Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Eagles

(d. 1557)

Sister of George Eagles. Of Rochester.

George Eagles' sister was burned with a man named 'Frier' in the summer of 1557. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2010.

 
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Frier

Martyr. Of Rochester.

George Eagles' sister was burned with a man named 'Frier' in the summer of 1557. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2010.

 
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John Glover

(d. 1555)

Gentleman. Elder brother to Robert Glover, the martyr, and brother to William Glover. Of Mancetter, Warwickshire.

Laurence Saunders sent John and Robert Glover a farewell letter on the morning he was burned.1570, p. 1674; 1576, p. 1428; 1583, p. 1502.

John Glover is described by Foxe as a constant professor of the gospel, who was 'exempted' after his death and cast out of the same church. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

He wanted to take the place of his brother, Robert, but others persuaded him to avoid such risks. A search was then made for him late in Mary's reign by the authorities. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

The mayor of Coventry warned John Glover of his impending arrest. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

John Glover escaped being arrested as he was fit enough to flee, although his brother Robert was ill and so was apprehended. 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

John Glover hid in the woods while the authorities looked for him and examined his wife, Agnes. He died of an ague brought on by hiding in the woods. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

John Careless sent greetings to John Glover in a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

After his death John Glover was buried in the churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Joyce Lewes

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Gentlewoman. Widow of one Appleby and then wife of Thomas Lewes. Of Lichfield.

Joyce Lewes was more concerned with her appearance than with religion in her early years. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2012.

She originally attended mass during Mary's reign, but then became troubled in her conscience when she heard of the death of Laurence Saunders. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2012.

Lewes lived close to John Glover and would often visit him to discuss why the mass was heretical. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover instructed Joyce Lewes against catholicism. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes' husband became furious with her and forced her to attend church, where she turned her back when the holy water was cast. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

A citation was delivered to her husband who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

When Joyce Lewes returned home, she began to pray and then went to visit John Glover, who instructed her. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes proved strong when examined and was thrown into prison. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

After she was condemned, Joyce Lewes remained in prison for a further twelve months, as the sheriff held off her execution. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

A writ was sent for from London ordering her death. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

On the eve of her death two priests of Lichfield came and met with Lewes at the under-sheriff's house, having sent word by the sheriff that they were coming to hear her confession. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, pp. 2012-13.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Foxe recounts Lewes' actions the night before her death. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

The sheriff came to tell Lewes that she but one hour to live. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes was led through the town to her execution by a number of billmen, led by her friends, Michael Reniger and Augustine Bernher, to the place of execution. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Lewes became weak on the long journey to her execution, as she had spent so long inside the prison. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

A messenger was sent to the sheriff's house for food and drink for Lewes, as she was so weak. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Lewes died quickly at the stake, as the under-sheriff had, at the request of her friends, ensured that she would be dispatched quickly, probably through the use of gunpowder. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

 
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Laurence Saunders

(d. 1555) [DNB]

Martyr.

Saunders' life and career are described. 1563; pp. 1037-38; 1570, pp. 1664-65; 1576, p. 1420; 1583, pp. 1493-94.

Laurence Saunders preached in Northampton, soon after Mary's accession, denouncing 'Antichrist's errors'. He was arrested and released. He came to London, despite warnings to the contrary. 1563, pp. 1038-39; 1570, p. 1665; 1576, pp. 1420-21; 1583, p. 1494.

On 15 October 1553, Saunders preached at Allhallows, Bread Street, denouncing the mass as an abomination. On the same day he was summoned by Bonner, interrogated, and committed to the Marshalsea. 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466; also 1563, p. 1039; 1570, p.1665; 1576, p. 1421; 1583, pp. 1494-95.

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He was interrogated by Gardiner and imprisoned. 1563, pp. 1041-42; 1570, pp. 1665-66; 1576, p. 1421; 1583; p. 1495.

It was rumoured in May 1554 that he, along with Bradford and John Rogers, would participate in a disputation to be held at Cambridge (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Saunders was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

Saunders was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

His letters and examinations: 1563, pp. 1040-47; 1570, pp. 1666-70; 1576, pp. 1421-25; 1583, pp. 1495-98.

Saunders was excommunicated at 6am on 23 January 1555. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

Saunders was examined and condemned by Stephen Gardiner on 30 January 1555. 1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483; also see 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

He was degraded, conveyed to Coventry and executed there. 1563, pp. 1047-48; 1570, pp. 1665-66; 1576, p. 1421; 1583, p. 1495.

Saunders is contrasted with Henry Pendleton. 1563, p. 1049; 1570, p. 1671; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, pp. 1499-1500.

Additional letters: 1570, pp. 1671-74; 1576, pp. 1426-29; 1583, pp. 1500-2.

Lawrence Saunders was imprisoned in the Marshalsea at the same time as Bradford was imprisoned [in the King's Bench] and often met with Bradford at the back of the prison. 1563, p. 1174, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1521, 1583, p. 1604.

His martyrdom was referred to in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

He received a letter from Bradford. 1563, p. 1194, 1570, p. 1815, 1576, pp. 1550-51, 1583, p. 1633.

He received another letter from Bradford. 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Saunders was described as a faithful witness of Christ by Robert Glover in a letter to his wife. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote the letter. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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Letter to evangelicals in Lichfield [BL, Harley 416, fos.13v-16r. Printed in LM, pp. 182-88.]

 
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Ralph Bayne

(d. 1559)

Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1554 - 1559) [DNB]

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College); Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College); Dr Norton (Master of Clare); Dr Philo (Master of Michael House); Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John); Dr Blith (of the King's Hall); Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College); Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel); Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's; Brikenden, of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Robert Glover believed that after Bayne and Draycot had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to attempt to do away with Glover while he was in prison 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before the bishop of Coventry in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

When friends and family of William Glover tried to have Glover buried in his local church, Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believed still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch him) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Bayne wrote a letter to the parish of Weme. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Cornelius Bungey was condemned by Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry. Articles were raised against Bungey which he answered. 1563, pp. 1282-83, 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1714.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

John Colstock, Nicholas Ball, Thomas Flyer, Thomas Pyot, Henry Crimes and Thomas Johnson, among others, were examined in the diocese of Lichfield by Ralph Bayne for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Bayne persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

He is described by Foxe as the cruel bishop of Coventry. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following but later dismissed them: John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141 , 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

A citation to appear before the bishop was delivered to Joyce Lewes' husband, who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Ralph Bayne was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Ralph Bayne died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Carman

Martyr. Plowright. Of Higham, Norfolk. (Fines)

Thomas Carman was apprehended at the burning of Richard Crashfield. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

He was examined and condemned by Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Sheriff Woodruff insisted that Thomas Carman's head be broken for getting his cart in the way when Woodruff's children were being brought to him. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Carman was burned on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
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Coventry
Couentry
NGR: SP 340 790

An ancient city and a county of itself, locally in the county of Warwick. 10 miles north-east from Warwick, 18 miles south-east from Birmingham. The city comprises the parishes of St. Michael, Holy Trinity and St. John Baptist, all in the Archdeaconry of Coventry, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield. St. Michael and Holy Trinity are vicarages. St. John is a rectory not in charge, annexed to the headmastership of the free school

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Lichfield
Lichfield, Lichfielde, Lichefield, Litchefield, Litchfield, Lychefield
NGR: SK 119 095

A city and county of itself, but locally in the county of Stafford. 16.5 miles south-east by east from Stafford. Lichfield, jointly with Coventry, is an episcopal see. The city comprises the parish of St. Mary, part of which is in the southern division of the hundred of Pirehill; St. Chad, part of which is in the northern division of the hundred of Offlow; and St. Michael, divided between the northern and southern divisions of the same hundred. The cathedral close is extra-parochial. St. Mary is a discharged vicarage; St. Chad and St. Michael are perpetual curacies; all in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Mancetter
Manceter, Mancetter
NGR: SP 315 965

A parish in the Atherstone division of the hundred of Huntingford, county of Warwick. 1.25 miles south-east from Atherstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Coventry and Diocese of Coventry and Lichfield

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Rochester
NGR: TQ 730 686

An ancient city, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 8.5 miles north from Maidstone. The city is the seat of the bishopric, and comprises the parishes of St Nicholas and St Margaret, both in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester. St Margaret's is a vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter, and St Nicholas is a vicarage in the patronage of the bishop.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2036 [2012]

Queene Mary. The apprehension, exam. and death of Maystres Ioyce Lewes Lartyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. August.And if you wil presume to offer his body dayly, then your power is aboue Christes power. With that he chafed, and sayd: What, shal wee haue doctrine? Ye are not hereto appointed.

Then the Chauncellor stoode vp, and sayde: will yee turne from this wicked error, and be an example of goodnes, as you haue bene an example of euill (for by youre wicked reading you haue perswaded simple women to be in this error) and ye shall haue mercy.

And I said: it is of God that I do craue mercy, whom I haue offended, and not of you.

Then sayde the Chauncellor: When were you at youre parishe Churche? These two yeares and more you haue stand excommunicate. Wherefore you are condemned. And so I was condemned.

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Richard Crashfield. Anno. 1557. August. 5.Thus hast thou, gentle Reader, the examinations of this godly young man, set forth and written with hys own hand, who not long after his condēnation was by þe Sheriffes and Officers there, brought to the stake, where with much pacience and constancie he entered his blessed Martirdome. At the burning of whiche Christian Martyr one Thomas Carman the same tyme was apprehended, by what occasion, it is not yet to vs fully certayne, whether it was for words, or for praying with him, or for pledging him at his burning, concerning which Thom. Carman, his story hereafter followeth in his order and place, further to be seene. 

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See 1563, p. 1655; 1570, p. 2232; 1576, p. 1927 and 1583, p. 2037 for Carman's martyrdom.

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¶ One Fryer and a certayne godly woman burned at Rochester, who was the sister of George Eagles. 
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Robert Frier and Eagles' Sister

Foxe's accounts of martyrs condemned in the diocese of Rochester earlier in Mary's reign were based on extracts from the diocesan registers. The accounts of Frier and of Eagles' sister, however, were not based on official records, and are in fact, quite vague. The identity of one of these martyrs is clear and verifiable: a notice of the excommunication and condemnation of Robert Frier of Tunbridge, dated 11 June 1557, survives (PRO C/85/144/36). But the notice also states that Robert Stevenson of Stowe was excommunicated and condemned at the same time and place; yet Foxe never mentions Stevenson. It is possible that Stevenson died in prison or escaped or (less likely) was pardoned before execution, yet the accounts of two other English martyrologists leave room for doubt. Robert Crowley, writing in 1559, stated that Robert Frier was burned at Rochester on 20 August 1557 along with another man and two other women (Robert Crowley, An epitome of chronicles[London, 1559], STC 15217.5, unpaginated). Thomas Brice, also writing in 1559, declared that Frier was burned, along with two women, on 20 July - this date is clearly an error - 1557 (A compendious regester in metre? [London, 1559], STC 3726, sig. D2v). It is impossible to be sure how many martyrs died in Rochester in August 1557, but it is likely that Stevenson was one of them and certain that Robert Frier was.

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Foxe's account of these martyrs was unchanged in subsequent editions of the Acts and Monuments.

MarginaliaAugust. 20. One Friar, & the sister of George Eagles, burned at Rochester.ABout the same time and month, one named Fryer, 

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We know from official documents that Frier's name was Robert and that he was from Tunbridge, Kent.

wt a woman accompanying him, who was the sister of George Eagles in the like cause of righteousnes, suffered the like martyrdome by the vnrighteous papistes, whose tyranny the Lord of his mercy abate & cut shorte, turning that wicked generation, if it be his will, to a better minde.

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The apprehension and death of Maistres Ioyce Lewes, the wife to Thomas Lewes, of Manceter, most constantly suffering for Gods word at Lichfield. 
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Joyce Lewes

The entire account of Lewes' martyrdom appears in the 1563 edition. It is based on the testimony of an informant or informants; perhaps one of the Glovers, perhaps Augustine Bernher or perhaps someone else. It was unchanged in subsequent editions. It is worth noting that although Foxe had copies of some of the official documents of Lewes' case, he made no use of them.

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MarginaliaThe story of Mistres Ioyce Lewes, Martyr.MAistresse Ioyce Lewes, a gentlewoman borne, was delicately brought vp in the pleasures of þe world hauing delight in gay apparell & such like foolishnes, with þe which follyes, the most part of the Gentlefolkes of England were then and are yet infected, who was maried first to one called Appelby, afterwarde to Thomas Lewes of Manceter. In the beginninge of Queene Maryes tyme she went to the Church and heard masse as others did, but when she heard of the burning of that moste godly & learned M. Laurence Saunders, who suffered in Couentry, she began to take more heede to the matter, and enquired earnestly of such as she knew feared God, þe cause of hys death: and when she perceaued it was because hee refused to receaue the Masse, she began to be troubled in consciēce & waxed very vnquiet, & because her house was euen hard by M. Iohn. Glouers house, of whome mention was made before. pag. 1614. and 1620. a man of blessed memory and of a singular example of his vnfayned godlines and manifold troubles whiche he suffered for the Gospell) shee did oftentimes resort to him, and desired him to tel her the faultes that were in the Masse, and other thinges that at that time were vrged as necessary to saluation.

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Now he perceiuing both her vnquiet minde, & also the desire she had to know the truth, dyd most dilligently instruct her in þe wayes of the Lord, approuing vnto her out of Gods holy word, that the Masse, with all other papisticall inuentions, was odious in Gods sight: and besides this, reproued her, for that she delighted in the vanities of this world so much. By the which godly counsell geuē by him, it happened that she began to waxe weery of þe world throughly sorrowfull for her sinnes, being inflamed with the loue of God, desirous to serue him accordyng to hys word, purposing also to flee from those thinges the whiche did displease the Lord her God. And because she had learned þe masse to be euil & abhominable, she began to hate it. And when at a time she was compelled by the furiousnes of her husband to come to the Churche, at the same tyme when the holy water was cast, shee turned her backe towardes it, and shewed her selfe to be displeased with their blasphemous holy water, iniurious to the bloud of christ: Whereupon she was accused before the Bishop, for the despising of theyr sacramentals.

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Immediately a Citation was sent for her to her hus-

bandes house, to appeare before the bishop incontinently. The Sumner þt brought the Citation deliuered it to her husband, who looking vpō it, & perceauing what it was, was moued wt anger, willing the sumner to take the Citation wt him agayne (or els he woulde make him to eate it. The Sumner refused to take it agayne, for he thought no man durst haue bene so bold to trouble him. But in þe ende Lewes compelled the sayd sumner to eate the Citation in deed, by setting a daggar to his hart: & when hee had eaten it, he caused him to drinke to it, & so sent him away. But immediately after, the sayd Lewes with his wife were commaunded to appeare before the B. where the sayd Lewes by & by submitted himself, & desired the Bish. to be good to him, excusing himselfe after þe best fashion he could. Wherupon the B. was content to receiue his submission, wt condition that his wife shoulde submit her selfe also. But shee stoutly told the byshop, that by refusing of the holy water she had neither offended God nor any part of hys lawes. At the which words the bish. being greeuously offended, & because she was a Gentlewomā, he would not take her at þe worst (as he sayd) he gaue her one monthes respite binding her husband in an hundred pound to bring her again vnto him at þe monthes end, and so they were both let go.

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When they came to their owne house, the sayde Maystresse Ioyce Lewes gaue her selfe to most dilligent praier and inuocating of the name of God, resorting continually to the aboue named man of God, Maister Iohn Glouer MarginaliaMistres Lewes instructed by M. Iohn Glouer.who did most dilligently instruct her with Gods worde, willing her in any wise not to meddle with that matter in respect of vayne glory, or to get her selfe a name, shewyng her the great daungers shee was like to cast her selfe in, if shee shoulde meddle in Gods matters otherwyse then Christ doth teach.

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When the moneth was nowe almost expired, and the time at hand that shee shoulde be brought before the Bishop, her husband being aduertised by the sayde Mayster Iohn Glouer and others, not to carry her to the Byshop, but to seeke some wayes to saue her, or if the worst should come, to be content to forfeit so much money, rather then to cast his own wife into þe fire: He answered, hee woulde not loose or forfeit anye thinge for her sake: and so lyke a murtherer of his owne wife, caryed her to the bloudye B. where she was examined, and found more stout then shee was before death was threatned. And to begin withal, MarginaliaMistres Lewes imprisoned.she was sent to such a stincking prison, that a certayn mayde which was appoynted to keep her companye, did sownd 

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Faint.

in the same prison.

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Being thus kept in prison, and oftentimes examined and euer founde stoute, at the length shee was brought in iudgement,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 402, line 13 from the bottom

The sentence against Jocosa Lewes by the bishop, is among the Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 78.

& pronounced an hereticke, worthy to be burned. When the Bishop reasoned with her, why she would not come to the masse, and receiue the sacramentes and sacramentals of holy Church, she answered: Because I find not these thinges in Gods worde, which you so vrge and magnifie, as thinges moste needefull for mens saluation. If these thinges were in the same word of God commended: I would with all my hart receiue, esteeme, and beleue them. The Bishoppe aunswered: if thou wilt beleeue no more then is in the scripture, concerning matters of religion: thou art in a damnable case. At the whiche wordes she was wonderfully amased, and being moued by þe spirit of God, tolde the Bishop, that hys wordes were vngodly and wicked.

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MarginaliaMistres Lewes a yeare in prison after her condēuation.After her condemnation, 

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BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 78r-v is a copy of the sentence condemning Lewes.

she cōtinued a whole twelue moneth in prison, because she was committed to the Sheriffe that was of late chosen, who coulde not be compelled to put her to death in his tyme, as he affirmed: for þe which thing after her death, he was sore troubled and in daunger of his life. All that time shee was in prison, her behauiour was such both in wordes and deedes, that al they that had any sparke of godlines or ciuile honesty, did greatly lamēt her case, that she should be put to death.

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Now when the tyme did drawe neare the which God had appoynted for her deliueraunce, the writte De comburendo, 

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De heretico comburendo was the act which made heresy a crime punishable by death. The name was also given to the writs from the chancery authorizing executions for heresy.

(as they terme it) beyng brought down from London, she desired certaine of her frends to come to her, with whom when they came, shee consulted how shee might be haue her self, that her death might be more glorious to the name of God, cōfortable to his people, and also most discomfortable vnto the enemies of God. As for death, sayd shee, I do not greatly passe: when I behold the amyable countenance of Christ my deare Sauiour, þe vglesome face of death doth not greatly trouble me. In þe which time also shee reasoned most comfortably out of Gods worde, of Gods election and reprobation.

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In the euenyng, before þe daye of her suffering, two of the priests of the close of Lichfield, came to the vnder Sheriffes house where shee laye, and sent worde to her by the

Sheriffe
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