Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Silverside

(b. 1497?)

Martyr. Widow of a priest called Thomas Silverside (second husband). Her first husband was probably William Downes who had died by 1517 (see Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester (Michigan, 1998), p. 181.) Of Colchester.

Agnes Silverside was imprisoned in the Mote-hall in Colchester. 1563, p. 1607, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

John Boswell wrote in his account of her deposition that she was an obstinate heretic who was willing to burn her rotten old bones. 1563, p. 1607, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

She was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

She was burned by the town wall in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

John Allerton insisted that Agnes Silverside was not a heretic. 1570, p. 2211, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

John Allerton wrote a letter to Agnes Smith, widow. 1563, pp. 1627-28, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2017.

[Alias Smith or May.]

 
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Anne Starkey

Maid to Mistress Bright of Romford.

Rose Allin told Mistress Bright of Romford and her maid, Ann Starkey, of the burning of her hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

 
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Elizabeth Folkes [or Foulke]

(b. 1537?)

Martyr. Maid and servant. Of Colchester.

Elizabeth Folkes was imprisoned in the Mote-hall, Colchester, on charges of heresy. 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, pp. 2007-08.

She was servant to Nicholas Clere, a clothier of Colchester. 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

Elizabeth Folkes was delivered to her uncle, Holt. 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

John Boswell stated that Folkes was a tall, well-favoured wench, and willing to be reformed. 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

She was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Boswell stated that Folkes had been delivered to the house of Henry Ashby, a good catholic, until she could be reformed. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Chedsey wept at the sentencing of Elizabeth Folkes. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Folkes prayed for forgiveness for her persecutors on the bench, such as the bailiff, Robert Mainard, but also warned them of the spiritual risks of shedding innocent blood. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

The day before she was condemned, Elizabeth Folkes was asked if she believed that there was a catholic church of Christ, to which she replied that she did. Boswell then delivered her to her uncle Holt. Folkes became concerned that people might believe she had recanted her beliefs. She subsequently defied the papists when she met with them at Cosin's house at the White Hart in Colchester, and so was condemned. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

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Her mother kissed her at the stake. She was burned by the town wall in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Folkes tried to give her petticoat to her mother but was not allowed to. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

As her guard tried to nail the chain around her, he missed the stake and hammered into her shoulder instead. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
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Ellen Ewring

(1512? - 1557)

Martyr. Wife of John Ewring. Of Colchester.

Ellen Ewring was indicted for attending an illegal assembly headed by Thomas Purto in 1556. (Court Rolls, Borough of Colchetser, 122/4).

She was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

Ellen Ewring was returned to her husband after being indicted for heresy in Colchester. She remained at home for a brief period but then met with Robert Mainard, the bailiff of Colchester, who kissed her and welcomed her home. She told him she knew he had given her a Judas kiss, and she was arrested again and sent to the Mote-hall. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

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She wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

She was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

She was burned by the town wall in Colchester 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Ewring was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

 
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John Boswell

Bonner's scribe.

John Boswell took part in the examination of several prisoners at Colchester on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1607, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2007.

He took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He wrote to Bonner on 24 October 1557 enclosing the depositions of several prisoners in Colchester. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

The prisoners in Colchester referred to by Boswell in his letter to Bonner were: Elizabeth Wood, Christian Hare, Rose Fletcher, Joan Kent, Agnes Stanley, and Margaret Simson. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
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John Ewring

Miller. Husband of Ellen Ewring. Of Colchester.

Ellen Ewring was returned to her husband after being indicted for heresy in Colchester. She remained at home for a brief period but then met with Robert Mainard, the bailiff of Colchester, who kissed her and welcomed her home. She told him she knew he had given her a Judas kiss, and she was arrested again and sent to the Mote-hall. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

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John Johnson

(b. 1515?)

Martyr. Labourer. Widower. Of Thorpe, Essex.

John Johnson was imprisoned with his three young children in Colchester Castle under charges of heresy. 1563, p. 1608, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

John Boswell stated that Johnson could read a little. 1563, p. 1608, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

John Boswell stated that Johnson claimed in his deposition that a priest called Trodgon was a true prophet. 1563, p. 1608, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Johnson was condemned. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was burned in the castle yard in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

[Alias Aliker.]

 
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John Kingston

Commissary to bishop of London and bachelor of law.

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer, and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 about the taking of 22 people charged with heresy to London. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576], 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Rose Allin was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

William Goodwin and Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

In his letter to Bonner, Kingston said that Alsey was to deliver 22 people to Bonner for examination. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kinstone and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Kingston complained to Bonner that he had not been able so far to carry out a visitation on many foundations in Colchester, such as the masters and lazars of Mary Magdalen, the proctor of St Katherine's chapel, the hospital and beadmen of the foundation of Lord H. Marney in Layer-Marney, and the hospital and beadmen of Little Horksley. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

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On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Kingston was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

A supplication was made against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Kingston took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
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John Thurston

(d. 1557)

Of Great Bentley, Essex. Of unknown occupation.

Edmund Tyrrel found John Thurston and Margaret, his wife, at William Mount's house and so sent them to prison at Colchester castle, along with the Mounts and their daughter. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Thurston died in Colchester Castle around May 1557. 1563, p. 1611, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2009.

 
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Margaret Thurston

Wife of John Thurston. Of Great Bentley, Essex.

Edmund Tyrrel found Margaret and John Thurston at William Mount's house and so sent them to prison at Colchester castle, along with the Mounts and their daughter. 1563, p. 1631, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

On the morning Margaret Thurston was due to be burned, her case was deferred. As she was preparing to be burned, she began to shiver and tremble, and felt as though she were being lifted up. She turned to get her psalter, just as the jailor took away her fellow prisoners. She was later taken to the town-prison where she remained for around another week. Shortly before her death she was taken back to the castle and told Joan Cook, later the wife of John Spark, what had happened. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

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Foxe describes her behaviour at her death on 17 August 1557. 1561, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2215, 1576, p. 1912, 1583, p. 2020.

 
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Mrs Bright

Of Romford, Essex.

Rose Allin told Mistress Bright of Romford and her maid, Ann Starkey, of the burning of her hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

Mistress Bright tended Rose Allin's wound in her house in Romford, when she and other prisoners stayed in Bright's house on the way to London. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

 
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Robert Brown

(d. 1568)

Baker, then later a grocer. Alderman of Colchester (1540 - 1568), Bailiff of Colchester (1557). [Mark Byford, 'The Price of Protestantism' in The Reformation in English Towns, 1500-1640,ed. by Patrick Collinson and John Craig (Basingstoke, 1998), p. 125 and Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester (Michigan, 1998), p. 288.]

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Robert Brown and Robert Mainard wrote to Bonner thanking him for the letter they had received via Edward Cosin. They also referred to the planned execution of William Bongeor, Robert Purcas, Thomas Benold, Agnes Silverside, Ellen Ewring (wife of John Ewring), and Elizabeth Folkes on 2 September 1557. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

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In their letter to Bonner, Robert Brown and Robert Mainard said that they did not have a prisoner by the name of Agnes Bowyer, wife of Richard Bowyer. They explained that the prisoner was in fact Agnes Bongeor, wife of Richard Bongeor. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

Edward Cosin delivered the writ ordering the burning of ten martyrs in Colchester to Robert Brown and Robert Mainard. They subsequently appointed the executions to take place on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

[Pace Higgs, he is not to be confused with Robert Brown a Colchester MP.]

 
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Robert Mainard

Bailiff of Colchester (1557). [Mark Byford, 'The Price of Protestantism' in The Reformation in English Towns, 1500-1640, ed. Patrick Collinson and John Craig (Basingstoke, 1998), p. 125 and Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester (Michigan, 1998), p. 288.]

Ellen Ewring was returned to her husband after being indicted for heresy in Colchester. She remained at home for a brief period but then met with Robert Mainard, the bailiff of Colchester, who kissed her and welcomed her home. She told him she knew he had given her a Judas kiss, and she was arrested again and sent to the Mote-hall. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

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Edward Cosin delivered to Robert Brown and Robert Mainard the writ ordering the burning of ten martyrs in Colchester. They subsequently appointed the executions to take place on 2 August 1557. 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

Robert Brown and Robert Mainard wrote to Bonner thanking him for the letter they had received via Edward Cosin. They also referred to the planned execution of William Bongeor, Robert Purcas, Thomas Benold, Agnes Silverside, Ellen Ewring (wife of John Ewring), and Elizabeth Folkes on 2 September 1557. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

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Mainard would often sleep through judgements against prisoners. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
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Robert or William Purcas

(b. 1537?)

Martyr. Fuller. Of Bocking, Essex.

Purcas's deposition was recorded by John Boswell and sent to Bonner. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Purcas was imprisoned for not taking confession and for denying transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was imprisoned in the Mote-hall in Colchester. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was burned by the town wall in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
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Valentine Dingley

Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Valentine Dingley was witness to the burning of a blind harpist's hand by Bonner. 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

 
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William Bongeor

(1497? - 1557)

Glazier. Martyr. Of Colchester.

Bongeor was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

William Bongeor was charged with heresy in the parish of St Nicholas and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was imprisoned in the Mote-hall in Colchester. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Bongeor was one of the prisoners named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971].

He was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was burned by the town wall in Colchester 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Robert Brown and Robert Mainard wrote to Bonner thanking him for the letter they had received via Edward Cosin. They also referred to the planned execution of William Bongeor, Robert Purcas, Thomas Benold, Agnes Silverside, Ellen Ewring (wife of John Ewring), and Elizabeth Folkes on 2 September 1557. 1563, p. 1632, 1570, p. 2201, 1576, p. 1899, 1583, p. 2008.

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[Probably related to Richard Bongeor.]

[Involved in enclosure riots in Colchester in 1538. Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester (Michigan, 1998), p. 135.]

 
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William Candler

Of Much Bentley.

William Candler, of Much Bentley, witnessed the burning of Rose Allin's hand. 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

[Possibly the same person, or related to, Thomas Candler.]

 
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William Chedsey

(1510 - 1574?)

Of Somersetshire. Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of Middlesex (1554 - 1559). President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford (1558 - 1559). [DNB; Fasti; Foster]

After the death of Edward VI Chedsey recanted and mutated his doctrine to his own purpose, as in his dispute with Peter Martyr.

Chedsey preached at Paul's Cross on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He argued with John Philpot in defence of transubstantiation in the 1553 convocation (1563, pp. 910-11; 1570, pp. 1574-75; 1576, p. 1342-3; and 1583, pp. 1413-14).

He was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. He debated with Cranmer on the morning of Monday 16 April (1563, pp. 932-33, 939-43, 946-48, 951 and 954-55; 1570, pp. 1594-96, 1599-1600, 1602 and 1604-5; 1576, pp 1360-62, 1364-65, 1367 and 1369-70; 1583, pp. 1430-32, 1435-1436, 1437 and 1439-40).

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When Chedsey addressed the lord mayor of London, he mentioned two letters- one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsberye, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

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He published a declaration at Paul's Cross in May 1555. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

Chedsey tried to persuade Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. He was unsuccessful but false rumors circulated that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

He witnessed Bishop Bonner's burning Thomas Tomkins' hand with a candle. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p. 1534.

In late June 1554, Chedsey discussed vernacular services and the adoration of the cross with Thomas Hawkes. The next day Chedsey preached in Bonner's chapel, extolling the saving power of the eucharist. 1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1589

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session, to examine Philpot and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York, Chichester, Bath, John Harpsfield, Chadsey, Bonner, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London and Sir Martin Bowes, knight. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

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Chedsey testified in the presence of Master Moseley and the lieutenant of the Tower that Bartlett Green had denied transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. 1563, p. 1217.

Benold was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Elizabeth Folkes was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. Chedsey wept when the sentence of condemnation was read against her. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

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When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

William Wood was examined by Chedsey, Kenall and Robinson on 19 October 1554 in St Nicholas's church, Rochester. 1570, p. 2281, 1576, pp. 1969-70, 1583, p. 2077.

Chedsey was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

He sent a letter to Bonner dated 21 April 1558 [BL, Ms. Harley 416, fos.74r-v. Foxe describes the letter on 1570, p. 2301 et seq.]

[Foxe frequently refers to him as 'Chadsey'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Roper

(1495/96 - 1578)

Of Lynsted. JP, MP (1529, 1545, 1547, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1558). Sheriff of Kent (1554 - 1555). Son-in-law to Sir Thomas More and author of a celebrated biographical sketch of More (DNB; Bindoff).

William Roper was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Roper was originally included in the Commission of the Peace for Middlesex in 1555, but his name was deleted. [SP11/5, no. 6]

On 1 April 1555, the Privy Council ordered Roper to arrest Thomas Woodgate and William Maynarde for clandestine preaching. 1583, p. 1561.

On 7 April Roper was ordered to arrest a man from Harwich, who went about with a boy, preaching from place to place. 1583, p. 1561. [NB: Foxe is mistaken in saying that the order was to arrest one Harwich; see APC V, p. 110].

After Master Roper of Lynsted talked with the judges, it was decided that John Bland should be returned to Maidstone until the Greenwich sessions of 18-19 February. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Roper escorted John Wade to his burning in July 1555. 1576, p. 1600, 1583, pp. 1679-80.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Roper took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

The sixth and last examination of Richard Woodman took place before Chichester, William Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William [or Thomas] Benold

Tallow chandler. Of Colchester.

Benold was imprisoned in the Mote-hall in Colchester. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 1610, 1576, p. 2202, 1583, p. 2007.

Benold was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

He was burned by the town wall in Colchester on 2 August 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bocking
Bocking
NGR: TL 755 234

A parish in the hundred of Hinckford, county of Essex. 1 mile north from Braintree. The living is a rectory and the head of a Deanery, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Romford
Romford, Romforde
NGR: TQ 515 895

A market town and parish in the liberty of Havering atte Bower, county of Essex. 18 miles south-west from Chelmsford, 12 miles east-north-east from London. The living is in the nature of a vicarage in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford, who appoint a Commissary

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thorpe [Thorpe le Soken]
NGR: TM 180 223

A parish in the hundred ofTendring, county of Essex. 9.5 miles south-east by south from Manningtree. The living is a discharged vicarage consolidated with those of Kirby le Soken and Walton le Soken, in the jurisdiction of the peculiar court of the Sokens.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2031 [2007]

Queene Mary. Tenne Martyrs condemned in Colchester.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. August.Then that cruell Tyrrill taking the candell from her, held her wrest, and the burning candell vnder her hande, burning crosse wise ouer the backe thereof, so long till the very sinowes crackt a sūder. MarginaliaTyrrell burneth Rose Allins hand. Witnes hereof Williā Kandler then dwelling in Muchbently, which was there presēt and saw it. Also Mistres Bright of Romford, with Anne Starky her mayd, to whom Rose Allin both declared the same,  

Commentary  *  Close

These are clearly Foxe's informants for this story.

and the sayd Mistres Bright also ministred salue for the curing therof, as she lay in her house at Romforde going vp towardes London with other prisoners.

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In which time of his tyranny, he sayd oftē to her: why whore wilt thou not cry? Thou young whoore, wilt thou not cry? &c. Vnto which alwayes she aunswered, that she had no cause, she thanked God, but rather to reioyce. Hee had, she sayd more cause to weepe then she, if he considered the matter well. In the ende, when the sinnowes (as I sayd) brake that all the house heard them, he then thrust her from him violētly, and sayd: ha strong whore, thou shamelesse beast, thou beastly whore. &c. with such like such like vile wordes. MarginaliaThe patience of the faythfull.But she quietly suffering his rage for the time, at the last, said: Syr, haue ye done what ye will doe? And he sayd, yea, and if thou thinke it be not well, then mend it.

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Rose. Mend it? nay, the Lord mend you, and geue you repentance, if it be his will. And now if ye thinke it good begin at the feet, and burne the head also. MarginaliaThe deuill payeth the persecutors their wages.For he that set you a worke, shall pay you your wages one daye I warrant you: and so she went and caryed her mother drinke as shee was commaūded. Furthermore, after the searching of the house for more company, at the last they found one Iohn Thurston and Margaret his wife there also, whome they caried with the rest to Colchester Castle immediatly.

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And this sayd Rose Allin being prisoner, tolde a frend of hers this cruell act of the sayd Tirrell, and shewing him the maner therof, she sayd: while my one hand (quoth she) was a burning, I hauing a pot in my other hand, might haue laid him on þe face with it, if I had would? for no mā held my hand to let me therin. MarginaliaShee reuengeth not euill for euill.But I thanke God (quoth she) with all my hart, I did it not.

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Also being asked of another howe she could abyde the paynefull burning of her hand, she said, at first it was some griefe to her, but afterward, the longer she burned, the lesse she felt, or well neare none at all.

And because Mayster Tyrrell shall not goe alone 

Commentary  *  Close

This disgression into the story of Valentine Dingley was added in the 1570 edition.

in this kinde of cruelty, you shall heare another like example of a blynde Harpers hand burnt by Bishop Boner, as is testified by the relation of Valentine Dyngley sometime gentleman to the sayd Bishop: who declared before credible witnes, as followeth: how the sayd Bishop Boner hauing this blind Harper before him, spake thus vnto him: that such blinde abiectes whiche folow a sorte of hereticall Preachers, when they come to the feeling of the fire, wyll be the first that will flye from it.

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To whō the blind man sayd: that if euery ioynt of hym were burnt, yet he trusted in the Lord not to flye. Then Boner signifying priuily to certeine of his men about him what the should do, they brought to him a burning coale. Which coale being put into the poore mans hand, they closed it fast again, and so was his hand piteously burned. Amongest the doers wherof was the said maister Valentine Dyngley witnes and reporter hereof, as is afore declared.

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We read in the story of Titus Liuius 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 386, fn 1

See Livii Historia, lib. ii. cap. 13. - ED.

of king Porsena: who after the burning of the righte hande of M. Scæuola, which came purposely to kill him, beyng onely contented therewith, sent him home to Rome agayne. But thus to burne the handes of poore men and women whiche neuer meant any harme vnto them, and yet not contented with that, but also to consume theyr whole bodyes without any iust cause, we find no example of such barbarous tyranny, neither in Titus Liuius, neither in any other story amongest the heathen.

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But to returne to our Colchester Martirs againe, as touching William Munt & his Wyfe, and burning of their daughter Rose Allins hand, sufficient hath bene declared. 

Commentary  *  Close

This sentence, added in 1570, replaces Kingston's letter describing the martyrs and their depositions which were deleted in the 1570 edition.

With the sayd William Munt and his family, was ioyned also in the same prison at Colchester, another faithfull brother named Iohn Iohnson, alias Aliker, of Thorpe, in the County of Essex labourer, of the age of xxxiiij. yeares, hauing no wife aliue, but three yong children, who also was with them indicted of heresy, and so all these foure laye together in Colchester Castle.

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The other sixe prisoners lay in Mote Hall in the sayde towne of Colchester, whose names were:

First, William Bongeor, of the parish of S. Nicholas in Colchester, Glasier, of the age of lx. yeares. 

Commentary  *  Close

Bongeor had been one of the Colchester protestants taken to London who made a qualified submission to Bishop Bonner. The privy council ordered Bonner to proceed against him as a relapsed heretic (APC VI, pp. 18-19).

2. Tho. Beuold of Colchester, Talow Chaundler.

3. W. Purcas of Bocking in the County of Essex, Fuller, a yong man, of the age of xx. yeares.

4. Agnes Syluerside, alias Smith, dwelling in Colche-

ster, widow of the age of lx. yeares.

5. MarginaliaHelene Ewring apprehended the second tyme.Helene Ewring, 

Commentary  *  Close

Ewring had been been indicted in 1556 for attending a protestant conventicle (Essex Record Office, Court Rolls, 122/4). Ewring had also been one of the Colchester protestants taken to London who made a qualified submission to Bishop Bonner. The privy council ordered Bonner to proceed against her as a relapsed heretic (APC VI, pp. 18-19).

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the wife of Iohn Ewring, Myller, dwelling in Colchester, of the age of fiue and forty yeares or thereaboutes, who was one of the two and twenty prisoners mentioned before. pag. 1863. sent vp in bandes frō Colchester to London, and after being deliuered with the rest, repayred home to Colchester agayne to her husbande, where notwithstanding she enioyed her liberty not verye long: for shortly after her returne, met with her one MarginaliaRobert Maynard a great enemy to the Gospell.Rob. Maynard then Bayliffe of Colchester, a speciall enemy to Gods Gospell, who spying her, came to her, & kissed her, & bade her welcome home from London. Vnto whome she considerately aunswered agayne, and sayd, that it was but a Iudas kisse. For in the end (quoth she) I know you will betray me: As in deed it came to passe, for immediately after that talke she was apprehended by him againe, & there lodged 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 387, line 20

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'lodged' to 'laid' in the text.} The first Edition, p. 1607, reads "laid with the rest;" as it does also later; "which were laid in out-chambers:" the subsequent editions read "lodged."

with the rest in the towne prison (as is aforesayde) called the Mote hall.

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6. The sixt of this company was Elizabeth Folkes, a yong mayd, and seruaunt in Colchester, of the age of twēty yeares.

These sixe were imprisoned in the town prison of Colchester called Mote Hall, as the other foure aboue specified, were in the Castle.

Diuers examinations these good men had at sundrye times before diuers Iustices, Priestes, and Officers, as M. Roper, Iohn Kingstone Commissary, Iohn Boswell Priest and Boners Scribe, and others moe, whereof the sayd Boswell made relation to Bishop Boner, certifying him of their depositions, as is to be read in our first book of Actes and Monumentes. pag. 1607. Last of all they were examined again in Mote hall the xxiij. day of Iune, by doctour Chadsey, Iohn Kingstone Commissary, with other Priestes, & Boswell the Scribe, in the presence of the two Bailiffes of Colchester, Robert Browne & Robert Maynard, with diuers other Iustices both of the town & country, and other Gentlemen a great sort: at which tyme and place, and before the said persons, they had sentence of condemnation read agaynst thē, chiefely for not affirming the reall presence of the Sacrament in theyr Aultar. The effect of theyr wordes therein, was this, or such like, as here foloweth.

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¶ First the Lordes faythfull prisoners in the Mote Hall.

MarginaliaWilliam Bongeor.WIlliā Bongeor, of the parish of S. Nicolas in Colchester, Glasier, sayd: that the sacramēt of the aultar was bread, is bread, & so remayneth bread, & for the consecration it is not the holyer, but rather the worse. To thys he did stand, as also agaynst all the rest of their Papisticall doctrine: and so had sentence read agaynst him.

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MarginaliaThomas Benolde.Thomas Benold of Colchester, Talow Chaundler, affirmed the like in effect that the sayd Williā Bongeor dyd: and so had sentence also read against him.

MarginaliaW. Purcas condemned.W. Purcas of Bocking said, that when he receiued the sacrament, he receiued bread in an holy vse, that preacheth the remembrance that Christ died for him. To this he stood and against other theyr popish matters: and so also had sētence read agaynst him.

MarginaliaAgnes Siluerside condemned.Agnes Syluerside, alias Smith, sayd: that she loued no Consecration. For the breade and wine is rather wore then better therby, she sayd. This good olde woman aunswered them with such sound iudgement and boldnesse, to euery thing they asked her, that it reioyced the heartes of many, and especially to see the pacience of such a reuerende olde age, agaynst the tauntes and checkes of her enemies. To this she also stood, and had sentence read agaynst her in like maner.

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MarginaliaHelene Ewring condemned.Helene Ewring aunswered the like in effect as þe other did, clearely denying all the lawes set forth by the Pope, wt her whole hart. This good woman was somewhat thicke of hearing, but yet quick in vnderstanding the Lords matters (his name therfore be praysed.) Agaynst her also there was sentence read.

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MarginaliaElizabeth Folkes condemned.Elizabeth Folkes the young mayden, being examined whether she beleued the presence of Christes body to be in the Sacrament substantially and really, or no: answered, that she beleued that it was MarginaliaA substanciall lye. A reall lye.a substantiall lye, and a reall lye. At which wordes the Priestes and others chafed very much, and asked her agayne, whether after the Consecration there remayned not the bodye of Christ in the Sacrament. And she aunswered, that before Consecration and after, it is but bread, and that man blesseth without Gods word, is cursed & abhominable by the word. &c. Then they examined her of confession to the Priest, of going to church to heare Masse, of the authority of the Bishoppe of Rome. &c. Vnto all which she answered, that she woulde neyther

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