Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Prest

Married woman. Martyr. Of Exeter.

James Turberville examined and condemned Agnes Prest. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1943-45, 1583, p. 2049.

Gregory Basset denounced Mrs Prest for talking of scriptures even though she was uneducated. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Walter Raleigh's wife visited Mrs Prest in prison in Exeter in 1558. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Mrs Prest was taken from this prison to the Guildhall in Exeter to be condemned. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2251, 1576, p. 1943, 1583, p. 2049.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry David

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Henry David was arrested for heresy. The writ for his burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

He was burned at Bury St Edmunds shortly before the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

[Brother of John David.]

 
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John Bate

(d. 1558)

Barber. Town crier of Ipswich. Persecutor of protestants. Would have liked to have been a priest under Mary but was married.

John Bate was sent with George Manning to seek out Agnes Wardall in the fields near her home. Wardall had escaped into the fields and hidden in a ditch. George Manning discovered where she was and gave her a warning to be still so that his co-searcher, John Bate, did not find her. She remained still and escaped thanks to Manning. 1570, pp. 2124-25, 1576, pp. 1846-47, 1583, pp. 1940-41.

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Bate sold his frieze gown that he wore at the execution of Alice Driver and Alexander Gouch, stating that it stank of heretics. God struck him dead three or four weeks later. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John David

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

[See his sentence recorded as 27 May in BL, Ms Harley 421, art.68.]

The writ for John David's burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

He was burned at Bury shortly before the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

[Brother of Henry David.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Philip Humphrey

(d. 1558)

Tailor. Martyr. Of Onehouse, Suffolk.

The writ for Humphrey's burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Humphrey was burned at Bury shortly before the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Cove

Servant of Sir Henry Doyle.

When Alice Driver and Alexander Gouch began singing psalms at their execution, Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid them be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Smart

(by 1507 - 1560)

Of Ipswich. MP for Ipswich (1545, 1555). Bailiff (1547 - 1548, 1551 - 1552, 1558 - 1559), JP (1547 - 1548, 1551 - 1553, 1554 - 1555, 1557 - 1560). (Bindoff)

Smart was Foxe's source for the account of Peter Moone and Agnes Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Smart denounced Agnes Moone to Hopton. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiffs, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

 
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Sir Clement Higham

(by 1495 - 1571)

Of Barrow, Suffolk. MP for Rye (1553), Ipswich (1554), West Looe (1554), Lancaster (1555). Chief bailiff of Bury St Edmunds, JP Suffolk (1529 - 1571). (Bindoff)[SP11/5, no. 6].

Robert Pygot appeared before the judge, Sir Clement Higham, who sent him to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

The examination of John Fortune was carried out by Bishop Hooper, aided by Doctor Parker, Master Foster and Master Hygham. 1570, p. 2100, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, p. 1918.

David and John Henry, Philip Humphrey were arrested for heresy. The writ for Humphrey's burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Alice Driver rebuked Queen Mary, for which the chief justice, Sir Clement Higham, ordered her ears to be cut off. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

At Bury St Edmunds, Clement Higham met with the witnesses against Cooper, Richard White of Wattisham and Grimwood of Hitcham, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Cooper was condemned to be hanged, drawn and quartered as an example to others. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Henry Doyle [or Dowell]

(d. 1561)

Sheriff of Suffolk, JP for Suffolk (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6; Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Philip and Mary, 3, 139], Pond Hall, Suffolk. [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600 (Oxford, 1986), pp. 27, 93, 167. JP 87, 171 in app. 1.]

Rowland Taylor, while rector of Hadleigh, used to call on Doyle at least once a fortnight to visit almshouses with him (1563, p. 1078; 1576, p. 1453; 1583, p. 1526).

Doyle was ordered by the privy council on 26 March 1554 to, together with Foster, arrest Rowland Taylor and Henry Askew and to send them to the council (1583, p. 1428).

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiff's, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When Driver and Gouch were tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

At his death John Cooper left a wife and nine children, with goods and cattle to the value of 300 marks, which was removed from Cooper's family by Sir Henry Doyle. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Richard Yeoman was set in the stocks after his capture. Yeoman met with John Dale in the cage, who had been there for three or four days and remained there until Sir Henry Doyle, a justice, came to Hadleigh. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall urged Doyle to take Dale and Yeoman to prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale and Yeoman should not be punished for more than a day or two. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale should be released immediately. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle submitted to Newall's requests eventually and signed the writ for them to be taken to Bury jail. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

[Foxe calls him 'Doell' or 'Doyll'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Exeter
NGR: SX 920 925

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Wanford, county of Devon, of which it is the chief town. 10 miles north-north-west from Exmouth, 44 miles north-east from Plymouth. The city comprises 17 parishes, two chapelries, and the extra-parochial precinct of the cathedral; all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Exeter, of which the town is the seat. 14 of the livings are discharged rectories; St John is a rectory not in charge; St David and St Sidwell are perpetual curacies.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2073 [2049]

Queene Mary. Alexander Gouche, Alice Dryuer Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Nouemberchurch militant, and the church triumphāt. MarginaliaGascoyne agayn taketh the matter in hand. Threee Churches.So he would faine haue made matter, but he could not tell which way.

Dry. Sir, is there mention made of so many Churches in the scripture?

Gasc. Yea.

Dry. I pray you where find you this word (Church) written in the scripture?

Gasc. It is written in the new Testament.

Dry. I pray you sir shew the place where it is written.

Gasc. I cannot tell the place, but there it is. With that she desired him to looke in his Testament. Then he fombled & sought about him for one: but at that tyme he had none & that he knew well enough, though he seemed to search for it. At the last she said: Haue ye none here sir?

Gasc. No.

Dry. I thought so much in deede, that ye were little acquainted withall. MarginaliaGascoyne little acquainted with the new Testamens.Surely, you be a good Doctor. You say you sit here to iudge accordyng to the law, and howe can you geue iudgement, & haue not the booke of the law with you? At which words Gascoine was out of countenance, and asked her if she had one.

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Dry. No, sayd she.

Gasc. Then sayd he, I am as good a doctor as you.

Dry. Well sir, I had one, but you tooke it from me (as you would take me from Christ, if you could) and since would ye not suffer me to haue any booke at all: so burnyng is your charitie. But you may well know (I thanke God) that I haue exercised the same: Els could I not haue answered you (to Gods glory be it spokē) as I haue. MarginaliaThe Papistes put to silence by a simple woman.Thus she put them all to silence, that one looked on another, and had not a word to speake.

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Dry. Haue you no more to say? God be honoured. You bee not able to resist the spirit of God in me a poore woman, I was an honest poore mans daughter, neuer brought vp in the vniuersitie as you haue bene, MarginaliaAlice Driuer brought vp at her fathers plough.but I haue driuen the plough before my father may a tyme (I thanke God:) yet notwithstandyng in the defence of Gods truth, and in the cause of my maister Christ, by his grace I will set my foote against the foote of any of you all, in the maintenance and defence of the same, and if I had a thousand lyues, it should go for payment thereof. MarginaliaSpencer readeth sentence agaynst Alice Driuer.So the Chancellour rose vp, and red the sentence in Latine of condemnation, and committed her to the secular power, & so went she to prison agayne, as ioyful as the bird of day, praysing and glorifiyng the name of God.

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¶ Alexander Gouche, Martyr.

AT which tyme Alexander Gouch also was examined, who was taken with her, as before is said, whose examination here after followeth.

MarginaliaThe articles whereupon Gouch was condemned.This Alexander Gouch was examined chiefly of the Sacrament & other ceremonies of the popish church. And as for that his beliefe was, that Christ was ascended into heauen, and there remayneth, & that the Sacrament was the remembraunce of his death and passion, and for refusing the Masse, and the Pope to be supreme hed of Christs Church, for these causes was he condemned, MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Gouch and Alice Dryuer at Ipswich. Anno. 1558. Nouember. 4.& died with Alice Dryuer at Ipswich, the 4. of Nouember which was the Monday  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 496, fn 1

The 4th of November in 1558 fell on a Friday: so that we must either read "7th of November," or "Friday." - ED.

after All Saintes, 1558. D. Myles, Spenser beyng beyng Chancellor, 
Commentary  *  Close

This passage, identifying Miles Spencer, who became the archdeacon of Sudbury, was added in the 1570 edition. Spencer died that year and Foxe probably felt that it was now safe to reveal this powerful cleric's controversial past.

they both endyng their lyues with earnest zeale, nothing fearyng to speake their conscience whē they were commaunded to the contrary.  
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In 1563 there are details on their being silenced at the stake which were lost in 1570, when a more detailed account of their execution was added.

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MarginaliaGouch & Alice Driuer brought to the stake.These two godly personnes beyng come to the place where the stake was set by 7. of the clocke in the morning, notwithstandyng they came the selfe same mornyng from Melton Gaole, which is vj. myles from Ipswich, beyng in their prayers, and singyng of Psalmes both of them together, Sir Henry Dowell then beyng Shiriffe, was very much offended with them, and wylled the Bailiffes of Ipswich to bidde them make an ende of their Prayers, 

Commentary  *  Close

Contrast this account of Sir Henry Doyle's behaviour at an execution with that described at the execution of Richard Yeoman.

they kneelyng vpon a broome fagot, one of the Bailiffes, whose name was Richard Smart,  
Commentary  *  Close

Earlier Foxe had printed an account of Richard Smart's repentence of his persecution of the godly in Mary's reign.

commaunded them to make an ende, saying: On, on, haue done, haue done: make an ende, nayle them to the stake, yet they continued in prayer.

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Then sir Henry sent one of his men, whose name is Rich. Coue, that they should make an end. MarginaliaThe Martyrs not suffered to pray.

Then Gouch stood vp, and sayd vnto the Shiriffe: I pray you M. Shirife let vs pray a litle while, for we haue but a little tyme to lyue here.

Then said the Bailife: Come of, haue them to the fire.

Then the sayd Gouch and Alice Driuer sayde: Why M. Shiriffe, and M. Bayliffe, wyll you not suffer vs to pray?

Away, said sir Henry, to the stake with them.

Gouch answered: Take heed M. shiriffe. If you forbid praier, the vengeance of God hangeth ouer your heds.

The Martyrdome of Alexander Gouch, and Driuers wyfe.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
The reuse of this woodblock (by a designer with a distinctive style of flaring flames wrapped round the bodies of martyrs, to whom 'The Burning of William Sawter' in 1401 and Bishop Farrar (1563, pp. 142, 1100) can also be attributed, reflects the readiness of the printer to continue to utilise existing woodblocks, however unsatisfactory for his improved design and layout. In fact this block, measuring 140 x 98 mm in its original state, was unsatisfactory from the start, necessitating a peculiar layout in 1563 with an odd-shaped column of text alongside to accommodate the print. Things were not much improved in 1570 and 1583, when the block was truncated on both sides, since it still overran the column of text. This strongly suggests that this, and the Sawtry and Farrar blocks, were all imports of some kind, which were not specifically made for the Acts and Monuments. In 1563 and 1570 this block was used to illustrate the burning of Simon Myller and Elizabeth Cooper, whose names were inscribed in the banderole over their heads. In 1583 the Myller-Cooper block, now with the names excised, leaving a blank scroll overhead, was used for the martyrdom of Alexander Gouch and Driver's wife. Myller and Cooper were left unpictured.

Then they beyng tied to the stake, and the iron chaine beyng put about Alice Driuers necke: O (said she) here is a goodly neckerchiefe, blessed be God for it.

Then diuers came & tooke them by the handes as they were bound standing at the stake. The shiriffe cryed, laye hands on them, lay hands on them. With that a great nūber ran to the stake. The shirife seyng that, let them all alone, so that there was not one taken.

There was one MarginaliaBate a rayling persecutour.Bate a Barbour, a busie doer about thē, who hauing thē a freese gowne vpon hym, sold it immediately: saying, it stunke of heretikes, with other foule wordes moe. MarginaliaExample of Gods iudgment vpon persecutors.After this, within three or foure weekes, Gods hand was vpon hym, and so he dyed very miserably in Ipswich.

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The Martyrdome of three which were burned at Bury, for the true testimony of Iesus Christ. 
Commentary  *  Close
Philip Humphrey and John and Henry David

This entire account first appeared in the 1563 edition. The processes against these martyrs and the sentences condemning them survive in Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 140r and 142r-143r).

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of 3. good men at Bury.ALthough our history hasteth apace (the Lord be praysed) to the happy death of Queene Mary, yet she died not so soone, but some there were burned before, and moe should haue bene burnt soone after them, if Gods prouision had not preuented her with death. In the number of them which suffred the same month when Queene Mary died, were three that were burned at Bury, whose names were these:

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Phillip Humfrey. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 497, fn 1

His sentence is recorded on the 27th of May, in the Harleian MSS., No. 421, Art. 68. - ED.


Iohn Dauid.
Henry Dauid, his brother. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 497, line 5

The names of Humfrey and the two Davids are included in the same process with Gouch and Driver, Harleian MSS. No. 421. fol. 140-143. Philip Humfrey is there stated to have been a tailor, of the parish of Onehouse in Suffolk; and Henry Davye a carpenter, of Stradeshull; John Davye a Sherman, of Stradeshull. These - together with Agnes Dame, de Grundesburgh, ("soluta") spinster, and Grace Wighton, de Lavenham, ("soluta") spinster - appeared at St. Mary's Church, Bury, before Dr. Milo Spenser, the Bishop's Vicar General, on Thursday before Whitsuntide, May 26th, 1558: next day Humphrye, the two Davyes, and Margaret Dryver are stated to have been given up, as incorrigible heretics, to Simon Oxford, an under-bailiff of Sudbury: Agnes Dame and Grace Wighton appear to have abjured and received absolution at the Bishop's Palace, Norwich, Sept. 9th, 1558, and were ordered to do penance next Sunday at the Cathedral.

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Concernyng the burnyng of these three, here is to bee noted, that MarginaliaSyr Clemēt Higham persecutor.sir Clement Higham  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 497, line 16

He was the last Roman Catholic Speaker of the House of Commons. His monument is in Barrow church, Suffolk.

about a fortnight before the Queen died, did sue out a writ for the burning of these three aforesayd godly and blessed Martyrs, notwithstandyng that the Queene was then known to be past remedie of her sicknesse.

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The trouble and Martyrdome of a godly poore woman which suffred at Exeter. 
Commentary  *  Close
Mrs Prest

An initial account of Mrs Prest's martyrdom reached Foxe while the 1563 edition was nearing completion and it was placed in the appendix to the first edition (1563, p. 1737). That account was clearly contributed by an individual informant, and in the 1570 edition it was replaced by a more detailed account, based on the testimony of eyewitnesses to at least some of the events. This account was unchanged in subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaThe story of a poore woman burned at excestor in Queene Maryes tyme.ALthough in such an innumerable company of godlye Martyrs, which in sundry quarters of this Realme were put to torments of fire in Q. Maries time, it be hard so exactly to recite euery perticular person that suffred, but that some escape vs eyther vnknowen, or omitted: yet I

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