Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anthony Norgate

Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Berry

(d. 1549) Servant to Sir Walter Mildmay

William Ombler, Thomas Dale, Henry Barton and Robert Dale took Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry, murdered them, stripped their bodies and left them in a field. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

 
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Christopher Cole

Lord of Mendlesham, Suffolk.

Seaman had three children and a wife, who was persecuted out of the town and all her goods were seized by Christopher Cole. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Crouch

Neighbour of Thomas Hudson. Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson's neighbour, John Crouch, went to the constables, Robert Marsham and Robert Lawes, to expose Hudson. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Cliffar

Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Richard Cliffar begged Berry, the commissary of Norwich, to be kind to Thomas Hudson. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
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Robert Baulding

Possibly a constable. Of Mendlesham, Suffolk.

Robert Baulding was struck by lightning at the taking of William Seaman and died of his injuries. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Lawes

Constable of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson's neighbour, John Crouch, went to the constables, Robert Marsham and Robert Lawes, to expose Hudson, and Berry commanded a watch to be made for Hudson. Hudson was eventually caught on 22 April 1558. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
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Robert Marsham

Constable of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson's neighbour, John Crouch, went to the constables, Robert Marsham and Robert Lawes, to expose Hudson, and Berry commanded a watch to be made for Hudson. Hudson was eventually caught on 22 April 1558. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
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Sir John Tyrrel

Of Gipping Hall, Suffolk. JP in Suffolk (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6; Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Philip and Mary, 3, 257.]

Thomas Spicer refused to follow Sir John Tyrrel's commandment to go to church. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

The following were persecuted by John Tyrrel and forced to flee Winston: Mrs. Alice Thwaites and two of her servants; Humphrey Smith and his wife; William Catchpool and his wife; Rought and his wife; Nicholas Birlingham and his wife. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

The following were persecuted by Tyrrel and forced to flee Mendlesham: Simon Harlstone and Katherine, his wife; Thomas Dobson and his wife; Thomas Hubbard and his wife; John Doncon, and his wife and maid; William Doncon; Thomas Woodward the elder; Konnold's wife; a poor widow; Mother Semon's maid; William Whyting. He was assisted in this persecution by Sir John Brodish, the parish priest. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

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Tyrrel commanded George Revet and Thomas Mouse to apprehend Adam Foster. He also commanded Robert Kereth to apprehend Robert Lawson. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, p. 2099, 1576, p. 1811, 1583, p. 1918.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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William Seaman was originally searched for by Sir John Tyrrel, who later set Robert Baulding and James Clarke to look for him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Sir John Tyrrel and Symonds would not allow Mother Benet to be buried in the churchyard. 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2036.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Carman

Martyr. Plowright. Of Higham, Norfolk. (Fines)

Thomas Carman was apprehended at the burning of Richard Crashfield. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

He was examined and condemned by Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Sheriff Woodruff insisted that Thomas Carman's head be broken for getting his cart in the way when Woodruff's children were being brought to him. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Carman was burned on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
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Thomas Hudson

(1528? - 1558)

Glover. Martyr. Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was married with three children. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

He was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

He hid among his faggots for around six months to avoid persecution. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

The vicar of Aylsham, Berry, inquired of Hudson's whereabouts to Hudson's wife, threatening to have her burned if she did not reveal his whereabouts. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson walked about the town for three days decrying the mass before returning home to prayer and fast. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

Thomas Hudson's neighbour, John Crouch, went to the constables, Robert Marsham and Robert Lawes, to expose Hudson, and Berry commanded a watch to be made for Hudson. Hudson was eventually caught on 22 April 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson appeared before Berry (who was also commissary), who railed against him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Richard Cliffar begged Berry to be kind to Thomas Hudson. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson was burned at Norwich on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Norgate

Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Seaman

(1522? - 1558)

Husbandman. Martyr. Of Mendlesham, Suffolk.

William Seaman was originally searched for by Sir John Tyrrel, who later set Robert Baulding and James Clarke to look for him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Baulding was Seaman's near neighbour and trusted friend. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Baulding was taken ill after a strange light fell upon him and later died. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Seaman had three children and a wife, who was persecuted out of the town and all her goods were seized by Christopher Cole. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

William Seaman was burned at Norwich on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Aylsham
Ailsam, Ailesham, Aylsham, Alesham
NGR: TG 193 270

A market town and parish in the southern division of the hundred of Erpingham, county of Norfolk. 12.5 miles north by west from Norwich. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Berry [Bury]
NGR: SD 805 105

A parish, comprising the market town of Bury, 3 chapelries and 2 townships in the hundred of Salford, and 5 townships in the higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, county Palatine of Lancaster, 9 miles north-north-west from Manchester. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Chester.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mendlesham
Mendlesham
NGR: TM 105 655

A parish in the hundred of Hartismere, county of Suffolk. 15.5 miles north-north-west from Ipswich. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Sudbury, Diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2059 [2035]

Q. Mary. Seaman, Carman, and Hudson, Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Maye.red in him, the more beastly and wretched dothe it declare their cruell & tyrannicall acte therin. The Lord geue them repentaunce therefore, if it bee his blessed will, Amen, Amen.

The Martyrdome of William Seaman, Thomas Carman, and Thomas Hudson, put to death by the persecuting papists at Norwich in the county of Norfolke. 
Commentary  *  Close
Seaman, Carman and Hudson

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition and was essentially unchanged in subsequent editions. It is based on detailed information supplied by a local informant or informants.

MarginaliaMay. 19. The story and Martyrdome of W. Seaman, Tho. Carman, and Thomas Hudson.IMmediately after William Nicoll succeeded in that honourable and glorious vocation of Martyrdome three constaunt godly menne at Norwiche in Northfolk, who were cruelly and tyrannically put to death for the true testimony of Iesus Christ, the xix. of May. an. 1558. Whose names be these.

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William Seaman.
Thomas Carman. 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe gives Carman's first name as Thomas, but his papers contain the sentence condemning William Carman to death (BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 157r-158r) and there is a copy of a writ sent to the lord chancellor stating that William Carman had been excommunicated (PRO C/185/141/27).


Thomas Hudson..

The sayde MarginaliaWilliam Seaman.William Seaman was an Husbandman, of the age of xxvi. yeares,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 462, bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'xxvi' to 'thirty-six' in the text.} The articles and sentence against Seman will be found among the Foxian Papers, Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 150: the sentence was read April 1st, 1558. The Editions after 1563 read "xxvi." for "xxxvi."

dwelling in Mendlesham in the county of Suffolke, who was sūdry sought for tymes by þe commandement of MarginaliaSyr Iohn Tyrrell Knight.Sir Iohn Tirrell knight, & at laste he himselfe in the night searched his house and other places for him: notwithstanding hee somewhat mist of his purpose, God be thanked. Then he gaue charge to hys Seruauntes, MarginaliaRobert Baulding.Robert Baulding, and MarginaliaIames Clarke, persecutours.Iames Clarke wyth others, to seek for him. Who hauing no officer, went in the euening to hys house, where he being at home, they took him and caryed him to theyr Mayster Syr Iohn Tirrell. This Baulding being Seamans nighe neighbour, and whome the sayde Seaman greatly trusted as a speciall friend, notwithstanding to doe hys Mayster a pleasure, now became enemy to hys chiefe friend, and was one of the busiest in the taking of him. Now as they were goyng to cary hym to theyr Mayster Syr Iohn Tyrrell in the night, it is credibly reported that MarginaliaA light out of the element.there fell a lyghte betweene them out of the element and parted them. Thys Baulding being in company with the rest when the light fell, and albeit he was then in hys best age, yet after þe time neuer enioyed good daye, but pyned away euen vnto the death. MarginaliaGods punishment vpon a persecutour.

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Well, for all that straunge sight (as I sayd) they caried him to theyr Mayster. Who when he came, asked him why he would not goe to Masse, and to receaue the sacrament and so to worship it? Vnto which William Seaman aunswered, denying it to bee a sacrament, but sayde it was an Idoll, and therefore would not receaue it. MarginaliaSeamā brought to Bishop Hopton, and by him condemned.After whiche wordes spoken, sir Iohn Tirrel shortly sent hym to Norwiche to Hopton then Bishop, and there after conference and examination had with him, the bishop read his bloudy sentence of condemnation agaynst him: and afterward deliuered him to the secular power, who kepte him vnto the day of Martyrdome.

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MarginaliaSeamans wyfe and his three young children, were persecuted also by Syr Iohn Tyrrell.This sayd William Seaman left behynde him when he dyed, a wife, and three children very young: and wyth the sayd young children, hys wife was persecuted oute of the sayde towne also of Mendlesham, because that shee would not go to heare Masse, and all her corne and goods seased, and taken awaye by Mayster Christopher Coles officers, he being Lorde of the sayd towne.

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MarginaliaThomas Carman Martyr.Thomas Carman 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 463, middle

The Articles and Sentence against Carman will be found among the Foxian Papers, Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 157: he is there called a "plowright, of Hingham, Norw. dioc:" and the sentence was read 18th Feb. 1558.

(who as is sayd, pledged Richarde Crashfield at hys burning, and thereupon was apprehended)  
Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, p. 1617; 1570, p. 2206; 1576, p. 1904 and 1583, p. 2012.

being prisoner in Norwiche, was about one time wyth the rest examined and brought before the sayde Byshop, who aunswered no lesse in his Maysters cause, then the other, and therfore had the like rewarde, that the other had, MarginaliaCarman condemned.which was the Byshops bloudy blessing of condemnation, and deliuered also to the Seculare power, who kept him with the other, vntill the day of slaughter, which hasted on, and was not long after.

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MarginaliaThomas Hudsō, Martyr.Thomas Hudson was of Ailesham in Norfolke, by his occupation a Glouer, a very honest poore manne, hauing a wife, and three children, and laboured alwayes truly and dilligently in hys vocation, being of thirtye yeares of age, and bearing so good a will to the Gospell, that he in the dayes of king Edward the 6. two yeares before Q. Maryes raygne, MarginaliaHudson learneth to reade Englishe.learned to read Englishe of Anthony & Thomas Norgate of the same Towne, wherin he greatly profited about the tyme of alteration of Religion. For when Queene Mary came to raygne, and had chaunged þt seruice in the Churche, putting in for wheate draffe, and darnill, and for good preaching blasphemous crying out agaynst truthe, and godlinesse, MarginaliaHudson flyeth from Papistry.he then auoyding all theyr ceremonies of superstition, absented hymselfe from hys house and went into Suffolkl a longe tyme, and there re-

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mayned trauelling from one place to an other, as occasion was offered. At the last, hee returned backe agayne to Northfolke to his house at Ailesham, to comfort his wyfe and children, being heauy, and troubled with hys absence.

Nowe when he came home, and perceiued hys contynuance there would be daungerous, he and hys wife deuised to make hym a place among hys fagottes, to hide him selfe in, where he remayned all the day (in steede of hys chamber) reading and praying continually, for the space of halfe a yeare, and his wife lyke an honest woman being carefull for hym, vsed her selfe faythfullye, and dillygently towards him.

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In the meane time came the Vicare of the Town, named MarginaliaBerry the Commissary, a persecutour.Berry (who was one of the Byshoppes Commissaries, a very euill manne) and inquired of this sayd Thomas Hudsons wife, for her husband. Vnto whom he answered, as not knowing where hee was. Then the sayde Berry rated her, and threatned to burne her for that shee would not bewraye her husbande where hee was. After that, when Hudson vnderstoode it, MarginaliaHudson waxeth bolde in the truth.hee waxed euerye day more zelous then other, and contiuually read & sange Psalmes, to the wonder of many, the people openlye resorting to him, to heare hys exhortations, and vehement prayers.

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At the last he walked abroad for certayne dayes, openly in the Towne, crying out continually agaynst þe Masse and all theyr trumpery, and in the ende, commyng home in hys house, he sate him downe vpon hys knees, hauyng his book by hym, reading and singing Psalmes continually without ceassing, for three dayes and three nightes to gether, refusing meate and other talke, to the great wonder of many.

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MarginaliaIohn Crouch bewrayeth Thomas Hudson to the Constables.Then one Iohn Crouch his next neighbour, went to the Constables Robert Marsham, and Robert Lawes in the night, to certifie them thereof: for Berry commanded openly to watche for hym, and the Constables vnderstanding the same, went cruelly to catche hym in the breake of the day, the xxii. of the moneth of Aprill. Anno. 1558.

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MarginaliaThe taking of Thomas Hudson.Now when Hudson saw them come in, he sayd: Now myne houre is come. Welcome frendes welcome. You bee they that shall leade me to lyfe in Christ, I thanke GOD therefore, and the Lorde enhable me thereto for hys mercyes sake. For his desire was, and euer he prayed (if it wer the Lordes will) that hee might suffer for the Gospell of Christ. Then they tooke him, and lead him to Berry the Commissarye, whiche was the Vicar of the towne, MarginaliaTalke betweene Berry and Hudson.and the sayde Berrye asked him first: where hee kepte hys Church for foure yeares before. To the whiche the sayde Hudson answered thus, where so euer he was, there was the church.

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Doest thou not beleue, sayth Berry, in the sacramente of the aultar? What is it?

MarginaliaSacrament of the Aultar.Hudson. It is wormes meate: my beliefe (saythe hee) is in Christ crucified.

Berry. Doest thou not beleeue the Masse to putte awaye sinnes?

MarginaliaThe Masse.Hudson. No, God forbidde: it is a patched monstre, and a disguised Puppet, more longer a peecing then euer was Salomons Temple. At whiche wordes Berry stamped, fumed, and shewed himself as a mad man, and sayd: well thou vilayn, thou: I wil write to the B. my good Lord, and trust vnto it, thou shalt be handled according to thy desertes. Oh sir, sayde Hudson: there is no Lorde but God, though there be many Lordes and many Gods. With that Berry thrust hym backe with hys hand. And one MarginaliaRichard Cliffar.Richard Cliffar standing by, sayde: I pray you sir, bee good to the poore man. At which wordes Berry was more mad then before, and woulde haue had Cliffer bound in a recognysaunce of 40. poundes for hys good abearyng, bothe in worde and deede: whiche his desire tooke no effecte. Then he asked the sayd Hudson whether he would recant or no. Vnto whiche wordes Hudson sayde: the Lorde forbid: I had rather dye many deathes, then to do so.

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Then after long talke, the sayde Berry seeing it booted not to perswade with him, tooke hys penne and inke, and wrote letters to the Bishop thereof, and sent this Hudson to Norwiche bound like a theefe to him, whiche was 8. miles from thence, who with ioy and singing chere wēt thether, as mery as euer he were at anye tyme before. In prison he was a month where hee dyd continually read & inuocate the name of God.

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MarginaliaSeaman, Carman, and Hudsō, condemned at Norwiche.These three Christians and constaunt Martyrs, William Seaman, Thomas Carman, and Thomas Hudson after they were (as ye haue heard) condemned, the xix. day of May. 1558. were caryed out of prison to the place where they should suffer, whyche was without Byshoppes gate

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