Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alexander [or Saunder] Gouch

(1520? - 1536)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Woodbridge, Suffolk.

Master Nunn persecuted Gouch of Woodbridge and Driver's wife of Grundisburgh, both of whom were to be burned near to his house at Grundisburgh. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

A search was made for Gouch and Driver's wife, who were found and sent to Melton prison. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

Gouch was condemned. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

He was burned at Ipswich on 4 November 1558. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiffs, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When they were tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

[Note that Gouch is called Saunder Gouch in 1563, but Alexander Gouch from 1570 et seq.]

 
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Alice [or Elizabeth or Margaret] Driver

(1528? - 1558)

Martyr. Wife of a husbandman. Of Grundisburgh, Norfolk.

Master Nownd persecuted Gouch of Woodbridge and Driver's wife of Grundisburgh, both of whom were to be burned near to his house at Grundisburgh. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

A search was made for Gouch and Driver's wife, who were found and sent to Melton prison. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Alice Driver was transferred to Bury St Edmunds for examination. 1563, 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

She rebuked Queen Mary, for which the chief justice, Sir Clement Higham, ordered her ears to be cut off. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Alice Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

Alice Driver was examined a second time. 1563, pp. 1671-72, 1570, pp. 2247-48, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, pp. 2048-49.

She was condemned. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

She was burned at Ipswich on 4 November 1558. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiffs, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

[The name of Driver's wife changes throughout. In 1563, pp. 1670-71, she is called Elizabeth in the headings, as well as in the heading to her second examination, but on p. 1672 of 1563 she is called Margaret. In 1570 et seq. she is called Alice.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Francis Nunn

Justice in Suffolk. Of Martlesham. Fellow of Gray's Inn (See BL, Harl. 416, fo. 174).

Master Noone persecuted Gouch of Woodbridge and Driver's wife of Grundisburgh, both of whom were to be burned near to his house at Grundisburgh. 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

Nunn went to Denham in search of Moyse, whom he chased on horseback through the fields. Moyse managed to escape. 1563, p. 1698.

[See MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600 (Oxford, 1986), pp. 1901-91, 322, 331, JP 36 in app. 1.]

 
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George Gascoigne

(1525? - 1577)

Studied at Trinity College Cambridge but left without qualification. Entered the Middle Temple (1548). MP Beford (1557 - 1558, 1558 - 1559). Elected MP for Midhurst (1572) but his seat was refused as creditors had taken proceedings against him. (DNB )

Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

 
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Miles Spencer

Chancellor of Norwich (1550 - 1556). [Fasti]

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spencer, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spencer, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Walgrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Driver and Gouch were examined at Ipswich before Dr Spencer and Dr Gascoigne. 1563, pp. 1670-71, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, pp. 1941-42, 1583, p. 2048.

Master Spencer persecuted William Hammon and his wife at Norwich for their refusal to accept catholic ceremonies. 1563, p. 1677.

 
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Sir Clement Higham

(by 1495 - 1571)

Of Barrow, Suffolk. MP for Rye (1553), Ipswich (1554), West Looe (1554), Lancaster (1555). Chief bailiff of Bury St Edmunds, JP Suffolk (1529 - 1571). (Bindoff)[SP11/5, no. 6].

Robert Pygot appeared before the judge, Sir Clement Higham, who sent him to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

The examination of John Fortune was carried out by Bishop Hooper, aided by Doctor Parker, Master Foster and Master Hygham. 1570, p. 2100, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, p. 1918.

David and John Henry, Philip Humphrey were arrested for heresy. The writ for Humphrey's burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Alice Driver rebuked Queen Mary, for which the chief justice, Sir Clement Higham, ordered her ears to be cut off. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

At Bury St Edmunds, Clement Higham met with the witnesses against Cooper, Richard White of Wattisham and Grimwood of Hitcham, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Cooper was condemned to be hanged, drawn and quartered as an example to others. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Grosborough
Grosborough, Grousborough
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ipswich
Ipswich, Ipswiche
NGR: TM 170 440

A borough in the liberty of Ipswich, county of Suffolk. 25 miles south-east by east from Bury St. Edmunds, 69 miles north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of St. Clement, St. Helen, St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at the Quay, St. Mary Stoke, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Mathew, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Stephen, Witham with Thurlstone, and part of Westerfield; all within the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. St. Clement with St. Helen is a rectory in charge; St. Mary Stoke is a rectory; St. Mathew and St. Stephen are discharged rectories; St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at Quay, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Nicholas and St. Peter are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Martlesham
Martlesam, Martlesham
NGR: TM 252 473

A parish in the hundred of Cartford, county of Suffolk. 2 miles south by west from Woodbridge. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Melton
Melton
NGR: TM 283 504

A parish in the hundred of Wilford, county of Suffolk. 2.25 miles north-east from Woodbridge. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ufford
Vfford
NGR: TM 295 523

A parish in the hundred of Wilford, county of Suffolk. 2.25 miles north-east from Woodbridge. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Woodbridge
Woodbridge
NGR: TM 275 492

A market town and parish in the hundred of Loes, county of Suffolk. 7.5 miles east-north-east from Ipswich. The living is a perpetual curacy, to which the impropriated rectory has been annexed, in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2072 [2048]

Quene Mary. Alexander Gouche, Alice Dryuer, Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Nouem.Nay, said sir Edward, you are one of Cookes scholers and so commanded him away, and to come before him the next day.

MarginaliaExamination of Iames Ashley.After the lyke maner they passed also with Iames Ashley, whom they warned the next day likewyse to appeare before them againe. So in fine they appearing againe, had their condemnatiō. And thus these foure blessed Martyrs & seruants of Christ, innocently suffred together at s. Edmundsbury, as is aforesayd, about the beginnyng of August, not long before the sicknes of Queene Mary.

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¶ The Martyrdome of two godly persons sufferyng at Ipswich for the Gospell of Christ and his euerlastyng testament, named Alexander  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 493, line 14

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'Alexander' to 'Saunder' in the text.} "Saunder" is, after the first Edition, changed into "Alexander:" the process against Alexander Gouch, or Gotche, will be found in the Harleian MSS. No. 421, folio 140-143: he is there said to be "de Colnes:" Colneis was one of the Hundreds of Suffolk, next to Carlsford, in which Grundisburgh is, and next to Loes, in which Woodbridge is.
There is a singular discrepance as to the Christian name of Driver's wife: in the first Edition, pp. 1670, 1671, she is called "Elizabeth" in this heading, and in the heading to her second examination: "the second examination of Elizabeth Driver:" but the same Edition, p. 1672, calles her "Margaret:" in the Harleian MSS. No. 421, fol. 140-143, we find the process against her, and she is there called "Margaret uxorem Nich. Dryver de Grundesburgh." She is there represented as having been formally condemned at St. Mary's, Bury, May 27th, 1558.

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Gouche, and Alice Driuer. 
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Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver

The backgrounds of Gouch and Driver, as well as their examinations, first appeared in the 1563 edition. Foxe was drawing on individual informants for their arrest and background and on official records for Gouch's examinations. (The processes against Gouch and Driver, and the sentence against Driver, are among Foxe's papers - see BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 140r-v and 142r-143r). The account ofDriver's examinations was compiled by a sympathetic observer of her trial. In the 1570 edition an account of their executions, supplied by an eyewitness, was added to this account. No further changes were made to the narrative of their martyrdoms.

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MarginaliaNouemb. 4. MarginaliaM. Noone a persecutour.MAister Noone 

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In the 1563 edition (p. 1698) Foxe has a further account of how Francis Nunn, the JP, who hunted Gouch and Driver so relentlessly, also nearly captured John Noyes (or 'Moyse'). This account was probably dropped because of Nunn's influence (he remained a JP well into Elizabeth's reign), but it is interesting that Foxe retained the account of his hunt for Gouch and Driver.

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a iustice in Suffolk, dwelling in Martlesham, huntyng after good men to apprehend them (as he was a bloudy tyraunt in the dayes of triall) at the length had vnderstanding of one Gouche of Woodbridge, & Driuers wyfe of Grosborough, to bee at Grosborough together, a little from his house, immediately tooke his mē with hym and went thether, and made diligent search for them, MarginaliaGouch and Alice Dryuer taken at Grousborough.where the poore man and woman were compelled to step into an hay golph to hide themselues frō their cruelty. At the last they came to search the hay for them, and by gaging thereof with pitchforkes, at the last found them: MarginaliaGouch and Alice Dryuer caryed to Melton Gaile.so they tooke them & led them to Melton Gaole, where, they remainyng a tyme, at the length were caried to Bury, against the Assise at S. Iames tide, and beyng there examined of matters of fayth, did boldly stand to confesse Christ crucified, defiyng the Pope with all his papisticall trashe. And among other thyngs MarginaliaQ. Mary called Iesabell.Driuers wife likened Queene Mary in her persecution, to Iezabell, and so in that sense callyng her Iezabel, for that sir Clement Higham beyng chiefe Iudge there, adiudged her eares immediately to be cut off, MarginaliaAlice Dryuers eares cut of, for likening Q. Mary to Iesabell.which was accomplished accordingly, and she ioyfully yelded her selfe to the punishment, and thought her selfe happy that she was coūted worthy to suffer any thing for the name of Christ.

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After the Assise at Bury, they were caried to Melton Gaole agayne, where they remained a tyme. This MarginaliaAlexander Gouch.Alexāder Gouch was a man of the age of 36. yeares or thereabouts, and by his occupation was a Weauer of shredding Couerlets, dwellyng at Woodbridge in Suffolke, & borne at Vfford in the same Countie. Driuers wife was a woman about the age of 30. yeares, & dwelt at Grosborough where they were taken, in Suffolke. Her husband did vse husbandry. MarginaliaGouch and Alice Dryuer caryed to Ipswich.These two were caried from Melton Gaole to Ipswich, where they remayned & were examined. The which their examination, as it came to our hands, hereafter followeth.

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The examination of Driuers wyfe, before Doct. Spenser the Chauncellor of Norwich. 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 493, line 4 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt adds 'and Dr. Gascoine' to the heading in the text.} The words "and Dr. Gascoine" are put in by the Editor, because he assisted in this, as well as in the next examination.

FIrst, she comming into the place where she should bee examined, with a smiling countenance. MarginaliaD. Spenser after the death of D. Dunning who dyed sodenly in Lincolneshire, was Chauncellour vnder Byshop Hopton.Doct. Spenser said: Why woman, doest thou laugh vs to scorne?

Driuers wyfe. Whether I do, or no, I might well enough, to see what fooles ye be.

Doct. Spenser. Then the Chauncellour asked her wherfore she was brought before hym, and why she was layed in prison.

Dry. Wherefore? I thinke I neede not to tell you: for ye know it better then I.

Spens. No by my troth woman, I know not why.

Dry. Then haue ye done me muche wrong (quoth shee) thus to imprison me, and know no cause why: for I know no euill that I haue done, I thank God, and I hope there is no man that can accuse me of any notorious fact that I haue done, iustly.

MarginaliaSacrament of the Aultar.Spenser. Woman, woman, what sayest thou to the blessed Sacrament of the aultar? Doest thou not beleeue that it is very flesh and bloud, after the words be spoken of consecration?

Driuers wife at those words helde her peace, & made no answer. Then a great chuffeheaded priest that stood by, spake, and asked her why shee made not the Chauncellour an aunswere. With that, Driuers wyfe looked vpon hym austerely, and sayde: Why Priest, I come not to talke with thee, but I come to talke with thy Maister: but if thou wilt I shall talke with thee, commaunde thy Maister to holde his peace. MarginaliaA fatte Priest put to silence.And with that the Priest put his nose in hys cappe, and spake neuer a worde more. Then the Chauncellor bade her make aunswere to that he demaunded of her.

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Dry. Sir (sayd she) pardon me though I make no aunswer, for I cannot tell what you meane thereby: for in all my lyfe I neuer heard nor read of any such Sacrament in all the Scripture.

Spens. Why, what scriptures haue you read, I pray you.

Dry. I haue (I thanke God) read Gods booke.

Spens. Why, what maner of Booke is that you call Gods booke?

Dry. It is the old and new Testament.  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 494, line 29

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'the old and new Testament' to 'the New Testament' in the text.} This is the reading of the first Edition; those following insert "the Old and" before "the New."

What call you it?

Spens. That is Gods booke in deed, I cannot deny.

MarginaliaNo Sacrament of the Aultar to be found in Gods booke.Dry. That same booke haue I read thoroughout, but yet neuer could find any such sacrament there: & for that cause I cannot make you aunswer to that thing I knowe not. Notwithstanding, for all that, I will grant you a Sacrament, called the Lords supper: and therfore seyng I haue graunted you a Sacrament, I pray you shew me what a sacrament is.

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Spens. It is a signe. And one MarginaliaD. Gascoyne persecutour.D. Gascoine beyng by, confirmed the same, that it was the signe of an holy thing.

MarginaliaWhat a Sacrament is.Dry. You haue sayd the truth sir, sayd she. It is a signe in deede, I must needes graunt it: and therefore seyng it is a signe, it cannot be the thyng signified also. Thus farre we do agree: for I haue graunted your owne saying. Then stoode vp the sayd Gascoine, and made an Oration wyth manye fayre wordes, MarginaliaD. Gascoynes Oration little to purpose.but little to purpose, both offensiue & odious to the myndes of the godly. In the ende of which long tale,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 494, line 43

The first Edition reads "take," which is probablyh a mistake for "tale" or "talke."

he asked her if shee did not beleeue the omnipotencie of God, and that he was almighty, and able to performe that he spake. She answered, yes, and said: I do beleeue that God is almighty, and able to performe that hee spake and promised.

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MarginaliaTalke betweene Alyce Dryuer & D. Gascoyne.Gasc. Very well. Then he sayd to his disciples: Take, eate, this is my body: Ergo, it was his body. For he was able to performe that he spake, and God vseth not to lye.

Dry. I pray you did he euer make any such promise to his disciples, that he would make the bread his body?

Gasc. Those be the wordes. Can you deny it?

Dry. No, they be the very wordes in deed, I cannot deny it: but I pray you, was it not breade that hee gaue vnto them?

Gasc. No, it was his body.

Dry. Then was it his body that they did eat ouer night.

Gasc. Yea, it was his body.

Dry. What body was it then that was crucified the nexte day?

Gasc. It was Christes body.

MarginaliaIf Christ had but one body, & that body was eaten vp ouer night, what body then was crucified the next day?Dry. How could that be, when his disciples had eaten him vp ouer night? except he had two bodies, as by your argument he had: one they did eate ouer night, and another was crucified the next day. Such a Doctor, such doctrine. Be you not ashamed to teach the people, that Christ had two bodies? In the 22. of Luke, MarginaliaLuee. 22.He tooke bread, and brake it, and gaue it to his disciples, saying: Take, &c. and do this in the remembraunce of me. Sainte Paule also sayeth, 1. Cor. 11. Marginalia1. Cor. 11.Do this in the remembraunce of me: for as often as ye shall eate this bread, and drinke this cup, ye shall shewe the Lordes death till he come: and therefore I meruaile ye blushe not before all this people, to lye so manifestly as ye doe. MarginaliaGascoynes mouth stopped.With that Gascoine held his peace, & made her no answer: for, as it seemed, he was ashamed of his doyngs. Then the Chancellor lift vp his hed of from his cushion, and commanded the Gaoler to take her away.

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MarginaliaThe Chauncellour when he could not aunswere her with reason, sendeth her to prison.Dry. Now, sayd she, ye be not able to resist the truth, ye cōmaund me to prison agayne. Well, the Lord in the end shal iudge our cause, and to hym I leaue it. Iwisse, iwisse, this geare will go for no payment then. So went she with the Gaoler away.

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The second examination of Alice Dryuer.

MarginaliaAn other examination of Alice Dryuer before D. Spenser, aud Gascoyne.THe next day she came before them agayne, & the Chancellor then asked her, what she said to the blessed sacrament of the aulter. MarginaliaSpenser vp with his Sacrament of the Aultar agayne.

Dry. I will say nothing to it: for you will neither beleeue me nor your selues. For yesterday I asked you what a sacrament was, and you sayde, it was a signe, and I agreed therto, & sayd, it was the truth, confirming it by the scriptures, so that I went not from your owne words: & now ye come and aske me agayne of such a sacrament as I told you I neuer red of in the scriptures.

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Spens. Thou lyest naughty woman, we did not say that it was a signe.

Dry. Why maisters be ye not the mē that you were yesterday? will ye eat your owne wordes? Are ye not ashamed to lie before all this multitude here present, who heard you speake the same?

Then stoode vp D. Gascoine & said, she was deceyued: for there were three churches: the malignant church, the

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