherton was reluctant to take Cooper into custody, as he had been a servant in the same house as Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Cicely Ormes was delivered to the secular power of the sheriffs, Thomas Sutherton and Leonard Sutherton (brothers), who took her to the Guildhall, where she remained until her death. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

[Note that in 1563 and 1570 Foxe refers to him as Sutterton; in 1576 and 1583, as Sutton.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Tye

Minister of Great Bentley, Essex.

Allerton was apprehended by Thomas Tye and sent before Bonner for further examination. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2208, 1576, p. 1905, 1583, p. 2013.

John Allerton's first examination was before Bonner, Morton and Tye on 8 April 1557. Allerton wrote an account of it in his own blood. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, pp. 2208-11, 1576, pp. 1905-08, 1583, pp. 2014-16.

Information against Ralph Allerton was provided by Thomas Tye, John Painter, William Harris, John Barker, John Carter, Thomas Candler, Jeffrey Bestwood, John Richard, and Richard Mere, all of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Allerton had been said by Tye to have schooled Lawrence Edwards over the baptism of his child. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

Tye persecuted the parish of Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

He was one of the cosignatories of a supplication against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

For the first 12 months of Mary's reign, Tye did not attend church; instead he met with other godly men who also absented themselves from church. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye knew of those not attending church and where they met, and wrote secretly to Bonner about who there were. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye wrote to Bonner exposing William Mount, Alice Mount (his wife) and Rose Allin (his daughter) for not going to church. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye told Bonner that John Love of Colchester had been twice indicted of heresy, that he and his wife and household had fled when his goods were seized, but that he had now returned home. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Tye wrote to Bonner again stating that he had heard Feckenham preach at Paul's Cross and then left London for Much Wakering. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

On the third Sunday after Trinity 1557, Tye preached at Much Wakering. 1563, p. 1605.

On the fourth Sunday after Trinity 1557, Tye preached at Harwich and reconciled twelve people back into catholicism. 1563, p. 1605.

On the fifth, sixth and ninth Sundays after Trinity 1557, Tye preached at Wakering Magna. 1563, p. 1605.

On the seventh Sunday after Trinity, Tye preached at Langenho. 1563, p. 1605.

On the eighth Sunday after Trinity, Tye preached at Peldone. 1563, p. 1605.

On the tenth Sunday after Trinity, Tye was taken ill and unable to preach. 1563, p. 1605.

On the eleventh Sunday after Trinity, Tye preached at Great Bentley. 1563, p. 1605.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Harris

Of Bromhill.

William Harris's servant, James Harris, was delivered to Bonner by Mordant and Tyrrel for examination. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2091, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1910.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Mount

Martyr. Husbandman. Of Great Bentley.

William Mount was imprisoned for his beliefs and sent from Colchester to London by the earl of Oxford, Lord Darcy of Chiche, Edmund Tyrrel of St Osyth's and others. He was later released. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2199, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

On 7 March 1557 at two o'clock in the morning, Edmund Tyrrel took William Simuel, the bailiff of Colchester, and two constables of Great Bentley, John Baker and William Harris, to the house of William Mount and his family in order to arrest them. 1563, p. 1606, 1570, p. 2199, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2006.

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He was condemned. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was burned in the castle yard in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

John Roth's letter to certain brethren condemned in Colchester mentions the Mounts. 1563, p. 1631, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Colchester
Colchester, Colchestre
NGR: TM 000 250

A borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 22 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. James, St. Martin, St. Mary at the Walls, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Rumwald and Holy Trinity within the walls; and St. Botolph, St. Giles, St. Leonard and St. Mary Magdalene without the walls; all in the archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Great Bentley
Muchbentley, Muchbently, Much Bently, Muche Bentley
NGR: TM 115 215

A parish in the hundred of Tendring, county of Essex. 8 miles east-south-east from Colchester. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2029 [2005]

Queene Mary. The story and persecution of Elizabeth Cooper, Simon Millar and others Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. August.but it would not be.

Then he looked on himselfe and he was full of spottes, & therewith waked, & tooke hold and stood to the truth: god be thanked therefore, and so constantly was burned wyth his felowes, as is aboue specified. pag. 2095.

¶ Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper burnt at Norwich. 
Commentary  *  Close
Simon Miller and Cooper

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition and remained fundamentally unchanged in subsequent editions. It was based on the account of an individual informant, apparently Thomas Sutterton, the sheriff of Norwich, or someone sympathetic to him. Interestingly, although Foxe had a copy of the condemnation of Miller (BL, Harley MS 425, fos. 155r-156r), he didn't use it.

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MarginaliaIuly. 13. MarginaliaSimon Miller a Marchant, Martyr.IN the Moneth of Iulye nexte ensued the Martyrdome of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper. This Simon dwelling then in the Towne of Linne, a Godly and zealous man in the knowledge of the Lord and of his trueth, detesting and abhorring the contrary enforced Religiō thē set forth, came from Linne to Norwich, where he standing in the prease and hearing of the people, comming out the same time from their popish seruice ended in the Churche, began to aske them comming out of the Church, MarginaliaThe wordes of Simon Miller to the people.where he might go to haue the communiō. At which wordes diuers much maruelling to heare & see his boldnes, one that was an euill disposed Papist, hearing þe same, said: þt if he would needs go to a communion, he would go bring him thither where he should be sped of his purpose. MarginaliaThe cause why Simon Miller was taken.Wherupō shortly after hee was brought to the Chauncellour of Norwiche (whose name was Dunning:) who after a few wordes & small talk passed with this examinate, committed him to Warde.

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MarginaliaSimon Miller examined before Doctour Dunning. Simon Millers confession espyed in his shoe.In the meane while as he was in examination, he had in his shoo his confession written in a certein paper, wherof a peece appearing aboue his shoo, was spyed and taken out. The Chauncellour asking if he would stand to the cōfession of the same fayth therin conteined, he constantly affirmed the same. Wherupō as is sayd, he was committed. Thus the sayd Simon being in the Bishops house vnder custody of the keper there called M. Felow, how it happened it is not certayne, whether by gentlenesse of the keper (who was somewhat gentle that wayes) or by leaue geuē of the Bishop: or els whether he had cōdescended of a purpose to theyr articles, MarginaliaSimon Miller dismissed to his house at Linne.he was dismissed and went home to his house at Linne. Where hee continued a certayne space, while he had disposed and set there all things in order. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 381, line 7

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'all things in order' to 'all thing in an order' in the text.} "Thing" bears occasionally a plural acceptation, as here, and in the following passage from the Festyvall (fol. lxvi. verso. ed. 1528): "At mydnyght our Lorde was borne, for by kynde all thynge was in peas and rest;" or more plainly in the following: "Then Brandon thanked God that he is so mercyfull and gracyous in all thynge" (fol. xcii. recto).

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MarginaliaSimon Miller returneth agayn to his confession & is condemned.That done, he returned againe to the bishops house to his prison and keeper, till the time at length he cōstantly abiding in his professed purpose, & defence of Gods trueth, was by the sayd byshop and his Chauncellour cōdemned and committed to the fire about the xiij. day of Iuly.

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¶ Elizabeth Cooper Martyr.

WIth this Simon Miller also was burnt one MarginaliaElizabeth Coeper, Martyr.Elizabeth Cooper (as is aforesayde) a Pewterers Wife, dwelling in Saynt Andrewes parish in Norwich, where she had before recanted, and beyng vnquyet for the same, and greatlye troubled inwardlye, at the last came into the sayd Saynt Andrewes Church, the people beyng at theyr popish seruice, and there standing in the same, MarginaliaElizabeth Cooper reuoketh her recantation in the open Church.sayde she reuoked her recantation before made in that place, and was hartely sorye that euer she did it, willing the people not to bee deceiued, neither to take her doynges before for an example. &c. These or suche like woordes she spake in the Church.

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Then cryed one Bacon 

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In the 1563 edition, Foxe records that Cooper was denounced by one 'Master Marsham' as well as Bacon. 'Marsham' was almost certainly Thomas Marsham, a catholic alderman of Norwich. This reference to Marsham was dropped in the 1570 edition, probably because of pressure from Marsham or his family or friends.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 381, line 22

The first Edition, p. 1603, reads, "Then cryed master Marsham and one Bacon," &c.

of the sayd Parish, laying hys armes abroade, saying: Mayster Shiriffe, will you suffer this? and repeating the same, vrged hym to goe from the church to her house, at whose knocking she came downe & was taken and sent to prison.

MarginaliaThe Shrieffe agaynst his will enforced to lay handes vpon Elizabeth Cooper.This Shiriffe (named M. Thomas Sutterton) & she had bene seruauntes together before in one house, & for the frendship he bare vnto her, & the more for the gospels sake he was very loth to do it, but that he was inforced by those other persons (before specified) much against his owne cōscience, which he now earnestly repenteth. 

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In the 1563 edition this phrase reads 'which I am suer he now greatly repententh'. These different phrases not only suggest that Foxe's informant was in touch with the martyrologist after this account was first printed in the 1563 edition, but that he was concerned with presenting Sutterton in a favourable light.

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This good woman being condemned, and at the stake with Simon Miller to be burnt, when the fire came vnto her, she a little shronke thereat, with a voyce crying once, ha. When the sayd Simon Miller hearde the same, he put his hand behinde him towarde her, and willed her to bee strong, and of good cheare: For good sister (said he) we shall haue a ioyfull and a sweete supper. MarginaliaElizabeth Cooper strengthned at the stake by Simon Miller.Whereat she beyng, as it seemed thereby strengthened, stoode as still and as quiet as one moste glad to finish that good worke whiche before most happely shee had begonne. So in fine she ended her life with her companion ioyfully, committing her soule into the handes of almighty God.

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¶ The Martyrdome of x. faythfull and blessed Martyrs, fiue men and fiue women, burnt at Colchester, fiue in the forenoone, and fiue in the afternoone, for the testimony and witnesse of Christ Iesus and his glorious Gospell. 
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Rose Allin

The entire account of these martyrs, apart from a disgression added in 1570, first appeared in the 1563 edition. It was drawn from London diocesan records and from individual informants. Cuts were made to this material in the 1570 edition, but apart from the disgression just mentioned, nothing was added to the 1570 edition.

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MarginaliaAugust. 2. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of 10. godly Martyrs, 5. men and 5. women, at Colchester.AS it is no new thing in those whom we call Prelates and Priestes of the Churche, to be raysers vp of persecution agaynst Christ and his poore flocke: 

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In the 1563 edition, this passage went on to criticise the nobility for aiding the clergy in persecuting God's faithfull. For reasons of prudence this passage was deleted in the 1570 edition.

so is it much to be maruelled or rather lamented, that noble persons, and mē of honor, and worship, would be made such Ministers to serue the affections of these tyrauntes, as commonly, as well in all þe sorowful dayes of the late Queene Mary, as namely in this present story is to be marked. 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 382, line 4

The first Edition goes on: "For if thou diligently marke (good reader) herein the labours of every state and degree in al tymes and yeares, who then sitteth so styl in worldly security, as doth the bloody byshops, unles it be to practise pestilent policy, to bring such worthy men to serve their slavishe slaughter, to the poysoning of Christen soules, as here in this history thou mayest se, to the great griefe of a good hart" (p. 1604).

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And first thou remembrest (gentle Reader) how mention was made a litle before pag. 1863. of xxij. which were sent vp prisoners together from Colchester to London by the Earle of Oxforde, the Lord Darcy, Maister Tyrrell of Saynt Osithes, and other Commissioners & Iustices. &c. The which xxij. (as is aforesayd) through a gentle submission put vnto them, were afterward released & deliuered.

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In the number of these foresayd xxij. was one MarginaliaW. Mount, Alice his wyfe, Rose Allin her daughter.William Mount of Muchbently in Essex, husbandman, with Alice his wife, and Kose Allin mayd, the daughter of the said Alice Mount: whiche comming home agayne to their house at Muchbently aforesayde, refrayned themselues from the vnsauery seruice of the Popish Churche, and frequēted the company of good men and women which gaue themselues diligently to reading, inuocating, and calling vpon the name of God through Christ: wherby they so fretted the wicked Priest of the towne called MarginaliaThomas Tye Priest, a wicked Promoter.Syr Thomas Tye, & other like vnto him, that casting theyr heades together, they made a pestilent Supplication to the Lord Darcy, in the name of the whole Parish, the tenour whereof hereafter foloweth.

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¶ The maner of a Supplication to the Lord Darcy, and by him deliuered to Syr Iohn Kingstone Priest and Commissary.

MarginaliaA supplication of the persecutors to the L. Darcy.PLeaseth it your honorable Lordship to be aduertised þt we confesse, whilest your good Lordship laye here in the country, the people were stayed in good order, to our great comfort: but since your Lordshippes departure, they haue made digression from good order in some places, & namely in the Parish of Muchbentley, by reason of three seditious persons, William Mount and his wife, & Rose her daughter, who by theyr colourable submission (as it doth appere) were dismist and sent nowne from the Bishop of London, and since theyr comming home thei haue not onely in their owne persons shewed manifest signes and tokens of disobedience, in not comming to the Churche, nor yet obseruing other good orders: but also most maliciously and seditiously haue seduced many from comming to the Church, and frō obeying all other good orders, mocking also those that frequent the Church, and calling thē Church Owles, and blasphemouslye calling the blessed Sacrament of the aultar a blind God, with diuers such like blasphemies. In consideration whereof, may it please your honour (for the loue of God, and for the tender zeale your good Lordshippe beareth to Iustice, and common peace and quietnes of the king and Queenes Maiesties louing subiectes) to award out your warrant for the sayd William Mount, his wife, & Rose her daughter, that they being attached & brought before your good Lordshippe, we trust the rest will feare to offend (their ring leaders of sedition being apprehēded) to the quietnes of theyr obedient subiectes.

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MarginaliaCruell persecutors.Your dayly Orators the Parishioners of Much-
bentley,
Thomas Tye Priest, Iohn Carter,
Thomas Candeler, Iohn Barker, Richarde
Mere, Iohn Paynter, William Harrys, Iohn
Richard, with other.

This being done, the said sir Thomas Tye bethought with himselfe where the persecuted did resorte. MarginaliaThomas Tye a false brother, & a bloudy persecutor.For in the beginning of Queene Maries reign, for a xij. moneth and more, he came not to the Church, but frequented the cōpanye of Godlye men and women, which absteined from the same, and as they thought, he laboured to keepe a good cōscience, but the sequele shewed him to be a false brother.

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Now (as I said) he partly knowing þe places of refuge for honest mē, did further enquire of other about þe same, & being therof sufficiently (as he thought) instructed to hys purpose, immediatly about þe time the supplication aboue specified was exhibited to þe sayd L. Darcy, wrote secretly a letter to Boner B. of Londō, wherin he maketh his accoūt how he had bestowed his time, & cōplayned of diuers honest mē, among the which was the sayd W. Mount & hys company. The tenour of which letter herafter foloweth.

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A Letter
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