Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes George

(1530? - 1556)

Martyr. Of Great Barfield in Essex.

Agnes George was the wife [unlawful?] of Richard George. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1915.

She was committed to prison in Colchester by Maynard [an alderman of Colchester] for not attending church, and then on to Bonner. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. , 1583, p. 1915.

On 6 June 1556 Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against her (essentially the same as those against Thomas Whittle). She answered the articles. 1563, pp. 1523-24, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, pp. 1914-16.

She signed a letter written with her fellow sufferers that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

She was imprisoned at Newgate and burned at Stratford-le-Bow on 27 June 1556. 1563, p. 1527, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1916.

Agnes George was burned at Stratford-le-Bow. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Alice Alexander

In a letter Bartlett Green stated that Alice Alexander may be innocent and so prove honest. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1856.

 
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Christian George

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of Colchester.

Christian George was arrested for heresy and burned at Colchester on 26 May 1558. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Henry Pond

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Henry Pond was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Hudleys

Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Hudleys was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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John Cawood

(1514 - 1572)

Queen Mary's official printer. (DNB) [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), p. 23.]

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In the 1563 edition, the privy council's letter to Bonner, announcing that the queen was pregnant, is stated by Foxe to have been printed by 'Iohn Cawood' (1563, pp. 1014-15). The letter was reprinted in later editions (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76) but the attribution to Cawood was never repeated.

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In the 1563 edition, a copy of Hugh Weston's prayer for the safe delivery of Mary's child was printed and followed by the phrase 'Imprinted by Iohn Cawode etc'. 1563, p. 1015) This phrase was omitted when the poem was reprinted in 1570, p. 1653; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1480-81.

John Cawood printed the proclamation of Philip and Mary, dated 13 June 1555, prohibiting the importation or ownership of certain protestant books. 1563, pp. 1146-47; 1570, pp. 1772-73; 1576, pp. 1513-14; 1583, p. 1597

 
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John Floyd

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

John Floyd was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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John Holiday

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

John Holiday was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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John Milles

Capper. Of London.

John Milles was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was imprisoned in Newgate with John Hinshaw. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2037.

He was put in the stocks for one night. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

He was sent with Thomas Hinshaw to Fulham, where he remained in the stocks for eight or ten days. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Milles was severely beaten by Bonner in Bonner's orchard for refusing to recant and make the sign of the cross on his forehead. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

He was sent to Fulham church to hear the articles against him. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

When he was returned to prison, Milles was visited by an old conjuring priest, sent at Bonner's command, who then tried to make Milles recant. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Foxe relates one of Milles' discussions with Bonner. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2045.

Milles' wife visited Bonner as she was almost ready to give birth, demanding the release of her husband. She refused to leave Bonner's house without him. Bonner relented and allowed him his liberty for one evening. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2045.

Robert Rouse, a kinsman of Milles, witnessed Bonner's request that Milles be returned to Bonner's house after he and his wife had spent the night in lodgings in Fulham. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Bonner insisted that Milles return, which he did - of his own accord - the following day. Bonner wrote something in Latin for him to subscribe to [which was unseen by Foxe] and as it seemed no great matter, Milles consented and subscribed. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Milles died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

[Brother of Robert Milles, the martyr, who was burned at Brentford. 1563, p. 1690]

 
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King

Constable of Islington.

King and his men investigated an illegal conventicle of 40 godly people meeting in a close in Islington. He arrested 27 of them and took them to Sir Roger Cholmley, who sent them to Newgate. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Matthew Ricarby

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Matthew Ricarby was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Matthew Wythers

(d. 1558)

Matthew Wythers was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Reinland Eastland

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London.

Eastland was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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Richard Baily

Of Whiteacre.

Richard Baily was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

 
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Richard Day

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of Essex.

Richard Day was arrested for heresy and burned at Colchester on 26 May 1558. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

[No relation to John Day or George Day.]

 
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Richard George

Husband of Agnes and then Christian George.

Husbandman. Of West Barfield, Essex. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1915.

Richard George was one of 18 men and 4 women indicted for heresy in Colchester. In the indenture he is described as 'labourer'.1563, p. 1566 [recte 1578].

Richard George was imprisoned during Mary's reign and released upon Elizabeth's accession. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1915.

He had another 'wife' who burned with Agnes George at 'Postern in Colchester' [however, Agnes is burned at Stratford-le-Bow]. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1915.

Richard George's first wife was called Agnes George and was burned at Stratford-le-Bow. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

His second wife, Christian, was burned at Colchester. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

He was imprisoned with his third wife and released upon the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Robert Southam

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation. Of London

Robert Southam was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Articles against him were administered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1559-61, 1570, pp. 2235-36, 1576, p. 2235, 1583, p. 2037.

He was condemned by Bonner. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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Robert Willys

Member of Islington conventicle. Of London.

Robert Willys was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Roger Holland

(d. 1558)

Merchant tailor. Martyr. Of Lancashire, then London.

Roger Holland was apprentice to Master Kempton at the Black Boy in Watling Street. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

Foxe recounts his early activities. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

Holland was assisted in his early protestantism by a maid called Elizabeth who advised him on what he should do. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

He went to Lancashire to visit his father and told many of his friends there of the heresy of papistry. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

He returned to London and married Elizabeth. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

They had a child whom Master Rose baptised into the protestant faith. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

Holland removed to the country but his goods and wife were seized by Bonner's men. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

Holland was apprehended in Islington and appeared before Bonner on 14 June 1558. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

His first examination was by Chedsey and both Harpsfields. 1570, p. 2239, 1576, pp. 1932-33, 1583, p. 2040.

His second examination was before Chedsey and Bonner. 1570, pp. 2239-40, 1576, pp. 1933-34, 1583, pp. 2040-41.

The last examination of Holland was before the lord Strange, Sir Thomas Jarret, Master Eagleston, Bonner, and others. 1570, pp. 2239-40, 1576, pp. 1934-35, 1583, pp. 2041-44.

During the examination his accusers said that Dr Standish had told them that Holland was the son of a catholic gentleman. 1570, p. 2239, 1576, pp. 1932-33, 1583, p. 2040.

Master Eagleston, a near kinsman of Holland and also from Lancashire, supported Holland at his examination. 1570, pp. 2239-40, 1576, pp. 1933-34, 1583, pp. 2040-41.

Bonner told Master Eagleston that he hoped Holland might turn into a good catholic. 1570, pp. 2239-40, 1576, pp. 1933-34, 1583, pp. 2040-41.

Bonner told Holland that he was as mad as Joan Boucher. 1570, pp. 2239-40, 1576, pp. 1933-34, 1583, pp. 2040-41.

Holland and Pond continued to exhort their doctrine to others in prison, to strengthen them in difficult times. 1570, pp. 2239-40, 1576, pp. 1933-34, 1583, pp. 2040-41.

Articles against him were administered and his answers given. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2066.

Holland was burned at Smithfield on 27 June 1558. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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Roger Sandy

Of Islington conventicle. Of London.

Roger Sandy was arrested with 26 others for praying in the fields in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Sir Roger Cholmley

(d. 1565)

Lord chief justice of King's and Queen's Bench (1552 - 1553), privy councillor (under Mary) and MP [Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons; DNB]. Judge, lieutenant of the Tower. Son of Sir Richard Cholmley [DNB]

Sir Roger Cholmley persuaded the royal guard to support Northumberland against Mary (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, p. 1407).

He was sent to the Tower, with Sir Edward Montagu, on 27 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower together with Sir Edward Montagu on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Sir Roger Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Cholmley participated in a debate/dinner conversation between Nicholas Ridley and John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, on the nature of the eucharist, held while Ridley was a prisoner in the Tower (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, pp. 1357-58; and 1583, p. 1428).

Cholmley came to William Flower at the stake and urged Flower, on pain of damnation, to recant his heretical beliefs. 1563, p. 1733; 1570, p. 1749; 1576, p. 1493; 1583, p. 1577.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Cholmley was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was made to Cholmley. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857. [Foxe erroneously calls him 'Sir Richard Cholmley'.]

Cuthbert Symson was brought before Cholmley, examined and racked. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Cholmley sent to Newgate 27 prisoners who were members of an illegal conventicle in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Thomas Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley, who sent him to Newgate. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

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The lord mayor of London and Chomley examined Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Tingle was a prisoner in Newgate. His keeper realised that Edward Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley, who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[Also referred to as 'Lorde Chiefe Baron' or 'Chomley']

 
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T. Coast

Haberdasher. Of London.

Coast was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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T. Tylar

(d. 1558)

Member of the Islington conventicle. Of London.

Tylar was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Thomas Hinshaw

(b. 1537/8?)

Apprentice. Of London.

Thomas Hinshaw was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was arrested for his protestant forms of prayer and reading. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

He was apprentice in St Paul's Churchyard to Martin Pugson. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

He was sent to Newgate, where he remained for around eight weeks. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner sent him before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Hinshaw was set in the stocks at Fulham. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Harpsfield chastised Hinshaw who rebuked him in return, sending Harpsfield into a rage. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Harpsfield told Bonner of how Hinshaw had spoken to him and defied his authority. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner whipped Hinshaw for his rebuke of the clergy. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Articles were brought against Hinshaw. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Shortly after his scourging, Hinshaw fell ill and was returned to his master. He was expected to die but survived, recovering twelve months later, after the death of Mary. He was still alive in [1570 ]. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

 
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William Harris

Martyr. Of Great Bentley, Essex.

William Harris was burned at Colchester on 26 May 1558. 1563, p. 1658, 1570, p. 2234, 1576, p. 1929, 1583, p. 2037.

 
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Braintree
Brainford, Brainforde, Braynforde, Braynford
NGR: TL 765 233

Possibly Braintree: text specifies Essex.

However, DL suggests Bramfield: TL 295 155

Bramfield is a parish in the hundred of Cashio, or Liberty of St. Albans, although locally in the hundred of Hertford, county of Hertford. 3.5 miles north-west from Hertford. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Huntingdon, Diocese of Lincoln.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Cawood

North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 575 375

 
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Colchester
Colchester, Colchestre
NGR: TM 000 250

A borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 22 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. James, St. Martin, St. Mary at the Walls, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Rumwald and Holy Trinity within the walls; and St. Botolph, St. Giles, St. Leonard and St. Mary Magdalene without the walls; all in the archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Islington
Iselington, Islington, Islyngton
NGR: TQ 305 850

A parish in the Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. 2 miles north by west from London. The living is a vicarage in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of London, concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Stratford (Stratford Langthorne)

Newham, east London

OS grid ref: TQ 375 835

2061 [2037]

Queeue Mary. Twenty two taken at Islington. 13 burned, 2. dyed in prison 7. escaped.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Maye. Iune.truth, I cannot firken vp my butter, and keep my cheese in the chamber, and wayte a great price, and let the poore want, and so displease God. But Husband, let vs be riche in good workes: so shal we please the Lord, & haue al good thinges geuen vs. &c. This good woman of that vice of couetousnesse (of all that knew her) was iudged least to be spotted, of any infirmitie she had. The Lord roote it out of the hartes of them that be infected therwith, Amen.

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¶ The Martyrdome of three constant and godly persons burnt at Colchester for the defence and testimony of Christes Gospell. 
Commentary  *  Close
Three Colchester Martyrs

The entire account of these martyrs appeared in the 1563 edition and remained unchanged.

MarginaliaMaye. 26. MarginaliaTwo men and one woman Martyrs.THou hast heard (good Reader 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 467, line 14 from the bottom

For "reader" the Edition of 1563, p. 1670, reads "brother."

) of the forenamed three that were burnt at Norwich, whose bloud quenched not the persecuting thurst of the Papistes. For immedyately after, euen the same month, vpon the xxvi. day was seene the like murther also at Colchester in Essex of two men and a woman, lying there in prison, appoynted ready to the slaughter: who were brought forth the sayde daye vnto a place prepared for them to suffer, and accordinglye gaue theyr liues for the testimonye of the trueth, whose names likewise hereafter followeth.

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MarginaliaMartyrs.William Harryes.
Richard Day.
Christian George.

MarginaliaThe Martyrdom of William Harries, Richard Day, and Christian George, at Colchester.These three good soules were brought vnto the stake and there ioyfully and feruently had made theyr prayers vnto the Lord. At the last being setled in theyr places, and chayned vnto theyr postes, with þe fire flaming fiercely round about them, they like constaunt Christians triumphātly praysed God within the same, and offered vp their bodyes a liuely sacrifice vnto his holy Maiestie: in whose habitation they haue now theyr euerlasting tabernacles: his name therfore be praysed for euermore. Amen.

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The sayd Christian Georges Husbande, had an other wife burnt before this Christian, whose name was Agnes George, which suffered (as you haue heard) with the thirteene at Stratford the Bow. 

Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, pp. 1523-27; 1570, pp. 2095-97; 1576, pp. 1807-09 and 1583, pp. 1914-16. Richard George was the husband of Christian George.

And after the death of the sayde Christian, hee maryed an honest Godly woman agayne, and so they both, I meane þe sayd Richard George and his last wife) in the end were taken also, and layde in prison, where they remayned til þe death of Queene Mary MarginaliaRichard George and his wyfe prisoners, deliuered by Quene Elizabeth.and at the last were deliuered by our most gracious soueraigne Lady Queene Elizabeth, whom the Lorde graunt long to raygne among vs, for hys mercies sake, Amen.

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In the month of Iune came out a certayne proclamation, short but sharpe, from the king and the Queene agaynst wholesome and godly bookes, which vnder þe false title of heresie and sedition, here in the sayd Proclamation were wrongfully condemned.

By the king and Queene. 
Commentary  *  Close
A Royal Proclamation against Heretical Books

This proclamation was printed in every edition of the Acts and Monuments. The signature of John Cawood, the queen's printer, at the bottom, indicates that the proclamation was printed from a printed copy, not a copy in one of the episcopal registers. [Hughes, P. L. and Larkin, J. F. (eds.), Tudor Royal Proclamations, II (New Haven: 1969), p. 90].

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MarginaliaA Proclamation by the King and Queene.WHereas diuers bookes, filled both with heresie, sedition, and treason, haue of late, and be dayly brought into thys Realme, out of forreine countryes and places beyonde the seas, and some also couertly printed within this Realme, and cast abroad in sundry partes thereof, whereby not onely God is dishonored, but also an encouragemēt geuen to disobey lawfull princes and gouernours: The king and Queenes maiesties, for redres hereof, doth by this theyr present Proclamation, declare & publish to all theyr subiectes, that whosoeuer shall after the proclayming hereof, be found to haue any of the sayde wicked and seditious bookes, or finding them, do not forthwith burne the same without shewing or reading the same to any other person, shall in that case be reputed and taken for a rebell, and shall wythout delay bee executed for that offence according to the order of Martiall law.

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Geuen at our Manor of S. Iameses, the sixt daye of Iune.

Iohn Cawood Printer.

The order and occasion of taking certayn godly men and women praying together in the fieldes about Islington, of whom 13. were condemned by Boner, & after suffered in the fire for the truthes sake, as in the story here following may appeare. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Islington Congregation

This account of the Islington congregation and the seven members of it who were martyred first appeared in the 1563 edition, except for the short but detailed biography of Roger Holland which first appeared in the 1570 edition. This material was unchanged in subsequent editions.

MarginaliaIune. 27. Marginalia22. men taken. 13. Martyrs burned.SEcretly in a backe close in the fielde by the Towne of Islington were collected and assembled together a certayne companye of Godly and innocent persons, to the number of fourty, men and women. Who there sitting to-

gether at prayer, and vertuously occupied in the meditation of Gods holy worde, first commeth a certayne man to them vnknowne: who looking ouer vnto them, so stayed & saluted them, saying that they looked like men þt meant no hurt. Then one of the sayd company asked the man, if he could tel whose close that was, and whether they might be so bold there to sit. Yes sayd he, for that yee seeme vnto me such persons as entende no harme, and so departed. Within a quarter of an houre after, commeth the constable of Islington, named MarginaliaKing Constable of Islington.king, warded with sixe or seuē other, accompanying him in the same busines, one wyth a bow, an other with a Bill, and other with theyr weapons likewise. The which sixe or seuen persons the sayde Constable left a little behinde hym in a close place, there to bee ready if need should be while he with one with him shuld go and view them before. Who so doyng, came throughe them, looking and viewing what they were doyng, and what bookes they had: and so going a little forward, and returning backe agayne, bad them deliuer theyr bookes. They vnderstanding that he was Constable, refused not so to do. With that cōmeth forth the residue of his fellowes aboue touched, who bad them stande and not to departe. They aunswered agayne, they would be obedient & ready to go whether so euer they would haue them: & so were they first caryed to a bruehouse but a little way of, whyle þe some of the sayd souldiers ran to the Iustice next at hand. But the Iustice was not at home: Whereupon they were had to sir Roger Cholmley. In the meane tyme some of þe women being of the same number of the foresayde xl. persons, escaped away from thē, some in þe close, some before they came to the bruehouse. For so they were caryed. x. wt one man, 8. with an other, and with some moe, with some lesse, in such sorte that it was not hard for thē to escape that would. In fine, they þt were caryed to Sir Roger Cholmley, were 27. which MarginaliaSyr Roger Cholmley, and Recorder of London, persecutours.Sir Roger Cholmley & the Recorder taking their names in a Bill, & calling them one by one so many as answered to theyr names, they sēt to Newgate. Marginalia22. sent to Newgate.In the whiche number of them that answered, and þt were sent to Newgate, were 22.

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These 22. were in the sayde prison of Newgate seuen weekes before they were examined, to whome word was sent by Alexander the keeper, that if they woulde heare a Masse, they should all be deliuered. Of these foresayd xxii. were burned 13. In Smithfield 7. at Braynford 6.

IN prison 2. dyed in Whitson weeke, the names of whō were MarginaliaConfessors.Mathew Wythers, T. Taylar.

Seuen of them which remayned, escaped with theyr liues hardly, although not without much trouble, yet (as GOD woulde) without burning. Whose names were these. MarginaliaPersecuted Christians.

Iohn Milles. 
Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, pp. 1690-92; 1570, pp. 2243-44; 1576, pp. 1937-38 and 1583, pp. 2044-45.


Thomas Hinshaw. 
Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, pp. 1691-92; 1570, pp. 2242-43; 1576, pp. 1937-38 and 1583, pp.2043-44.


R. Baily, wolpacker.
Robert Willeys.
Hudleys.
T. Coast, haberdash.
Roger Sandey.
 

The first seuen were brought forth to examination before Boner, and so hauing their condēnation were burnt (as is sayd) in Smithfield. The other 6. followed not long after, and suffered at Brayneford, whereof specially here followeth now in order of story to be seene.

The examination and condemnation of seuen godly and faythfull Martyrs of Christe, burnt in Smithfield.

MarginaliaIune. 27. Marginalia7. Martyrs burned in Smithfield.COncerning the examination and condemnation of these abouesayd, whiche were apprehended and taken at Islington, 7. first were produced before Boner the 14. of Iune, to make aunswere to suche articles and interrogatoryes, as by the sayd Byshop should be ministred vnto them. The names of these seuen were: MarginaliaMartyrs.

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Henry Ponde.
Raynold Eastland.
Robert Southam.
Mathew Richarby
Iohn Floyd.
Iohn Holydaye.
Roger Holland.
 

To these 7. constant and godly Martyrs produced before Boner, certayne articles were ministred in this effect as followeth.

Articles.

FIrst that ye being within the Cittye and Dyoces of London, haue not (according to the commō custome of the catholick

Churche
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