Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cuthbert Symson

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Deacon of the protestant congregation in Marian London.

Foxe describes Cuthbert Symson's character. 1563, p. 1650, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Rough went to Symson and they agreed to give a book containing the names of the congregation to Kate Rough. 1563, p. 1650, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Kate Rough dreamed she saw James Mearing's wife with a bloody banner in her hand and a fire-pan on her head. 1570, p. 2228, 1583, p. 2032.

Rough was arrested by the vice-chamberlain of the queen's house at the Saracen's Head in Islington with Cuthbert Symson and Hugh Foxe on 12 December 1557. They had pretended to be there to hear a play but were actually reading their communion books. 1563, p. 1653, 1570, p. 2231, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2034.

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Cuthbert Symson was racked and condemned. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

He was put in stocks prior to his condemnation. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

He had a vision in the stocks which he reported to master Austen, to his wife, and to Thomas Symson. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Cluney checked on Symson in prison prior to his condemnation. Someone else also entered his cell. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Articles were brought against him and he answered. 1563, pp. 1653-64, 1570, p. 2230, 1576, pp. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Roger Sergeant gave information against Cuthbert Symson. 1563, p. 1652 [incorrectly numbered as 1632], 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Symson wrote a letter to his wife. 1563, p. 1653 [incorrectly numbered 1633], 1570, pp. 2230-31, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, pp. 2033-34.

He was burned on 28 March 1558. 1563, p. 1650, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2034.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
David Beaton

(1494? - 1546)

Archbishop of St Andrews from 1539 (DNB)

John Rough was originally a Black Friar in Stirling for sixteen years until the time when Lord Hamilton (earl of Arran) sued the archbishop of St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Shortly after he condemned George Wisehart in 1546, Beaton was stricken with illness and died. 1570, p. 2306, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 2106.

[In fact, Beaton did not die of illness; he was assassinated by members of the Anglophile party in Scottish politics.]

 
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Edward Seymour

(1506? - 1552)

Duke of Somerset (1547 - 1552) [DNB]

Edward Seymour was the patron of Robert Ferrar. 1563, p. 1098; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, pp. 1470-71; 1583, p. 1553.

Seymour signed a royal dispensation of 5 August 1550 permitting Hooper to be consecrated without having to wear vestments. 1563, p. 1050; 1570, p. 1676; 1576, p. 1403 [recte 1430]; 1583, p. 1504).

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Rough

(d. 1557)

Minister. Martyr. Born in Scotland. Of Stirling. (DNB)

John Rough was originally a Black Friar in Stirling for sixteen years until the time when Lord Hamilton (earl of Arran) sued the archbishop of St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was in the service of Hamilton for just one year. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was sent to preach in Ayr for four years. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

After the death of the David Beaton, he went to St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was assigned a pension of £20 by Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

After the battle of Musselborough he went to Carlisle, then on to the duke of Somerset. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was sent as preacher to Carlisle, Berwick and Newcastle. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He married in Newcastle. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was called by the archbishop of York to the benefice of Hull, where he remained until the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He fled to Norden in Friesland upon the accession of Mary. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He came to London on 10 November 1557. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Foxe relates John Rough's sermon about and conversation with Dr Watson in which Rough berated Watson for his doctrinal beliefs. 1563, p. 1734.

Rough was betrayed by Roger Sergeant, a tailor. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was arrested by the vice-chamberlain of the queen's house at the Saracen's Head in Islington with Cuthbert Symson and Hugh Foxe on 12 December 1557. They had pretended to be there to hear a play but were actually reading their communion books. 1563, p. 1653, 1570, p. 2231, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2034.

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On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jerningham (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Articles were brought against him and he answered. 1563, pp. 1647-48, 1570, pp. 2226-27, 1576, pp. 1922-23, 1583, pp. 2029-30.

Rough attended the burning of Austoo at Smithfield. On his way home he met with Master Farrar, a merchant of Halifax, who asked him where he had been. 1563, p. 1648, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2034.

Rough was burned at London on 22 December 1557. 1563, p. 1735, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

He wrote a letter to his godly friends. 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

He wrote a letter to the congregation two days before he burned. 1583, pp. 2030-31.

 
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Lord James Hamilton

(d. 1575)

Second earl of Arran. Governor of Scotland and duke of Chatelherault. (DNB).

John Rough was originally a Black Friar in Stirling for sixteen years until the time when Lord Hamilton (earl of Arran) sued the archbishop of St Andrews. 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Margery Mearing

Martyr. Of London.

Margery Mearing was examined on 18 December 1557. 1563, p. 1645, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2031.

She gave answers to articles against her. 1563, p. 1645, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1923-24, 1583, p. 2031.

She was condemned on 20 December 1557. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

John Rough was her pastor. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Rough excommunicated her shortly before his arrest. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Mearing visited Rough in prison on the pretence of being his sister. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Margery Mearing went to Roger Sergeant's house and asked if Judas was at home. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Mearing was talking with a friend when she saw Cluney, Bonner's summoner, making his way to her house. Cluney took her away to be examined. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

She was burned with John Rough. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ayr
Ayre
NGR: NS 340 220

A seaport, burgh and market town in the district of Kyle, county of Ayr, of which it is the capital. 34 miles south-south-west from Glasgow. The parishes of Ayr and Alloway were united at the end of the seventeenth century. The ecclesiastical affairs are under the superintendence of the Presbytery of Ayr and the Synod of Galloway and Ayr.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Berwick
Barwicke
NGR: NU 00 0528

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Carlisle
Carleil, Carliell
NGR: NY 400 555

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Hull (Kingston-upon-Hull)

East Riding of Yorkshire

OS grid ref: TA 095 295

 
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Mus [Mussium]

Gard, France

Coordinates: 43° 44' 0" N, 4° 12' 0" E

 
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Newcastle-upon-Tyne
NGR: NZ 250 650

A borough and county of itself, locally in the castle ward, county of Northumberland. 276 miles north-north-west from London, and 117 south-east from Edinburgh. The town was originally one parish, later divided into four parochial districts. St Nicholas, the original parish, All Saints, St Andrews and St James, all within the Archdeaconry of Northumberland and Diocese of Durham. The living of St Nicholas is a vicarage; St Andrews, All Saints and St Johns are perpetual curacies. There is also a chapel of St Anne, which is a donative in the hands of the Mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne [Newcastell]

Northumberland [Tyne & Wear]

County town of historic county of Northumberland; cathedral city

OS grid ref: NZ 255 645

2052 [2034]

Queene Mary. Articles of Richard Gibson. The story of Iohn Rough Martyrs.
MarginaliaAnno 1558. March.¶ Articles proponed by Richard Gibson vnto Edmund Boner, Byshop of London, by him to be aunswered, be yea, or nay, or els to say he cannot tell

MarginaliaGibsons questions or demaundes put to B. Boner.1. WHether the Scriptures of God, written by Moyses, & other holy Prophetes of God, through fayth that is in Christ Iesus, is auayleable doctrine to make all men in all thinges vnto saluation learned without the helpe of anye other doctrine, or no.

2. What is authority and from whence it commeth, to whom it apperteineth, and to what end it tendeth.

3. Whether the holy word of God, as it is written, doth sufficiently teach all men, of what dignity, estate, or calling by office so euer he or they be, theyr full, true, and lawfull duety in theyr office: and whether euery man of what dignity, estate, or calling by office so euer he or they be, are bound vpon the payne of eternall damnation in all thinges to do as they are hereby taught & commaunded, and in no wise to leaue vndone any thing that is to be done, being taught and commaunded by the same.

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4 Whether any man, the Lorde Iesu Christ God and man onely except, by the holye ordinaunce of God euer was, is, or shall be Lord ouer fayth, and by what lawfull authority any man, of what dignity, estate, or callign by office soeuer he or they be, may vse Lordship or power ouer any man for fayth sake or for the secrecy of his conscience.

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5. By what lawfull authority or power any man, of what dignity, estate, or calling so euer he or they be, may be so bolde as to alter or chaunge the holy ordinaunces of God, or any of them, or any part of them.

6. By what euident tokens Antichrist in his Ministers may bee knowne, seing it is written that Sathan can chaunge himselfe in to the similitude of an Aungell of light, and his ministers fashion themselues as though they were the Ministers of righteousnesse, and how it may be knowne to him that is desirous thereof, when he is one of that number or in the daunger thereof, or when he is otherwise.

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7. What the beast is, the which maketh warre with the Sayntes of God, and doth not onely kill them, but also will suffer none to buy nor sell, but such as worship his Image, or receiue his marke in theyr right handes, or in theyr foreheades, his name or the number of his name, or do worship his Image, which hy the iuste and terrible sentence of God already decreed, shalbe punished in fire and brimstone before the holy Angels and before the lambe: and they shall haue no rest day nor night, but the smoake of their torment shall ascend vp for euermore: Also what the gorgious & glittering whore is, the which sitteth vpon the beast with a Cup of gold in her hand, full of abhominations, with whom the kings of the earth haue committed fornication, and the inhabitours of the earth and she her selfe also is dronken with the bloud of Sainctes, which is the wine of her fornication, whose flesh the hornes of the beast shall teare in pieces, and burne her with fire. For god hath put in their hartes to do his will.

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8. Whether a king ouer all those people whiche are borne and inhabite within his owne dominions, regions, and countryes, or any part of them, of what dignity, estate, or calling by office soeuer they be, here vpon this earth immediately vnder Christ, by the holy ordinaunce of God, is lawfull, supreame, and chiefe Gouernor or no: And whether a king ouer all those people within his dominions, regions and countryes, and euery part of them, by holy ordinaunce of God, lawfully may, and ought not otherwise to doe, nor suffer otherwise to be done, then in his owne name, power, and authority (the name of God onely except) as lawfull, supreame and chiefe heade in all thinges that belongeth to rule (without exception) to gouerne and rule: And whether all those people of what dignity, estate, or calling soeuer they be, are boūd by the holy ordinaunce of God, to owe theyr whole obedience and seruice in all thinges without exception (theyr duety to god onely excepted) to their king onely, as to theyr supreame and chiefe Gouernour vpon earth immediately vnder Christ: And whether a king without offence agaynst GOD and his people, maye geue away, and not himselfe vse that his authoritye and power geuen him of God, or lawfully may without offence to God and his people (after knowledge thereof hadde) suffer himselfe by fraud or guile, or by any other vnlawfull meane, to be beguiled, defrauded, and spoyled thereof, and whether any subiect, of what dignity, estate, or calling soeuer he or they be, without offence to God and to his kinge, to the minishing or derogating of the supreme prerogatiue roial of his king or of any part therof, may do ought, or after knowledge therof, had without offence to God & to his king, may conceale the same

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9. Whether the holy written law of God be geuen of God vnto all men, of what dignity, estate, or calling by office soeuer they be, aswell thereby to gouerne all theyr Dominions, Regions, and Countryes, and theyr people therin inhabiting, as themselues: and whether any law or lawes MarginaliaHe meaneth the Canon law. (the holy law of God onely excepted) not being made within any Dominion, Region, or Country whereas it or they be vsed, may be lawfully vsed before it or they

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be, as the lawfull law or lawes of the same Dominion, Region or Countrey, by publicke and common order of the same Dominion, Region, or Countrey lawfully allowed: and whether any subiect without offence agaynst God and his king, within the Dominion of his king, may lawfully vse any such lawe or lawes not so allowed.

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Emanuell,

MarginaliaPsal. 39.¶ Ascribe vnto the Lord, O ye mighty, ascribe vnto the Lord, worship and strength: geue the Lord the honor of his name, and bow your selues to the holy maiesty of the Lord.

MarginaliaPsalme. 84.I will harken what the Lord God will say: for he shall speake peace vnto his people, that they turne not themselues vnto foolishnes. This 6. of Aprill. 1557.

By me Richard
Gibson.

¶ The death and Martyrdome of Iohn Rough Minister, and Margaret Mearing burned at London the 22. of December. 
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John Rough and Margaret Mearing

Most of the account of John Rough first appeared in the 1563 edition; it was based partly on official documents (the articles against Rough) but mostly on Rough's writings and on material from individual informants. In 1570, an anecdote about Rough and Thomas Watson was added and in the 1583 edition, a letter from Rough to the underground London congregation was added. The account of Margaret Mearing was printed in its entirety in the 1563 edition; it was unchanged in subsequent editions. This account consisted of her answers to the articles against her, drawn from official records, and of information sent to Foxe by individual informants.

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MarginaliaDecember. 22. MarginaliaIohn Rough, Margaret Mearing, Martyrs.IN this furious time of persecution, were also burned these two constant and faythfull Martyrs of Christ, Iohn Rough a Minister, and Margaret Mearing.

This Rough was borne in Scotland, who (as himselfe confesseth in his aunsweres to Boners Articles) because some of his kinsfolke woulde haue kept hym frō his right of inheritaunce which he had to certaine landes, did at the age of xvij. yeares, in despite MarginaliaA zealous occasion of a Frierly profession. (and the rather to displease his frendes) professe himselfe into the order of the blacke Friers at Sterling in Scotlande: where he remained the space of xvj. yeres, vntill such time as the Lord Hamulton, Earle of Arren, and gouernour of the Realme of Scotland aforesayde (casting a fauour vnto hym) did sue vnto the Archbishop of Saynt Andrewes, to haue him 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 443, line 9 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt inserts 'dereigned' into the text here.} This word is introduced from the first Edition, p. 1646. It seems to have been omitted afterwards from the meaning being obscure, or through oversight. But some word seems necessary to the sentence. "In some places the substantive deraignment is used in the very literal signification with the French desrayer, or desranger; that is turning out of course, displacing, or setting out of order; as deraignment, or departure out of religion - and deraignment, or discharge of their profession; which is spoken of those religious men who forsook their orders and professions." (Blount, in Todd's Johnson.)

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out of his professed order, that as a Seculare Prieste he might serue hym for his Chapleine. At which request the Archbishoppe caused the Prouincial of that house, hauing thereto authority, to dispence with hym for his habite and order.

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This sute beyng thus by the Earle obteined, the sayde Rough remayned in his seruice one whole yeare: MarginaliaIohn Rough first called to the truth.duryng which time it pleased God to open his eyes, and to geue him some knowledge of his truth, and thereupon was by the sayd gouernour sent to preach in the freedome of Ayre, where he continued foure yeares, and then after the death of the Cardinall of Scotland, he was appoynted to abyde at S. Andrewes, and there had assigned vnto him a yearely pension of xx. pound from king Henry the eight Kyng of England. Howbeit, at last waying with himselfe hys owne daūger, and also abhorring the Idolatry and superstition of this countrey, and hearing of the freedome of the Gospell within this Realme of England, he determyned with himselfe not to tary any longer there: And therefore soone after the battel of Musclebourough, he came first vnto Carliell, and from thence vnto the Duke of Somerset, MarginaliaIohn Rough first comming to England in K. Edwardes tyme. then Lord Protectour of England, and by his assignment had appoynted vnto him out of the Kinges treasurye xx. poundes of yearely stipend, and was sent (as a Preacher) to serue at Carliell, Barwicke, and Newcastell. From whence (after he had there, according to the lawes of God and also of this Realme, taken a countrey woman of hys to wife) he was called by the Archbyshoppe of Yorke that then was, vnto a benefice nighe in the Towne of Hull: where he continued vntil the death of that blessed & good king Edward the 6.

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But in the beginning of the reigne of Queene Marye (perceyuyng the alteration of Religion, and the persecution that woulde thereupon arise, and feeling hys owne weakenes) MarginaliaIohn Rough with his wyfe flieth into Friseland.he fled with his wife into Friseland, & dwelte there at a place called Norden, labouring truely for his liuing, in knitting of Cappes, hose, and such like thinges, till about the end of the moneth of October last before hys death. At which tyme, lacking yearne and other suche necessary prouision for the mainteinaunce of his occupation, he came ouer againe into England, here to prouide for the same, and the x. daye of Nouember arriued at London. Where hearing of the secret society, and holy Congregation of Gods children there assembled, MarginaliaIohn Rough ioyneth himself to the congregation at London.he ioyned himselfe vnto them, and afterwardes being elected theyr Minister and Preacher, did continue moste vertuously exercised in that Godly felowshippe, teaching and confirming them in the trueth and Gospell of Christ. But in the ende (suche was the prouidence of God, who disposeth all thinges to the best, the xij. day of December, he with Cutbert Sym-

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son
SSSSs.ij.
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