Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Glyn

Agnes Glyn was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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Agnes Penifather

Of Lichfield.

Agnes Penifather took Joyes Lewes to the place of her execution. She was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She was examined by the bishop as to the words she spoke to the two priests of Lichfield, John Ady and James Foxe, about Lewes' remains. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

The two priests met with Penifather in her father's house. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She refused to do penance and so was commanded to prison, and the sheriffs were charged with her imprisonment under the threat of £100 forfeit should anyone be allowed to speak with her. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

At the persuasion of her friends, she was compelled to recant. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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Anne Glover

Wife of John Glover. Of Mancetter, Warwickshire.

Anne Glover was apprehended and taken to Lichfield for examination. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

Anne Glover was examined by the Marian authorities who were seeking her husband. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

After his death John Glover was buried in the churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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[Foxe also refers to her as Agnes Glover.]

 
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Anthony Draycot

(d. 1571)

Chancellor of Lincoln under Longland; chancellor of Coventry under Bayne. [DNB DCL, 1552; Foster]

John Glover was buried in the Churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Chancellour Draycot examined Thomas Barnes and Elice Byrch on 27 June 1556 regarding their conversation about the proclamation of two queens in England after the death of Edward VI. One of them was condemned to bear a fagot for speaking against the mass. 1563, p. 1527.

Draycot persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

Anthony Draycot had Waste apprehended in Derby. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

Joan Waste was condemned by Anthony Draycot and Ralph Bayne. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

On the day of her death Joan Waste was accompanied to church by Draycot, Thomas Powthread, Henry Vernon, Master Dethick of Newhall and many others. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot preached a violent sermon against Joan Waste. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot demanded that the gentlemen and bailiffs witness Joan Waste's death. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot went to an inn and slept during Joan Waste's execution. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot is described by Foxe as being even more cruel that Ralph Bayne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following (but later dismissed them): John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

As Joyce Lewes took a drink at her execution, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Thomas Parkinson was examined in 1558 by Anthony Draycot and made to do penance. 1563, p. 1681.

Anthony Draycot was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Cicely Ormes

(1525? - 1557)

Martyr. Wife of Edmund Ormes, worsted-weaver. Of St Laurence's parish, Norwich, but born in East Dereham. Daughter of Thomas Haund, tailor.

Cicely Ormes was taken at the death of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper, for saying that she would pledge them of the same cup that they drank on. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

John Corbet of Sprouston, Norwich, overheard Ormes show her confessional allegiance with Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper and took her to Dunning. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1916, 1583, p. 2023.

On 23 July 1557 she was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

She was delivered to the secular power of the sheriffs, Thomas Sutherton and Leonard Sutherton (brothers), who took her to the Guildhall, where she remained until her death. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

She was taken on 5 July and twelve months before her death had recanted, but then withdrew her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

The two Norwich sheriffs witnessed her final words and death. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1916, 1583, p. 2023.

Foxe describes her behaviour at her death. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1916, 1583, p. 2023.

She was burned at Norwich on 23 September 1557. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1916, 1583, p. 2023.

 
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Elizabeth Cooper

(d. 1557)

Wife of a pewterer, John Cooper. Martyr. Of Norwich.

Elizabeth Cooper had recanted in St Andrew's parish, Norwich. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Having been troubled by her recantation, she stood up in the midst of the mass and revoked her recantation. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

A man named Bacon urged the sheriff, Thomas Sotherton, to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

In the 1563 edition (only), 'master Marsham' is described as having denounced Cooper along with Bacon to the sheriff. [This was almost certainly Thomas Marsham, an alderman of Norwich.] 1563, p. 1603.

Cooper was taken to prison. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Sotherton was reluctant to take Cooper into custody, as he had been a servant in the same house as Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Elizabeth Cooper was frightened by the flames at the stake but Simon Miller, who was being martyred with her, took her hand and persuaded her not to be frightened. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

She was burned at Norwich on 13 July 1557. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

 
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Elizabeth Smith

Elizabeth Smith was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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Felow

Jailor. Of Norwich.

Felow was keeper of the prisoners at Bishop Hopton's house. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Felow may have allowed Simon Miller to return home to set his house in order prior to his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Cicely Ormes was sent to Felow to be kept in the bishop's prison. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

 
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Helen Bowring

Of Coventry.

Helen Bowring was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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James Foxe

Minister. Of Lichfield.

Agnes Penifather was examined by the bishop of Lichfield about what she said to two priests of Lichfield, John Ady and James Foxe, about the martyr Lewes' remains. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

[Not related to John Foxe of Stoke or John Foxe the martyrologist.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Joan Love

Joan Love was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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John Ady

Minister. Of Lichfield.

Agnes Penifather was examined by the bishop of Lichfield about what she said to two priests of Lichfield, John Ady and James Foxe, about the martyr Lewes' remains. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Corbet

(by 1514 - 1559)

Of Sprowston, Norfolk. Steward of sheriff's court (1540 - 1547), recorder (1547 - 1550), JP Norfolk (1541 - 1553), commr relief Norfolk (1550), goods of churches and fonts (1553). (Bindoff)

John Corbet overheard Cicely Ormes show her confessional allegiance with Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper and took her to Dunning. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1916, 1583, p. 2023.

 
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John Harlstone

Of unknown occupation and origin.

John Harlstone was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

[Not related to Simon Harlstone.]

 
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Joyce Lewes

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Gentlewoman. Widow of one Appleby and then wife of Thomas Lewes. Of Lichfield.

Joyce Lewes was more concerned with her appearance than with religion in her early years. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2012.

She originally attended mass during Mary's reign, but then became troubled in her conscience when she heard of the death of Laurence Saunders. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2012.

Lewes lived close to John Glover and would often visit him to discuss why the mass was heretical. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover instructed Joyce Lewes against catholicism. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes' husband became furious with her and forced her to attend church, where she turned her back when the holy water was cast. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

A citation was delivered to her husband who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

When Joyce Lewes returned home, she began to pray and then went to visit John Glover, who instructed her. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes proved strong when examined and was thrown into prison. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

After she was condemned, Joyce Lewes remained in prison for a further twelve months, as the sheriff held off her execution. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

A writ was sent for from London ordering her death. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

On the eve of her death two priests of Lichfield came and met with Lewes at the under-sheriff's house, having sent word by the sheriff that they were coming to hear her confession. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, pp. 2012-13.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Foxe recounts Lewes' actions the night before her death. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

The sheriff came to tell Lewes that she but one hour to live. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes was led through the town to her execution by a number of billmen, led by her friends, Michael Reniger and Augustine Bernher, to the place of execution. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Lewes became weak on the long journey to her execution, as she had spent so long inside the prison. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

A messenger was sent to the sheriff's house for food and drink for Lewes, as she was so weak. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Lewes died quickly at the stake, as the under-sheriff had, at the request of her friends, ensured that she would be dispatched quickly, probably through the use of gunpowder. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

 
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Leonard Sotherton [or Sutterton or Sutton]

Sheriff of Norwich. Brother of Thomas.

Cicely Ormes was delivered to the secular power of the sheriffs, Thomas Sutherton and Leonard Sutherton (brothers), who took her to the Guildhall, where she remained until her death. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

 
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Margaret Biddel

Of unknown status and origin. Of Coventry.

Margaret Biddel was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom in 1557. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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Margaret Cootesfote

Of Coventry.

Margaret Cootesfote was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

 
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Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Harlstone

Wife of John Harlstone. Of unknown origin.

John Harlstone's wife was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

[Not related to Simon Harlstone.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Bird

Sheriff. Of Lichfield.

Nicholas Bird was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

[Not apparently related to the Birds of Norwich or Dedham.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Bayne

(d. 1559)

Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1554 - 1559) [DNB]

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College); Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College); Dr Norton (Master of Clare); Dr Philo (Master of Michael House); Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John); Dr Blith (of the King's Hall); Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College); Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel); Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's; Brikenden, of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Robert Glover believed that after Bayne and Draycot had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to attempt to do away with Glover while he was in prison 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before the bishop of Coventry in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

When friends and family of William Glover tried to have Glover buried in his local church, Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believed still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch him) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Bayne wrote a letter to the parish of Weme. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Cornelius Bungey was condemned by Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry. Articles were raised against Bungey which he answered. 1563, pp. 1282-83, 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1714.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

John Colstock, Nicholas Ball, Thomas Flyer, Thomas Pyot, Henry Crimes and Thomas Johnson, among others, were examined in the diocese of Lichfield by Ralph Bayne for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Bayne persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

He is described by Foxe as the cruel bishop of Coventry. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following but later dismissed them: John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141 , 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

A citation to appear before the bishop was delivered to Joyce Lewes' husband, who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Ralph Bayne was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Ralph Bayne died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Simon Brigges

BA Cambridge (1534), DD (1547). One of the founding fellows of Trinity College in 1546. (Venn)

Richard Crashfield was examined by Dr Brigges. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, pp. 2204-05, 1576, pp. 1902-03., 1583, pp. 2010-11.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brigges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brigges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Simon Miller

(d. 1557)

Merchant. Martyr. Of King's Lynn, Norfolk.

Simon Miller went to Norwich and asked people coming out of church where he might take communion. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

A papist brought him before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward in the bishop's house. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

His keeper, Felow, may have allowed him to return home to set his house in order before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Having returned to Lynn briefly, Miller returned to Hopton and Felow and was subsequently burned with Elizabeth Cooper in Norwich on 13 July 1557. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

He held Elizabeth Cooper's hand at the stake and convinced her not to be frightened. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Sotherton [or Sutterton or Sutton]

(fl. 1553 - 1564)

Lord mayor and sheriff of Norwich. See Muriel McClendon, The Quiet Reformation (Stanford, California, 1999), p. 211. Brother of Leonard.

A man named Bacon urged the sheriff, Thomas Sotherton, to detain Elizabeth Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Sotherton was reluctant to take Cooper into custody, as he had been a servant in the same house as Cooper. 1563, p. 1603, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Cicely Ormes was delivered to the secular power of the sheriffs, Thomas Sutherton and Leonard Sutherton (brothers), who took her to the Guildhall, where she remained until her death. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

[Note that in 1563 and 1570 Foxe refers to him as Sutterton; in 1576 and 1583, as Sutton.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
East Deram
East Deram
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Lichfield
Lichfield, Lichfielde, Lichefield, Litchefield, Litchfield, Lychefield
NGR: SK 119 095

A city and county of itself, but locally in the county of Stafford. 16.5 miles south-east by east from Stafford. Lichfield, jointly with Coventry, is an episcopal see. The city comprises the parish of St. Mary, part of which is in the southern division of the hundred of Pirehill; St. Chad, part of which is in the northern division of the hundred of Offlow; and St. Michael, divided between the northern and southern divisions of the same hundred. The cathedral close is extra-parochial. St. Mary is a discharged vicarage; St. Chad and St. Michael are perpetual curacies; all in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sprowston
Sprowson
NGR: TG 249 116

Not identified, suggest:

Sprowtson, Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2047 [2023]

Queene Mary. The Martyrdome of Cicelye Ormes in Norwich.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. September. MarginaliaCor. 2.For neither eye hath seen, nor the eare hath heard, neither can it enter into the hart of man, what good thynges the Lord hath prepared for them that loue hym.

Marginalia1. Peter 1.Ye are not bought neither with siluer nor gold, but with the precious bloud of Christ.

MarginaliaActes. 4.There is none other name geuen to men wherein wee must be saued.

So fare ye well wife and children,
and leaue worldly care, and see
that ye be diligent to pray.

MarginaliaMath. 6.Take no thought (sayth Christ) saying: what shall we eate or what shall we drinke, or wherewith shall we be clothed: for after all these thynges seeke the Gentiles) for your heauenly father knoweth that ye haue need of all these thyngs, but seeke ye first the kingdom of heauen, and the righteousnesse thereof. And all these things shall be ministred vnto you.

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¶ The Martyrdome and sufferyng of Cicelie Ormes, burnt at Norwich for the testimonie and witnesse of Christes Gospell. 
Commentary  *  Close
Cicely Ormes

This entire account first appears in the 1563 edition and it was based entirely on testimony from an individual informant or informants. It was unchanged in subsequent editions.

MarginaliaSeptember. 23. MarginaliaCicelye Ormes Martyr.ABout the 23. day of the sayd moneth of September, next after the other aboue mentioned, suffered at Norwich Cicelie Ormes, wyfe of Edmund Ormes Worstedweauer, dwelling in S. Laurence parish in Norwich, she beying of the age of xxxij. yeares or more, was taken at þe death of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper aboue mēcioned, in a place called Lolardes pit without Bishoppes gate, at the sayd Norwich, for that shee sayde shee would pledge them of the same cup that they dranke on. For so saying, MarginaliaM. Corbet. of Sprowson, persecutour.one Maister Corbet of Sprowson by Norwich, tooke her and sent her to the MarginaliaThe Chauncellours name was Dunning.Chauncellor. When shee came before him, he asked her what she sayd to the Sacrament of Christes body. And she sayd, she did beleue, that it was the Sacramente of the bodye of Christ. Yea saide the Chauncellor, but what is that that the priest holdeth ouer his head? Shee aunswered him and sayd, it is bread: and if you make it any better it is worse. At which words the Chauncellor sent her to the bishops Prison to the keeper called Fellow, with many threatning, & hote words as a man being in a great chafe.

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The xxiij. day of Iuly shee was called before þt Chaūcellor againe, who sat in iudgemēt with MarginaliaBrigges a Popish persecutor.Master Bridges and others. The Chauncellor offred her if she would goe to the Church and keepe her tongue, shee should be at lybertie, and beleue as shee would. But she tolde him shee would not consent to his wicked desire therein, doe wyth her what he would: for if she should, she sayde GOD woulde surelye plague her. Then the Chauncellour tolde her, he had shewed more fauour to her, then euer he did to any, and that he was loth to condeme her, considering that shee was an ignoraunt, vnlearned, and foolysh woman. But she not weying his words, tolde him if he did, he should not be so desirous of her sinfull flesh, as she would (by Gods grace) be content to geue it in so good a quarell. Then rose he and red the bloudy sentence of condemnation against her, 

Commentary  *  Close

The sentence condemning Ormes, dated 23 July 1557, survives among Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 152r-153r).

and so deliuered her to the secular power of the shiriffes of the Citie, M. Thomas Sutherton, and M. Leonard Sutherton brethren, who immediately caried her to the Guildhall in Norwich, where shee remayned vntill her death.

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This Cicelie Ormes was a very simple woman, but yet zelous in the Lordes cause, beyng borne in East Deram, and was there the daughter of one Thomas Haund Tailor. She was taken the v. day of Iuly, MarginaliaCicelye Ormes first recanted.and dyd for a tweluemonth before she was taken, recant, but neuer after was she quiet in conscience, vntill she was vtterly driuen from all their Poperie. Betweene the tyme she recanted and that she was taken, she had gotten a letter made, to geue to the Chancellor, to let hym know that MarginaliaCicelye Ormes repenteth her recantation.she repēted her recantation from the bottome of her hart, & would neuer do the like againe while she liued. But before she exhibited her bil, she was taken & sent to prison, as is before sayd. She was burnt the 23. day of September, betweene 7. and 8. of the clocke in the morning, the sayd two shirifes being there, and of people to the number of 200. When she came to the stake, she kneeled downe and made her prayers to God. That beyng done, she rose vp and sayde: good people, I beleeue in God the father, God the sonne, and God the holy ghost, three persons and one God.

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This do I not, nor will I recant, but I recant vtterly from the bottome of my hart, the doynges of the Pope of Rome, and all his popish priestes and shauelynges. I vtterly refuse and neuer will haue to do with them again by Gods grace. And good people, I would you shoulde not thinke 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 428, line 5 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'thinke' to 'report' in the text.} "Report" is changed after 1563 into "think."

of me that I beleeue to be saued in that I offer my selfe here vnto the death for the Lordes cause, but I

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beleeue to be saued by the death of Christes passion: and this my death is and shall be a witnesse of my fayth vnto you all here present. Good people, as many of you as beleeue as I beleue, pray for me. MarginaliaNote well this saying of Cicelye Ormes.Then she came to the stake and layd her hand on it, and sayd: welcome the Crosse of Christ. Which beyng done, she lookyng on her hand, and seeyng it blacked with the stake, she wiped it vppon her smocke, for she was burnt at the same stake that Symon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper was burned at. Then after she had touched it with her hand, shee came and kissed it, and sayd welcome the sweete crosse of Christ, and so gaue her selfe to be bound thereto. After the tormentours had kindled the fire to her, she sayd: MarginaliaThe last wordes of Cicelye Ormes at the stake.My soule doth magnify the Lord, and my spirite reioyceth in God my Sauiour, and in so

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Cicelye Ormes at Norwich. Anno. 1557. September. 23.¶ The burnyng of Cicelie Ormes at Norwich.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Foxe is the main source for our knowledge of Joan Boughton, whom he reports to have been over eighty when she was burned at Smithfield, believing Wyclif was a saint. Her daughter, Lady Jane Young, who was thought to have met the same fate at a later date, is more traceable and raises interesting questions about the social networks infected by heresy.
There already existed a small block (Type 1) of a single woman at the stake, but a new image (Type 2) portrayed the 'very simple woman', Cicelie Ormes at the stake she had welcomed as the cross of Christ. This woodcut remained unique to her and did not serve any other woman martyr - a fact that says something about Foxe's estimate of these martyrs. It disappeared from the Book of Martyrs after Foxe's death, having been used to illustrate a murder pamphlet.

saying she set her hands together right against her brest, casting her eyes and head vpward, and so stood, heauyng vp her hands by little and little, till the very sinewes of her armes brast asunder, and then they fell: but she yelded her lyfe vnto the Lord, as quietly as she had bene in a slumber, or as one feelyng no payne: So wonderfully did the Lord worke with her: his name therfore be praised for euermore, Amen.

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¶ The trouble and disturbance among good men and women at Lichfield. 
Commentary  *  Close
Persecution at Lichfield

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition. It is based on material taken from the Coventry diocesan registers which now survives in Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 69r-71v and 73r-74r.

MarginaliaOctob. 27.AFter the death and Martyrdome of maistresse Ioyce Lewys, a little aboue specified, MarginaliaGood men and women troubled in Lichfield, for kissing Mistres Ioyce Lewes before her death.. diuers good men and women in the same towne of Lichfield were vexed and in trouble  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 429, line 20

There is a process against Nicholas Hurde, Jo. Hurleston, Elizabeth Smyth, Margaret Cole, John Hurleston, Helene Bowring, Margaret Byrell, Ana Penifather, dated Sep. 30, in the Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 69-74.

before the Bishop and his Chauncellor, for kissing the sayd Ioyce Lewys, and drinking with her about the tyme of her death, the names of which persones were these: Ioane Loue, Elizabeth Smith, Margaret Biddell, Helene Bouring, Margaret Cootesfote, Nich. Bird Ioh. Hurlstone and his wyfe, Agnes Glyn, Agnes Glouer, 
Commentary  *  Close

Agnes was the wife of John Glover, the spiritual mentor of Joyce Lewes.

Agnes Penyfather. &c. These with other were produced to their examination before the Bishop & his Chācellor for the cause aboue named, and therefore adiudged for heretikes, for that they did pray and drinke with the sayd maistresse Lewys, but especially Agnes Penyfather sustained the most trouble, for that she accompanied  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 429, line 20 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'accompanied' to 'brought' in the text.} This is the reading of 1563: the subsequent editions give "accompanied," which is the meaning of the other.

the sayde Ioyce Lewys goyng to her death. Whiche Agnes beyng examined further of the sayd Bishop, what words she had spoken to two priestes of the church of Lichfield, MarginaliaAgnes Penifather accused of two Priests for wordes. called Iohn Adye and Iames Foxe, concernyng the sayd Ioyce Lewys after her burnyng, sayd as followeth: that she beyng asked by þe said two priests beyng at her fathers house in the Citie of Lichfield, at such tyme as she came frō the burning of the sayd Ioyce Lewys, wherefore shee the sayd Agnes did weep for such an heretike, meanyng Ioice Lewys, whose soule sayd they was in hell: the sayd Agnes Penyfather to the demaund made this aunswer, that she thought the sayde blessed Martyr to bee in better case

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