Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
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John Jacob

Under-constable of Laxfield, Suffolk.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Silliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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John Kurde

Shoemaker. Of Syresham, Northamptonshire.

John Kurde was condemned by William Binsley, chancellor of Peterbrough and later archdeacon of Northampton, in August 1557. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2216, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

At the commandment of Thomas Tresham, the sheriff, he was led to a stone pit outside the north gate of the city and burned. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

[Note that Kurde is the unnamed shoemaker mentioned in Book 11. 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1894.]

 
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John Noyes

Martyr. Shoemaker. Of Laxfield, Suffolk.

Noyes was confronted as he was leaving his house and taken before the justices the next day. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes was put in the Eye prison (Eye in Suffolk) and then transferred to Norwich, where articles were ministered against him. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes' brother-in-law, Nicholas Fisk of Dennington, comforted Noyes in the Guildhall prior to his death. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes wrote down for Fisk the cause of his condemnation. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes was sent from Norwich to the Eye prison and then on to Laxfield, on 21 September 1557, where he was to be burned. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Master Thurston (justice), Master Waller (undersheriff) and Thomas Lovel (high constable) prepared the place for Noyes' execution. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

Lovel and his man, Granmow, broke into the only house nearby that still had a fire lit to make a torch to light the fire for Noyes' pyre. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes said the 50th Psalm before the stake. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes spoke to his sister while he was at the stake, asking her not to weep for him but for her sins. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

Nicholas Cadman, an ostler, set a faggot against Noyes, which Noyes then kissed. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes gave his psalter to Waller, to whom he entrusted his wife and children, and asked him to give the book to them. Waller agreed but did not keep his promise. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

Foxe records Noyes' final words at the stake. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

While Noyes was burning, John Jarvis, a manservant of Norwich, commented on how Noyes' sinews shrank. Grannow and Benet, the sheriff's men, heard his words and pinioned him, taking him before the justice, who bound his father and master £5 each. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2021.

The following Wednesday, Jarvis was brought before justices Thurston and Kene, sitting at Fressingham in Hoxne hundred. They commanded that he be set in the stocks the next market day and then whipped about the market, naked. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2021.

Jarvis' master, William Jarvis, craved friendship with the constables, who did not set him in the stocks until the Sunday. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2021.

Jarvis was whipped about the market with a dog-whip. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2021.

Foxe states that some reported that Jarvis was whipped for saying that Nicholas Cadman was Noyes' ostler. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes' ashes were buried in a pit, along with one of his feet that had not burned to ashes. 1570, p. 2218, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2021.

Noyes wrote a letter to his wife. 1570, pp. 2218-19, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, pp. 2022-23.

[Fines suggests that Noyes might be a variant of 'Moise'.]

 
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John Rote

Vicar of St Giles in Northampton.

At John Kurde's execution, John Rote told him that he was authorised to grant Kurde's pardon if he would recant. Kurde refused. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

 
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John Thurston

(d. 1606)

JP. Of Laxfield, Suffolk. [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600 (Oxford, 1986), p. 86, app. I, III.]

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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Master Thurston, Master Waller and Thomas Lovel prepared the place for Noyes' execution. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2022.

 
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Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Nicholas Fisk

John Noyes' brother-in-law. Of Dennington, Suffolk.

Nicholas Fisk comforted Noyes in the Guildhall prior to his death. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

 
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Nicholas Stannard

Catholic of unknown occupation. Of Laxfield, Suffolk.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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[Probably related to William Stannard.]

 
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Sir John Silliard

(by 1518 - 1575).

Of Wetherden, Suffolk. MP for Ipswich (1553, 1555), Bodmin (1554), Preston (1554), Chippenham (1558). JP for Suffolk (1554 - 1556). Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk (1555 - 1556). (Bindoff)

High sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

After Thomas Spicer was condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Silliard spoke to Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole when they were at the stake. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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Sir John Silliard, the sheriff, had Elizabeth Lawson removed to his house and held in irons. As she would still not repent, he returned her to jail. 1563, p. 1677, 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

 
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Sir John Tyrrel

Of Gipping Hall, Suffolk. JP in Suffolk (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6; Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Philip and Mary, 3, 257.]

Thomas Spicer refused to follow Sir John Tyrrel's commandment to go to church. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

The following were persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston: Mrs. Alice Thwaites and two of her servants; Humphrey Smith and his wife; William Catchpool and his wife; Rought and his wife; Nicholas Birlingham and his wife. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

The following were persecuted by Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham: Simon Harlstone and Katherine, his wife; Thomas Dobson and his wife; Thomas Hubbard and his wife; John Doncon, and his wife and maid; William Doncon; Thomas Woodward the elder; Konnold's wife; a poor widow; Mother Semon's maid; William Whyting. He was assisted in this persecution by Sir John Brodish, the parish priest. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

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Tyrrel commanded George Revet and Thomas Mouse to apprehend Adam Foster. He also commanded Robert Kereth to apprehend Robert Lawson. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, p. 2099, 1576, p. 1811, 1583, p. 1918.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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William Seaman was originally searched for by Sir John Tyrrel, who later set Robert Baulding and James Clarke to look for him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Sir John Tyrrel and Symonds would not allow Mother Benet to be buried in the churchyard. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2036.

 
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Sir Thomas Tresham

(d. 1559)

Grand prior of the order of St John in England. [DNB]

Sir Thomas Tresham was a witness against Cranmer. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, p. 1879.

Shipper, the bursar, invited Palmer to dinner. Unbeknown to Palmer, the other guests included Friar John, Richard Smith and Dr Tresham. 1570, p. 2119 [no names given other than the friar's], 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

 
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Sir Thomas Woodhouse

(by 1514 - 1572)

Of Waxham and Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. MP for Great Yarmouth (1558, 1559). Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk (1553 - 1554, 1563 - 1564). (Bindoff)

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir William Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

 
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Sir William Woodhouse

(by 1517 - 1564)

Of Hickling, Norfolk. MP (1545, 1547, 1553, 1558, 1559, 1572) Dunwich, Suffolk. Master of naval ordinance (1542 - 1552). Lieutenant admiral (1552 - 1564). (Bindoff)

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Sir William Woodhouse was a member of the council who suspected Elizabeth of involvement in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others. 1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

 
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Thomas Lovel

Chief Constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', Suffolk.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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Lovel and his man, Granmow, broke into the only house nearby that still had a fire lit to make a torch to light the fire for Noyes' pyre. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1914, 1583, p. 2021.

[Perhaps related to John Lovel, MP for Dartmouth (1563) (Hasler).]

 
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William Binsley

Chancellor of Peterbrough (1557). (Fasti)

John Kurde was condemned by William Binsley, chancellor of Peterbrough and later archdeacon of Northampton, in August 1557. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2216, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

 
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William Stannard

Absolved.

William Stannard was examined with the thirteen who were burned together at Stratford-le-Bow. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

William Stannard was condemned to be burned 13 June 1556, but Cardinal Pole sent dispensation for his life and he and two other prisoners escaped. 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

He signed a letter written with his fellow sufferers that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

 
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Wolfren Dowsing

Catholic of unknown occupation. Of Laxfield, Suffolk.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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Aye [Eye]
NGR: TM 145 735

Eye is a borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction although locally in the hundred of Hartismere, county of Suffolk. 20.5 miles north from Ipswich. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Sudbury, Diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Dinnington
Dinnington, Dinnyngton
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Hoxne
Hoxton
NGR: TM 181 775

Hoxne, a parish in the hundred of Hoxne, county of Suffolk. 3.25 miles north-east from Eye. The living is a vicarage annexed to that of Denham, in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, Diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Laxfield
Laxfield
NGR: TM 293 722

A parish in the hundred of Hoxne, county of Suffolk. 6 miles north by east from Framlingham. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Cratfield annexed, in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, Diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Northampton
NGR: SP 755 605

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Spelhoe, county of Northampton, of which it is the chief town. 66 miles north-west by north from London. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St Giles, St Peter and St Sepulchre; all in the Archdeaconry of Northampton and Diocese of Peterborough. The livings of St Giles and St Sepulchre are discharged vicarages; All Saints is a vicarage; and St Peter is a rectory with the perpetual curacies of Kingsthorpe and Upton annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Syresham
Syrsam, Sysam
NGR: SP 630 416

A parish in the hundred of Kings Sutton, county of Northampton. 4.75 miles north-east from Brackley. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Northampton, Diocese of Peterborough.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2045 [2021]

Queene Mary. The Martyrdome of Iohn Kurde. The story of Iohn Noyes.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. September.Now when these foresayd good women were brought to the place in Colchester where they should suffer the 17. day of September, in the yere aforesayd, they fell downe vpon their knees, and made their humble prayers vnto the Lord: which thing beyng done, they rose & went to the stake ioyfully, and were immediately thereto chained, and after the fire had compassed them about, they with great ioy and glorious triumph, gaue vp their soules, spirites and lyues, into the hands of the Lorde: vnder whose gouernment and protection, for Christes sake we beseech hym to graunt vs his holy defence and helpe for euermore, Amen.

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Thus (gentle Reader) God chooseth the weake things of the world, to confound mighty thyngs.

¶ Iohn Kurde Marytr. 
Commentary  *  Close
John Kurde

This account, based entirely on information sent to Foxe by individual informants, came to light while the 1563 edition was being printed. Foxe realized that it referred to an unnamed shoemaker whose death had already been recounted in the Acts and Monuments and inserted cross-references to the earlier narrative. But he never integrated the two accounts into one narrative. After the first edition, no changes were made to the narrative of this martyr.

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MarginaliaSeptember. 20. MarginaliaIohn Kurde, Martyr.IN the story before, somethyng was touched of a certaine Shoomaker suffring at Northampton, beyng vnnamed whom because we vnderstand by a letter sent from þe sayd parties, that he suffered in this yere, 1557. and in the moneth of September, therefore wee thought there to place hym. His name was Iohn Kurde a Shoomaker, late of the parish of Syrsam, in Northampton shire, who was imprisoned in Northampton Castle for denying the Popish transubstantiation, for the which cause MarginaliaWilliam Binsley Chauncellour to the Bishop of Peterborough, and now Archdeacon of Northampton, condemned Iohn Kurd.William Binsley Bacheler of Lawe, and Chauncellour vnto the bishop of Peterborough, and now Archdeacon of Northampton did pronounce sentence of death against the sayd Kurde, in the Church of All Saintes in Northampton in Aug. an. 1557. And in Septemb. followyng, at the commandemēt of Sir Tho. Tresham, Shiriffe then of the Shire,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 424, line 1

In Bridge's History of Northamptonshire by Whalley (vol. i. p. 7) we find, in a list of the Sheriffs of the County, Sir Thomas Tresham as chosen in 2 & 3 of Philip and Mary, i. e. between 25 July, 1555, and 24 July, 1556, so that it does not appear how he could have been sheriff in September or October 1557; and the earlier date assigned {in Book XI} must be the correct one.

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he was ledde by his Officers without the Northgage of North-

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Iohn Kurd at Northhampton. Anno. 1557. September. 20.The burnyng of Iohn Kurde Martyr, at Northhampton.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
The fourth appearance of this cut in Books 11 and 12 in 1583.

hampton, and in the Stonepits was burned. A Popishe Priest standyng by, whose name was MarginaliaIohn Rote a Popish Priest.Iohn Rote, Vicare of S. Giles in Northampton, did declare vnto hym, that if he would recant, he was authorised to geue hym his pardon. MarginaliaPopishe pardon refused.His aunswer was that he had his pardon by Iesus Christ, &c.

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¶ The true Certificate of the takyng of one Iohn Noyes of Laxfield in the Countie of Suffolke Shoomaker, which was taken the ix. day of Aprill, in the yeare of our Lorde God, 1557. as hereafter followeth. 
Commentary  *  Close
John Noyes

This account first appeared in the 1570 edition and is based on Noyes's writings and on the testimony of individual informants. But John Noyes is very probably the 'Moyse' whose escape from capture is described in 1563, p. 1698. (This is supported by the fact that the sentence condemning John Moyse of Lichfield, Suffolk, survives among Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 159r-160r).

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MarginaliaSeptember. 12.IN the moneth of September this present yeare, or (as some report) in the yeare past, suffred the blessed Martyr Iohn Noyes, whose story here followeth.

First M. Thomas Louell beyng then chiefe Constable of Hoxton Hundred, in the Countie aforesaid, and one Iohn Iacob, and William Stannard then beyng vnder

Constables of the aforesayd towne of Laxfield, and Wolfren Dowsing, & Nicholas Stannard of the same towne, beyng then accompted faithfull and catholike Christians, MarginaliaPersecution by the Constables Sheriffes, & Iustices of Suffolke.though vndoubtedly they approoued most cruell hinderers of the true professours of Christ and his gospel, with others, were commaunded to bee that present day before the Iustices, whose names were M. Thurston, sir Iohn Tyrrell, and M. Kene, and Sir Iohn Sillierd beyng hie Shiriffe.

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These sittyng at Hoxton in the Countie of Suffolke aforesayd, and there MarginaliaCharge geuen by the Inquisitors.the sayd townesmen aforesaid hauing commaundement of the sayd Iustices, to enquire in their towne if there were any that would neglect to come to their seruice and Masse, further to examine the cause why they would not come and therupon to bring the true certificate to the sayd Iustices within 14. dayes then next ensuyng: they then commyng homeward, beyng full of hatred agaynst the truth, and desirous to get promotion, wtout any such commandement of the Iustices (as farre as we can learne) tooke counsel one with an other how to attach the said Iohn Noyes without any more delay.

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MarginaliaCounsell taken for attaching Ioh. Noyes.This diuelish enterprise agreed vpon, chiefly through the counsaile of M. Tho. Louell, Wolfren Dowsing, and Nicholas Stannard aforesayd, MarginaliaIohn Noyes house beset aboute.with expedition his house was beset on both sides. This done, they found the sayde Iohn Noyes on the backside of the sayd house going outward, and Nicholas Stannard called to the sayd Iohn, & sayd, whether goest thou? And he sayd, to my neighbors. And the sayd Nichol. Stannard sayd: your Maister hath deceiued you: you must go with vs now. But the said I. Noyes aunswered: no, but take you heede your Maister deceiue not you. MarginaliaIohn Noyes taken by Nicholas Stannarde Persecutor.And so they tooke hym and caried hym to the Iustices the next day. After his appearance & sundry causes alleged, the Iustices & the shiriffe together MarginaliaIohn Noyes cast into Eye Dungeon.cast him into Eye dungeon, add there he lay a certaine tyme: And then was caried from thence to Norwich, and so came before the bishop, where were ministred vnto hym these positions followyng. MarginaliaEx Regist.

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MarginaliaArticles agaynst Iohn Noyes.1 Whether hee beleeued that the ceremonies vsed in the Church, were good and godly to stirre vp mens myndes to deuotion.

2 Item, whether he beleeued the Pope to be supreme head of the Church here in earth.

3 Item, whether he beleeued the bodye of our Lorde Iesus Christ to be in the Sacrament of the aultar vnder the formes of bread and wine, after the wordes of consecration.

MarginaliaReall presence denyed.Whereunto he answered, that he thought the naturall body of Christ to be only in heauen, and not in the Sacrament, &c.

MarginaliaSentence read against Ioh. Noyes.For the which, sentence at last was red by the Bish. against hym, in the presence of these there sittyng the same tyme, D. Dunnyng Chauncellor, sir Wil. Woodhouse, sir Tho. Woodhouse, M. George Heyden, M. Spenser, W. Farrer Alderman of Norwich, M. Thurston, Wynesden with diuers other.

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More of hys Examination then this, came not to our handes.

In the meane tyme his brother in law one Nich. Fisk of Dinnington goyng to comfort hym at such tyme as he remained prisoner in the Guild Hall of Norwich, after christian exhortation, asked hym if he did feare death when the B. gaue iudgement against him, considering the terror of the same. And the sayd Noyes answered: he thāked God he feared not death no more at that tyme, then hee or any other did, beyng at liberty. Then the said Nich. required hym to shew the cause of his condemnation. Vppon which request the sayd I. Noyes writ with his own hand as followeth.

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MarginaliaThe cause of Iohn Noyes condemnation.I sayd (quoth he) that I could not beleeue that in the sacrament of the aulter there is the natural body of Christ that same body that was borne of the Virgin Mary. But I sayd that the sacrament of the body & bloud of Christ is receiued of christian people in the remembrance of Christs death as a spirituall foode, if it bee ministred accordyng to Christes institution.

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But they said I could not tell what spiritually ment.

The Bishop sayd that the Sacrament was God, and must bee worshipped as God. So sayd the Chauncellour also.

Then answered I: My L. I cannot so beleeue.

Then quoth the bishop, why? Then say thou doest beleeue. Notwithstanding these subtile collusions could not preuayle.

Now beyug condemned, hee was sent agayne from Norwich to Eye prison, & vpon the 21. day of Sept. in the yeare aforesayd about midnight, he was brought frō Eye

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