Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Names and Places on this Page
John MillesThomas HinshawIpswichIslington
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Milles

Capper. Of London.

John Milles was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was imprisoned in Newgate with John Hinshaw. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2037.

He was put in the stocks for one night. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

He was sent with Thomas Hinshaw to Fulham, where he remained in the stocks for eight or ten days. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Milles was severely beaten by Bonner in Bonner's orchard for refusing to recant and make the sign of the cross on his forehead. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

He was sent to Fulham church to hear the articles against him. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

When he was returned to prison, Milles was visited by an old conjuring priest, sent at Bonner's command, who then tried to make Milles recant. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Foxe relates one of Milles' discussions with Bonner. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2045.

Milles' wife visited Bonner as she was almost ready to give birth, demanding the release of her husband. She refused to leave Bonner's house without him. Bonner relented and allowed him his liberty for one evening. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2045.

Robert Rouse, a kinsman of Milles, witnessed Bonner's request that Milles be returned to Bonner's house after he and his wife had spent the night in lodgings in Fulham. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Bonner insisted that Milles return, which he did - of his own accord - the following day. Bonner wrote something in Latin for him to subscribe to [which was unseen by Foxe] and as it seemed no great matter, Milles consented and subscribed. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Milles died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

[Brother of Robert Milles, the martyr, who was burned at Brentford. 1563, p. 1690]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Hinshaw

(b. 1537/8?)

Apprentice. Of London.

Thomas Hinshaw was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was arrested for his protestant forms of prayer and reading. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

He was apprentice in St Paul's Churchyard to Martin Pugson. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

He was sent to Newgate, where he remained for around eight weeks. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner sent him before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Hinshaw was set in the stocks at Fulham. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Harpsfield chastised Hinshaw who rebuked him in return, sending Harpsfield into a rage. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Harpsfield told Bonner of how Hinshaw had spoken to him and defied his authority. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner whipped Hinshaw for his rebuke of the clergy. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Articles were brought against Hinshaw. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Shortly after his scourging, Hinshaw fell ill and was returned to his master. He was expected to die but survived, recovering twelve months later, after the death of Mary. He was still alive in [1570 ]. 1563, p. 1691, 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ipswich
Ipswich, Ipswiche
NGR: TM 170 440

A borough in the liberty of Ipswich, county of Suffolk. 25 miles south-east by east from Bury St. Edmunds, 69 miles north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of St. Clement, St. Helen, St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at the Quay, St. Mary Stoke, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Mathew, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Stephen, Witham with Thurlstone, and part of Westerfield; all within the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. St. Clement with St. Helen is a rectory in charge; St. Mary Stoke is a rectory; St. Mathew and St. Stephen are discharged rectories; St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at Quay, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Nicholas and St. Peter are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Islington
Iselington, Islington, Islyngton
NGR: TQ 305 850

A parish in the Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. 2 miles north by west from London. The living is a vicarage in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of London, concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2067 [2043]

Queene Mary. The scourging of Tho. Hinshaw, aud Iohn Milles.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Iuly.Among these 6. was one William Pikes (as yee haue heard) who sometime dwelt in Ipswiche in Suffolke, by his occupation a Tanner, a very honest godly man, & of a vertuous disposition, a good keper of hospitalitie, and beneficial to the persecuted in Queene Maries daies. Thys saide William Pikes, in the 3. yeare of Queene Maries raigne, 

Commentary  *  Close

Pikes, or Pickess, had been forced to flee Ipswich before May 1556: see 1576, p. 1981 and 1583, p. 2089.

a little after Midsomer, being then at libertie, wēt into his Garden, and tooke wyth him a Bible of Rogers translation,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 481, fn 1

This was William Tyndale's translation, published at Hamburgh under the name of "Thomas Mattewes:" the press was corrected by John Rogers...- ED.

where hee sitting wyth his face towardes the South, reading on the said Bible, sodenly fell downe vpon his booke betwene a 11. and 12. a clocke of the day, foure drops of fresh bloud, & he knew not from whence it came. Then he seeing the same, was sore astonished, & coulde by no meanes learne (as I sayd) from whence it should fall: and wiping out one of the droppes with his finger, called his wife, and said: In the vertue of God wife, what meaneth this? Wil þe Lord haue 4. sacrifices? I see wel enough the Lorde will haue bloude: his wil be done, and geue me grace to abide the triall. Wife, let vs pray (sayde hee) for I feare the day draweth nigh. Afterwarde he daily looked to be apprehended of the papistes, and it came to passe accordingly, as yee haue heard. Thus much thought I good to wryte heereof, to stirre vp our dulle senses in considering the Lordes woorkes, and reuerently to honour the same. His name therfore be praised for euermore, Amen.

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Moreouer, concerning the sayd William Pikes, as he was in Newgate sore sicke and at the poynte of deathe, so that no man looked he should liue 6. houres, there declared to them that stoode by, that he had bene twise in persecution before, and that now he desired the Lord, if it were his will, that he might glorifie his name at the stake, and so as he prayed, it came to passe at Brainford.

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Ye hard before of those 22. taken at Islington, 13. were burned, and 6. escaped, albeit very hardly, & some of them not without scourging by the hands of the bishop. In the which number was Thomas Hinshaw & Ihon Milles, according to the expresse Picture here after purported.

Ex epigrammate Ennij apud Ciceronem allusio. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
An allusion from an Epigram of Ennius in Cicero
Foxe text Latin


Si fas caedendo coelestia scandere cuiquam est,
Bonnero coeli maxima porta patet.

[Note different start to the second line in1570]

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

If it is right for any man to ascend to heaven through blows, to Bonner lies open the mighty gate of heaven.

Actual text of Cicero, de republica, Fragments, sect. 6. line 3


Si fas endo plagas caelestum ascendere cuiquam est,
Mi soli caeli maxima porta patet,

cf. Seneca the Younger, Epistlae Morales ad Luc. Letter 108. 34. 5.


Ennium hoc ait Homero [se] subripuisse, Ennio Vergilium; esse enim apud Ciceronem in his
ipsis de re publica hoc
epigramma Enni:
si fas endo plagas caelestum ascendere cuiquam est,
mi soli caeli maxima porta patet.

cf. Lactantius, Divinarum Institutionum lib. I, de falsa religione deorum, Migne P.L., col. 0211B

Apud Ennium sic loquitur Africanus; Si fas endo plagas coelestum ascendere cuiquam est, Mi soli coeli maxima porta patet.

 
Commentary  *  Close

This epigram was added in the 1583 edition.

Si fas cædendo cœlestia scandere cuiquam est,
Bonnero cœli maxima porta patet.

In effigiem Boneri, carmen.

QVæ noua forma viri, quid virga, quid ora, quid aluus
Pondera quid ventris, crassitiesʠue velit?

Corpus amaxæum, distento abdomine pigrum
Rides, anne stupes, lector amice, magis?
Vasta quid ista velint, si nescis pondera, dicam,
Nam nihil hic mirum venter obesus habet.
Carnibus humanis & sanguine vescitur atro,
Ducentos annis hauserat ille tribus.
Ergo quid hoc monstri est, recto vis nomine dicam?
Nomen nec patris, nec gerit ille matris.
Qui patre Sauago natus, 

Commentary  *  Close

This is an allusion to the widespread story that Bonner was the illegitimate child of a priest named Savage.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 482, line 11 from the bottom

The allusion here seems unfounded. Baron Lechmere informed Strype "that he (Bp. B.) was born at Hanly in Worcestershire, of one Boner, an honest poor man, in a house called Boner's place to this day, a little cottage of about £5 a year. And that his great grandfather, Bishop Boner's great friend and acquaintance, did purchase this place of the said Bishop in the times of Queen Elizabeth," &c. (Annals, i. pt. ii. 300.)

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falso que Bonerus
Dicitur, hunc melius dixeris Orbilium. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 482, fn 2

See Hor. Epist. II. 1. 71. - ED.

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The same in English. 
Commentary  *  Close

Note that this translation does not translate the final three lines of the Latin version, which denounced Bonner's alleged illegitimate birth.

MVse not so much, that natures woorke
is thus deformed now,
With belly blowen, and head so swolne,
for I shall tell you how:
This Canniball in three yeares space
three hundreth Martyrs slew:
They were his foode, he loued so bloud,
he spared none he knew.

It should appeare that bloud feedes fat,
if men lie well and soft:
For Boners bellie waxt with bloud,
though he semde to fast oft.
O bloudy beast, bewaile the death
of those that thou hast slaine:
In time repent, since thou canst not
their liues restore againe.

G. G.

In Bonerum.

CArnificis nomen debetur iure Bonero,
Qui sine Christicolas crimine mactat oues.
Certe carnificis immitis nomine gaudet,
Siʠue isto peius nomine nomen, amat.
Carnificem vocitas? ridet crudelia facta
Narris? rem gratam non facis ipse magis.
Det Deus vt sapias meliora Bonere, vel istis
Te feriant meritis munera digna precor.

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The scourging of Thomas Hinshaw. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. The account came from an individual informant, possibly Hinshaw himself.

IN the godly number aboue mentioned, which were apprehended at Islington, there Congregated together

The right Picture and true Counterfet of Boner, and his crueltie, in scourging of Gods Sainctes, in his Orchard, at Fulham.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Bishop Bonner (who perhaps scarcely needed the label attached to his garden wall in this woodcut) is particularly vivid in his characterisation here as the fat unlaced figure of ridicule acting as master of devilish ceremony. There was no mistaking his outrageousness, as he beat the prisoner John Willes so hard that he wore out his willow scourge and turned to a birch one, drawing so much blood that even his attendants recoiled. This was a device used elsewhere by the illustrators, and here all eyes are averted from Bonner's actions - the two clerks confer on their own, the servants coming in with a fresh birch whip turn away, and the man whose job it is to hold down the unfortunate prisoner covers his eyes. Bonner, who died in 1569, was still alive when the first edition of the Acts and Monuments appeared, and according to John Harington's later story, when shown his picture in the work laughed and said, 'a vengeance on the foole, how could he get my picture drawn so right?' In conflating the accounts of this episode in the text the illustrators took some liberties, for instance with the 'lad' bringing the new birch rod, and the victim, Thomas Hinshaw - reported as aged 19 or 20 - both of whom appear older. They were ready to rise above the specifics of textual fidelity in order to produce an image of Bonner's personal cruelty on a par with the corporate cruelties of the persecuting 'true Catholic Church of Christ' (represented in the first woodcut of 'The Proud Primacy of Popes' series, 1570, sig. nnir; 1576, p. 756; 1583, 780. Play on Bonner's name added to the visual exploitation of his character. What good qualities could be found in this bishop who combined the role of ruthless persecutor with the rauncy as well as the pauncy Vice of old comedy fame? The point was made in a simple pun. 'Boner' for Bonner ('Bono' inscribed on the wall behind him - very much the contrary of its Latin meaning (bonus, good).

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