Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Dale

(1511? - 1557)

Weaver. Of Hadleigh, Suffolk.

Dale was arrested for his heretical beliefs. He became sick in prison and died there. His body was cast out and buried in the fields. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

[Not related to John Dale, fellow of Queen's College.]

 
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John Nowell

(d. by May 1567)

Rector of Hadleigh (1554 - 1560), dean of Bocking (1556 - 1564), rector of Great Massingham, Norfolk (1556 - 1567) (Emden, 1501-1540).

John Nowell succeeded Rowland Taylor as rector of Hadleigh. Foxe contrasts him unfavorably with his predecessor. 1563, p. 1070; 1570, p. 1696; 1576, p. 1448; 1583, p. 1521.

[A copy of a sermon preached by Nowell in Hadleigh on 10 February 1555, the day after Rowland Taylor's execution, survives in Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 425, fols. 119r-120r). Nowell denounced Taylor for having 'dyed in a damnable case'. This sermon was not printed by Foxe, but a long extract from it is in Strype, Cranmer, pp. 604-6].

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John Alcock did not remove his cap during the procession, for which action Nowall called for the constable to arrest Alcock. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Robert Rolfe was an honest constable and asked Nowall why he was so enraged by John Alcock. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Nowall insisted that Rolfe place Alcock in the stocks. Rolfe said that he would bail him and so not put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe later met with Alcock and told him that he was sorry for him. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe feared that Newall would be cruel to Alcock because of Newall's dislike of Rolfe. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe took Alcock to appear before Newall who committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

[Foxe calls him 'Maister Neweall'.]

 
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Richard Yeoman

(1497? - 1557)

Minister. Martyr. Of Hadleigh, Suffolk. [See John Craig, Reformation, Politics and Polemics: The Growth of Protestantism in East Anglian Market Towns 1500-1610 (Aldershot, 2001), pp. 163, 172, 173.]

Richard Yeoman was Rowland Taylor's curate. When Taylor departed, he left Yeoman in charge. But Yeoman was driven away and later burned at Norwich. 1563, p. 1067; 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1447; 1583, p. 1520.

Richard Yeoman took over Taylor's cure at the departure of Taylor. 1563, p. 1661, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

As soon as Master Newall took over the benefice he set a catholic curate in Richard Yeoman's place. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Yeoman fled to Kent, where he sustained himself and his wife and children by selling laces, pins and points from village to village. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Master Moyle, justice of Kent, set Richard Yeoman in the stocks at Fulham. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman returned to Hadleigh and resided secretly in the Guildhall. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman's wife begged bread and meat for her family, while her husband spent his time devoutly and also carding wool for his wife to spin. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall found out where Yeoman was hiding and took the bailiff's deputies and servants to seize him. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Richard Yeoman was set in the stocks after his capture. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman met with John Dale in the cage, who had been there for three or four days and remained there until Sir Henry Doyle, a justice, came to Hadleigh. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall urged Doyle to take Dale and Yeoman to prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale and Yeoman should not be punished for more than a day or two. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale should be released immediately. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle submitted to Newall's requests eventually and signed the writ for Dale and Yeoman to be taken to Bury jail. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

After Dale, a weaver, died, Yeoman was removed to Norwich prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman was burned at Norwich on 10 July 1557. He was tormented at the stake. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

 
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Robert Rouse

Kinsman of John Milles.

Robert Rouse witnessed Bonner's request that Milles be returned to Bonner's house after he and his wife had spent the night in lodgings in Fulham. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

 
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Rowland Taylor

(d. 1555)

Rector of Hadleigh. Martyr [DNB]

Foxe gives an account of Rowland Taylor's life and early career. 1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, pp. 1445-6; 1583, pp. 1518-19.

[A letter from William Turner to John Foxe describing, among other things, Rowland's early life and background survives among Foxe's papers (BL, Harley 416, fols. 132r-133r). Foxe never printed this information].

Foxe recounts Taylor's conflict with catholics in Hadleigh; Taylor was summoned before Stephen Gardiner and refused to flee. 1563, pp. 1065-68; 1570, pp. 1693-95; 1576, pp. 1446-47; 1583, pp. 1519-20. [Note that this contradicts the next entry, in which the privy council orders Taylor's arrest in Hadleigh].

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The privy council ordered Sir Henry Doyle and one Foster to arrest Rowland Taylor and one Henry Alskewe (or Askew in Foxe) and bring them before the council on 26 March 1554 (1583, p. 1428, from APC 1554 - 1556, p. 3).

Taylor's first examination by Stephen Gardiner and deprivation of his livings: 1563, pp. 1068-71; 1570, pp. 1695-96; 1576, pp. 1447-48; 1583, pp. 1520-21.

On 6 May 1554, John Hooper wrote to Taylor and his fellow prisoners, Robert Ferrar, John Bradford and John Philpot,discussing a proposed disputation in Cambridge in which they would represent the protestants. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

Taylor was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against a proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

He wrote an account of his examination by Stephen Gardiner on 22 January 1555 and also wrote defending clerical marriage. 1563, pp. 1071-74; 1570, pp. 1696-99; 1576, pp. 1448-50; 1583, pp. 1520-21.

[An eyewitness account of Rowland Taylor's fourth and final examination, which Foxe did not print, is found in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 590, fols. 64r-68r].

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Taylor and his fellow prisoners John Bradford, Robert Ferrar and John Philpot. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1428; 1583, pp. 1501-02.

In a letter William Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

Taylor was brought before Gardiner at St Mary Overy's on 29 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483).

[An eyewitness account of Rowland Taylor's fourth and final examination, which Foxe did not print, is found in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 590, fols. 64r-68r].

He was excommunicated and sentenced to death by Stephen Gardiner on 30 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483).

His condemnation, degradation, last supper with his family and his will: 1563, pp. 1074-76; 1570, pp. 1699-1700; 1576, pp. 1450-51; 1583, pp. 1523-25.

His journey to Hadleigh and execution there on 9 February 1555: 1563, pp. 1076-80; 1570, pp. 1700-03; 1576, pp. 1451-54; 1583, pp. 1525-27.

He wrote a letter to Margaret Taylor. 1570, pp. 1703-05; 1576, pp. 1454-56; 1583, pp. 1527-29.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Stephen Knight and William Pygot claimed that they were taught their religious beliefs by Rowland Taylor. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1720; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

Rowland Taylor's martyrdom is referred to in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

In a letter to Laurence Saunders, John Bradford stated that he should refer to the answers of both Taylor and Philpot when considering the plight of Saunder's friend, mentioned in Saunder's letter to Bradford. 1563, p. 1195, 1570, p. 1815, 1576, p. 1550-51, 1583, p. 1633.

Rowland Taylor was mentioned in a letter by John Bradford to Lady Fane. 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

Ridley, in a letter to John Bradford and others, expressed his joy at hearing the report of Dr Taylor and his godly confession. 1563, pp. 1894-95, 1570, pp. 1896-97, 1576, pp. 1624, 1583, pp. 1724-25.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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Taylor made Robert Drakes a deacon, at the commandment of Thomas Cranmer. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Joan Waste said that the doctrine taught and sermons given by Dr Taylor were believed by Taylor and others to be a true doctrine. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Henry Doyle [or Dowell]

(d. 1561)

Sheriff of Suffolk, JP for Suffolk (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6; Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Philip and Mary, 3, 139], Pond Hall, Suffolk. [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600 (Oxford, 1986), pp. 27, 93, 167. JP 87, 171 in app. 1.]

Rowland Taylor, while rector of Hadleigh, used to call on Doyle at least once a fortnight to visit almshouses with him (1563, p. 1078; 1576, p. 1453; 1583, p. 1526).

Doyle was ordered by the privy council on 26 March 1554 to, together with Foster, arrest Rowland Taylor and Henry Askew and to send them to the council (1583, p. 1428).

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiff's, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When Driver and Gouch were tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

At his death John Cooper left a wife and nine children, with goods and cattle to the value of 300 marks, which was removed from Cooper's family by Sir Henry Doyle. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Richard Yeoman was set in the stocks after his capture. Yeoman met with John Dale in the cage, who had been there for three or four days and remained there until Sir Henry Doyle, a justice, came to Hadleigh. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall urged Doyle to take Dale and Yeoman to prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale and Yeoman should not be punished for more than a day or two. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale should be released immediately. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle submitted to Newall's requests eventually and signed the writ for them to be taken to Bury jail. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

[Foxe calls him 'Doell' or 'Doyll'.]

 
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Sir Thomas Moyle

(no later than 1500 - 1560)

Of Gray's Inn, London. Justice of the Peace (1537 until his death). Sheriff of Kent (1556 - 1557). Member of Heresy Commission 1552 and 1556. [Hasler]

William Foster was apprehended and imprisoned by Sir Thomas Moyle. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2140, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

 
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Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Hadleigh
Hadley
NGR: TM 026 425

A parish in the hundred of Cosford, county of Suffolk. 10.5 miles west by south from Ipswich. The living is a rectory within the exempt Deanery of Bocking, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2069 [2045]

The apprehension, condemnation, and Martyrdome of Rich. Yeoman.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iuly.if she be with one, or two, should perish, the bloud of them would be required at thy hands. Then to this agreement he came, that he should hire a bed in the towne of Fulham and her husband should go home with her the morow after, vppon this condition, that his kinsman there present (one MarginaliaRobert Rousse kinseman to Iohn Milles.Rob. Rousse) should bring the sayd Milles vnto his house at Paules the next day.

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Whereunto the sayd Milles sayd, he would not agree, except he might go home by and by. At length his wife beyng importunate for her husband, & seyng that she would go no further, but there remaine vnlesse she had her husband with her, the bishop fearing belike the rumor which might come vpon his house thereby, bade the sayd Milles make a crosse and say: MarginaliaThe condition putte to Iohn Milles to saye. In nomine Patris. &c.In nomine Patris & Filij, & Spiritus sancti. Amen. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative, quoting Bonner's words to Milles
Foxe text Latin

In nomine patris & filii, & spiritus sancti, Amen.

Foxe text translation

In the name of the Father, and of the Sonne, and of the holy Ghost.

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Then the sayd Milles began to say: In the name of the Father, and of the Sonne, and of the holy ghost, Amē. No, no, sayth Boner, say it me in Latine, In nomine Patris, & Filij, & Spiritus sancti, Amen. 

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Foxe text narrative, quoting Bonner's words to Milles
Foxe text Latin

In nomine patris & filii, & spiritus sancti, Amen.

Foxe text translation

In the name of the Father, and of the Sonne, and of the holy Ghost.

Milles vnderstanding the matter of that Latine to be but good, said the same, 
Commentary  *  Close

The words 'makyng a crosse and knocking his breast' were eliminated here in the 1570 edition, probably because Foxe disapproved of such gestures.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 486, line 17 from the bottom

The first Edition, p. 1691, adds, "makyng a crosse and knocking his breat" - a part of the performance which it was perhaps considered, afterwards, would be best omitted. But many had to accommodate much farther.

MarginaliaIohn Milles sent home with his wyfe.and so went home with his wyfe, his foresayde kinsman beyng charged to bring hym the next day vnto Paules, either els sayd Boner if thou doest not bring hym, thou art an heretike as wel as he. Notwithstandyng, the charge beyng no greater, this kinsman didde not bring hym, but hee of his owne voluntarie accord came to the said B. within a fewe days after, where the B. put vnto him a certaine writing in Latin to subscribe vnto, conteyning as it semed to him no great matter, that he needed greatly to sticke at: albeit, what the bill was, he could not certainly tell. So subscribed he to the bill, and returned home. And thus much cōcernyng the 22. taken at Islington.

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The history and cruell handlyng of Richard Yeoman, D. Taylors Curate at Hadley, constantly sufferyng for the Gospels sake. 
Commentary  *  Close
Richard Yeoman

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition and remained unchanged in subsequent editions. It was based on the testimony of an individual informant, probably one close to Yeoman, since it describes his experiences in both Kent and Suffolk.

AFter the story of these 22. taken at Islington, proceedyng now (the Lord willyng) we wil prosecute likewise MarginaliaIuly. 10. MarginaliaThe story and Martyrdome of Richard Yeoman Minister.the taking and cruell handlyng of Richard Yeoman minister. Which Yeoman had bene before D. Tailors Curate, a godly deuout old man, of 70. yeres, which had many yeres dwelt in Hadley, well seene in the scriptures, & geuing godly exhortations to the people. With hym Doc. Tailor left his cure at his departure. But as soone as M. Newal had gotten the benefice, he droue away good Yeoman as is before said, & set in a popish Curate to maintain and continue their Romish religion whiche nowe they thought fully stablished. Then wandered he long time frō place to place, moouing & exhorting all men to stand faithfully to Gods worde, earnestly to geue themselues vnto prayer, with patience to beare the crosse now layed vpon them for their triall, with boldnes to confesse the truth before the aduersaries, & with an vndoubted hope to waite for the crowne and reward of eternall felicitie. But when hee perceiued his aduersaries to lye in waite for him, MarginaliaRichard Yeomā flieth into Kent.hee went into Kent, & with a little packet of laces, pinnes and points, and such like things, he trauailed from Village to village, sellyng such things, & by þt poore shyft gate hymself somewhat to the susteining of himselfe, his poore wife and children.

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MarginaliaRichard Yeoman set in the stockes by M. Moile of Kent.At the last, a Iustice of Kent called M. Moyle, tooke poore Yeoman and set him in the stocks a day and a night, but hauyng no euident matter to charge hym with, he let hym go againe. MarginaliaRichard Yeomā returneth agayn to Hadley.So came he secretly againe to Hadley, and taried with his poore wife, who kept him secretly in a chāber of the Towne house, commonly called the Guild hall, more then a yere. All the which tyme, the good olde father abode in a chamber locked vp all the day, & spent his tyme in deuout prayer and reading the Scriptures, and in carding of wool which his wyfe did spin. His wife also did go and beg bread and meat for her selfe and her children, and by such poore meanes susteined they themelues. Thus þe saints of God susteined hunger and misery, while the prophets of Baal liued in iollitie, and were costly pampered at Iesabels table.

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At the last, MarginaliaParson Newall a wicked persecutour.person Newal (I know not by what means) perceiued that Rich. Yeoman was so kept by hys poore wyfe, and taking with him the Bailiffes deputies and seruants, came in the night tyme & brake vp fiue dores vpon Yeoman, MarginaliaYeoman taken by Parson Newall.whom he found in bed with his poore wyfe and children. Whom when he had so found, he irefull cried, saiyng, I thought I should find an harlot and a whore together. And he would haue plucked the clothes of from them. But Yeoman held fast the clothes, and said vnto his wyfe, Wife, aryse and put on thy clothes. And vnto þe person he sayd: Nay Person, no harlot, nor whore, but a maried man and his wife, accordyng vnto Gods ordinance,

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and blessed be God for lawfull matrimony. I thank God for this great grace, and I defie the Pope & all his Poperie. Then led they Rich. Yeoman vnto the cage, & set hym in the stocks vntill it was day.

There was then also in the cage an olde man named MarginaliaThis Iohn Dale dyed in Burie Gaile, as is before mentioned.Iohn Dale, who had sitten 3. or 4. dayes, because whē the sayd Person Newal with his Curate, executed þe Romish seruice in the Church, he spake openly vnto him and sayd: MarginaliaThe wordes of Iohn Dale to Parson Newall and his Curate.O miserable & blind guides, will ye euer be blind, leaders of the blynd? will ye neuer amend? will ye neuer see the truth of Gods word? wil neither Gods threates nor promises enter into you harts? wil not the bloud of Martyrs nothing mollifie your stonie stomacks? Oh indurate hard harted, peruerse, & crooked generation. O damnable sorte, whom nothyng can do good vnto.

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These and like words he spake in feruentnes of spirit against the superstitious religion of Rome. Wherfore person Newall caused hym forthwith to be attached, and set in the stockes in the cage. MarginaliaIohn Dale sette in the Cage by Parson Newall.So was he there kept til sir Hēry Doile a Iustice, came to Hadley.

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Now when poore Yeoman was taken, the person called earnestly vpon Sir Henry Doile to send them both to prison. Sir Henry Doile earnestly laboured and entreated the person, to consider the age of the men, & their poore estate: they were persons of no reputation nor preachers: wherefore hee would desire him to let them be punished a day or two, and so to let them goe, at the least Iohn Dale who was no priest, and therfore seeyng he had so long sitten in the cage, he thought it punishment enough for hys tyme. MarginaliaSyr Henry Doyle entreared for Gods Sainctes, but could not be heard.When the person heard this, he was exceeding mad, and in a great rage called them pestilent heretikes, vnfitte to lyue in the common wealth of Christians. Wherefore I beseech you Sir (quoth he) accordyng to your office defēd holy church, and helpe to suppresse these sectes of heresies, &c. which are false to God, and thus boldly set themselues to the euill example of other, against the Queenes gracious proceedyngs. Sir Henry Doyle seeyng he coulde do no good in the matter, & fearing also his perill if he should too much meddle in this matter, made out the Writte and caused the Constables to cary them foorth to Bury Gaole. 

Commentary  *  Close

A rare portrayal in Foxe of Sir Henry Doyle as a reluctant persecutor; usually Doyle was described as a zealous persecutor of the godly.

For now were all the Iustices were they neuer so mightye, afrayde of euery shauen crowne, and stood in as much awe of them, as Pilate dyd stande in feare of Annas and Cayphas, and of the Pharisaicall broode, which cried MarginaliaThe kingdome of Locustes.Crucifie hym, Crucifie hym. If thou let hym goe, thou art not Cæsars friend.

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Wherefore, whatsoeuer their consciences were, yet (if they would escape danger) they must needes bee the Popish Bishops slaues, and vassails.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 488, middle

The first Edition has it, "and the Massemongers underlinges."

So they tooke Richard Yeoman and Iohn Dale, pinioned, and bound them lyke thieues, set them on horsebacke, and bound their legs vnder the horses bellies, MarginaliaYeoman & Iohn Dale sent to Bury Gaile.and so caried them to the Gaole at Bury, where they were tied in irons, and for that they cōtinually rebuked Popery, they were throwne into þe lowest dungeon, where Iohn Dale through sickenesse of the

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Richard Yeoman, Minister, at Norwich. Anno. 1558. Iuly. 10.¶ The burnyng of Richard Yeoman.
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This was the fifth time this image was used in Books 11 and 12 in 1583.

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